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MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 



Vol. XXXII. 



Amherst, Mass., Wednesday, October 5, 1921. 



No. 1 



FRESHMAN ENROLLMENT "^J^ amherst 
ONE HUNDRED AND SIXTY j ACCEPT 0FFfR ,N AMHERi> 

New York Well Represented Among lOreen i» Succeeded by <"""•" 



MEMORIAL BUILDING 

NOW OPEN TO STUDENTS 



Newcomers. 



Faithful Librarian Closes 13 Years 
Service. 



SPEEDY VARSITY CRASHES 
THROUGH HEAVY VISITORS 

College Undergraduate Activities are {i ^ fc Defeated 13-0 in First (Jame 
Installed in new campus edifice 



The first week of college closee with 

I Freshman registration Off 160 which 
includes s.une do/.enor more women sin 
dents and li "»«'" from outside the state. 
The following li Ifci completed lisI "' 
students, M. A. Itfie: 
Adams, Kathleen PolBBd Worcester 

Aldrleh, George 8. Millviil." 

AUsS, F.dgarW. Medlield 

Aadersea. Leslie < . Baal Brldgewatcr 



Anthony, Paul L. 

Armstrong, B. 
Barker, Jobs B. 

Barnes, Adrian D 
Batal. .lames 
He in pit. I It- It- n A. 
BilHke, F. P. 
Binner. BogM B. 
Blanchard. Norman II 
Blass, Louis, Jr. 
Braun, Carl F. 
Bray, Ualph B. 

Barboe Bninuct 
Burl, Driu O Jr. 
( edj . Harold \ 
Cahill. Carl W. 
Oaaa, Gilbert B, 
Casey, A. Kit a 
I aaaano, Joaapfe 
Church, George L. 
Cleaves. Leigh ton G. 

( onnois, Daniel F. 
Cook, l'eter 

Oooke, Robert <;. 

I 'ni win, Basil J. 
< train, Kenneth B. 

by, John S. 
Currier, la-land L 
Cutler. Walter I.. 
Davis' Osborne 



Bangua 
K< Diiagtoa, Bd, 
Brldgewatsr 

South Weymouth 

Lawrence 

Amherst 

Had ley 

Mahlen 

l'ittslielil 

Boston 

Monlau'iie City 

Fraininghatn 

K:»Ht hatu j.t i»ti 

Worth in ;:t "li 

Niwlnuy 1'in't 

Creenwich 

Pall Liver 

I iio\elai!ii 

Dorehester 

< lardaer 

Dalton 

Kast BridgCWSter 

Richmond 

Bast Boston 

Jamaica Plata 

Arlington 



\v,- retiiine.i t.. soilage thli toll to 

lin( l nrimlag from the faoultj ranks Prof. 

Charles B en-.. n. Ilbrarlaa. after ■ 

faithful service of 18 rwnx bead of 

Ibrary departmsat, be reslgBcd on 

Sept. 80, last, troin that position lo ac- 
cept a similar one as head of the. I « 

Library of this town. 

\tter trad oat lag from Ooan, a. C. 
lo taps, Prof. Greea waa coaoactad with 
the Hartford Coarant for six years, and 
t ben accepted a position In the Oonn. 

Mate Library until 1908. UpOB COmlBg 

,,, M \. c. at that time I"' was made 
bead librarian, wblcb position he has 
Ailed ever since. 

Always on the lookout tor new and 

better systems for running oar library, 
Professor GreeB bas made admirable 
progrem with the very limited faclll- 
;ll hand. Each year has scsb some 
change for tbe better, to mak« I 

letuitj 
tertbeuppei Boorof the building was 
opened ap as a raadtng room which 
belped much torellose tb< sgeetloB 

down stairs. 

Another recent innovation sre tbe 
so-ealle.l--trate.nitV libraries,' sen. nut 

to all fraternity ami rooming-bouses for 
a certain length <>t llmi , 

COBStaat additions have hcen made 

to the supply of bool that Mr. 

ie library one of ihe 
ol its kind. 



Of the Seaso Lewandowski 
Y\ ures. 

Aggle'S little »1 looll.all team 
start, d the seaSOD I tbS right way h.V 

. iniieetl t! Agfis IsVO last 

Saturday eftSTDOOl >n Alumni Field. 

i, oatwetghew, the Aggie team 

had things mostly their own way and 

* er e never In tear of beleg scored on, 
The score Indicates Uttto as U> the 

..,, n gth ol the two teams for Conn. 

,. made l>u I lirsl down in the 

entire game, and never held the ball 

Inside Haeeachaseti rd line, 

Alger, t lark. Maishman, Mudgetl, 
bf] rick, ami Salmon slu.wed ii|. well in 

their tit-; sarelij game, Clark and 

Maishman Btsklag gOOd gBlBS OB the 

The post office a.d aew Collog Clark's forward passim was 

intl ,el.aseme,„ a.v already open. I , , ly com n.cndah c 

latter Includes as„, t a fountain in It. iBBOCtlCUl opened lie ,,.,,, by 

::;,.;:„,. ».»•«.».* • ^«"^ , , ; ;;; ■; , ;;;:,;;n:. 

. ■ . l i ■. . i 1 1 vv liiiiiutes i line iiisiiiiik «"o 

a „ up-i bsrbci shop la the base- i lew 



With the beglaalag of s sew college 
year tbe Memorial Bull. lint; was throws 
open for tbe nee ol the students, and 
tggle now linds hersell bettei equipped 
tban ei ■ before for social and son- 
athlettc sol 

The t . Si. C, \ re< opiloo was ibs 
ii,si social evenl ol the year to be held 

In Memorial Hall, and I he new sur- 

roundini la itrtklag contrasl to 

|ba old Social Union room. 

Practleally all ol tb ol the 

various student ac.ivii ■ - are m.w In- 
■tailed in their new and re eommod- 

. headquarters. These offices arc 
n ,w ceotrallaed In one building rathe. 
than being scattered eboul as bereto- 



fore. 



btarblebead 

Springfield, Vi. 

BelchertowB 



Dean. Leal \\ . W.si I'alm Beach. Pla. 

Demon, Elsli rratnlBgaam 



Philadelphia, Pa. 

Berth L e alag t o a 

Palmer 

Wlacbester 

Littleton 

Chelmsford 

Bpringfleld 

A mherst 

Allentown. Pa 







DeVitO, Douunick 
Droke. Dorothy M 
Duffy. Leo F. 
Bldredge, Btnart 
Erlckaaa, Emll L. 
Parriagton, Llawood H 

Fitield. Oagood B. .Ir. 
Fish, Donald <>. 
Flexer, Carl S 
Fuller. B. Billot 

Qahaa, Laurence K. Worcester 

(.albraith, Leo L. BWWth Hadley 

Baaaoa, William James Arlington 

Gilbert, Ohawacey McL. Berth Amberal 
GleaaoB, Harold A. Chestei 

Glidden, Wallace N. Bfoodlords, Be 

Goldstein Sebastian \. Brockton 

Gordon, Solomon 

GUI 

BernardstoB 

Melrose Highlands 

F. Bwrlagfield 

Haeussler, Gilbert J. Springfield 

Hale, Laurence N'.So. Glastonbury .Conn. 

Uanscomb. George W. Boston 

Continned on psge 8 



1„ profeaeoi Greea the college ! 

a mau.n i.ue ahi'ity ami of « i • 
perleeeein bis Held. He Is baon 
pecially to tblscami • bibb al* 

•-,,„ blsiob" and ever willing to he 

a friend to students and faculty si 

Wiih bim go the staeere i 

Continued on page 5 




Y. W. C. A. RECEPTION 



,,.„.;,.. awl ade football al Me. his tail. Iters ithaa 

, n hnm u , v , u ,,.,.da>sol,lo.ir summer vaca,uu,.,m only to 

help wla the first gt agalaat CoBaeeticat, hat also to aria 

tbe coining games ob tbe ichedale. 



ic 



Th 



tables ami howling 

Installed Ib the aeai 



Grottt, Helen M. 
Grorer, Walter C. 
Guild, Everett J. 
Guterruan, Carl E. 



The v. W. c. A. held a reception last 

Suiidav evening at the Abigail Adams BW |, 

| B honor of the new women students. ;i m. 

Fortv-livc girls were present, and Miss f,,,,,,,.. 

Skinner M iss Hamlin . Mrs. Bead, and A st „ „, rules regarding the use Of 

Melrose i Mrs Chamberlain, Of the Advisory , b « building has been drawn up and 

Board were present. Allghtaapper iho uld be fdllowed out. Dean I, 

,i Allowed by a brief musical in Assembly Tharada] expressed the 

orosram Bhort apaches were eItob by senti.mnt .ha. the balldlng is >■ 

ihe presidents oi the T. W. C. A. and ,, ut B0 | to. abuse, BBd thai lu orlglB 

the Student Council, and the leader ot alll | purpose b ekept in mind. 

tbe Glee Club Bias 8k Inner and Miss "" t , ,. 

ocatoB | HaBl Hn addressed the aew atadeats Harold W. Poole '21 has become atb- 

BoeteB an(l welcomed then. ... a lull shaie in jetie lastructor at Dammei Leademy, 

the life of lbs ©allege. Sewburyport. 



( , (mp , uti , lllf orKdi,orialamlBusine oi.sonthe I 



BMBcee today, <>ct 



:,. see K. A. Babbajid 




psntiag. n was the ability of the 

tfaroOB and White in following the hall 
and hanging on to it that resulted in 

their Aral 'wo -< ores. After a few 
minutes of play, Aggie recovered the 
ball ob a ramble ob CoBaeeBewt'B HJ 

yard line. An attempted forward pass 

I and Lewandowski kicked a field 

goal Iron, the IS yard Has for the first 

eoore of the seas.,., Near tbeeed of 
the flrsi awarl ir, Aeheaon blocked and 

recerered ■ Connecticut kick, hut was 
tackled when within II JTBrds ol the 
goal. With the opening of the second 
, i. a forward pass, Clark to Cray- 
bim over the line for a touch- 
dow . and "Dame" finished the good 
work by kicking the goal. Toward etie 
,,, the tits' ball "Larry" tried an- 
other drop-kick from mid-field which 

Continued on page 3 






The Massachusetts Collegian, Wednesday, October 5, 1921. 



COLLEGE LOSES NEARLY 

THIRTY OF ITS STAFF 



THIRTY NEW APPOINTMENTS 
TO M. A. C. FACULTY 



Dr. Sprague, Mr. Green, and G. M. 
Campbell Among the Absent. 

The following is the official list of res- 
ignatious from M. A. C. in the hint nine 
month*: 

Florence Archibald, Library Assistant 
May O. Arthur, Stenographer, Depart- 

inent of Rural iiotue Life 
Jessie Hacharach, Matron, Abigail 

Adams House 
Carolyn K. Hutterworth, Clerk, Exten- 
sion Service 
George M. Campbell, Field Agent 
George H. Chapman, Hesearch Professor 

of Botany 
Elizabeth Coleman, Clerk, Department 

of Microbiology 
Laura Comsiotk, Supervisor Home Dem- 
onstration Projects 
Irene Crutch, Stenographer, Division of 

Agriculture 
Charles H. Fernald, tDied Feb. '22, 1921) 
Charles K. Green, Librarian 
I moklifl Holland. Clerk, Depart- 
ment ol Physical Education 
Mary E. Ilorlon, Stenographer, Presi- 
dent's Office 
Marguerite G. Ickis, Curator, Depart- 
ment of Botany 
Ruth Lebau, Stenographer, President's 

Office 
Aline J. Legare, Stenographer, Division 

of Agriculture 
Marion B. Macarty, Stenographer.Treas- 

urer's Office 
Rebecca L. Mellor, Stenographer. Bx- 

perimeut Station 
Anne C. Menser. Investigator, Chem- 
istry 
Katheriue J. Middletou, Assistant Li- 
brarian 
Doris Milled, Stenographer, Extension 

Service 
James M. Neill, Instructor in Micro- 
biology 
Jessie A. Neill, Clerk, Treasurer's 
William E. Philbrick, Assistant Profes- 
sor of Landscape Gardening 
Mildred Pierpont, Stenographer, Short 

Course 
Helen Rand, Private Secretary, Division 

of Rural Social Science 
Marie Sayles, Assistant Supervisor, State 

Home Demonstration Projects 
Mary I. Shores, (died Jan. 2U, 1921) 
Sadie Shores, Clerk, Extension Service 
Clara Smith. Stenographer, Department 

of Dairying 
Flsie Smith. Stenographer. Presidents 

Office 
Mary A.Smith, Stenographer, Depart- 
ment of Agricultural Economics 
Robert J. Sprague, Professor of Eco- 
nomics and Sociology 
Julia G. Strahan, Instructor in Home 

Economics 
Alfred L. Tower, Instructor in Physics 
Glen E. Upton, Instructor in Dairying 
James Whiting, Foreman, Department 
of Floriculture 



Several Aggie Graduates Included 



in List. 



Old Deerfield Fertilizers 

"■Reasonable in dollars and sense.'" 
A. W. HIGGINS, INC., South Deerfield, Mam 



Among the list ol appoint ments dur- 
ing the last nine iio.ni lis are ten M. A. I 
C. graduates. Th« following are the 
new appointments: 

Georgt W. Alderman. Instructor in 

Physics. 
ROt C. Avery, Instructor in Microbi- 
ology. 
Carl M. Bogholt, Instructor in Enu- 

lish. 
Lwellyan L Derby, Instructor in 

Physical Education. 
Charles O. Dunbar, Investigator in 

Chemistry. 
Oliver S. Flint, Collector of Blood 

Bam pies. 

An liur P. French, Investigator in 

Pomology. 

Mary E. (iarvey, Instructor in Micro- 
biology. 
Ouy V. (ilatfelter, Asst. Professor of 

Animal Husbandry. 
Henry S. Greeee, Librarian. 
Olga Grtssle, Instructor in Home Bo> 

oDOmics. 
Marshall Lanapbear, Instructor la 

Agronomy. 

John J. sUfinpls, Instructor in Agri- 
cultural Economics. 

Kilo.. J. Mansell, Instructor in I'll • 
cal Education. 

Richard A. Mellon, Field Agent. 

Charles a.WehaM, Asst. Professor of 
Agronomy. 

Harlow L. Pendleton, Instructor in 

Dairying. 
Norman E. Phillips, Asst. ProteSOOl 

of Beekeeping. 
Lucille W. Reynolds, State Leader of 

Home Demonstration Agents. 
Roland W. Rogers, Asst. Professor of 

Horticulture. 
William C. Sanctuary, Professor of 

Poultry Husbandry. 
Anna Smith, Laboratory Assistant. 
Richard W.Smith, Jr., Instructor in 

Dairying. 

Paul E.Tnissell, Instructor in French. 

Paul XV. Vietz, Asst. Professor of 
Farm Management. 

Anna M. Wallace, Curator, Depart- 
ment of Botany. 

Marie O. While, Matron. Women's 
Dormitory. 

Joseph F. Whitney, Asst. Extension 
Professor of Landscape Gardening. 

S. C. Hubbard. Foreman. <>ept. <> f 
Floriculture. 

W A. Mack, Instructor in Pomology. 



JACKSON & CUTLER 

DEALERS IN 

DRV AND FANCY GOODS 
Trunks Bags Suit Cases 



Carptrvter & Morehoust, 

PRINTERS, 

No. i, Cook Place, 



Amherst. Mass 



Candy Shop 



Sodm Pmrhtr 



BECKM AN'S 

Candies and Ice Cream 



257 Main Stieet THE PARK COMPANY, Inc. arts** Miss. 



An optical shop which measures np to the 
highest standard <>f modern service. You 
can rely cm ..ur skill and ttood taste in all 
optical matters. 



Our Art Department Is filled with pictures 
suitable for the decoration of frat" houses, 
or for birthday and wedding (lifts. Greeting 
cards for particular people. 



Deuel's Drug Store 

TOILET ARTICLES 



Shaving Sticks and Creams 



Razors and Razor Blades 



VICTOR RECORDS 



Kodaks and Supplies 



Fountain Pens 



GLEE CLUB REHEARSALS 

Regular rehearsals for the Glee Club 
will commence soon under the direction 
of leader Viuten and manager Lowerv. 
At last Bight's iryouts several new men 
showed promise ol Rood voices. Among 
the veterans of the club are II. W. 
Spring, B. N*. Holm an, K. W. Moody, 
H. Erystan, J. 0. Wuittier, L. B. Arl- 
ington, I. W. Blade, V. S. Bennett, L. 
F. Broderick, It. F. R. Martin and E. 
Martin. 



COACH GRAYSON HAS 

LIKELY LINE CANDIDATES 

Two-year football started last week 
with 41 candidates out for positions on 
the team. Coach "Era" Grayson has 
plenty of line material, including the 
three veteraus of last year, but would 
like more men out for the backfleld. 
Trull. Kennedy. Pierce, and Bangs are 
doing well in the backfleld, while 
Adams. Fisher. Gallagher, Baker, and 
Straut are promising linesmen. 

Host of the candidates have not 
playsd football before sad Captain 
Bet'terlv. tackle. Raymond, centre, and 

GerremODty, end. are the veterans a- 
,,,„„,. whom this fear's eleven will be 
built. 



PaKe'» Shoe Store 

SPECIAL 

Saddle Strap Oxfords . . . $5.98 

THE NEW III. kX SONG I BOOK 

At the Treasurer's Office— $1.00 

LEARN TO SING ALL THE AGGIE SONGS 



When Vou Area Down Tow 



n 



DROP IN 



7 21 — The engagement is announced of 
Mr. Richard Mellen, ALumni Secretary 
and Miss Getrude Hollis of Amherst. 



The Candy Kitchen 






— FOR — 



, 21 —Jonathan H. Smith has secured 
a good position in California, When his 

dramatic talant is showing to advan- 
tage. 



Lunch, Candy, Ice Cream and Smokes 

COLLEGE CANDY KITCHEN 

"The Home of Sweets" 



Th e Massachusetts Collegian, Wednesday, Octoberj^l^. 



Have you seen our Pennants, Banners, Pillows and Leather Goods ? 
Did you buy yours P How much did you pay V 



C. A. 5. GAME 

Coutinuec from psgs 1 



SOPHOMORES LOSE 

AND THEN WIN 



failed only hy inceB. 

In the middle >f the third quarter ■ 
penalty brought ^Rgie a little closer to 
the C. A. 0. goal aid "1-awy" dropped 
over his second -oal of the afternoon. 
Toward the end of the second half a 
forward brooghl Aggie to within live 
yafdsojthc Comcticiit (0*1 for a lirst 
down hut only a kck of time prevented 
another tOOObdota. 

The team weit well for the lirst 
game and shown! what it learned in 
coming back 10 ays early for practice. 
The line held lile a stone wall and the 
backfleld ripped hrough for many long 
gains. 
The lineup: 

M. A. C. ' *• ' 

AcheBon, Uoser,Virth,le re. Sneidman 
Cotton, It rt, Mitchell 

Alger, Sowers, I y rick, lg rg. Ashman 
Freeman, c 0, Staines, Grot 

Mndgett, rg Iffi Siualiiitz 

Mohor, rt ll.Hark 

(iraywon, Balmoi, re le, BoM 

Sargeant, (laikqb 

qb McCtillough, llollowel 
Marshman, Saryant. llil» 

rhh, Mikowski, Ryan 
Tnmey, rhh Ihb, McNill 

Lewandowski, b •'». Dalej 

Beore: M. a. ' 13, 0. A. ('. o. Tooeh- 

down— Grayson Goal from touchdown 
— Grayson. Gals fiom field -I.ewan- 
dowski 2. Refree, Keagan. Umpire, 
Larkla. HemlLinesinan, Yonng. 



Poster Scrap a Frosh Victory but 

Sophs Get Nearly 70 per cent 

of Nightshirts. 



Full Line of 



COLLEGE JEWELRY 

Let us serve you. 



THE HOME 

of Aggie Men 



IN 



SPRINGFIELD 



M. A. C. W1PS ONE 

GR/ND CHAMPIONSHIP 



Fourteen Ribous Awarded College 
Cattle at S]ringfield Exposition. 
M. A. C. canbe credited with a line 
exhibition of ive stock at the Kaslern 
States ExposltOO, although it was only 
at the last ssonenl that 'it was found 
possible for *( exhibition from here to 
he shown. Tb various animals entered 
|B the COOlestl comprised a mare ami a 
foal among th horses.four head of Bol- 
us, five heal of (Juernseys and three 
head of Ayrdiires, among the cattle, 
while two pea Ol sheep, one ot >oUth- 
downs and oi« of MiropshireN were ex- 
hibited. In tie .Innior Extension Ex- 
hibit, a whitieow with litter amlallol- 
stein cow wen shown The whole ex- 
hibit was oneof an educational value 
and represenative of the college live 
stock. The nare and foal both took 
second place n their respective cla 
\inong the lolsteins.Heth of Amherst. 
3d, was awarced grand chamiiion female 
and alsotookfirslin her age. Both this 
row and motier were bred at the col- 
lege farm, .mong the Guernseys were 
several prizt winners and among the 
Ayrshires, arearling bull took third in 
a very good class of a dozen or moie. 
For the tota number of twelve head 
entered, foiueen ribbons were awarded. 
These compised one grand champion- 
ship, one campion, two first prizes, 
three secom prizes, four thirds, two 
fourths and me fifth, 



The unofficial poetei wrap woke the 

campus to another year ol eotWlty, last 

Wedncs.lay alien, oon. when SophotnoM 
yells tol.l that the tii-i K.esli.nan .-lass 
meeting was over. A large group of 
students saw the door at the north ent- 
rance ot the Drill Hall yield umiei the 

Blows of a crowbar, and I I, In spite 

„! ,,„. | lt .avy l.ai rica.le, t he Freshmen 

cia.nhercd through. Individual nmcs- 

tling hunts followed, and in the mean- 
time the large inimh.t <>> unoccui'ied 
PrOBB dOStTOjed posters. The scrap 
can not l,e consi.leied raOOtaiflll toi lbs 

Sophomoies trom a tinancial point ol 
viev, at Last, in laet it is rat her doi.ht 
ful Whether a sin-le poster w as sold. 
The annual Ni-htshirl I'a.ade last 

Thursday night, was featured i.y ■ 

strong comeback on the part of the 
Sophomores. The Freshmen, clad in 
cwi> thing Hum pink pajamas to long 
white nightshirts, asseinhled in the 
Drill Hall at MO '•• «•. am1 "' '" 
promptly su.tounde.i hy I fcTOttp ol 
vcn". tul Sophs armed with genci.ois 
wooden paddles. In lulls of t he . m null 

i he Bober-looklof Freshmen were re- 
minded of their proper position in col- 
lege life. After a series ot record 

dashes through the eauntlet.the Presh- 

,„,.„ we- mai.hcl to Freshman Field, 
where | large crowd had gathered 
around the roped area to watch the 
I'tcshmen lose their nightshirts in the 
M *ei minutes struggle. The oflieial 
count showed that the Sophomoies had 
rtjBted for the 00% Ol nightshirts 
aCOIMTJ lor a victory, and an addi- 
tional if/, for good measure. 



IS 



ARTHUR P. WOOD I Hotel Worthy 

197 Main St., "Hainp." 



HENRY ADAMS & CO. 

The Rexali Store 

Drug!, Sodas, Cigars, Candy. 

Amherst - - Mass - 

SELECT CATERING 

— at — 

Reasonable Prices 



Drop in for a meal or over 
night. 

TARIFF REASONABLE 

Main and Worthington Streets 

Civs mi • trial) 



DRAPER HOTEL 

Northampton, Mass. 



D) r s ♦ C 3 s $ i n ! The ***** f ° r c ° nege Bant > uets 



Tel. 566-M 



12 SOUTH PROSPECT STREET |Wm. M. Kimball, Prop. 
Amherst, Mass. 




Send forthisBook 



PRESIDENT BUTTERFIELD 

ON MISSION BOARD 



Important Educational Boerd Picks 
Head of College as a Member. 

Duriim tiie ib ' Prealdeol Bot- 

leitield, who reeenily left tot Chlai <»n 
an Asjrieiilnual Commission, Dean 
K.iwanl If, l.ewi> srlll '"• aetinu Presi- 
dent. The Orjranlzetlon known as the 

HortB American Board "i Koreiun 

si. »ns. formed ■ Bomaalseloo of -even 
members to make to Investigation ami 
report on the poseibilttlet ol education 
i„ eastern China Prealdeol Bn 
(told wee asked to Join Ike eomnilsalon 
U> Investigate the need ol Chins along 
agrlenltural nod other lodoatriol II 
Am. >im the other members are a Pi 
tor <>f 1 lie University oi < bieago, 
Wnoiiey, Presldenl of Moon( Holyoke 
Colleue, Bishop MacConnell nod three 
<»t beta. 

Presldenl Botterfleld left amhi 
sVagaai 11, aod sailed from Vnnooover 
tbelTth of that month. The commis- 
sion will spend must oi their time In 
China ami will return early in Januars. 




all about the 




Just send us a postal card requesting "A Better Way of 
Milking," and we will send it immediately, without obl.gafon on 

your part. , . 

This 32-page book contains articles by professors of dairying, 
by an eminent veterinarian, and by prominent dairymen from «H 
sections of the country on the subject of mechanical milking. 

It will give you a better idea of what to expect from the 
De Laval as well as from other milkers, than anything which has 
ever been written. 

The De Laval Separator Company' 

NEW YORK CHICAGO SAN ™ AACISCO 

165 Broadway 29 Ea.t MadUon Street 




en 

co 

1— 

C_D 



DON'T FORGET WOELD AGGIE NIGHT OCTOBER 22. 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Wednesday, October 5, 1921. 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Wednesday, October 5, 1921. 



THE NUSSACMJSETTS COLLEGIAN 

Published erery We.lnr8.lay by the 
Students Ol the Massachusetts ag- 
ricultural College. 

BOARD OF EDITORS. 



HoBAKI W. HCIUSO D . 

A8H.HIATK KDITOI 

. ■.>•, \KH - t Man'2 K.litor 

KKNVKTH A. IU.INAUI> "M 
Si *SI.BT W. ■■OMUn 

IKYING W. Sl.M.K •'-':'. 

Joan m w"«rrrran'«i 

iOM>MOM < "'ill n "-'« 

Kent M. W"i "-'< 

Ci.Ihiia I'" "'•"*-• ■'"• "^ 

ViUBINKSS DKPAKTMICNT. 

BOLWB> WimiW ■ 
, , n ,,,i ( i. I.. B«l »* "-' 



Subscription H.OO per year. Single 
copie., 10 centH. Make all orders paya- 
ble to The Massachusetts Collegian. 

In case of change of address, snb- 
ncriberswill plea* notify the bWSlMSm 
manager as soon as possible. 



Enured as seeonrt tUub matter M the *n,l,i. 
rZ Office, ace.** r« «.all.n« SjSeejW 

of October. Utl ,u.l.o.i/e.i AnguBt 20. WW. 



,,„„ clan undergraduate then :I ,v,r "- 
ipectlvc (fiance through the paal T***» 
,„,!,, Bnt terns at Atfle. Thespeetaols 
oj n.at liirn.il> handful ol men stragg- 
ling 1,, K el things started, beating Har- 
vard on tbs Couneetlcut, eonstruotlng 
,he formulae for that ettaar, "Aggls 
npirit," itudjinf, t....! Under those 
men who gave the beat years of their 
lives to put real, red blood Into the 

veins of an infant loetitatioO, BJUSt 

muk. start soa ol the Hay state proud 

(lf betngastudenl on the campus where 

,. „i,i timers (ought tbs first battles. 

ai:, i inch :i look Into the past, let 

the studsni of IfM g»«« a,,e;i " llllv 
yaarcend wonderwhat the undergradu- 
all . oi urn will tbink wh.-n as gaaed 
hack. Will that man, jrel unbora, be 
proud tothlakol ns as bis predecessors, 
poln witli pride to our acbletemeota, 
.,,,,1 „,, "Look at what tlu.se fellows 
fiftj vears ago didf" Of will be per- 
baps say. " kggis seemed to be on s 
down grade when grandad was there. 
How proud the graybalred grad «»» 

lsTl must have fell wlien lie was here 
|;,st June! How secretly glad thai he 
bad fougbl the Rood Bghl ■ half-cc..- 

lur.v ago. 
Y,. s , Wl . are bletorj makers, in our 

bands lies the late "» IklS perh -I of 

aggie's story. Lei It be aBeaoalsaaoee, 
not a Dead age Let's make out de- 
•oendaats say, "What workers those 

bofS hack there BS«d tO he I " 



pari it' tliis 50th anniversary. ••John 
Eppi " j, ,,lay written hy Prof. Band, 

portrayed eollegs IWebereal aggie as 

i, wil s In the early seventies, and was 
(herelo.e doubly interesting 10 the 

large audiences which crowded Btoek- 
bridge Hall at both performances. 

The annual Commencement baseball 
game With Amherst ...i Alumni Field, a 
4-2 victory was a very fitting dimes 
for last year's successful season. Need- 
,,. ss to say, there was DOthlng the •> 
,„„,„ or student body would have 
lik( .,l better tO see. The team gOttO 
/ink Amherst star pitcher, and put 
noroM tour runs, ■ lead which couhl 
not hS overcome. '•Hub- Collins, 

plteblngfor aggie, bad almost perfect 
8U pporl and kept the visitors well in 
band. 



OWN HALL 



Thursday| 8r, ' KK - ,,,!,, " ,,T,ON,,AY 



Hat. at 3 

Eve. leaows 

6-45. 8-30 



Friday 

Met. at 3 
Eve. I shews 
6-45.8-30 



MILITARY DEPARTMENT 

CHANGES LEADERSHIP 



RESOLUTIONS 



Enthusiasm. 
Whal a watchword we have be n 
given this year /•;«".»*' >"*■»' l"'" 1 "'" *" 
some uninteresting way Of other b) 
W.bster. but really meaning in the last 
analysis that quality in a human bring 
Which turns for him the drab into the 
..olden.the dull int.. the fascinating, 
t b« line-bucking hard work into en ion 
ableeltort. There is no Letter way for 
a freshman to pu, bis best foot forward 
here than to he enthusiastic. 

Let us apply this quality to hut -me 

tniaaMke Sena* Rules. These rules 

nretn force here for two reasons-l.rsi . 
because tradition requires .hen. (a most 
....satisfactory reason to a beglaaer-J 
and secondly, because through then 
tbS f.eshman class receives the notion 

that it is four yean below graduation, 

, re ts aeeuatomed w follow inline with 

tbOBC in authority, and consequently'- 

t ,in,es ot real value to the Institution. 

True it is hard for some leOuewOOm- 
nen to do thing* wbleh some lf» other 

newcomers are not required by their 
superiors to do. It seems (o ..* . hat the 

Shorter Conreeesbonld conform to rego- 

1„ freshman rules. hut we have SO 
power over that, and a real aggie Utah. 
man won^t let that worry him. 

The rules are there, why waste time 
In breaking them? a.ny spineless jelly- 
neboan do that, and probably nol get 
caught. Why not show the proper 
Bplrlt, reeognlM the rules *• something 
thatKoes to make n\> ^-^' » nd *'"" 
thnsiasticallyobey them.' 

^ KK ie is yours, f.eshman. and in a 

.hort Ume you will have tberrinsol 
power in your hands. Welcome to M. 
^ C (we haven-t taken a whole edl- 

lor lnl t.. say that) hut show the right 
rt n« t -abow lbs enthusiasm ws want 

to see -now that you are hew 

Making History. 

\t the openin« assembly of this \ ear. 
Lctiug-Preeident Lewis .ailed attention 
io tbs fact that we are beginning to 
nil .ke history tor the next fifty years of 
eollege develo!>ment at M. A. C. 

Nothing could more stll the Imagina- 



U/aereOI it has pleased God in His iu- 
Cnite wisdom to reinose iroin ...if earth- 
ly tight our beloved brothers Gordon 
Bnrnham Crafts and Lloyd Wane.. 
Chapman, he it 

Kesrised, that vvc of theQ. T. V. Pre- 
tcmlty.do eapreu our deepest regrel 

at the Ions ol our esteemed brothers, do 
berebj extend our sincere and heart- 
felt sympathy to their families in this, 
their. lav of SOROW, also.be it further 

Betofeed, that a copy of these resolu- 
tions be B«a1 to their families: that a 
pop, be sen. to the Mvss.v ... SI us 
<'oi.i.i,..ian. ami that a OOpj he written 
npoB the pevmane.it records of the 
fraternity. 



For the Fraternity, 

Hoi: \.;r W. .si'uis .. 
J. I.owi I I Will i 

Kol.l Kl M l>AIM.iS<i. 



SEMI-CENTENNIAL DAYS 

WERE FULL OF ACTION 



A 4-2 Victory Against Zink of Am- 
herst Left a Perfect Taste in 
Aggie's Mouth. 
Five big 'h>.vs. June 10-14 last, brim- 

mingover with activity and entbuel- 

Went to make Up the beet and 

-ml celebration this campus 
has ever -ecu. The throngs of alumni 
that returned, many of then, for the 
tirst time, together with friends ol tbs 
college and students, fully justified the 
elaborate plans made for Aggie's Semi- 
centennial. 

A better entertainment could not 

bare been furnished for our guests. 

On Citi/.ens' Day addresses were given 

by Gov. Cox, Beemtary ol agriculture 
Wallace, and Dr. A. W. Gilbert '"4. l'he 
laierelaas sine, which proved ■ big 
drawing card foi outsiders, was won b> 
the Seniors, with honorable mention to 

the Sophomores. Tbs Soph-Senior Hop, 
which completed tbs celebration, was a 

grand success la new Memorial Hall. 
'Ibis was the Brri official event to take 

place there. 

Dramatics played a most important 



Major F. K. Shnyder Now in Charge. 
Polo to be an M. A. 0. Sport. 
During lb* past suminei the leader- 
ship of (he Military Department DM 
Changed and three new officers have 
been added to the staff of ths organisa- 
tion i,,. Col. Richard Walker, who 
bas been at M. A. V. for . he past two 
years, has been transferred to the <>r- 
gaalsed Reserves at Lexington, Ky., 

and Major f. F. Sb nyder has taken his 
place. Major Shnyder came to the eol- 
lege las. tall, to assist Col. Walker, 
,!,,„. the Ifith Cavalry at Fort Clark, 

Major Herman Kobbs has been made 
naaloriuebargeoi horsemanship at the 
eollege. He was brougb) here from the 
tfih Cavalry e< Fort Ringgold, Texas, 

where he was in command of the post. 

Captain V. V.shufel: will supervise 
all dismounted instruction. He has 
been with the IStb Cavalry at Fort 
Clark, Texas. 

Captain Thomas Brady, Jr., has been 
assigned to assist Major Kobl.e in 
mounted instruct ion . He has been con- 
nected with the 10th Cavalry at Fort 
Ruaohuca, Arizona. 

With the obauge in the leadership of 
(he EL O.T.C. at M. A. C. important 
revisions of the schedule of the depart- 
ment have been made and new plans 
tor the searing year formulated. A 
change In regulations has made it pos- 
sible for all instruction during the fall 
term to be out of doors, weather per- 
mittiag. There will be no distinction 
between tactics and drill. The students 
will receive only one mark from the 
Military Department. The faculty has 
given the Military Department the new 
hours of 10-45 to 12-00 and on Wednes- 
day from 2-50 to 4-30. Instruction will 
beon Monday, Wednesday and Friday 
by .lass and on Tuesday and Thursday 

by troop. 

The addition of about W new horses 
and the condemnation of some of the 
old ones will give thedepartment about 
60 good horses this year. With this In 
mind, the prospects of a polo team this 
year are very good. Polo will he par. 
of the regular instruction of the Juniors 
and Seniors, and possibly later of the 
Sophomores, and as soon as a suitable 
squad can be organized outside games 
will he arranged. 



Saturday 

Hat. at 3 

Eve. '-' shuns 

6-45.8-30 

Monday 



Hat at 3 

Eve. I shows 

6-45.8-30 



"The County Fair."; reel 
■pectacle. featuring weiiey 
Barry, kid with the freckles. 

Newt. Hutt and Jeff. Topiei 

Kail Policy Now In Kffert- 
Pleturee 1 "lavs weekly, every 
Honday. Thursday. Friday 
and Saturday. Two shown 
even evening at 0-45 and 8-SO. 
ail Miitineea at 3-00. 

And now comet, old man 
Pep'a I u vorUe daughter. So 
Long Letty." S-rael jwodue- 
t ion. feat uri.igr.Royaarnee, 
Walter Hiers. Colleen Hoore 
and Grace Darmond. 

Scenic reel 
•I reel Butter Keaton Comedy 

Will Hogeri and Irene Rich I 
in "Boy» Will Be Boyi." 1 

I 1 1 vin Cobb's great story. 

The ehucklesome story of al 
Ban wl»> never had a boy- 
hood until lie was way past 
the half-.ent.iiy ina-k. 

Newt. "Do or Die." Comedy 

A notable cast In £fi*Spb 
Lincoln'! BTestwork, "■"- 
ners of the Tide." an epic of 
the BSa. The raising of a 
sunken craft and other thrills. 



Pathe Review Comedy 



Why ge down town for a 

First-class Hair Cut or Shave ? 

I'atroiilze the 

College Barber Shop 

Memorial Building. M. A.C 

H. ,i. iii'WKix, free. 



SING LEE 

Main Street 

Quick Laundry 



Amherst House Shoe Repairing 



Shorn 

Repairing 



Shorn 

Shine 



T. MIENTKAS 

PLAZA 

Northampton Mass. 

60LDSTEIN BROS. AMUSEMENT CO. 

Where the Best 

PHOTO-PLAY 



• • • 

Are shown. 

Program chanied dalle e«e.»t Honday 

and Tuesday. 

FRKD'K P. BELMONT. Manager. 



Edith Hamilton Parker 

Graduate Teacher of Dancing!. 

Studio, MASONICBLOCK.Northampton 

FRIDAY EVENING, Assembly Class 

Popular with M. A. C. Men 



Private lessons by appointment. 
Tel. 761 Northampton 



FRESHMAN CLASS OFFICERS 

Kenneth H. Craig of Jamaica l'lain. 
president; Emery 8, Loud ,,f Rockland. 
Vice-president; A. Btta Casey of Fall 
Kiver, secretary; Leslie C. Anderson of 

Kasi BrMgewaler, treasure.-. Oarabed 
K. Mouradian of Bridgewater, sargeant- 
at-arms. 



AMHERST BOOK STORE 

Note Books Fountain Pene 



C. F. DYER 



Knox Hats 
Parker Shirt* 
Burberry Comtm 
Clanseot Jnekelw 








COLLEOE OUTFIT' 

I ii II- 



Wei eh-Mnr&el son 
Hjilierilasliery 

( Imrrli, Wehl. & Close 
Neeliweur 

Hiokej* Freeman (lollies 
Adler-Koehester Clothes 



" A GREAT PASSION 

FOR RIGHTEOUSNESS 



MR. GREEN RESIGNS 

Continued from nage 1 



Acting-President LewiB holds Inter- 
est of Large Chapel Audience. 

,\l the Mrs. Sunday cliapel of the 
oollegt vear. Dean Lewis gave an in- 
spiring address.... whal S man should 

obtain from ■ college sdueation. lie 
M ld that to...' years st eollege should 

K ive a man not only great physical and 
111( . llla i growth, and the ability to n»eet 

men. hut more than anything else a 

great pension for righteonaneea. 

The eollege uraduate sl.ould l.ave an 
intense passion lor honesty and truth 

l„ »li bis dealings. He should work tor 

boaeaty and square play In politics. Bs 
sii.-uid also have adeepdeslrs forgood- 
wi n »od iiii.ii.m1 aaderstaadlag. The 
laaseaataught by tha '■"•" VVai with 
all its tremendous sacrifice, must not be 
lost to the world, it Isfor eollegs men 
above all others to try to promote good- 
will in the industrial, political and 
social life ol America. 



SIDELIGHTS ON THE GAME 

Conn. Aggie surely expected to win 

iiiat game Saturday if the slat of their 

rooting squad denotes anything. They v faol« student body for the greatest euo- 

•idn.it their learn la one of the best i" cess and pleasure la his new work 

. , ___._ _,, .... i i... i'i. 



SONGS AND CHEERS GREET 

SPEAKERS AT RECEPTION 



»Y" Reception Brings Forth Over 
Half of Student Body. 



The Y. ht. C. A. gave a rerj success- 
ful reception t<> 'he Freshmen, last Fri- 
day evening, in the Memorial Building. 
A large number of both old and new 
students attended, and mans of the 
faculty also were present. Speeches In 
behalf of the athletic ami' non-athletic 
activities of the college were made l.y 
A. W. Smith and B. 1". .lacks,,., rc spc o t- 
' ively. Acting President Lewis gs 
thrief address in which he emphasized 
\ the need el putting "pep" i» ill our 
I college work. Coach (inre's words to 
} the assembly were full of enthusiasm 
: and further increased the student body's 
^ regard for "Kids'' oratorical powers. 
\ In conclusion everyone joined la sing- 
ing the college song. Cider and dough- 
nuts were served, and a brief interval 
of dancing followed. 



years, and that they expect to win all 
lbs remaining games on their schedule. 

Aggie was great!; pleaaed at John 
Lewaodowski's double performanee 

Saturday. The two drop kicks that 

scored were beauties, and tbeolhei was 
an all-bui. from a hard angle and 
against the wind. 

'H,,. <■ \ c. eheering section was 

right .here with the •"punch." and it 

didn't coma In bottles ailhei 

Massachusetts c.-eds have nothing on 

those from Cenneetlent. Bvidenlly, 

1 he\ are out to sin pass I hat leei.rd made 
at Verm. ml last year. 

"Kid" Gore thinks that 1". minute 

periods are too long In a football game 

(for C. A. C. football playei 

That boy Marshmaa of ths "Home 

( "ilv" is right the n line rushes. 

•Kay" Vintcn must have forgotten 
that the voice goes down instead of up 
after half a football game 

The Freshmen are last gelling edu- 
cated. L sure seemed good to hear 
that Old chapel bell going after OUT first 
victoiv ol the season. Long ring the 

bell! 

We are now ready to reap the benefits 
Of (hose new bleachers. Mr Kenney 
baS carried Oal bis part <>! the deal any. 
way. 



The vacancy caused by Profeasor 
Green's resignation will be filled by sir. 
Henry 8. Greene, formerly of the Unl 

Vtrsity Of West Virginia. Foi the past 
lew years, however. Mr. Greens bas 
been engaged in War Service lor the 
Vmeiiean I. Hoary Association. lb 
expected to assume his duties here at 
once. 



Von can iav« from 
$3.00 to $5.00 a pair 



— on — 



Young Men's 
College Footwear 

hy buying at 
FLEMING'S, Northampton 



THIRTY-FIVE MEN OUT 

FOR 1925 FOOTBALL 



TWO YEAR FRESHMAN 

CLASS A LARGE GROUP 

The biggest Freshman Class in the 
history of the Short Courses matricula- 
ted last week, consisting of more than 
165 men and women. This is an in- 
crease of 25 per cent over the former 
record. The second year men, who 
have been on the farms during the 
summer came back in full force, num- 
bering some 135 men. Besides t lies. 
there are 37 Federal Hoard men and If 
taking the Vocational Poultry course. 
About 50 Unit Course men, are expected 
a little later in the year. The Two- 
year Course has been reorganized into 
coordinated courses with the idea of 
specializing the work and thus have 
the vocational plan brought in view. 

John S. Stockbridge, unclassified, is 
[ in the employ of the State Entomolo- 
gical Department. 



Schedule of Five Games Op*ns Sat- 
urday on Alumni Field. 
More than 3"> candidates reported to 
Coach Hansell during the past week for 
positions on the 10M Football Team, 
and practice is held daily on Freshman 

held. Lowell, UcGeoeh (Sullivan, lioil- 
l.ro.k. ami Hatal are some of the good 
bachfield mat: rial nnd carry the ball 
well, while there is a wealth of good 
material for the line. Some of the 
most promising linemen are Loud. 

Banscomb, Cook, Gordon, GoMetela, 

Lewis. Mouradian. Ward, Taylor, Haifa, 
Marx, Shumway, Lord, and Cassano. 
Zwisler, Cleaves, Malley. Sheldon. Hurl, 
Hale, Gutermea and Oliver are com- 
peting for the wing positions. 

The Team will have a schedule of 
five games, playing Deerfield, Williston, 
Amherst High, Dalton High, and 
Northampton High. The game with 
Dalton will be played this coming Sat- 
urday October S, on Alumni Field. 



VARSITY BASEBALL 

Fall work in varsity baseball has been 
instituted with .John Maginnis as coach, j 
One practice has been held, but several 
games are to be played this week., 
Kroeck. Moseley, H 11 J aid, Harrows. 
\ieeol. Kane and Gordon are among 
those not engaged in football work who 
have reported. 

James W. Alger '21 was married on 
Sept. 3 last to Miss Lina H. Belden of 
Hatfield. The couple are now "on the 
tarm" at North field. 



Who Was John Hancock?" 

asked Thomas A. Edison in his 
Employment Questionnaire 

We will pay One 
Hundred Dollars 
($100)forthebest 
answer to Mr.Ed* 
ison's question* 

Competition closes November 15, 1921 

ADDRESS 

DEPARTMENT OF PUBLICITY 




Company 

of Boston. Massachusetts 



Look Them Over 



HART SCHAFFNER & MARX READY CLOTHES Best In the Country. 

Interwoven Sox-Lisle, Silk. Wool. 

Mallory Hats You know what the] arc. 

Parker, Tyson and Arrow Shirts Made la all styles 

Arrow and E. a W. Collars 

OaKes Bros. Sweaters- Absolutely ALL WOOL 

English Golf Hose -Prices from $2.00 lo $4.00 

Parcel Post Laundry Cases— $1.75 and $2.00 

Newman Caps— Hest imported iweeds, 

We supply Aggie Men with Class Hats, Canes, Sweaters, etc. 

Prices always as low as the low. 



F. ML THOMPSON & SON 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Wednesday, OctoberJ^mi. 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Wednesday, October 5, 1921. 



S. S. HYDE 

OptlolSti «..»<! jeweler 

( IMeauant Street (up one flight'. 

Oculists' Prescriptions Filled 

Broken Lenses Accurately Replaced 

Big Ben Alarm Clocks 
AND OTHER RELIABLE MAKES 

Kiilly Gssianteed 



FRESHMEN PULLED 

THROUGH THE POND 



| Come in, Aggie Men ! 

Here's your eaanee to pick 

ii|> SOSM real Bargains in 

HIGH 6RADE CRAWFORD CORDOVANS 
AND CORDO CALVES 

»od ether ma kes sad rtylat of thorn. 
You eu'l ssTord lo mis* t» is BA.LS1 
Alao Expert Shoe Repairing done by 

J. GINSBURG 

iq Pleasant Street. <»n ><'<" »•» uptown. 



1924 Wins Annual Rope Pull in 
Nine Minutes. 
IMS is hereby added to the list of 
KreshiiM-n classes who have been drag- 
ged tbrovgb (he muddy college pond in 
taeaaaaal Bopb o sse w Tr— hwaa ™ P e- 
pull. 

Iiiniiciliately after the football game 
large numbers of spectators lined the 
rope, in tbe hopes of seeing 60 men 
"ebaaa amoebae". The Freshmen as- 
semble! at the Drill Hall and marched 
to the field of action in chain gang 
(omatioa. Vot several minutes the 
straining, tttgglag Freshmen refused to 
budge, then slowly with increasing 
vcl.-ciiy moved toward the water'sedge. 
When the pistol announced the finish, 
BOOt of the Freshmen were ou the 
farther bank with spirits dampened as 
well as clothes. The Freshmen in spite 
| i heir handicaps put up a good scrap, 
and made the event as closely contested 
as eould be expected. 



PRIVATE DANCING LESSONS 

MABELLE LOVEJOY MILLS 

Individual Dancing a Specialty 

Mills Studio, l'bone 466-K, P- O^BIock 
—THY— 

C. H. GOULD 

for first-class 
Watch, Clock and Jewelry Repairing 

IS Pleasant St., Amherst, Mass. 



THE MILLETT JEWELRY STORE 



LABROVI 

TJ« LEAmNCTAILOR 

Pressing promptly done on Hoffman. San- 
itary Pressing Machine. « suits &<J" 
Caps and Gowr.s for Rent - also 
Fall Dress Suits and Tuxedos, 

and a full line of dress supplies. 

We Specialize on Cleaning White Flannels. 

Full line (lent*' Fiiniishin-js. 
If you want full satisfaction on Cleuniiuf. 
P,'esslni and Rep airing of < lot l.es. come in. 

,. Amity St.- LABROVIT1 PMM SU* 



GRANGE STORE 

I iue Groceries 
Candies and Fruit* 

MASON A. DICKINSON, Proprietor 

NOVICK & WARREN 

CUSTOM TAILORS 

Cleaning, Pressing, Repairing and Dyeing 

Neatly and prompt? done. 
Work called for and delivered. 

Saw money by buying a Pressing Ticket. 

4 Suits Pressed for $2.25. 

Dress Suits for Hire. 



19 Pleasant St. Tel. 9 J 

roundly < otmabts Cafe. 



32 Main Street. 



Amherst. Mass. 



Aggie Stationery 

with Class Numerals 
1922 TO 1925 



A. J. HASTINGS 

Newsdealer and Stationer 

. , . Haas. 

Amherst 

STANDARD DAIRY SANITATION 



It is Impossible to overestimate the 

value of the herd test. "II .liminales 
,!„• scrub and culls out the boarder. 
»nd leaam to the Dairyman a produc- 
tive herd. 

Y( . t these boaeficial results eai I be 

fully realized naleas tbe locreaaed milk 
vidd is protected by such sanitary 
methods o1 production that have them. 
st> lvs met the test -.1 day lo day per- 

[ormaai ft. 

For over eighteen 5 eai - 



ONE POINT IS MARGIN 

OF FRESHMAN VICTORY 

Boxing Bouts Give Frosh Edge on 
Their Superiors in Wrestling. 
Following up their success in the pos- 
ter scrap the Freshman class atjain 
•merged victorious last Wednesday 
evening, when they won the wrestling 
;lIM | boxing bouts by I score of 4-:>. 
The natural amphitheatre on the east 
side ol the ravine was tilled with stu- 
dents eager lo watch the conflict. Pre- 
ceding the events short "pep" talks 
were niven by members of the football 
„..,,„ ah ,| caching staff. 19* showed 
lu superiority la boxtag by winning 
three of th*. four bouts, while 1924 
found nodifhculty in downing two of 
the three freshman wrestlers. Boxing, 
a mow feataM at this annual event. Itv 
cued up the evenina's program consid- 
erably, making it evaa more indueive 
to the fostering Of class spirit which is 

the primary aim of all Bophomote- 
Preahman contests. 



L. L 



DERBY TO COACH 

VARSITY TRACK MEN 




bM provided this needed protection to 
,|,e Dairy Industry, and the sweet, 
wholesome, sanitary cleanliness it crc- 

Me s Is reeogalsed by Agricultural Col- 

legeaof the United States and Canada 

as the standard dairy sanitation. 

Wyandotte Dairyman's Cleaner and 

cleanser is gaaraateed to meet ever- 
ts In the dairy Of the trial will COSt 
you aothlng. 



Indian In Circle 




oilier from your supply 

hollse. 

It cleans clean. 



Two Meets Planned for Fall Work 
Track at M. A. C. has been changed 
by the addition of a special coach for 
this sport, I,. L. Derhf. Mr. Derby has 
previously been connected with tbe in- 
stil Btloa, but has been studying at the 
Harvard Summer School. 

BO has already arranged for two track 
meets for this fall to replace cross 
country racing which has this yearbeeu 
dropped from the college's athletic ac- 
tivities The first meet, a novice meet, 
will be held Oct. 15 and will consist of 
interclass competition in 18 events. Let- 
ter men and point scorers in intercolle- 
giate competitions will be barred from 

entry in this meef Prises consisting of 
jerseyi with class numerals will be 
awarded to the first place winners. 

The other, a handicap meet will be 
held Nov. •'» and will be open to the 
entire college. Announcement of prizes 
will be made later. 

During the winter, track activities 
will constat of relay races. Prospects 
tor a fast relay team are promising 

indeed, inasmuch as tin I last year's 

team are still Is College. 



in every pfcft 

The J. B. Ford Cpi Sole Mnfrs., 
Wyandotte, Mich. 



David Potter T(i is hack on the 
Pampas as graduate student and assist- 
ant in Botany. 




20forJ5$ 



like them! 

<7A^areDIFFERENT 
Ohet/ are GOOD 

BEECHNUT 

CIGARETTES 



Each 

year makes its 

own crop prices 

Panning history shows that over-productionandtowprtcaa 
one year are almost invariably followed by much smaUex 
crops and higher prices the next. To the fMI ««■» 
this means opportunity. While others wait, he ocU. H* 
plants; and when the rise comes his crops are grow* 
Do you see the situation in that light? 
E. Frank Coe's Fertilizers are ready t o help, fhey srx 
good fertilizers — formulated, mixed, 
cured right. They'll not only give 
your crops a quick start, but they'll 
keep right on feeding them to suc- 
cessful maturity. The very best in- 
gredients and over SIXTY YEARS 
of manufacturing experience go into 
E. Frank Coe's Fertilizers. 



1^,H^««^B^0r»p 



Ordmr note for Spring planting. It we've 
no dealer near you. write for the agency. 

THE COE-MORTIMER CO., Inc. 

BuUidiari *t Tk« American Agricultural Chemical 0*. 

51 Chambers St. New York City 



HAT U a *afa ■» a* 
ltr frown. aandlaS, 
■tored. Alwaya mmrt»ubta. 
Or. faed It. Bod alio em» 
rlcbaa nil tor next crop. A 
reasonable application ofB. 
Frank Coa'i Special Tto 
Dressing ibould ne arly 
doable yield. Mention row 
eolls and write for TaluaM* 
book "The Neglected Hay 
Crop." Free, with oo taf 
Ulixer fuueaUoDa. 



E.FRANK COES 



Req.U S Pat. Off. 



Fertilizers 

"Increase the yield of every held 



East Entry 
NORTH COLLEGE 



P. L. BURNETT, 22 
H. A. MURRAY, 22 



THE COLLEGE STORE 

M. M. RICHARDSON, Mgr., '23 



liasement 
MEMORIAL BUILDING 



T. T. ABELE, 23 

H. D. WEATHERWAX, 24 



FROM "THE REGISTER" TO 

"THE MASS. COLLEGIAN" 



it is iatereating as are look back to 

the sail) days when It. A. C. was lirst 

.l.lished. and then follow her eourse 

up to the present time, to tra<o also 

the development ol the College BOWS 

publications. as the Collage |rsw 

from year lo year, ho also did the publi- 
cations edited by the students gTOSJ 

hoth in quality, size, and ImportaaOS. 
And today, aftei a period of more than 
lifty years, we have the M LM \< B I II rW 
(om.koian. whieh not only represents 
the pulse of the student body, but also 
gives tbe College news in away superior 
to any previous Aggie paper. Sin.-e the 
College was foaaded there have been 
six different papers edited, five of 
which were published l.y the students 
themselves, and one of these live by a 

fraternal organisation within the Col- 
lege, 

Tbe College was otlieially opened in 
18o7, but ii was not until two years 
later, in 1889, that the lirst written ex- 
pression ol "Aggie" student wit ap- 
peared. "77/e Broad sTsaa^eWe «/ las 
Ifaasaeaasstti d^catoiw.1 College" was 

the name of the number, and only this 
single volume ever appeared under 
such a name. It eonsisted solely of a 
grind on all tbe students, but evidently 
lack of grinding power prevented its 
reappearance tbe following year. It is 
of interest to note in passing that this 
same year saw the first appearanee of 
of tbe Index. 

In 1871 came The lUgitttr. This was 
not a student publication, but was 
published by the College. It served as 
somewhat of a calendar for the year, 
and appeared regularly in June, from 
1871 to 1878. 

The following year saw the publica- 
tion of The Cycle. This booklet was 
presented by the 1). <.. K. Society, now 
Kappa Sigma Fraternity, to the public, 
and such a policy was continued for 
ten years. It was of 24 pages, and was 
published at Commencement time each 
year. Although The Cycle was a fra- 
ternity publication, nevertheless it con- 
tained principally items which were of 
interest to the entire student body, and 
very little fraternity news was printed. 
Finally, on Oct. 1, MH), appeared the 
first real Aggie newspaper, edited by 
the student body. It was the A<i<j'i" 
Life, a three column paper of eight 
pages, published bi-weekly, and about 
the same width as our present Coi.i.io- 
ian. but a few inches shorter. The 
subscription price was $1.00 a year, but 
the first edition was sent to all friends 
and alumni as a sample. In these pres- 
ent hard limes when all commodities 
have so advanced in price, we may at 
least be thankful that the Collegian 
has not increased in price, in compar- 
ison with the number of copies received. 
In A<i<iie Life there was a wider discus- 
sion of subjects pertaining lo agricul- 
ture, especially in regard to the agri- 
cultural demonstrations conducted here 
at the college. Thirty yearsagolast June 
was the Commencement number, which 
contained principally Commencement 
addresses and poems. A slight change 
in policy was apparently adopted in 
1892. for a two column, twelve page 
edition was substituted for the size of 
the previous year. 
For some reason, the term "Aggie" 



became obnoxious to the ear of the M. 

A 0. undergraduate and also to many 
of the alumni. Therefore, in 1901, the 
student body voted 116 to 4 to exclude 
the term " Aggie" from all their publica- 
tions, and on Nov. 6, 1901, the paper 
was forced to change Its name from 
The Awiie Life to The College Signal. 
The new form contained on the average 
about eighteen pages, with three col- 
umns to tbe page. 

In the lirst issue of 1909 a great ad- 
vance came in the life of the paper. It 
was changed to a weekly, of eight pages 
with four columns to the page. The 
present size of the Coi.i.koian was then 
adopted, as was also the general ar- 
rangement of the material in the paper. 
The Masna. ill skits Collmuan of- 
tieially came into existence in 1914. and 
that name has existed up to the present 
time. The policy of the paper is to 
serve both the alumni and students to 
the fullest degree possible and keep 
uppermost in the minds of all. thai 
watchword,— Altogether for M. A. C 



KINGSLEY'S 

SODAS SUNDAES CANDIES 

Luncheonette 



If it's for HAT RENOVATING, 
GLOVE CLEANING or SHOE 
DYEING, CONSULT THE COL- 
LEGE SHOE -SHINE PARLOR 
BY THE AMER. EX. OFFICE. 



High Grade 



140 Main Street, Northampton, Mass. | COLLEGE rOOliiEAK 
'After Every Meal" 



WRIGLEYS 



Economy Prices 



MASS MEETING 



Saturday night tbe annual mass 
meeting was held at which the Fresh- 
men take the oath. 

The newcomers had prepared a good 
lire which formed a hot back ground 
for several fiery talks. Geo. Cotton, 
John Lewandowski and Stan. Freeman 
all senior football men gave intersting 
anecdotes. "Sunny" Mansell, Ollie 
Flint and Coach Core followed with 
pep talk*. Mr. Mack a new man on 
the campus gave an interesting account 
of his impressions. The usual songs 
and cheers completed the evening's 
program. 

WAUGH 22 TO LEAD 

ROSTER D0ISTERS. 

At the last meeting of the dramatic 
society Fredireck Vail Waugb '22, of 
Amherst, was elected president for the 
coming year. Mr. Waugb had a promi- 
nent part in the Commencement play 
last spring; and is a member of Kappa 
Sigma. The vice-president is Robert 
Fitz-Kandolph Martin and the General 
BtaaagST, Gustave Lindskog. Work on 
dramatics will start sometime in tbeuear 
future. It is expected that the fresh- 
man class will exhibit much talent. 




The Shoe man. 
Main St.. Amherst 



tt 



CENTS 



B130 



The Flavor Lasts! 

See our big showing of 

IMPORTED DOTTED VOILES... 

— and — 

IMPORTED DOTTED ORGANDIES 



The Vary Latest Materials 



G. EDWARD FISHER 



"BIDE-A-WEE 

Creamed Chicken and Waffles Our Specialty 

Ami oltui u<xh1 thtSSS to eat. 

MRS. L. M STEBBINS 

Middle Street. Ctel. 41B W) Mauley. Mm*. 

WEBSTER'S STUDIO 

Nash Block 
AMHERST SHOE REPAIRING CO. 

Your Shoes Repaired 

WHILE YOU WAIT 

~~~ s 

H 
E 
SHEPARD 
A 
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Furnishings, Shoes 



MARRIAGES 

'19 _\\r. K. French and Miss Louise 
Morse. Mr. French is instructor and 
dean in short course work at M. A. C. 

'21.— K. W. Smith, Jr. and Miss Amy 
K. Tuthill of Moravia, N. Y. Mr. Smith 
is a recent acquisition to tbe depart- 
ment of dairying. 

Both these men are members of Phi 
Kappa Phi and the Q. T. V. Fraternity. 

ALUMNI NOTES. 

Starr M. King '21, has accepted a 
position as teacher of chemistry at 
Deerfield Academy. He was on the 
campus Saturday afternoon watching 
the football game. 

W. Hichard Sears of Woburn, an M. 
A. C. graduate, recently won an im- 
portant prize in landscape work at 
Harvard College. As a result he is 
given eight months in Europe for study 
and travel. He left two weeks ago and 
expects to return by Commencement. 



HARDWARE 



Come to us for 



Fireplace Goods, Coat and Trouser Hangers 

Ever Ready Flash Lights and Paint 

Clothes and Shoe Brushes 

Anything in Hardware and Cooking Utensils 

Always glad to see you. 



THE MUTUAL PLUMBING & HEATING CO. 



H„ Min^ttM^-r'" Wednesday. October 5. 1921. 



1 tie rvias sm"" *-"" - . ; __ __ • 

1^Tp^r~OENT efficient 

p W essing-always something new BROTHERS & GAU „ M 

SOUTMWIvrx « f ^ ^^ Men by CoUege Men 



FRESHMAN ENROLLMENT 

Continued from page 1 



lluwuitii. Oeorga '«■ 
Heald, Theodore B. 
BoblM, Roger w - 
Bolbrook, LeOler If. 

llovt. Calen 
Hurley. Kvercll 11. 
Hulchins, Mauribc 1». 

Hyde, John W. 
Ica/.a. Floreaelo 
[•graham, Edward f. 

JftOk, Mclvin ('. 
Jack. Ronald A. 
JOBM, Wendell A. 
Joiisherg. Henry F. 
Katalian. Sarki- 
Cakavas, .lam.'s < . 

Keith, bowta H. 

Kelso. SoOTf* 

Kingsbury, aeaoa C. 
Koowlee, George A. 
Laagenbaeher, Robert K. 

Weehawken. N. J 



Stanih.rd, Duncan M. 

Steele, Percy H. aebarj 
Stephen, Edith n. 

Dalton I Stone, SeOTgC L 

Amherst ! Strog, Bowel B. 
gltcbbarg Sullivan. Donald C. 
n.-w Bedford] Taube, Quotaee 

l'lainville 



Seeding iTajlor, HiltoaW. 
park, n. J. Tompletoa, Boberl .1 
Lawrence Tbompeoa George H 




tioalelto 

Dalton 

Amherst 
New York City 



Tula, Bobert W. 

Tattle, Vernon B. 
Walter. Walter B. 
Waldroo, Ragene 
Ward, Gordon 11. 



(iialliam 

Jamaica Plain 

Worcester 

North Weynioiilh 
WaBJgn 

lv.-kskiil, NTl'. 

Lyon 

Rnglewood, N- J- 



Walsh, Philip B. 
White, Karl M. 
Whittum, Walter \V. 
Wilcox, Stanley D. 
Wilder, Frank II 



Amherst 

Abington 

Springfield 

Bpringfleld 

Sterling Junction 



Northampton 

Auhurnilale 

Atnhersl 

l'anaina 

Millis 

Amherst 
Aniloist 

Boelladale 

Byanola 

Springfield 

Lowell 

Bridgnwatei 
Beading 
Bedfield 

Everett 



Wolfe;'Arlie F. Columhia C.ty In, 

Woodbury, B. Lawrence Hgjgfg* 
Zlnn, Arnolds. 1Umt &S& 

Zwleler, Frederick F. Hoiyoke 



3 






Lewis. Donald W. 
Logan, Bene! W. 
Lord, John F. 
Loud. Eatery B. 

Love. Andrew W. 

LotoU, HolUa B. 



Stow 

Brockton 
Betbaon 

Uockland 

South Worcester 

Falmouth 



UotJSamaelW.CaaiberlaadCenier.Me 



Macau ley. Donald W. 
Baboaey, Walter f. 
Mailey, Prank B. 
Marx, Berber! J. 
M.t.eoch. Charles K. 
McGratb, Tboaaan B. 
Beeerre, G. Donald 

Miller, l'aul 

Hoaradlaa, Oarabod K. 
Boson, David 

Needham. Basil A. 
Nelson. Paul It- 
Nichols. Helen L. 
N,,lte. Whitney H. 
Nylon, J. Herhert 
O'Coaaor, artbai at. 
Oliver. Charier F. 
Oreutlickerman. Klsa K. 



Beverly 
tfillvillO 
Brighton 

ilolyoke 
Providence. K. 1 
Ilolyoke 

Badoon 

Springfield 

Brldgewatox 

Ilolyoke 
Taunton 
Bolyoke 

Northampton 

\\ eston 

Last Boston 

BoTorc 

Brockton 

>pi iiitfTield 

North Adams 




■*.. 



Parker. Donald L. 
Parsons. J. Gilbert Melrose Blghla»da 
Peatman. Margaret S. > , " ,slon 

Peckham, CarlleleA. Melrose Blghlaodi 



A Gateway— Electrical 



Potroo, Veasey 

Peltier. Xavicr P. 
Post, Frank 
Baffa. John E. 
Blghter, Edwin M 
Boot, Frank E. 
Boss, Charles F. 

Bona, Donald K. 

Bowley. Harold F. 

Kussell. May K. 

Eyas, Charles \V. 

sagemaster, James 

salmon, I. Cheuery 
.muels. Samuel B. 

Saaarna, Bobert F. 

Searer, Baeeetl B. 

Sheldon. C. Herhert 
Sheridan. Irwin B. 
>hu in way. George F. 

Simmons. Carl 

Slmpeoa, Gllbort 
Blnelalr, Alma B. 
Blade, Weeley I.. 

Slower), William A. 
Smith, Emily < I, 
Snow, Helen 
Sprague, Dudley Deli. 



Dorchester 
Spencer 
Boston 
Hatfield 
Altamont. N. Y. 
Beruardstou 
Lee 
Hudson 
WeHt Warobam 
Jamaica l'lain 
Hatfield 
Boston 
Turners Falls 
Bronx, N. Y. 
Northampton 
South Baneoa 
Cllftoadale 
Mansfield 
Ifoneon 
Kin eston 
Ilolyoke 
Smith'a Ferro 
Chelsea 
Sbelburao Falls 
Lee 
Arlington 
Melrose 



ONLY a forty-foot gateway bounded 
by two brick pilasters and orna- 
mental lamps, but it is unlike any other 
gateway in the entire world. 
For back of it is the General Electric 
Company's main office building, accom- 
modating 2300 employees. And just 
next door is its main laboratory with the 
best equipment for testing, standardiz- 
ing and research at the command of ca- 
pable engineers. Then down the street a 
mile long— are other buildings where 
electrical products are made by the 
thousands of electrical workers who 
daily stream through. 



General Office 



Through this gate messages and repre 
sentatives from a score of other factories 
and over fifty branch offices come and 
go every hour-an endless chain of co- 
ordinated activities carrying on and en- 
larging the scope of over a quarter cen- 
tury's work for the betterment of 
mankind. 

What a story this gate would tell, if it 
could, of the leaders of the electrical in- 
dustry and of ambassadors from other 
industries and institutions— and from 
foreign lands. The story would be the 
history of electric lighting, electric 
transportation, electrified industrials 
and electricity in the home. 




©ffi 




Schenectady, N. Y. 

W-450D 






AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 






Vol. XXXII. 

ALUMNI TO GATHER 
IN FORTY-FIVE DISTRICTS 

World Aggie Night Banquets are 

Planned Throughout the 

Country. 

World Aggie Night has become an 
annual event, and will he held this 
year on Saturday. Oct. 22, 45 dinners 
being planned throughout the country. 
and It is expected from present indica- 
tions at the Alumni headquarters in 
Amherst that the event will he even 
more successful thau last year, when 
700 alumni gathered at the 40 dinners. 
These meetings are primarily for the 
purpose of promoting good fellowship 
among the alumni, to renew college 
memories, and to discuss current activ- 
ities and problems of the Alma Mater, 
in which every alumnus is interested. 
The favorable reports from last year's 
meetings show what enthusiasm can be 
raised in such gatherings, and should 
influence every Aggie man who possi- 
bly can to set aside that night and do 
bis bit to "Boost Old Aggie." 

The Amherst-Aggie football game 
promises to be a big drawing-card for 
the Amherst dinner at Draper Hall. 
Results of the game will be telegraphed 
immediately to all the meetings in the 
country. The Aggie Fair should also 
interest the alumni, and show them a 
few of the things we are doing here uow. 
In the following list of meetings, 
changes will be noticedfrom thelist for- 
merly published In the Alumni bulle- 
tin, as follows: Ames, Iowa; Pittstield; 
Worcester; Minneapolis, Minn.; Boze- 
man,Mont.; Buffalo, N. Y.; Pittsburg, 
Pa 



Amherst, Mass., Wednesday, October U^ML 



No. 2 



GIANTS LEAD YANKEES 

IN "WORLD'S SERIOUS'' 



AGGIE AND BATES BATTLE 

TO A SCORELESS TIE 



Varsity Baaeball Candidates Hard at 
Work. Hilyard, Kroeck, and Har- 
rington ara Infield Veterans. 



Heavy Center Line of Opponents FaiU 

to Check Gore's Men. M. A. C. 

Shows Superior Play. 



Alabama— Auburn, Dr. F. L.Thomas, 
Auburn, Ala. 

California— Iios Angeles, E. F.Damon, 
535 Claremont Place, Pomona. The 
dinner will be held at 7 P. M., at Pau- 
lais, formerly Christoplus, 741 South 
Broadway. San Francisco, Stanley 
Freeborn, Univ. of California, Berkeley. 
Colorado— Denver, F. A. Davis, 223 
Magestic Bldg., Denver. 

Connecticut— Hartford, B. J. Soutb- 
wick,9 Fales St., Hartford. New Haven.K. 
K. Clapp, 550 Central Ave., New Haven. 
Stores, H. J. Baker, Storrs. 

Cuba— Havana, W . E. Leonard, Cen- 
tral Soledad, Cienfuegos. 

District of Columbia— Washington. H. 
J. Clay, 2603 Monroe St., N. E. 

Georgia— Atlanta, Dr. H. E. Stock- 
bridge. 

Illinois— Chicago, T. J. Moreau, 140 
South Deerborn St. 

Indiana-LaFayette, O. G. Andersou. 
Iowa _ Ames, F. H. Culley, 725 Hodge 
Ave. 

Louisiana— New Orleans, H. J. Neale, 
1303 Calhoun St., Audubon Park, New 
Orleans. 

Continued on pag« 8 



Kail baseball at Aggie this year has 
taken on larger proportions than ever 

before. A aoaad of nearlj M naea h 

pracl icing regularly three times a week 
under the direction of John Maginn.s, a 
member of the 1M0 learn and last 
year's Freshman coach. 

A "world's aMriOM" >* being held BOI • 
on the campus and the "(iian.s" have 
already won two games from the 
"Yankees" by scoreB of 4 to I ami I 
to 2 The "Glanta" have practically a 
veteran laflaM with "Hill" Kroeck on 
tirst Harrington on second, Hilyard 
back at his old place at shortstop, and 
Nicoll or Harrows tilling out at thud. 
Fish is a promising Freshman candidate 
for the inheld. Baker VI, GMoWl '24. 
andGalbraith-2:, have also played on 
the "Yankees' " inner defense. U the 
outlield "Doc" Gordon is playing his 
usual game, and CabiU, a Freshman 
looks like a com.ng star. A.W.fOSltB 
'22 and Faneuf23 are other candidates. 
The loss of Phil Newell by gradua 
tion has left a big hole behind the bat 
and without a really high class catcher 
in college. Both Alexander and Kane 
have been making a creditable showing 
there, however, and either should be 
able to put up a good game next season. 

SQUTB BECOMES A 

COLLEGE PUBLICATION 

Adelphia Conducta Firat Student 
Forum. 



The Maroon and While eleven jour- 
MyedtO l.cwiston Sat. inlay afternoon 
;i „',l battled tO a scoreless tie v..th 
Hates. In spite of the fact that IhOJ 
did not win. they showed the dOWB 
Htaters some good loo. hall, and also 
how thev build stone-walls at Agg.e. 
\ heaw wind, followed at the hegin- 
„i„ U r of ihe third quarter by a steady 
,-a.n. slowed up .he game, so t hat each 
side was watching for Ihe lu.ky break. 
|; ;l les kicked oh to Aggie at the start . 
The kick-off rolled along and hit <>iav 
son on his own 10-yard line. "Dame" 

recovered the ball and then "l.awy ' 
panted well ep the middle of the Beld. 

With the ball it> possession of Bates, : ( 
long pass was palled off which took the 
,,.,„ ,,, „„, 16-yard line. But here is 
where this stonewall idea comes m. 
Continued on pa»e 5 



PRES. BUTTERF1ELD 

WRITES FROM KOREA 

Head of College Sends Words of 
Interest to Aggie Men. 
s M .« ... Kouua, Bent. i<». ttal. 
Editob Tin 0oix«oia»: 



INFORMAL DANCE AT 

MEMORIAL HALL 



First Dance of the Year to be Held 
Saturday Afternoon and Evening. 
Next Saturday, Oct. I, at KM P. M-, 

downstairs in Men.o.ial Hall. BOBMB* 
|,«r Ihe time and place, to. the occas.on 
is the tirst Informal of the year, and ...- 
.-idenlally the tirst one 10 be enjoyed 
at the new Memorial Building. 

Bob Wondworth '24 will have on 
hand an exceptionally ja/./.y orchestra 
to furnish the music Tickets may be 



Today 1 visited an agricult Bial school 
i lt -ai here, and found the director was a 

|0I r student of I'roless.-r Brooks' at 

Sapporo. So in Korea as well as in all 

parti of Japen, I have mot men who 

either studied under or know by repu- 
tation the 'Aggie Bead" that nearly 
N rean ago came OOl l«' balld aa agri- 
cultural college in the far norlh of 

Japan. 

I recently spent a day at BapPOTO and 
literally lead "the time of my Iff* 

just beeaaaa I ooaae from Amherst. The 

institution is now one of live Imperial 
r„.v. rait lea. But it is proud of its 
origin. There an- unite numerous no- 

Boatoaa el tbo mw Iroai M. A. C. Tbe 

campus and its aettlH makes one think 
;l bit Of eat OWa. Tbe tanning of the 
island, which has about halt the an I 

of New Kngland. is N Ifkl *** 

Kngland farming than in any other pail 
of the Far Hast. Many animals, crops, 
fruits, vegetables and implements were 
introduce. 1 Horn the Fnited States. I 
visited a dairy farm that would .......pare 

favorably vttb the best la HOW Kngland. 
only part Of tbe students had return- 
,.,| lor I he new year, but I was asked to 
KPMk loll.c... I lirst challenged them 
M behalf of our nine to a baseball 
t-a.ne. I also suggesied that it would 
be worth while to see if the two siud- 
ent bodies might nut have "Commit 
,,l QofTOapoadoeoa," tO interchange 
greetings aod ideas and to keep alive 



Thursday's assembly was given over 
to tbe first Student Forum of the rear. 
C H Gowdj, as president of Adelphia, 
led tbe meeting. The tirst question 
brought up for discussion was that of 
making the Squib a regular college pub- 
lication, by securing for it the support 
of the entire student body. 

Abele and Vinten spoke at length on 
the history of the humorous monthly, 
and of the up-bill work which had been 
done to bring it to its present standing. 
Vinten said that the difficulties of tbe 
past bad in large measure been over- 
come, and that the big thing now 
needed to put the Squib in its rightful 
place was popular college backuig. 
Towne and Wealherwax, members of 
the board, commended the paper to tbe 
support of the college. 

A motion was made and carried by a 
large majority making the Squib a col- 
lege publication, to he subscribed to 
through the treasurer's office. The 
first subscription is due at the begin- 
ning of tbe second teim, and thereafter 
will be payable at the opening of the 
college year. 
The meeting was then given over to 
Continued on page 2 



neenred any time batON >a.urday of 

( ; ()W dy 22. a. the Aggie to.,_ OT VI.*. ^^"^^ thaM be found 



•fj at the Theta Chi hous". These 
tickets include, as usual, the regular 
informal BOppertO be served at Draper 

Hall 

The Mt. Hoiyoke chaperon is Mrs. 
Cameron, of the Faculty House, and 
the girls will arrive on the car leaving 
South Uadleyat 140 r. H. There will 
), e two chaperons from Smith. Mrs. 
Lawman, Dickinson House, will make 
arrangements from 4 to 9 P. *. OP Fri- 
day, and Mrs. l'armelee, Tyler House, 
will beat liberty any time Thursday. 
Cars will leave Hamp at 2-00 i\ m. 

The committee in charge of arrange- 
IIH nts for the Informal includes two 
new members from the Senior class, 
C. R. Vinten and C. H. Gowdy, and 
also three men of last year's committee, 



I am convinced that the found- 
ing Of tbO SopaOtO Agiicultural ( ill 
is one of the great, chapters in Aggie 

history, and 1 am equally sure that the 
.laughter institution is proud of the 
mother college. 

I have been amazed to discover bow 
widespread is the knowledge of Presi- 
dent Clark's work at BapBOffO, but even 
DMXe to find how powerful was the in- 
fluenceof his atay of less than a year. 
In the lirst class were boys who have 
become leaders in .Japan. Nearly all 
of the til Kt -lass became ami have . | 
maine.l Christians. This came about 
through President Clark's attitude and 
teaching and tbe effect upon Japan bai 
been tremendous. It all goes to show 
what a vigorous man of strong personal- 



F. \. waugn. Hidendid Incida 



and K. W. Moody 

Judging from the stand in Assembly, 
the Freshmen think social activities at 
M. A. C. are restricted to the three 
upper classes only. This is not the 
case. Freshmen are welcome as well 
as all others, assuming that there are 
8 »me members of the class who practice 
the popular art. 



I hope this splendid incident in the 
life of M. A. C. is never to b> iVen 

either in Japan or in America. Indeed. 
I hope it may be an incentive io ether 
M. A. C. men to seek service in some m 
tbe lines of activity in the Far Fast in 
which Americans are more and more 
engaging. Here will be the theater ot 
the most significant events of your life 






The Massachusetts Collegian. Wednesday, October 12, 1921. 



lime, and here, in China particularly, 
are avenues of service second to none 
elsewhere. 

With hearty greetings to the entire 
student hody, I am. 

Most Bincerelv. 

Kl WON L. BlTTKRFlKLl>. 



INTERCLASS MEET 

SATURDAY, OCT. 17 



Track Men Are Busy in Preparation 
For Novice Meet. 

This Saturday afternoon the track 
season opens at M. A. C. with a meet 
destined to revive the interest of the 
student body in track activities. This 
meet will be purely a novice com- 
petition between the classes inasmuch 
as intercolleKiate point-scorers ot the 
college will not be allowed to enter. 
Class numerals with jerseys will be 
awarded the winners of first place in 
each of the 13 events. In the case of 
one man winning first place in more 
than one event, the first only will count 
and the holders of second places in the 
ott.tr events will be awarded the prizes. 
Two year men will be allowed to com- 
pete as a class. 

To date the Juniors and Seniors have 
not come out as well as the lower 
classes, but there is still plenty of time 
for members of these classes to come 

out. 

The events to be held Saturday are: 
100, HO, 440, 1-2 mile, 1 mile, 2 mile, 
120 hurdles, bigfc jump, broad jump, 
pole vault, discus, shot put, and 220 
hurdles. 

Although letter men and point-scorers 
of last year's team are ineligible for 
this meet, many, including Capt. Sulli- 
van, L. S. Woodworth, Donald Mac- 
Cready, Rouer Friend, and Gilbert 
Irish, are out on the field helping the 
new men, and getting in trim for the 
handicap meet to be held Nov. 5. 
Prizes for high scorers in this meet will 
be gold, silver and bronze medals which 
are now on display at the athletic olhce. 
Considerable attention is being given to 
field events this year, and results seem 
to indicate that this year's track team 
will be much stronger in field events 
than was the team last year. 



SQWB BECOMES A 

COLLEGE PUBLICATION 

Continued from p»ge 1 

the Senate. A. W. Smith brought up 
the matter of holding classes on Colum- 
bus Day and adding an equivalent 
amount of time to the Thanksgiving 
recess. The students voted to waive 
Oct. 12 in favor of the longer holiday 
at Thanksgiving time. 

Mr. Smith also spoke on the coming 
Country Fair, which is to be held the 
21, 22, and 23rd of this month, on the 
grounds between Clark and Wilder 
Halls. lie urged the cooperation of 
every Btudent in making the fair a 
success. The proceeds are to be used 
in furnishing the Memorial Building. 



SECOND AGGIE FAIR TO 

BE A BIG INSTITUTION 

Entertainments and Booths of Inter- 
eat to be in Charge of Stu- 
dent Groups. 

The second annual Aggie Fair will 
transpire on Friday, Saturday, and Sun- 
day, the 21st, 22nd, and 23rd of October. 
An entirely different plan of events 
from those of last year will characterize 
the fair this year. In the first place, the 
proceeds instead of going to individual 
participants will be used for furnishing 
the Memorial Building. In the second 
place, a change in location will be in 
effect this year. Instead of being in 
the space north of French Hall, it will 
occupy the big field between Wilder 
and Clark, where it will be more con- 
spicuous and attractive to passers-by on 
the main thorofare. Four year, two 
year, and graduate students are all in- 
terested and will participate in niakum 
the fair one that will attract interest 
for miles around. Among the dist.n- 
,. mshing features of the fair will be ex- 
hibits by all the cluhsand department*, 
iBClttdlBI the Pomology Club, Horticul- 
tural Manufactures, Dairy, Animal Hus- 
bandry. Entomology, Poultry, etc. The 
Military Department will stage ■ rodeo, 
and possibly a polo game. There will 
be a Hirle Gallery for those who wish to 
test the.r marksmanship. The Military 
Department will furnish the rifles and 
the Rifle Club will have charge. 

A big Midway will be in full swing, 
which will include one or more stunts 
from each Fraternity group. The com- 
m ,ttee in charge is planning to award a 
prize for the best stunt. The girls will 
open up a tea room where all sorts „l 
delicious refreshments will be obtain- 
able. There will also be dancing rn- 
day and Saturday eveniugs in the Me- 
morial Building. The fair will be closed 
during the football game Saturday M 
that everyone may attend the hope, 
for victory over Amherst. There will 
be a big bonfire on Saturday night ... 
the meadow on the opposite side of the 
road, and an Alumni Mass Meeting at 
which time the Freshmen will take the 
Oath of Fidelity. The Grange will be 
having a picnic on the campus grounds 
at some time during the fafr.|»huh will 
probably be the center of attraction for 
its members. Al Smith is acting as 
general promoter of the fair and with 
the backing of the student body 11 H 
sure to be a success. 



Old Deerfield Fertilizers 

^Reasonable in dollars and sense" 
A. W. HIGGINS, INC., South Deerfield. Ma$ ^ 



JACKSON & CUTLER 



DKAI.KHS IN- 



DRY AND FANCY GOODS 
Trunks Bags Suit Cases 



C*rp*rvter St Morehouse, 

prihtehs, 

No I, Cook Plac*. Amhertt, Ma*. 



Candy Shop 



Soda Parlor 



BECKMAN'S 

Candies and Ice Cream 

Maaaaohuaotta 
Northampton, 



257 Main Street THE PARK COMPANY, lllC. Northanpton, Mass. 



An optical shop which measures m> to tip 
hlgbsst standard o« Modern lonrtee. ym 

CM rely on our skill and (food taste In all 
optical matters. * 



Our Art Depart m-nt is filled with pictures 
suitable lor the decoration of frat houses, 
or for birthday and weddimt (lifts. Oreetinif 
OSrdfl fOI particular people. 



Deuel's Drug Store 

TOILET ARTICLES 



Shaving SticKs and Creams 



Razors and Razor Blades 



VICTOR RECORDS 



Kodaks and Supplies 



Fountain Pens 



OUR OPPONENTS 

SCORES LAST SATURDAY 



Dartmouth 

NEW HAMPSHIRE STATE 

AMllEKST 
TUFTS 

Boston University 
WORCESTER TECH 



24 







52 




SENATE MEETING 

At the first regular meeting of the 
College Senate for this term, which was 
beld Tuesday evening at 7-15, the plan 
of changing the holiday of October 12 
to Friday and Saturday of the rhanks- 
giving recess was discussed. This was 
brought up in assembly and it was 
decided to transfer the holiday to 
Thanksgiving time. Various com- 
munications were received concerning 
walking on the grass around college 
buildings and wearing sweaters in 
chapel. It is hoped that both Fresh- 
men and upperclassmen will look out 
for these misdemeanors in the future. 
The Memorial committee made known 
U8 desire that the Senate, Adelphia.and 
the Senior class cooperate in seeing 
to it that the Memorial Building is 
treated with proper respect. It was 
also dee'ded to allow the Sophomores 
to wear their class hats, but with a 
wbite band around the brim to distin- 
guish them from the Senate hats. 

Immediately after the Senate meet- 
ing a meeting of Adelphia was called 



F>&«e>^ Shoe Store 

SPECIAL 

Saddle Strap Oxfords . . . $5.98 

ThUewm. IU SONG BOOK 

At the Treasurer's Office— $1.00 

LEARN TO SING ALL THE AGGIE SONGS 



When You Are Down Town 



DROP IN 



The Candy Kitchen 



— FOR — 



Lunch, Candy, Ice Cream and Smokes 

COLLEGE CANDY KITCHEN 

"The Home of Sweets" 



The 



Massachusetts Collegian, Wednesday, October 12, 1921. 



Pies! Pastry! We Bake Our Own Mother Makes Them 

YE AGGIE INN 



By the Campus Entrance 



QOWDf 'Mi *&• 



Mom i i -~ 



Coi i «■ '-'-' 



(AKIY '88 



Sakok.ni '38 



Stkkkk '/4 



d which it «U decided U) put '"''""' 
' lht . Mude.it bod} a. the following 

.„,,.l V .he plan of placing. he Bquib 

„„ :i i M sisNvi.i. the other oollege p«Nl- 

, :l ,io„sandals plans for the agSt- 

Fail Tbs Bow** will hold* meaUae. 
eWJ Tuesday Dlfbl al M6 In the 
Senate row lo the Memorial Botldtag, 

TWO-YEAR OPENS 

TODAY AT LUDLOW 




AGGIE GAINS SEVERAL 

MEN FROM TRANSFERS 



Grayson's Football Men Fast and 
Show Promise of Successful Out- 

c6me Today. 
Two-vear Coach "■■" SrayeOO bad 
it* Ural real chance '" obeerYe ins 
,.,,.,,„,,, i M i Betordey when the 8bort 
, ,, ;11 „. ,,,,„ played the eareHj Meondi 
todeamc oul oe the long end ol a lo-o 
•oore. The gn»e brought out many 
weaknesses, end also showed that the 
baekfleld, thoagk light, le pretty reel la 
lfB|ro a with the bell. The line »« 
week end the pley* showed a lack »i 
perfection. Tins weekwlll be demoted 
todolee. away win. Ibeee weekw 
and also t<> perfecting eew plays 

Today, ill" teaea Jouraeyeto Ladlow, 
to combat with the grid warriotaol the 
Ludlow Memorial Ieetitote. Theeleven 
will leave behind them Captain Better- 
|y, who is owl wlthaeptalaed ankle, 
\,h ; i. the star kicker, whoee Injorj Is 
a twisted knee, and Fisher, a BlO-ponad 
eaadldate lot gnard, who toewft 

with water on the knee. ThCM men 

unstained their injuries lest Wednesday 
i ao-eelnats BcriBi»agewltb the Var- 
sity Maroon and White. 

The probable lineup of todaj 

at Ludlow is as follows: 

, rremoety re, Btreul rt, ttellagb i 
rg, Raymond c, Settletoa Ig, Oothoee 
or Adams It, Pierce le, The baekfleld 
la Interchangeable and will consist of 
Baags, reeney, Trull, and Bwiaeheek 
or Brerogle, 

AGGIE BACK FIELD IN 

SHAPE FOR WORCESTER 



Seven Middle Western Colleges Rep 
resented in List of New Comers. 
Fourteen students haw transferred 

,,, M \. C. iron. Nations colleges 
,,,,,,„;,,„„„ the United Mates, while 

»mee rroni India. Nine (last 

vra.-s total iranefer regletrat ) ol 

,„ese have enrolled with the elaeeol 

1924 Fifteen is not a large enlistment 

from the other colleges, bul the m.m- 

be, MrvM lo round ...it the ranks of 

thoM eUuM which were iout.d de- 
pleted this fall. A gOOd example ot 
this replenlehlag process is found at 

M I.T. where the Senior class is BOf) 
of ...eater strength than in the pr.-vi- 

on.year,dne to the fact that 600 own 
bare Iranafewed from other oollegee. 

Transfers 10 M. A ■ C. 
I.ewart. Hart ley , from Kenyot. OolIOfO, 

enters 15^4 

Dixon. William Q., from Dickinson Col- 
lege, enters |0M 

Gftdsby, James II., from Inivcisilv ol 
Illinois, enters 1934 

Orates, George, it..... Dealeoa Ualfen 

ily, .'I. I crs UNH 
Kelhy. K. F.cdric Ho... 1'niversity ol 
Minnesota, entei* 1028 

Koplemaa, Barry, from Row Hampshire 

,1,., eaten IflW 
Maiiow.-. George a.., from Holj " 

••ten tOW 
Miller. K.lwin C, Iron Pofdne ual- 

ilty, enten 10M 
Mobemedl, ttageer, rrom Unlsantty ol 

Bombay, India, enters 1088 

Partington, Clyde v. from New Hamp- 
shire state, enten 1084 

Pierce, Arthur B„ from Dartmouth Odt- 
lejrc, enters l'.t-i4 

Bowel 1, Winston II.. H<nn New Hamp- 
shire state, eaten 1084 

Walker, Jndson N., Iron stlddlebwry 

College, enters 1!»24 

Joaaberg, Benrj F.,iroai Daltenltj ol 

Virginia, eaten 1088 
Blaaer, Boger i"-- t'"" 1 Ualtawliy ol 

Montana, enters \ss:, 



Full Line of 

COLLEGE JEIBLM 

Let us serve you. 



THtE HOME 

of Aggie Men 



IN 



SPRINGFIELD 



IS 



ARTHUR P. WOOD 

197 Main St., "Hamp." 



HENRY ADAMS & CO. 

The Rexall Store 

Drugs, Sodas, Cigars, Candy. 

Amherst - - Mas$ - 



Hotel Worthy 

Drop in for a meal or over 
night. 

TARIFF REASONABLE 



Main and Worthington Streets 

(Givs «• s trial) 



Have you seen the 

"MISS SARATOGA" MIDDIES ? 

We have t hen in 

Heavy All-wool Flannel 

in the neweHt QOlOfB, 

NAVY, RE D, GOL D, GREEN 1 
G. EDWARD FISHER 



DRAPER HOTEL 

Northampton, Mass. 

The Leader for College Banquets 



Wm. M. Kimball, Prop. 



Fast Offensive is Hoped to Triumph 
In Saturday's Game. 

Next Batarday.Afglemeetaheryearlj 
oppoBeet, Worcester Tech, ei Worcester, 

in the third name of the seaeOB tot each 

team. Teea a.-, .piired some good rreeb* 

man material lhi> >ear. and as there is 
BO Freshman rule at Worcester, they 
;,,>• allowed tO play <>n '»'«' varsity. 

Worcester Teeb pal up n x»>«l n* mv 
Sgafael Trinity two weeks ego, hut 
fi.re.l rather poorly Saturday against 
B. U. W. P. !• being heavily OBgbt* 

srelgbed la the latter ptanw. 

The Maroon and White team is rapid- 
ly roandioi Into Bald season form ami 
should will from their Worcester rivals. 
Li. the baekfleld Clark at quarter. Tu 
ate] at fallback and Lewandowskl at 
right halfback are in good shape, 

Marshman. Collins and Sargent are al- 

teraatiag it the other halfback 

BSOB -24, played well at gttard Satur- 
d,.\ and looks to he a fixture in the line. 



PLEDGE 

Arthur E. Pierce ol Newton, a mem- 
ber of the Sophomore class, transferred 
kl iron. Dartmouth College, has 

been pledged by the Phi Slgras Kappa 

fraternity. 



Campus Views 

OK TIIK 

SEMI-CE NTENNI AL 



1 <n: vot it 

«'M" BOOK 



See BLISS '24, A 2 * House 

LINCOLN W. BARNES, StockbrWge Hall 



Brother Alumnus ! 

Do you happen to 
know of any other 
Alumni who are not 
subscribers, and who 
ought to be? 
"Do a 

Good Turn 
Daily." 
Please notity us and 

we'll do the rest. 
Copies of the Semi-Cen- 
tennial Issue are 

still available. 

Bound Volumes at 

$4.00 

For any year. 




DON'T FORGET WORLD AGGIE NIGHT OCTOBER 22. 



Tbr j^^g ^fe Wednesday, Oc tober 12, Ml, 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Wednesday, October 12, mi. 



TIIE MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIAN 

Published every Wednesday by the 
Slu(lent8 of the Massachusetts Ag- 
ricultural College. 

HOARD OF K1MTORS. 



two gallons each per minute out of t*W 
cistern, and Jill arc Opened when the 

cistern to fall, bow loan before it will 

be empty.' 

Somebody Blight appl> these OOHdl- 

lions at M. A. C. 



ROISTER D01STERS MEET 

IN THEIR NEW OFFICE 



TOWN HALL 



An Appreciation. 



»•"»«•! ^ mn •- Manning MUor 

HOBAKT W. WfKIMt .- . 

ABBOCIATK EniTOKH. 

1 , nine It. ARKiNOT.. s ^» *»»' "* 

RUNNETH A. BAKSAIID 'Tl 

8TANI.«V W. HllOMI.KV -n 

i lt v i v . . w. si.M'K. '-':; 

.lollN M. WH1TT1EH'2S 

Sm ,.m..n * '<>"» v " JH 
in i ii M. Wood 1* 

Bi.lfOiA K. Hi.ihk. .!«•. '2-» 



BUSIKB8S DEPARTMENT. 

, „, , K -.•» imsl new Manager 

2' A '« fl M kv"^ Adv.r««.l»S Manager 
MVK< . K o,«.m ••'» Ovulation Manager 

HOI.KHN WlllTTAKKK « 

cuvyomn i.. B«i ens "-' 

IMW I. Si i BUS * 

"Ascription $2.00 per year. Single 

eepiea, 10 cent,, Make all '^XT 
ble to The Massachusetts Collegian. 

In case of change of address, sub- 
.crihers will please notify the business 
manager as soon as possible. 

Kntere.Ltieconn-.-laa. matter at the Amhertt 
o IT Accepted for mailing at special 

oro-tol.cr.19i: .u.horired August 20. 1918^ 



The biggest fall advert Istng Bgenej 

at v„,rio is going full ewlag, proclaim- 

•,,,,,,1,0 wares of the "Old Bay State" in 
B VOtet louder and further reaching 
than anv other. New friends are being 
won to Aggie by means of it. Seniors, n 

Ivmoll . bigh schools are pricking np 

their ears at . he sound ol it , and alumni 
are taking renewed latere*! la their 
alma mater because of it. 

Kvcrybody is enthusiastic about foot- 
ball. No game is so typically Ameri- 
can ill its pictures.|Ueness. in its aggres- 
siveness, in t he opportunity it gives for 
true sportsmanship, as the big colleg- 
iate fall sport. We have always been 
proud to be railed, athletically, a "foot- 
ball college." because of clean, hard- 
liohting elevens, the name of the Ma- 
roon and White has traveled wide, 
hearing along with its tale of athlet.c 
powers the story of the college as an 
institution Of learning. It has edeST- 
Keed AggU la the best way that she 
could be advertised. 

Hats off to King Football. 



'Aggie Review" to be Produced on 
December 17. 

The Bolster Doisters held a meeting 
in the Memorial building Monday, Oct. 
101 h. at which the election of Frederic 
Wangh for president was continued. 
Owing to some mistake on the part of 
the members all ballots were not turned 
in after last commencement. 

Lewis K. Dickinson was elected sec- 
retary at this meeting also. 

There was a discussion regarding 
the Freshman Show. The class of 1»24, 
dldaol give a show last year, but in- 
stead produced an act as part of the 
\..«ie Review. This year, however, it 
«eeius desirable to revive the old custom 
and have the class of 1»25 produce 
something of their own. 

The Aggie Review will be given OB 
schedule on December 17th. This is 
something new on the campus, having 
been given last year for the first time. 
It proved to be such a success that every- 
one is looking forward to this produc- 
tion with a great deal of enthusiasm. 



(Thursday 

Mat. at 3 

Eve. I shows 
6-45. 8-30 

Friday 

Hat. at 3 

| Eve. '-' shows 
6-45. 8-30 



ftL'l*KRPR»>I)l^Tit>N DAY! 

Thomas Meighan, and Fair* 
Blnney in "The F rentier of 
the Stars." from the Satur- 
day Evening Post story by 
Albert I'ayson Terhune. 

News. Mntt and Jell. Toslct 

Alice LaKe In "The Greater 
Claim." An unusual tale of 
an unusual chorus girl. Alice 
I^ike Is remembered for her 
fine work In" Lombard! Ltd. 

SC "! C re e er$«..hln.C«». ( 



Saturday 



Hat. at 3 

Eve. 2 shows 

6-45. 8-30 



AN i M SI AI.TKKAT 

Wallace gold. Ainet Ayros 

and Theodore Kobe*** , l " 
"The Love Special."ada pted 
from U.<- novel. •'The Uangti- 
ter of a Magnate." by Frank 
H, spearman. 

News. "Do or Die.' 



gob. Danl.ls. JacK Httlhall 

i and Walter Biers in Two 
MondaV Wesls With Pay." from the 
J BatuTday (vestas I'ost story 
l,y MUM Wilcox Putnam. A 
breezy comedy of a salesgirl s 
vacation, a case of mistaken 
identity, a thrilling rescue 
and a delightful romance 



Hat at 3 

Eve. •-' shows 
6-45.8-30 



Comedy 



Y. M. C. A. BUDGETT 

NEARLY SIX HUNDRED 




In A Spirit of Recognition. 



One by One. 

Nowhere in a college is the loss of a 

1 faculty ...ember felt more than in 

H„ snide... body. In spite of those 
volumes of our literature which have 
8 o popularly portrayed the conditions 
existing between learner and teacher 
la ,,.is country -portrayed then, by 
poUrtiagel the old caricatures on the 
bUckboerd Of tb« little red country 
school house, and at the cartoons of 
lB€ poor, stoop shouldered prof, tn the 
im(l lern college humorous paper - ,>ro- 
„. ss „rs .mm can ai good deal to us. No 
MVO ria of OOllegedajii anever a lord 

mof eptoaeare to a gradaate tk-aa thoea 

of the class moms, with Prof. So-and-So 

on the rostrum 

It seems as though each year when 
were...... to M. A. r. we tind missing 

(nun our faculty men whom we could 
hardlj have imagined getting along 
without. This tall there were I rot. 
Sprauue and "Caartle" t.reeu whom 
W e had associated in our minds with 
V,,,ie ever since we had heard of the 
InimaUon-gon. away from us. And 
Whoever to secured in the Zoology De- 
partment and Library to replace them, 
tll ose college departments can never 
M .en. qntte the same to us who have 
known the "Old Guard." 

V nod prof, is fitted into a college 
slowiv. taking years in the process be- 
;,,„ he can really become 100% ethc.ent 
lohtojob. For he must know, not only 
hl- subject, but also the type of men 
that attend the institution and the. 
special problem-. 

| few fean ago We bad many well 
«aaoeed" faculty ...embers. A few 

. , —what? Kor.vearbyyear, 
years hence— w "... . . 

oM by one, they are dropping away, 
DOt dying, bat going somewhere where 
th0V \. a „ „>e better, do better w-o.k 
wU h the knowledge they have... them- 

relves. Ami they leave beh.nd then, 
vacant chatrs bave scars on the trunk 

,,i .acie nrofaaeoreblp. 

OBee we saw a problem sotneth.ng 
UU ,his -Ii a 1000 gallon etatera has 
tlliee pipes, one capable of pour.ng 
three gallons pel minute tale the cis- 
tern, the other two capable of tak.ng 



OM month from to-day is November 
LI VM\ Does every one appreciate the 
.ignifkaecn Of that date.' The nations 
of the world are to si' in a limitation of 
armaments conference, at Washington. 
D (' The result of that conference is 
ex pecud bj many to be a turning point 

lD the btotory of tbe world. A Hair, will 

progress tbereaftei either as they have 
l.een progressing (if we can call it pro- 
gressing) or else the conference decision 
will be for the betterment of the United 
Nations of the World. The men who 
are to represent their people on this 
occasion have been picked as the ex- 
perienced, serious minded, politlelaoi 
who in the minds of their rulers are 
superior ...en, best qualified to sit at a 
lataertBgof such momentous import- 1 

ante. 

Statesmen, business men and others 

all over the land will anxiously await 
the word from Washington. They will 
earnestly hope and pray for the 
"supreme guidance". Is It not fitting 
that we at M. A.C aboald fully real- 
1Z e the importance of this meeting ? It 
1,001 too early now to think it out for 
vo.trself. Talk it over among your 
friend, and in your fraternity house 
ami besides a sincere salutation to the 
representatives of other countries rep- 
resented let us each have, in particular, 
our own silent prayer of acknowledge- 
ment, in a spirit of recognition to the 
four men who will guide our country s 
voice at this sitting, Messrs. Hughes, 
Koot. Lodge and Underwood. 



Student Chairmen Appointed Re- 
cently. 



A. MIENTKA 

, Rmpmlrlng VKMn* U WmH 

NKW l'RH'KS 
Men's Whole Soles. Kubber Heels 
Man's Half BoUs. Kubber Heels 
M;M;sKut.ber8oles.Kubberll..ls 

Men's Half Soles 

U"k «,«n»»">-*>.HIlMT HOU8B 




Student Barber Shop 



Beaefeed: That the Mama. Htmarn 

Con k... ian favors the general plan of 
putting the scientific bureaus of the 
Governmental Washington under the 
Jurisdiction of the Smithsonian Institu- 
tion with the view of developing Gov- 
ernment science to its highest poss.ble 
ethciency by affording workers perma- 
„a„t tenureof office, greater freedom ... 
investigations, non-interference of pol- 
ities and adequate salaries. n. r . J. 

The college volunteer band is fast 
getting into trim and promises to be 
in yood shape b] the time of the Am- 
herst game. 



AtaBetting-upconference held this 
year two days before the opening oi 
college at the East Deerfield H. H. \. 
M C A. tfieM. A.C. Christian Asso- 
ciation organized its work for the year. 
The following men were chosen as 
committee chairmen: 
Campus Service °«*2 

Fubl.ci.y, J-kson £ 

Community Work, Vtnten 22 

Mission Study. T "f! r .^ 

Deputations, *>' ad « JJ 

New Student Work, Wnittter 23 

In order to successfully carry out the 
work for the year, the following mini- 
mum budget was drawn up: 
Deputations. *»0 00 

Bible Work, »• 00 

Kntertainment, 2& °° 

International com- 
mittee, Y.M.C A- 25 00 
Missionary Work, 25 00 
lioy'a Work, 80 00 

Kvangelistis Cam- 
paign, •« °° 
Telephone, 22 °° 
Printing and office 

affairs, 75 °° 

Delegates to Confer- 

80 00 

Postage and paper, 20 00 
Waoanaaeoae, j*0_00 mb w 

The \ssociation is occupying its new 
, iuar ters in the Memorial Building. 
Though the furniture la the new 
rooms is as yet rather sparce there 
U, a .rood collection of some of its best 
book,, which everyone is welcome to 
toread in the Memorial Building 

In a short while there are to he 
sorted a series of Life Problem Dis- 
cussion Groups, led by students and 
faculty. Announcements will be made 

later. 



YE 

OLD 

TIME 



HAIR 
CUT 
35c 



HARRY A. ERYSIAN 



North College 



Why so down town for a 

First-class Hair Cut or Shave ? 

Patronize the 

College Barber Shop 

Memorial Buildlns. M. AX. ^ ^^^^ prop . 



SING LEE 

Main Street 

Quick Laundry 




Northampton MaM - 

60LDSTEIN BROS. AMUSEMENT CO. 

Where the Beat 

PHOTO-PLAY 




• • • 



Word has been received from Dr 
Mutkekar of Nagpur, India, stating 
that afiairs are now going well with 
biro Dr. Mutkekar, who was here for 
three years, found on his return to 
India in 1919, that both his wife and 
mother had died of influenza. 



Are ghown. 
Program chawed daily •«€•* Maaiar 

and Tuesday. 

FRKD'K P. BELMONT. Manaser. 



AMHERST BOOK STORE 

Note Booka Fountain Pena 



C. F. DYER 



Knox Hats 
Porker Shirts 
Burberry Coats 
Clanscot Jaekets 




Welch-Marftetsoii 
Haberdashery 

Church, Webb & Close 
Neckwear 

II ickey-Freeman Clothes 

Adler-Kochester Clothes 



BATES GAME 

Continued from page 1 



and Bates got no farther. That stone- 
wall Aggie line just moved up the field, 
and Angie was never again in danger. 

In the second aud third periods, the 

ball remained for the most part in the 

middle of the field, and the paetlag 

was frequent. In the third period. 

Marshn.an pulled down a Bates pas-. 

and ran 10 yards to the enemy's It-yard 

line, before being downed. A fumble 

, after three plays was recovered by 

I Bates, which team then punted out of 

danger. 

The ball was in the possession of 
Aggie almost the entire fourth period, 
and twire the ball was rushed to the 

Bates' la-yard llaa. la the last three 

minu.es of play. •Lavvy" tried two 
field goals; the lirst went wild, and the 
laecond failed by inches. 

The two big iruards and the Bat.-s 
[center were unable to open any holes 
in the Aggie line, and did not break up 
Ithe offense. Aggie was able to make 
irst down twice as many ti.n.s as 
iates, and completed three forwards to 
\he Maine teams one. We may well 
be proud of the factihat M A.C. was 
not penalized once during the entire 
game. Captain Cotton played a slash- 
ing game in the line, ami Lewan.lowski, 
besides running well, got of some 
J pretty kicks. 



Lewan.lowski had hard luck in his 

dropkleklag. Oae held goal would 

have meant the jrame bat the slippe.v 
ball and wind blowing across the field 
proved too lnneh for hun and all tlm e 
attempts failed. 



"Willie" Marshman inter.. pted a 
Bales forward pass by a pr.itv cal.-h in 
the third period, lie ran the ball back 
U yards and nearlv got tree fOI • tOOCb 
down. 



YEARLINGS WIN FROM 

DALTON H. S. 25-0 



quested not to enter the building at 
this time. 

A trench mortar has arrived at the 
Drill Hall addressed to Kenyon L. But- 
terfield. It bearM the inscription. T'sed 
in action at St. Mihiel offensive by 
1st Battalion Trench Artillery Sept. 12, 
TH.an.l Bois Le Prat and Aru'onne of- 
(aasiTS Sept M, "IK." This mortar was 
intended to decorate the terra. .■ in 
trout of the Memorial Building, but ob- 
viously the crude looking weapon was 
not meant for decorative purposes. 
What will be done with it still remains 
;i question. 



You can save from 

$3.00 to $5.00 a pair 

— on — 

Young Men's 
College Footwear 

by buying at 

FLEMING'S, Northampton 



I M. A. «'. 

, Acbeson, le 
| Cotton, lt 

Mudgett, Ig 

Freeman, c 

Salmon, rg 

Mohor, rt 

Grayson, re 

Clark, qb 

Marshman, lhb 

Tumey, rhb 

Xewandowski, fh 



ll.VTKK 

re, Bergman 

rt, Boss 

rg, Peterson 

8, Price 

lg, Johnson 

lt, t;uiney 

le, (iormley 

qb, Kemplon 

rhb, Kelley 

lhb, KeKeaea 

fh, Davis 



Eldridge and Sullivan Tear Holes in 

■ifh School Line for Long Gains. 

The Freshman football team went 
through Us litst battle last Sat.ir.laj 
when il defeated Daltoii lliu'h School, 

2B-0. 41tboagh this gaase was played 

Sftet only a week's preparation, the 
Freshmen showed up in premising Style 
for the future. The game was played 

tbroagh a sold raiasrorsn bat la spite ..i 

this the team played a good game. 'I he 

line was especially strong, Ualtoa being 

unable to gala a first down. The back- 
field was also strong on the defense, 
stopping all but two of Daltoii's 14 
Uiesal forward paSSOS. Moinidian wa> 
an inspiration in .he line, anil kept that 
par. of the team OS its ...es. Marx and 
Ward playing the gaard positions made 
several good tackles. 

On the offense, qiiarterhack Sullivan 

H ent his baakflcld throngh the line for 

consistent galas. Fldri.iue featured in 
the otie.iv.- gettiag away a number of 
times for touchdowns. The Other baek- 
lield men also did t heir share toward 
the victory 



Keferee, D. J. Kelley, Springfield; 

Sumpire, C. D. C. Morse, Maine; head 

linesman, W. ft. O'Donnell, l'ortland 

%Jl. C. Time, two 10 and two 12 minute 

fieriods. Substitutions— Aggie-Sargent 
or Marshman, Marshman for Sargent, 
Collins for Marshman; Bates— H. Wood- 
^nan for Ross, Canly for (Iormley, Wil- 
-son for Kempton. fiaBBtH for Kelley, 
Moullon for Bounds. Fellows for Moul- 
»on, Moulton for Davis. 



The lineups: 

niKHHMKN. 

Cleves, lg 
Davidson, It 
Ward, lg 
Boss, c 
Marx, rg 
Mouridian, rt 
Oliver, re 
Sullivan, qb 
Sprague lhb 
Eldridge, rhb 
Sheldon, fh 



kai.ton ii. s. 
re, Connors 
rt, ft. Boats 

rg, Stevens j 

o, Poatero] 
II*. Bayette 

It, Williams j 

le, Crockwell 

qb, Depew 

rhb, GHlsert 

lhb. A. Iloxie 

lb, Murray 



"Who Was John Hancock?" 

asked Thomas A. Edison in his 
Employment Questionnaire 

We will pay One 
Hundred Dollars 
($100) for the best 
answer to Mr. Ed- 
ison's question. 

Competition closes November 15, 1921 

ADDRESS 

DEPARTMENT OF PUBLICITY 



SIDELIGHTS ON THE GAME 

About a dozen hardy spirits, with one 
exception from the senior class made 
the round trip of over 450 miles "over 
the road." Three found accomodations 
|n the Portsmouth Station House Satur- 
day night but all were safely back in 
Amherst Sunday evening, several of 
Ihem getting back ahead of the team. 



Score— Freshmen 25. Dali.-n lliuh 
School 0. Touchdowns- Sullivan 2. Kl- 
dridge 2. Goal from touchdown— Sul- 
livan. Keferee -Williams. I'mpire— 
Mack. Head linesman — McLaughlin. , 
Time— four 10 minute periods. .Substi- 
tutions—Freshmen, Cawfford for David- 
son, Pierce for Cawfford, Lord for Ward, 
Hale for Oliv. r. 




Company 



of Boston. Massachusetts 




It rained hard between the halves 
jaand the field and ball were wet and 
yslippery during the second half. 
AShowers made it disagreeable for play- 
ers and spectators alike in this session. 



The Aggies did not get going until 
late in the game. In the last few min- 
ntes Bates was hard pressed and M. A. 
;. had several chances to score. 



CAMPUS NOTES 

John <L bowery '*■ has announced 
his engagement to Miss Dorothy (i. 
Parks of Maiden. 

A recent letter from A. W. Letghtoa 
'21 indicates that he has accepted a po- 
sition as teacher of mathematics in the 
Huntington School, Boston. 

A reception was tendered Acting 
President Edward M. Lewis by the 
faculty last Friday evening In Lbs 
Memorial Building. Students were re- 



Look Them Over 

HART SCHAFFNER 4 MARX READY CLOTHES-Rist In the CouMrj. 

Interwoven Soa— Lisle, Silk. Wool. 

Mallory Hats -You know what they are. 

ParKer, Tyson and Arrow Shirts Made la all styles. 

Arrow and E. at W. Collars 

OaKes Bros. Sweaters- Absolutely ALL WOOL 

English Golf Hose- Prices from $2.00 to S4.00 

Parcel Post Laundry Cases-$1.75 aad $2.00 

Newman Caps— Best imported tweeds. 

We suppl) Aggie Men with Class Hats, Canes, Sweaters, etc. 

Prices always as low as the lowest. 



F. M. THOMPSON & SON 



S. S. HYDE 

<>l>tl^I*»«» «»«»«1 Jeweler 

9 I'leasant Htreet (m> one flight 

Oculists' Prescriptions Filled 

Broken Lenses Accurately Replaced 

Big Ben Alarm Clocks 
AND OTHER RELIABLE MAKES 

Fully tiuaranteed 



The Massac husetts Collegian, Wedn esday, October 12, 1M1. 

PRIVATE DANCIN6 LESSONS 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Wednesday, October 12, 1921. 



UNUSUAL NUMBERS TRY 

FOR GLEE CLUB POSITIONS 



Come in, Aggie Men ! 

Here's your chance to pick 
ap Mmie real Bargain! i" 

HI6H 6RADE CRAWFORD CORDOVANS 
AND CORDO CALVES 

and other makes and style* of shoes. 
You can't afford to miss this SAI.K! 
Also Expert Shoe Repairing done I ■> 

J. GINSBURG 

19 Pleasant Street. 0* >"<»• w! «>' ■» ,own - 



THE MILLETT JEWELRY STORE 



Upwards of Sixty Men, Including 

Many Freshmen, Respond to 

Coach Worthley's First Call. 

(ilee slab tivouts were held last week 
Tuesday. The maaagemaal aeeorei u 

that thej have plenty of new songs lo 
MtlHf] IBS a... bilious ior the pMMnt. 

The aaaaoa'a aehednle ol ooaeerU will 
be aaaonneed shortly. 

The following men from last years 

Glee Cluh have been triad ,,u,: 

From'M, H. W.Sprtag, H. F. Bich- 

ar.ls. E.G. Bornham, K. W. Moody, R. 

N. Holmaa.B.A.Bryaiao.aadMcNuUy. 
from '88, f. O.Seare, Jr., L. t. Brod- 

eriok, B.G. W lell, J. B. Fanesf, B. 

r. Martin, 1. W. Blade, B.C. Noreroee, 

L. B. At.ii.utoM. •). M. Whiitier, J. B. 

Bennett. 

From "-24, Keiine.ly. 

Seveial new men also gave promise 

of betas oi value to the elob: K. G. 
Murray "SB, R- s - Blaoehard '22, B. W. 
Blakelj '88, B P.Bmitb'88, P. Gold '88. 
It. \v. Bldredgc '88, C. w*. Kelta '88, 

W. C. Frost -24. K. S. I.oti.m "24. II. D. 
Mrvenson '24, G. L. Chorob '8B, H. R, 
Fuller '2.">, .). <i. Taisoiis '25. 



MABKLLE LOVEJOY MILLS 

Individual Dancing a Specialty 



GRANGE STORE 

Fine Groceries 
Candies and Fruit* 



Mi... Studio, H rS-BPto-W- MASON A. D.CKINSON, Proprietor 

NOVICK & WARREN 

CUSTOM TAILORS 



—TRY— 

C. H. GOULD 

[or first-elaaa 

Watch, Clock and Jewelry Repairing 

18 Pleaaanl St., Amherst, Mass. 

LABROVITZ 

THE LEADING TAILOR 

I'ressinup.otnpil.v.loneonlloll.nanSan- 

Itary Preeaing Machine, 8 roUi 83." 
Caps and Gow: s for Rent also 
Full Dress Suits and Tuxedos, 
m4 a tun Has of ereaiaaifllea. 

We Specialize on Cleaning White Flannels. 

Ft«H Ihtc Qenta 1 furnish in;/*. 
if m w.u.t full ■nttsfwttoii on ri.-aaini:, , 9 pleasant St. 
pfiXg and Bepalrin* of Clothe., eo Hi- 



Cleaning, Pressing, Repairing and Dyeing 

Neatly an. I prOB.pl J done. 
Work called ror and delivered. 

Save moneY b* buying a Pressing Ticket. 

4 Suits Pressed for $2.25. 

Dress Suits for Hire. 



I el. 9 J 



, 1Ami ,vS.. LABROVITZ PI BM-W 



Former!! < olambta < «fe. 



32 Main Street. 



Amherst. Mai*. 



Aggie Stationery 

with Class Numerals 
1922 TO 1925 



1NTERFRMERN1TY 



A. J. HASTINGS 

Newsdealer and Stationer 



Amherst 



Mass. 



STANDARD DMRY SANITATION 

I, is impossible to uvrieslimale the 
value of the herd test. "II ilimh'ates 

ihe scrub ami culls ..nt the boarder.' 
and insures lo the Dairyman a produc- 
tive herd. 
Yet these benefieial resalta eannol be 

fully realised aaleea the increased milk 
yield is protected by SOeb sanitary 
methods of production tbsl have ibem 
selves met I he lest ..I day 10 -lay per- 
formance. 

For over eighteen years 



C/eaner and C/eanser 



s provided this needed protection to 
the Dairy Industry, and the sweet. 

wholesome, sanitary cleanliness II ere- 

ates is recognized by agricultural Col- 

lepesof the United Stales and Canada 

as the standard dairy sanitation. 

Wyandotte Dairyman's (leaner and 
Cleanser is guaranteed lo meet every 
test in the dairy ot the trial will est 
you nothing. 



i rot a ti in circle 




< >rder from your 
hou*e. 



<ltp 



It cleans clean. 



In every pkB 

The J. B. Ford Co., Sc 



le Mnfrs., 



Wyandotte, Mich, 



CONFERENCE NOTE 

At the last conference meeting it was 
voted lo Strike from rule nine the clause 

referring; to ■ bond, The following 

nine fraicrnil ies are members Ol the 

lnlerfiaternity Conference and arc 

reeugniaed by the the feeultj ; 

<}. T. V. 

Phi Slgv* Kappti 

Kappa Bigms 

Kappa Gammi Phi 

Theta Chi 

Sigma Phi Bpailon 

Urnbda Obi Alpha 

Alpha Sigma Phi 

Alpha Gamma Ufa i 
Delta Phi Alpha, altbo no! a member 
,,f the conference, la reeog ilaed by the 
faculty. 

A word aboul fraternities In the un- 
dergraduate's college life. 

"Going to college" includes much 
more than studying four yeara and re- 
ceiving a college degree for your efforts. 

\ man who spend- font vcais at \ 
and does not lake advantage of ihat 

time to form faai friendabipa a. 

fellow suidiMiis who do es m>i da«aIop-a 
spirii of loyalty to bia Alma Mater, and 
who does not use bla physical and 
menial abilities in college activities for 
his own benefit and tor the good of the 
College is not the kind who will put his 

college degree to the beef • >! use wbea 
it is granted to him. 

Fraternities aim t<> promote Brra 
friendabipa, friendabipa that will last 
lone after college years are over. They 
provide a real borne for their members 
during tbelrcollege life. They stimu- 
late competition lor activities, 10 the 

benefit of the College and individual. 

Their Ideals eel a high standard for 

which to sirive. 

But studies and participation in col- 
lage Interests an.! affairs eome Brat. 
F,.r this reason the fraternity pledging 
teaaon baa been placed in the second 
term. We ask, for the beuefil of out 
college, thai you live np i" the follow- 
ing r.ilo. in spirit as well as literally : 
1. There hall he no rushing from 

the lime 'he Sit'. -Fresh men reach Am- 
heist in ihe tall ttntll the beginning "I 

the second I. I'm. 







20forl5t 



% like them! 

<7A^ arc DIFFERENT 
nhey are GOOD 

BEECHNUT 

CIGARETTES 



Each 

year makes its 

own crop prices 

Farming history shows that over-productonandlowprtcea 
one yTr are -Imost invariably followed by much .rn-Uer 
crops and higher prices the nest. To the tall-ijhlff- 
this means opportunity. While others watt, heart.. Ha 
plants; and when the rise comes his cropa ara grown, 
Do you see the situation in that light? 
E. Frank Coe'a Fertilizers are ready t o help. They are 
good fertilizers— formulated, mixed, 
cured right. They'll not only give 
your crops a quick start, but they'll 
keep right on feeding them to suc- 
cessful maturity. The very best in- 
gredients and over SIXTY YEARS 
of manufacturing experience go into 
E. Frank Coe's Fertilizers 




TTAT la • ••*• °**-_ 



Order now for Spring planting. If »•*•• 
no dealer near you, write for the agency. 

THE COE-MORTIMER CO., Inc. 

Iu&»Wior» »f r»e American Agricultural Chemical 0*. 

51 Chambers St. New York City 



mm lit §'•*«. ■'•"*l£ 

Or. t—a It Bod •!*> •• 
rlcbM toll for Mxt cns> A 
rasanntblo tppUcstloii «ia 
frmak Coa'i BtMCUl Tie 
Dreailns ihonld noirlr 
double yield. Mralta »«■ 
■olU and writ* for T»luibto 
book "Th» Mt\—Ui Htf 
Crop." Tree, wlttl OTT Uf 
Ullsar muoitloiia. 



»h 



E.FRANK COES 



Req.U S.Pat. Off. 



Fertilizers 

'Increase the yield of every field 



East Entry 
NORTH COLLEGE 



THE COLLEGE STORE 

M. M. RICHARDSON, Mgr., '23 

P. L. BURNETT, 22 

H. A. MURRAY, 22 



Hasement 
MEMORIAL BUILDING 



T. T. ABELE, 23 

H. D. WEATHERWAX, 24 



I, No Fresh. nan shall enter a fia- 

terniiy house until the opening da] of 

aecoad tern, except on l.usincss and 

provided the wriltcn pelinissi. I both 

,!„■ president and \ iee-p. .Mdenl of ihe 

confereoee la obtained. 

;j. Until the first day of the aeoond 
,,.,,„. memheis ol Ualerniiies or fraier- 

„ity repreaenUtlveaaball not have more 
than casual intercourse with Freshmen, 

[hey shall not entertain the Freshmen 
at meals in Amherst or nearby lowns. 
II,, v shall not take Freshmen to aih- 

leiic tcsis or to moving picture 

BboWS nor •treat" Kieshn.cn at dmg 

■torea or eating houses. Casual meet- 
ing*, of walks, aboul the campus ,.e 
allowable, but walks outside >•! A„. 
I,,., si. ,.r organized trips by Freshmen 
and fraternity, and actions of similar 
nature are r,.utr;.i> to the rulinu. Mem- 
bers Of Ihe Ualerniiies and fraiernitv 
representatives shall not room with 

i •lesbmcu. Buablageovera the area la 

which the Freshman is present daring 
(he period of no rushinu. 

4. There shall be no ta.k about l.a 

teraltlee between Freshmen ami frater- 
nity membere until the opening of the 

Becond term. I.niertainmenl ol Fresh- 
inen in the homes of fraternity men dur- 
ing football trips will he considered 
Bgatnal the spirit of the rul 

:.. Visit iiiii Freshmen in their rooms 
is not permissible exce|.l will, written 
permission of bi.th president and v ice- 
president of the conference. 

tt. The rushing season, which in no 
COM shnll be less than six days, will 

ooaaaaaaoa ihe Brat day of the second 

term and end at b P. K. on ihe first Sun- 
day of the second term. Men shall he 
pledned in chapel the following day. 

7. Printed invitations, with return 
laawata, lavltlng Freebmen t<> visit na 
teraily houses during the ruahlag week 

will be distributed to the Freshmen the 
next to the last chapel before the first 
tern. Baal examinations by Ihe Inter- 
Fraternity Conference. Replies are to 
turned iu to the conference at the 

next chapel. 

s. From the first pledging date as 
Itated above no Freshmen shall he 
pledged until the aeoond Monday of the 
third term. 



u. Ho member or repeeseotatlfa of ■ 
Fraternity or of the three upper ola 
s i i:i n t;i ik 1. 1 commnnleate with aaj 
Freabman batwaan six p. m. oa the tirst 
Sunday of the second term and pledg- 
ing time, it any Freabman talks ot 
communicates with an 5 of tbeaaid upper 

Classmen or Fraternity representatives 

during the Interval of time above, be 

shall not be allowed to pledge until a 
,ime set by ihe I iiteriratci nil > « o.ifer- 
t .„,e. In OaM ibis trouble is not loiind 

llUt BBtn titer a Freabman la pledged 

there shall be Imposed ot. the Frater- 
nity a maximum penally of one halt 
the bond. 
10. No invitation to membership in 
any Fraternity ol the Conference shall 

be given b] :<M.\ peaaoa who has m.t 
matriculated as regulai toar-yaaf stu- 
denl at at, a.. C. 
U. The wearing ol a pledge button 

binds a li. simian lo join lb. iiaicrnity 

whose inaizala be arej weara la chapel 

on the Monday following the litst Sun- 
day oi ihe second term, and by this he 
shall BOt be eligible I" membership in 

the other fraternities. 

l'_\ At T-00 f. M. on I he first Sunday 
Of the second term all Freshmen shall 

meet at the place described by the 

president of the eonletei.ee. All bids 

shall be given out by the president of 

Ihe conference at this lime. No other 
bids shall in any way obligate a Fresh 
man before the pledging date. Ifiac- 
Cepted bids shall be returned to the 
preside* „t the luler-Fraiernily f..i. 
i,., ence at the end "of the pres.iibe.l 

dale 

111. The pledging rules shall he 
printed in the Y. If. C. 4. Handbook 

ior Freabman ami in the Colu ■■! vn. 

\ ,opy of these rules shall be poslcd in 

ooeb fraternity house at all times from 

the opening of Hie liist term until the 

dal he tirst pledging. 

14. Anv fraternity shall forfeit mem- 
bership la the conference t..r infringe- 
ment of the rubs according to the 
decision of the conference. Any Fresh- 
man infringing upon these rules shall 
not he eligible for a fraternity for a 
1,110 of one year. Reports ,,1 viola- 
tions may be made in a signed com- 
munication 10 the president of the 
Inter-Fraternity Conference. 



KINGSLEY'S 

SODAS SUNDAES CANDIES 

Luncheonette 



140 Main Street, Northampton, Mass. 
-After Every Meal" 



WRIGLEYS 



shine: as-u-go 

KtMllfllllllT 

The College Shoe Shine Parlor 

fur yeiir 
Hat Renovating. Shoe Dyein*. Shoe Shining 

At 1:1 \i..il> St . I.y Am Kx. Olll" 



High Grade 

COLLEGE FOOTWEAR 

— AT — 

Economy Prices 




The Shoeman. 
Main St., Amherst 

"BIDE-A-WEE" 

Creamed Chicken and Wattles Our Specialty 

A 11. 1 ..tliei t'e.xl tilings to eat. 

MRS. L. M STEBBINS 

Ml.l.lle Street. (Tel.416-W) lladiei. M»M. 



COLLEGIAN DIRECTORY 



TEN 

FOR 

FIVE CENTS 

B130 

The Flavor Lasts! 

Mrs. Prudence P. Cassin 

SELECT 
CATERING 

At Reasonable Prices. 

Informals a Specialty 

1 2 S. Prospect St., Amherst, Mass. 
Tml. BOB-M 



WEBSTER'S STUDIO 

Nash Block 
AMHERST SHOE REPAIRING CO. 

Your Shoes Repaired 

WHILE YOU WAIT 

s 

H 
E 
SHEPARD 
A 
R 
D 

Furnishings, Shoes 



Associate Alumni, 
Memorial Building, 
M. A. C. Athletic Association, 
Non Athletic Association. 
The College Senate, 
li.iseball Association, 
Football Association, 
Track Association, 
The Collegian, 
Hockey Association, 
Basketball Association, 
Roister Doisters, 
The Aggie Squib, 
Musical Clubs, 



Telephone 

Richard Mellen, Ass't Sec. 175-J 
Richerd Mellen, Manager 175 J 
C. S. Hicks, General Mgr., 403-M 



F. P. Rand, Manager 

A. W. Smith, President 
C. T. Clark, Manager 
William H. Feck, Manager 
Richard Newell, Manager 

B. F. Jackson, Kditor 
F. S. Tucker, Manager 
S. L. Freeman, Manager 
Gustav Lindskog, Manager 

C. R. Vinton, Fditor 

]. (".. Lottery, Manager 



HARDWARE 



■ Come to ua for 



Nineteen Hundred Twenty-two Index,, H. W. Spring, Manager 
Nineteen Hundred Twenty-three Index, O. E. Folsom, Manager 
Y. M. C. A. K - w - Moody President 



8377 
280 

8325 
8316 

404-W 

8377 

8325 

530 

8330 
170 

280 

83M 

832S 



Fireplace Goods, Coat and Tronser Hangers 

Ever Ready Flash Lights and Paint 

Clothes and Shoe Brushes 

Anything in Hardware and Cooking Dtensils 

Alwaya glad to see you. 



THE MOTOAL PL0MBIH6 & HEATING CO. 



The Massachusetts Collegian. Wednesday. October 12. 1921. 



=== ^^^oir-ip o/="A/T EFFICIENT 

IaJVJ I E-l* W . , .. , r„n»«P Mm You will find us better stocked and 
We invite you to look over our Fall fine .. Clothes -"££?£ ££**&£ At * shop that is constantly 
equipped than ever to take care of your needs from Collar Buttons to Custom 
progressing-always something new. BROTHERS & GAULT 

SOUTHWIW D ^ For College Men by College Men. 




WORLD AGGIE NIGHT 

Continued from page 1 



Maine— OroDO, L. 8. Corbett, U"iv. of 
Maine. Portland, Chart** White, ISS 
Deering Ave. 

Massachusetts— AmherHt ,K. F.tiaakill. 

Boston (iiluinnae) Mrs. John Shores, 27 
Astor St.. Boston. Boston (alumni) I*. 
W. Boss. 40 Court St. Fitchburg, l>r. 
H. U.Clark, Pearl Hill U«>a<l. I'ittslield, 
K. M. Oibbs, 57 Taylor SI. Springlield. 
H. \V. Ueadle, Newton Ave., West 
Springfield. Worcester, K. S. Wright, 
HH Woodland St. 

Michigan-Detroit. B. ft. Dunham. 
7720 Lawton Ave. Kast Lansing. C. 1 
Halligan. 324 Oak Hill Ave. 

Minnesota— Minneapolis. P. W. Lath 
am, 2115 Franklin Ave., Nankin (at 4 1 
p. M. 

Missouri-St. Louis, P. C. Brooks, Bfit 
Veronica Ave., East St. Louis. 

Montana— Bozeman, F. S. Cooley, Mr. 
Cooley's home. 

New York-Albany, W. .1. Birdsall, 
% Bureau of Farm Markets. Buffalo, 
M. K. Clark %6520 Elmwood Ave. Ith- 
aca, H. A. Pratt, State College. New 
York City, 4 West 28th St., A. T. Beals. 
North Carolina— Charlotte, H. B. 
Bursley, 10 South McDowell St. 

Ohio-Cleveland, A. S. Tupper, 1520 
Spring BMd. Columbus, It. F. Taber, 
Ml Fast Patterson Ave. 

Oregon -Corvallis, Prof. A. I* Peck, 
College Crest. 

Pennsylvania— Philadelphia, L. I. 
Buckman, 404 Brooks Dorm., Univ. of 
Peun., W. I. Mayo, Assistant. Dinner 
will be at 7 p. m. at the Arcadia Cafe, 
Widner Bldg., Chestnut, below Broad 
St. Pittsburgh, A. E. Lindquist, Petro 
leum Ave. State College, E. I. Wilde, 
209 West College Ave. 

Porto Rico— Mayaguez. Prof. H. T. 
Cowles. 

Rhode Island— Providence, W.S. Fish- 
er, 251 Niagara St. Dinner will be held 
at 8-30 p.m. at King Fong Restaurant, 
205 Weybossett St. 

T. H.-Honolulu, K. ft, Bartlett, The 
Kameharaa Schools. 

Virginia -Richmond, F. B. Carpenter, 
602 Hawthorne Ave. 

Washington-Seattle, F. D. Couden, 
2010 North 82d St., Seattle. 

Wisconsin— Madison. .1. I 
Jr., 1600 Madison St. 



a national organization with headquar- 
ter* in Chicago and New Voik. One 
feature of the work of this society is the 
production of moving platan n-els oi M 
educational type. 

Major Shnyder proposes to use the 
old billiard room in North College (of 
purposes of indoor military instruction. 



s„me of the equipment will be sand 
U hlai for exercises, automatic nhVs, 
machine guns, rfSeft, and many other 
iblngft ol interest in the line of ord- 
nance No definite arrangement for 
tll( . UM „i ibe r..nin has yet been made. 



ALUMNI NOTES 

'20.— "Of" Tirrell has accepted a 



position as Instructor of Animal Hus- 
bandry at New Hampshire StateCol- 
lege. 

Oeorge L Slate '21 has left home, 
and at present is engaged in teach- 
ing agriculture and coaching track 
in the ttlgt> School of Wilmington, Dela- 
ware. 



CAMPUS NOTES 



The military department has organ- 
ized four polo teams, which will play a 
Berles of games with each other this 
fall. The champions may be scheduled 
to go agaiust the Northampton polo 
club in the near future. 

The football team was rendered an 
impromptu innovation Sunday Bigot, 
when it arrived at the Aggie Inn. by a 
loyal bunch of Aggie rooters. Coach 
(iore gave them a little talk In which] 
he showed appreciation for their spirit 
and enthusiasm. 

Prof. W. R. Hart has been selected as 
a member of the advisory board for the 
Society for Visual Instruction. This is 



Milk Made from Protein 
Not from Color 



Variation in color, from a light yellow 

to a brownish, will occasionally be found 

in Buffalo Corn Gluten Feed. 

This is due to the corn solubles. These 

contain a small amount of sugar, which 
is affected by the heat in drying. 

The corn solubles enrich the feed. They 
give it more protein, more phosphates, 
and greater digestibility than are con- 
tained even in the corn from which it is 
made. 

This concentration of the corn solubles 
in the feed, with their rich qualities, is of 
far greater value to the dairy farmer than 
is a feed of absolutely uniform appearance. 



»VT.W.'f.3fl 



?'.': *nS^> 



»PR0DU^Ri! 



C If you select your feed 
on these standards, you 
will buy Buffalo Corn 
Gluten Feed. Because 
then you will be getting 
the most milk at the 
lowest cost. 

Corn Products Refining Co. 

New York Chicago 



>«>i.'* : 



HOTEIN MINIMUM 23-^ 
vEfL MINIMUM: « 





MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 



Vol. XXXII. 



Amherst, Mass., Wednesday, October 19, 1921. 



No. 3 



C. RAYMOND VINTEN 

SENIOR PRESIDENT 

Senior Class Elects Officers and 

Nominates Men for Informal 

Elections. 

The Senior class held its first meeting 
of the year Thursday. Oct. 14. in Flint 
Laboratory. Coming just after aeeon 
bly, ft large proportion of the .lass were 
present. C. B Vinten of Id xburv was 
elected president. Vinten is very prom- 
inent in the non-athletic activities of 
the college. He is a member of the 
Senate and Adelphia. edilor-tn-chiet of 

the Soirio, leader ol Iba ftlea Club, 

chairman of the Informal Coininillep, 
:in. I president of the Landscape Club. 
OtbeT otliccls elected were U.S. Mosc- 
ly of Olaslonbury, Conn., vice-pr.si 
dent; Miss H. M IVrry of Waltham. 
secretary; .1. N. Lewandowski of l.ast- 
hampton, captain: .1 Kroeck, dr., ol 
Huniinglon. L. [., N- V., sergeant-at- 
arms; 15. F. Jackson of Belcherlown. 
historian. Fight men II. W. Spring, 
H. F. UW, U.S. Mosely, F. I. Hooper, 
J.S. Lowery. (i. II Thompson. I'. M. 
Seed, and li. B. Conanl— were nomi- 
nated, four of whom will be elected to 
the Informal < ommittee by the student 
body at a future Assembly. 



MAROON AND WHITE TO OPPOSE AMHERST 
SATURDAY WITH EITHER TEAM A FAVORITE 

Amherst and M. A. C. to Resume Football Relations After Fourteen 

Years Estrangement. Lewandowski's Kicking Sure to 

be a Factor. Wing a Fast Man. 

INTENSE ENTHUSIASM IN BOTH COLLEGES 



FIRST SELECTIONS FOR 
GLEE CLUB ANNOUNCED 



FRESHMEN PLACE WELL 

IN FALL TRACK MEET 




R. F. KELLEY a Transfer from Min- 
nesota Wins First Place in 
Three Events. 

The novice meet which was held last 
Saturday afternoon bids fair to become 
an annual event at M. A. C. Much new 
and unsuspected talent was discovered 
in the four regular claBBes of the school, 
especially among the Freshmen. Cftr 
hill '25 ran a good race in the 100 yard 
dash, Gordon 'SB barely nosing him out 
of first place in that event. Tierce '25 
showed up well in the quarter mite, 
capturing his numerals in that entry. 
Hill '24, who had previously entered in 
three events and who had taken sec- 
ond in the ISO high hurdles, showed 
wonderful speed and endurance by 
winning the half mile run. R. F. Kel- 
Continued on page 7 



OUR OPPONENTS 

SCORES LAST SATURDAY 




I.KH- Grayson '2:5. Abie's stellarend. whoseoliensUe pi»j and goal ki< king 

have feat u icd this season's work. 
i; 1( ,„, \\inu, Ainheist half-back, whose WOT* ha- 0000 BM -lass this fall. 



Maine 


7 


BBODI ISLAM) STATK 


:$ 


AMHF.UST 


ti 


I'nion 





VBRMONT 


ti 


TUFTS 





NKW U A MI'S 1 1 Hi K STATK 


41 


Lowell Textile 


7 



Aggie and Amherst will line up 
against each other next Saturday ■ftol 
noon on Pratt Field for the lirst gridiron 
battle between the two colleges in four- 
teen years. 

Aggie has played three game- M fOJ 
this season to Amherst's four. In tin- 
lirst game of the season Amhetst re- 
ceived a SB-0 set back at the hand- ot 
the heavy Springfield eleven. They 
recovered for the Columbia game ami 
the Blue and White was forced to bow 
to the l'urple and White, 0-7. Two 
weeks ago. Amherst battled our rival 
Tufts to a 0-0 score, and last Saturday 
they returned from their battle with 
Union on the long end of a *>-<) .-vie. 

In all their contests, the Amherst 
team has shown great strength, and 
though out weighed they have fought 
their opponents to ft standstill time 
after time. 

About 511 men reported for their team 

on Sept. IS, and among these were 

| eight letter men. Their team is fairly 

light, with aback-field averaging about 

KB pounds. Wing, who plays left half 

back is by far the best player on the 

I team, and has been a consistent gainer 

Continued on page 4 



VARSITY TEARS THROUGH 

WORCESTER TECH LINE 

Excellent Line Bucking and 8peed in 

Last Half Give Aggie a 

35-0 Win. 



Two of Kipling's Works Included in 
Attractive Program of Songs. 

The Clec Club is out to surpass its 
record of laHl season. That ih to say. it 
is expected that the college will have 
the most successful representation in 
Ibis branch of non-athletic activities It 
has ever had. 

This is m> laity dream or idle assump- 
tion. There are three conditions fun- 
damentally essential to such a '•banner 
season". The lir-t is good material lO 
work with. Coach Harlan N. W'orihley 
has an ample supply of Huh. besides 
last year*! veterans, several new names 
from ell fo«r classes are found on the 
approved list printed below, making 
fo*r evenly balanced parts in the club. 

The -econd essential is ft g 1 conceit 

repertoire Among the songs selected 
bj Leader Kay V'iiUmi and Coach Worth- 
ley, for t heir pep ftft well as their art- 
istic value, are: Rolling Down toKio", 
by Kud\aid Kipling and Kdward Ger- 
man; "The Viking Song", music by S. 

Coleridge-Toy lor; "A Snag from the 

Sewanee Indian-' . Irom Kipling's .Jun- 
gle Hook . 

The most important point in such an 
organization is eni husia-m bseeooep. 
This was shown in the lirst regular i. 
beaisal held la-t Friday evening, with 
-.M in ai tendance, all anxious to do I hi ill 
best and outshine the others. Mi 
W'orihley assured the men that Ikon 
would be plenty of work, with two re- 
hearsals a week. Tuesdays and Fridays 
at h(H» i\ m., so that with the lirst con- 
cert, held annually at lladley, just be- 
fore the Boston trip, the club should be 
going ftl top speed. Following is the 
approved list of eligible- 

11)22-11. W. Spring, M. G. Murray. 

<;. A. Cotton. II. A. Krysian, H. II. Mc 

Nully, K. N. Holman. H. I*. Smith, A. 

Higgin. It. W. Hlakeley, H. F. Hichards, 

Continued on page 6 



Last Saturday was belter weather for 
baseball than for football, but in spite 
..t the heal, the Aggie eleven was able 
to push over live touchdowns against 
Worcester lech in folly-four minutes of 
play, and ended by carrying away a 35- 
(I victory. For ft time it appeared as 
though there would be little scoring, as 
the Maroon and White made hut one 
touchdown during the tirsl half, but 
tin- -coring started ooofl after Sargent 
replaced Clerk at quarter in the third 

period, and the ball was carried across 

tbc Worcester line four times in the 

last half. 

The first period was mainly an ex- 

i change of punts, but Aggie took ad- 

I rentage of a break when Worcester 

made but eight yards on a kick from 

their forty-yard line, and with Cellins 

and l.ewandowski carrying the ball, it 

Continued on page 8 



The following statement from Di- 
rector Haskell to the alumni coun- 
teracts a previous notice lO Alumni 
in regard to solicitations : 

At the meeting of the alumni to 
le held at Amherst on "World 
Aggie'" night a presentation of the 
present financial condition of the 
Memorial building Campaign will 
be made. Opportunity will he given 
to alumni to make payments on 
past pledges, and to make new 
pledges. On aOOOaal of present 
business conditions many pledges 
made by alumni in good faith can- 
not be met. This state of affairs 
makes necessary the appeal to the 
alumni which is contemplated at 
the meeting to be held in Stock- 
bridge Hall immediately after the 
alumni dinner on Saturday night. 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Wednesday, October W. ML 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Wednesday, October 19, 1921. 



WORLD AGGIE NIGHT 

PLANS NEARLY READY 



New York to have Banner Meeting; 
Two at Porto Rico. 



RUMOR HAS BENGAL 

TIGER COMING TO AGGIE 



ArranReinentH are fast beinK com- 
pleted for the World AggU Kt*M '» ee( - 
hiK8 to be hold Saturday, Oct. '22. It is 
expected that there will be present at 
the different dinners throughout the 
country a larger number of Aggie men 
than has ever been gathered together 

before. 

There is a great signiticanoe in these 
4. r > groups of alumni, gathered simulta- 
neously and for the same purpose. Every 
alumnus should loyally support the 
plan by atteuding his meeting and 
bringing a surplus of enthusiasm. 
Members of the faculty are dotag I fit 
part. Acting-President Edward M. 
Lewis is giving up the Amherst-Aggie 
football game to be present at the New 
York meeting. Director Haskell of the 
Experiment Station will speak at Wash- 
ington, I). C. Other speakers for the 
occasion will be: Prof. S. B. Parker, 
Providence, R. I.; W. li.Cole.Pittsticld ; 
C II. Gould, New Haven, Conn. There 
will probably be at least one college rep- 
resentative at BoatOfl also. 

The New Yolk meeting has been 
changed to the City Club, at 66 W. 44th 
St. Zabriskie '13, is chairman of this 
meeting, and Jule Eaton, of Nyack, will 
be the toastmaster. Daniel Willard 
H2, Pres. H. A- O. has sent word that 
be will be there. Besides Dean Lewis, 
other speakers will be Dr. Francis <;. 
Manley '00 of Beverly, and Lt. C. A. 
Tinker 'Ot, V, S. Navy, survivor ol the 
wreck of ZR-S.A crack speaker from the 
student body will be sent down directly 
alter the first half of the Amherst gasp 
with the news fresh! Besides live 
speaking, there willbe plenty of stunts, 
singing and telegrams. 

Just as enthusiastic a meetinR will 
be held at Porto Uico, with two alumni 
in attendance. These are U. T. Cowles 
'10, and W. V. Tower '03. At least 40 
letters have been received, assuring at- 
tendance at the football game and sup- 
per in Amherst. Among those we will 
see back are: Dr. Joel E. Goldtb- 
waite WBill" Munson -06,Phil Whit- 
more '15, and "Bud" Ross 17. 



Many Diverse Features Point to Fair 
of Unusual Interest. 
Plans for the second annual Aggie 
Fair are well under way, and Friday. 
Saturday, and Sunday of this week will 
be replete with the cries of the barkers 
of the midway and the enthusiasm of 
the gathering crowd. One of the great 
attractions of the fair will be the indi- 
vidual stunts put on by the different fra- 
ternity groups. These will be judged, 
and to the group that puts on the best 
stunt a prize of an ox-hide banner suit- 
ably engraved with K. k. 0. laolfBia 
will be awarded. There will be chine- 
log in Memorial Hall Friday and Satur- 
day evenings at 8-00 o'clock. Dunbar's 
orchestra will play Friday night and 
M.-seley's will play Sat unlay Bight. 
Both orchestras are playing gratis and 
the funds received will go towards fur- 
nishing the hall. 

Logan and Johnson Lt. have donated 
two cases of assorted jams and two 
0MM Of syrups which will be sold. The 
. , i,U will have individual tents where 
candy, cake, etc., will be sold, and 
apples, cider, hot .logs and all the other 

,uston,ary indiges. ibh-s of a typical fair 
CM be obtained somewhere on the Held. 
The Midway will be the exhibit par 
excellence- everything from throwing 
bad weights at the coal-hued heads ot 
(he African .lodger to the old time hon- 
ied exhibition of the diving girls. It 
la rumored that an immense bengal 
tiger has been imported at great ex- 
pense and will undoubtedly be chained 
InoMOf the exhibition tents. It will 
however be muzzled at night to prevent 
• ltH roars from disturbing the slumbers 
of the neighboring inhabitants. 

Many rale the 21st, 22ml, t*d 23rd 
will be'days ol extraordinary interest 
and activity on the campus and all 
signs point to big doings on those dates. 



Old Deerfield Fertilizers 

"Reasonable in dollars and sense" 
A. W. HIGGINS, INC., South Deerfield. Mam 



JACKSON & CUTLER 



DKAUCRS IN- 



DRY AND FANCY GOODS 
Trunks Bags SuUCases 



No 



Carptjrvtcr & Morehoust, 
PRINTERS, 

,, Cook Place. Amher.t, Ma*. 



Candy Shop 



Sodm Pmrlor 



BECKMAN'S 

Candies and Ice Cream 



Northampton, 



Mmmmmohummttm 



257 Main Street THE PARK COMPANY, IflC. Nortatfon, Miss. 



An OlttflHl shop which measures up to the 
highest standard of ...... em service. \<>u i 

can rely on our skill and itood taste In all 
optical matters. _ 



Our Art Department Is filled with pictures 
suitable for the decoration of »t J«™ e '. 
or for birthday ami wedding gifts. Greeting 
cards for particular people. 



Deuel's Drug Store 

TOILET ARTICLES 



Shaving SticKs and Creams 



Razors and Razor Blades 



VICTOR RECORDS 



ROISTER D0ISTERS TO 

STAGE AGGIE REVUE 



KodaKs and Supplies 



Fountain Pens 



SQUIB ATTRACTS LESS 
THAN TWENTY COMPETITORS 



Men Needed for Positions in the 
Art Department. Meetings Mon- 
day Nights. 
The competition for the 8qvtb board 
is well under way. Several Freshman 
have entered this competition and prom- 
ise to make the contest keen. Among 
those that have come out for the board 
are: Cooke, Hale, Jack, Knowles, An- 
thony, Salmon, Waite, and Langen- 
backer for the business department; 
and Batal, Whitum, Wilder, Craig, 
Duffy, and Ward for the literary depart- 
ment. Sherman '24 is also out for this 
department. No one has yet signified 
their intentions of coming out for 
the art department. The SfwP would 
welcome all art candidates as well as 
others. Meetings are held every Mon- 
day evening at 8-30 in the Memorial 
Building. All board members and 
competitors should be present as assign- 
ments are given out then, 
i The board intends to publish the first 
issue of the Squib the middle of Novem- 
ber' fhis will be the "Home Sick Num- 
ber'' which will be dedicated to the 
Frosh. 



Freshmen are Expected to Bring Forth 
New Talent. 
The policy of the BoftttT Roisters 
will be approximately the same as last 
year. With the student vaudeville ban- 
ished, the Roister Doisters will superin- 
tend the Aggie Revue on Dec. 17th. In 
all likelihood a comedy will be pre- 
sented at Prom time, with something a 
little more serious to be presented at 
Commencement. f 

The excellent work of last years 
Seniors and members of the Roister 
Doisters has set a precedent which the 
present members intend to follow to 
the extent of their ability. The organ- 
ization suffered from the loss of several 
of last year's stars, but has a work. ng 
nucleus of no mean ability in the pres- 
ent Junior and Senior classes. The 
present membership is as follows: 

1922 -President Waugh, Warren, Reed, 
WhUaker, Miss Border. 

igag— Vlce-PrwrideDt It- Martin, Sec- 
retary Dickinson, liro.lerick. CR. John- 
son Assistant Manager Friend. Manager 
I.uHlskog.Towne. the Misses Labro v. t/., 
Bateman, Martin. Boles. 

1924 -Darling, J. L. Williams, Weath- 
erwax, Miss slack. 

There is need of new material, due to 
the loss of last years seniors. The 
Roister Doisters hope that, since Fresh- 
„„.„ are eligible, there will be good 
material in the large entering class, 
and among those of the upper classes 
who are not now members of the 
Roister Doisters. 



Page's Shoe Store 

SPECIAL 

. . . $5.98 



Saddle Strap Oxfords 



THE NEW M. A. C. SONG BOOK 

At the Treasurer's Office— $1.00 

LEARN TO SING ALL THE AGGIE SONGS 



When Vou Are Down Town 



DROP IN 



The Candy Kitchen 



FOR — 



Lunch, Candy, Ice Cream and Smokes 

COLLEGE CANDY KITCHEN 

"The Home of Sweets" 



Pies! 



Pastry ! We Bake Our Own -Mother Makes Them 

YE AGGIE INN 



(iowi.v '2-2, Mgr. 



MosKI.Y '91 



By the Campus Entrance 

Coi.i.in- « ( ' AK ' " '" 



SAIK1KNI '88 



Ml IKK '24 



L. S. W00DW0RTH AS 

JUNIOR CLASS PRESIDENT 



Norman D. Hilyard Vice-PreBident. 
Nominations for Infoimal Com- 
mittee made. 



PRINCETON TO CALL INTER- 
COLLEGIATE CONFERENCE 



Sixty 



The Junior et«N Mumbled tor its 
lirst mMtlns Tuesday. Oct. 11 i'. the 

1 Social l'niun Kooms •< " ''• >■• » liu| ut 
( . ;iI „li, lutes for class otliv.Th ami the In- 
formal committee was presented b) tb« 
nominating commillee. Onicers elected 
w.re: L.8. Woodworthof Sewlou. pres- 
ident : V. 1). Hilyard ot Detroit. Mich.; 
v,,.e-prevident ; 1. W. Slade ol Clu-Uea, 

Lecretary; II. Baker of Marsl.liel.l.tr.as- 
„,.-.. 8, K. Hardy of Lin leton, San;e..t- 

«. \riMs-. B, B. Sargent ol Buxton, Me., 

eaptain: HIM M. L»B. Lewis ol Jamaica 
Plain, historian. 

Those nominated for election to the 
[informal committee were Kolsom. Heal, 
lliieklev, llale.Sat-ent and Alexander. 
Ihe student l.odywill choose three ol 
tb« „ix for the committee.. The 
same smoker committee as lant year 
OOMtetiBf <>' <'i:..vson, chairman. Sar- 
gent, and Mohor was re-elected. At 
the next cla*H smoker the class charac- 
ters lor the IM /"'Jo- will he voted 
upon. 

SATURDAYS INFORMAL 

AN ATTRACTIVE AFFAIR 



The Condition of the Hall, the Or- 
chestra, the Dinner, and Dances 
is of the best. 



on Saturday afternoon and evening. 
ihe lirst Informal of the year took place 
in the Auditorium of the Memorial 
ButldlMJ under the supervision of ( K. 
Vinten '22, and C. B. Oowdj 22. The 
Auditorium was decorated with palms 
and ferns, which l.n.ke the sharpness 
of the comers. The Memorial Bnlldlng 
was open for the benefit of the fair 
visitors who were shown about. Forty- 
Ijw couples attended and danced from 
:5-(M) r. m. until 840 o'clock. The gtrU 
from Smith came on the 2-30 car in 
charge of Mrs. l'armeley and Mrs. Law- 
nion, while the Mt. Holyoke girls also 
came on the 2-30 car, Mrs. Cameron 
acting as pilot. 

The music was furnished by leader 
"Bob" Woodworth, banjo; "End" 
Parker, piano; "Diddle" Dunbar, traps; 
and Mo.'- Wood, saxophone. The 
.baperones sal at the south end ol the 
bail, accompanied by three Freshmen. 
At M0, the dancers assembled in 
Draper Hall and received a most delici- 
ous meal, served by Miss Deither, 
which consisted of: bouillon, lamb 
chops with mashed potato and MOnl- 
b.ped peas, rolls with jelly. raspl..n> 
sherhert sundae, cake and den»i-t;i^« . 
At 8-10, the Smith girls had to leave, 
in order to catch the 0-00 o'clock car for 
Northampton, while the Ml. Holyoke 
girls remained until the strains of 
'Home Sweet Home"' told everyone 
that the first Informal of the year had 
ended, a success. 



Eastern Colleges To Send 1 
Representatives. 

Definite step* have now been taken 
by the Senior Council to call an lnler- 
colle-iaie conference on the siibje.l 
of disarmament. 10 b* held in l'rtn.e- 
U>n on Oct. 20. 'ihe proposal is to in- 
vite two representatives each ffOH OTW 
Oil collet;es and universities ibrOOgbOQl 
the Kast.an.l it If hoped in this manner 
to stimulate discussion among the tin- 

dnrgradnata bodies ..t these college! 

and to deepen the interest in the 
whole question of the limitation ol 

armaments. 

■bviob « ot \. II IN ' 1" ia*i 

This action comes a- I se<|Uel tO 
President Hibhen's matriculation ser- 
, lum on October 4th. in which be 
Stated, ; 'l wish to urge upon votn 
serious const, leration. theretorc, the 
possibility ot organising ■ movement 
bor« which, with the co-operation of 
Ihe representatives of oilier univeiM 
ties throughout the country, mlgbl 
give expression to tbe convictions 
upon this sul.jc.t olisarn lament) which 
1 am sure TOO hold." 

■ii lt . duty ot organizing the nonfor- 

,.,„.,. has been assumed by the Senior 
. ooncil, under whose BttaptOM it is 
to be held. This ( ouncil has appoinl- 
,.,i a committee of six undergraduates 
who ;.re to take charge of the organi- 
zation »f this conference. 

Invitations have gone out to all the 
important colleges and universities in 
the Boat, and a pfOOpOOtVJ and the pro- 
posed ptogram have been sent to all 
who are e.Npe.tcd to participate. In Ibis 

eonferenee. The chief features consist 
of an afternoon and an evening meeting, 
to he addressed by prominent men who 
have been invited to come for this 
purpose: and a bMOJSOt i" the 1'ni- 
versity Dining Halls. At the after 0000 
meeting a resolution will be introduced 
expressing tO the Oovernment the 

sympathy of tbe college* ol thnoonntrj 

wilhlhepurpose of the coming Washing- 
ton Conference, and solicitation for its 
successful conclusion. 

Ihe gathering of college representa- 
tives, if is hoped, will stimulate public 
interest in the coming cotilerence. and 
serve as a basis for crystallization of 
public opinion in support of the c..\- 
ern.nent. One of the chief results 
should be to engender wider discission 
of the vital question of the limitation of 
armaments in the colleges as well as 
outside through the wide publicity 
which will doubtless be given to the 
movement la the college papers sod 
the metropolitan press. 

It is felt that on account of the fact 
that during the war it was largely tbe 
college men who composed our army 
and bore the burnt of tbe conflict, th< ll 
endorsement of a program of disarma- 
ment cannot be misinterpreted and then 
expressed opinion should carry consid- 
erable weight. 



Full Line of 

COLLEGE JEWELRY 

Let us serve you. 

ARTHUR P. WOOD 

197 Main St., "Hump." 



THE HOME 

of Aggie Men 



IN 



SPRINGFIELD 



IS 



HENRY ADAMS & CO. 

The Rexall Store 

Drugs, Sodas, Cigars, Candy. 

Amherst - - N a5$ - 

SEE THIS BARGAIN ! 

Heavy Wool Jersey 

BROMLEY DRESS 



Hotel Worthy 

Drop in for a meal or over 
night. 

TARIFF REASONABLE 



Main and Worthington Streets 

Clva at a trial) 



I ul: 



ONLY S9.98 

Colors-BR 0WN,NA VY, HENNA 

G. EDWARD FISHER 



THE 
DRAPER HOTEL 

Northampton, Mass. 

The Leader for College Banquets 



Wm. M. Kimball, Prop. 



Brother Alumnus ! 

Do you happen to 
know of any other 
Alumni who are not 
subscribers, and who 
ought to be? 
"Do a 

Good Turn 
Daily." 
Please notity us and 

we'll do the rest. 
Copies of the Semi-Cen- 
tennial Issue are 

still available. 

Bound Volumes at 

$4.00 

For any year. 




DON'T FORGET WORLD AGGIE NIGHT, OCTOBER 22. 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Wednesday, October 19, 1921. 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Wednesday, October 19, 1921. 



THE MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIAN 



Published every Wednesday by the 
Students of the Massachusetts Ag- 
ricultural College. 

BOAK1) OF KDITOKS. 



BBi.blNo K. Jackson '22 Rdttor in-Chief 

Hobabt W. MIM "n . Manmninif Editor 

ASBOCIATK ElMTOHH. 

Li THKK B. UHM1U ■» Ass't Man's Ufa* 
Kkvnkim A. Baknakd 'Tl 
Stani,«t W. Bkomlky -n 

IllVlN'i W. Hi. AUK fj 

John M. Whitti*r'2S 
Solomon < 'oiikn "IX 
Kirn M. Woon 'l\ 

Bi.ihha K. Hush, .In 



other. Football cultivates respect, not 
love. In that way i'. differs from cro- 
quet and dwp-the-baBdksrcblsf. Sueb 

incidents li;i|>pen in almost everv name 
with any team on the schedule They 
are pel -haps inevilahle. IJul <lo not tear 
down in a tew minuteH what it has 
taken years to build up. Remember to 
be what you are supposed to be -what 
your sony claims, 
"Victors or the vanquished, her spirit 

is the same; 
Maroon and White has won the fight, 
her boys have played the Rama!' 1 



•■-•i 



FRESHMEN IN SCORELESS 

TIE AT DEERF1ELD 



TWENTY-FIVE MEN 

CONSTITUTE AGGIE BAND 



Bubinebb Department. 
Chari.m A. kick II Business Manager 

IIvkon O. Murray "22 Advertising Manager 
Owkn K. Kolsom '28 rtrrulatlon Manager 

HOLDKN WHITTAKKK "2S 

CUfPOBD i.. nun "-'•* 

uoiikki v. Brasss "-'■» 



SubBcription $2.00 per year. Single 
copies, 10 cents. Make all orders paya- 
ble to The Massachusetts Collegian. 

In case of change of address, sub- 
scribers will please notify the business 
manager as Boon as possible. 

Entered at secondc tats matter at the A inherit 
Post Office. Accepted tor mailing at special 
rate of pontage provided for In section 110S. Act 
of October. 1917 authorized August 20. 1918. 



The County Fair. 
Everything looks propitious for a line 
County Fair this week. Amherst game. 
Alumni Day, and all should bring a 
large crowd of the Fair Sex, male and 
female. A good chance for the fatter* 
nities lo spring a stii|iiise on the rush- 
ing rules will be to dazzle the freshmen, 
favorably ami legitimately, with a ffOOd 
act at the Fail. 



That Strike. 
It has not been the policy of the OOL- 
i.k.oian to dlactlM national matters, but 
we do hope that they'll have that rail- 
road st like set! led by the time of the 
New Hampshire game 



Our Soc^ly F.dilor feels hurl that he 
Was not invited to the entertainment 
over in the Abbey last week. 



"Her Spirit is the Same." 

For the enthusiastic 'Sons of Old 
Massachusetts" there are no dates on 
the I9S1 calendar after Oct. 22. Till 
then all roads lead to Fralt Field. It 
is there that the acme of our athletic 
hopes will he realized, the spectacle of 
a real football game with the SOBS of 
Lord Jo*. There has been nothing in 
years that has so aroused the interest 
of campus, alumni, and the general 
public as the renewal of these relations 
after a lapse of many years. 

As fai as we can determine, there 
are two reasons for this enthusiasm. 
The first is natural, but both unfair 
and dangerous. It lies in the fact that 
at one time the relationship between 
these two institutions in Amherst was 
so strained that a meeting between 
them was likely to result in encounters 
sanguine and fistic. So there are some 
who are probably buying tickets in the 
merry hope of seeing a jolly student 
battle of ye olden type. 

The other reason is one which is also 
natural, but perfectly fair and sports- 
manlike. It is the desire to see again 
the resumption of football relations, 
this time on a friendly basis. 

We don't know of a thing that we 
would prefer to see thau an Aggie vic- 
tory over Amherst, or anything we 
would rather not see than any display 
of senseless, useless pugnacity. There 
has been a careful systematic plau on 
foot for some time to bring these two 
colleges— similar in their democracy 
and spirit, alike in their love for their 
respective alma maters, and naturally 
desirous to turn out the "best in Am- 
herst"— together in friendly rivalry. 
Everybody was happy when we learned 
that a game was arranged for this fall- 
happy for one of the two reasons given. 
But we could uot blame the administra- 
tive powers of either college if they, in 
case of any trouble Saturday, should 
break off, forever, athletic relations 
with the other college. 

Men of Aggie— look to the future! It 
may be that there will be incidents in 
the game Saturday that will not seem 
to indicate any love of one team for the 



Y. M. C. A. 

This week is ibe big time for the V. 
M. ('. A. Treasury. A personal canvass 
of all four year students is being made 
in order that each student may have a 
fair chance to do his part financially for 
the Christian Association. Each class 
is lead by a captain, the captains being i 
Murray '22, Tisdale '2:5, Stevenson '24, 
and Cook of '22, '2">. The canvass i- 
to be carried on in a business like man- 
ner and with pep. Every student, it 
is planned, will be visited by a canvass- 
er before this Thursday. The associa- 
tion is every student's organization, 
and as such should be supported by the 
student body in Otdei that the students 
may receive the full benefits of the 
association. 

In a short while File Problems dis- 
cussion groups will be organized, by, of 
and for the etudents. Announcements 
concerning these groups will appear at 
an early dale. 

TWO FRESHMEN HURT 

IN RECENT SCRIMMAGE 



Ward's Touchdown Comes Thirty 

Seconds Too Late to Help 

Freshmen. 

The Freshman second team played B 
scoreless tie with the Dcertie'.d Academy 
second team at Deertield Saturday. 
The score was no indication of the com- 
parative strength of the two teams. 
Deertield did not make a first down 
during forty minutes of play while the 
Frosh outfit found no difficulty in rush- 
ing I be ball down the Held. The 1025 
allegation would have scored more 
than once in the course of the game 
had there been less fumbling. The 
line held like a stone-wall, but the 
loose playing of the backtield retarded 
the progress of the team. The superior 
punting of the Deertield team more 
than once saved their goal from being 
crossed. 

Rafts, CasSSBO, and Marx played well 
OB Hie line, while Ward who ran forty 
yards for a touchdown in the last miu- 
nie of play was recalled as time had 
expired. The lineup: 

Taylor, re: Etsvffs, rt : Marx,rg;Cas- 
saiio. c; Gordon, lg: QISSSOB, It; Lord, 
Is; Basol, .|'»; Mclierch, rhb; Sheldon, 
fb; Ward, lhb. 

The fast Northampton eleven prom- 
ises to give the Freshmen a real tUSSSl 
this Friday. The name srill be played 
on our field and will be well worth 
seeing. 



New Band to Fare Forth at the Am- 
herst Game. 

The following men have become 
members of the college band, under the 
leadership of II. S. Moseley, a sec- 
ond year two-year man : 

'22 — Undquist, cornet; Moseley, cor- 
net ; Murray, drum; Wood, saxophone; 
Swift, baritone. 

'2J1 -Hroderick, drum; Fuller, clari- 
net; Lindskog, drum. 

'24 -Kennedy, trombone; King, alto; 
Nelson, trombone; Noyes, cornet. 

►J6— Aldrich, bass horn ; Kingstou, 
drum. 

2-yr. '22— Adams, saxophone; Cham- 
berlain, alto; Woodwotth, cornet; 
Kierstoef, trombone. 

2-yr. '23 -Baker, cornet ; Jones, bari- 
tone; Webber, cornet; Wheeler, alto; 
Adminster, saxophone; Uhodes, cornet. 

II is hoped that every man who can 
play a band instrument will report at 
Social Union room, Friday at 4-30, for 
practice, in order to make the best pos- 
sible showing at the game Saturday. 



Oliver To Be Out Of The Game All 
Season. 

Charles F. Oliver '25. who has been 
playing right end on the Freshman foot- 
ball team, dislocated his knee last week 
when the Frosh scrimmaged the Var- 
sity. Oliver, a Brockton High School 
star, had been showing up well on the 
Freshman squad and his loss will be 
keenly felt in-as-mueh as he will proba- 
bly be kept out of the name the re- 
mainder of the season. Taylor from 
Chatham is tilling his place. 

K. M. White '25, from A Ding ton re- 
ceived a rap on the head in the same 
scrimmage and was in a dazed condition 
until the next morning. 



The class in Landscape 80 has been 
designing snowtlakes. The designs sub- 
mitted by Vinten, Law, and George 

Thompson having been adopted as the 
styles for this coming season. the winter 
may now open. 



NON ATHLETIC CREDITS. 

The list of credits, gained by men 
during the last college year, as an- 
nounced by the Non-Athletic Board, are 
,iven below. 1021 men are not included. 
Itt22 

F. II. Warren 4 

It. W. 11 order 4 

F. (i. Burn ham 
F. \V. Martin 
II. W. Sprint; 
K. W. Moody 

( . It. Vinten li 

It. N. llolman 

F. V. Waugh 

F. W. Ilussey 

II. S. Moseley 

J. G. Lowe 1 \ 

K. A. Barnard 

S. W Bromley 

B. F. Jackson 

C. A. Buck 
M. 8, Mm ray 

KM 

K. F. Martin 24 
F. B. Martin 

C. B. Johnson 4 

L, F. Broderick 14 

I. A. Boles 4 

F. W. Bateman 4 

K. B. Friend 4 

J. S. Bennett 1 

J. B. Faneuf U 

11 F. Richards 1 

F. <;. Sears M 

U. C. Norcross U 

I. W. Slade 1 
L. T>. Arlington 2 
.1. M. Whittier I 
K. G. Wendell M 
C. A. Towns 1 
U. I). Fuller 1 

II. Whitaker 1 
C. E. Poison 1 

1024 

H. II. Darling 4 

J. L. Williams 4 

M. I'. Slack 4 

E. F. Lamb 1 

L. F. Kennedy 1 



1924 INDEX COMPETITION. 

The competition for the 1024 fades 
lias started. The following men have 
signified their intentions of entering the 
competition. Literary: Nelson, Bead, 
Wood, Williams, White, and Miss Wood. 
Business: Ball. Belden, Bowes, Lamb, 
and Sims. Art: Loring, Noyes, and 
Miss Thompson. As yet no one has en- 
tered the competition in the Statistical 
and Photographic departments. All 
men who wish to conae out for these de- 
partments or the others should see 
Friend '23, at once. 

Cards for individual statistics will be 
passed out in assembly Thursday. Every 
one is requested to have all informa- 
tion ready at that time. 



M. A. C. vs. AMHERST SATURDAY 

Continued from page 1 



by his clever runniug. Captain David- 
son at end, and Elliot at full back have 
played well, the latter doing the brunt 
of the kicking. 

We meet Amherst Saturday with a 
team much like their own, both in 
weight and experience. Captain 
Cotton and "Lavvy" both of whom 
have been showing a tine brand of foot- 
ball for Aggie are expected to show 
up well on Saturday. 

Enthusiasm at both ends of the town 
is at top pitch and the interest in Sat- 
urday's game is rapidly attaining to 
greater intensity than the interest in a 
Harvard-Yale game. 



Tenor and Mandolin Banjos 

Saxophone*. Drum*, mUt., Rmhmmdlnm 

DEAN'S MUSIC HOUSE 

Cor. Main and State Sts., Springfield. 

Local A arent. 
Edward Landis. II Amity Street, Amherst. 

Why go down town for a 

First-Glass Hair Gut or Shave? 

Patronize the 

College Barber Shop 

Memorial Building, M. A. C. 

H. J. DUWELL, Proprietor. 




I1ICKKY-FRKKMAN CLOTHES ARE EXTERNALLY, INTERNALLY, 

ETERNALLY HAND-TAILORED 

If you are wanting u rendy-to-wenr rail you should come to us. If you ore 
wanting n < ustoin-iiuule sU.it. you should eoine to uh. If you want a CAMPUS 
SUIT tailored ri6lit you will have to come to us. Order today at the shop that's 

More than a Toj*i»ery— 
A College Institution. 



CAMPUS NOTES 

KarebflBss '2;!. has recently been ap- 
pointed tbe Junior member of Ibe Me* 
mortal Hail Management Committee. 
Ifosslej '88 Is tbe otberetudeol member 
of this committee. 



STEVENS MEMORIAL 

INSTITUTE WINS 16-7 



STUDENT LABOR SITUA- 
TION IS EXPLAINED 



Dames will be bold in i in- Memorial 

Building OOtB Friday and Saturday 

eveaingsof this week. Tbsmosiolsto 
be fnrolsbed i>v hss of tbe beet orebee- 

tras that the college BBB assemble. Ad- 
mission Is five Bests per dsBes. Pro- 
ossdi go to swell the fund which is 

being raised to purchase lurnil me for 
the Mem- .rial IJnilding. 

(laud news from the class of '7H! Fi\e 
hundred dnllars has bSSfl sul.seril.ed la 
the Memorial Uuih ling Fund since last 
Commencement, bringing the total for 
this class to the HOOO mark. The class 
has also rstsed its percentage suh- 

eeribed horn 60% 10 100% 1 herd. v. Tbe 

deceased members have I D siib- 

eertbed fol M well as the living mem- 
bers ot the class A record to be proud 
of! 

The main business ..1 the Senate 
meeting on Tuesday, Oet. It, was to 
approve (he, list, submitted by Ihe 
Student Employment < 'oiiimit lee. of 
men to whom work has beet, given l>> 
the committee. This Bslsbsd, several 
Freshmen were givefl a warm intro- 
duction to the Senatorial body, the 
main purpose bsisg to lind promising 
material for that long-expected pond 
parly which is to lake place soon. 

C. H. llotild has been appointed 
faculty representative to the non-ath- 
letics activities board to take the place 
,.! Prof, I.ockwood, who will be away 
the greater part of this year. Prof. 
Machmer was reappointed chairman of 
the bosid. Other members are Acting- 
President Lewis, BX-ofieio, Prof. Hand. 
Business MSBBSTSr; from the aiutnni 
Worthley '18 and Mellen '21, and the 
student managers: Lowery IS, Spring 
••22. Krasker 22, Buck '22, Poison '2:5. 
and Lisdsbog '2:1. 

The Orchestra, formerly the Mando- 
lin Club, has been formed, and the 
following men have been selected from 
the M or more candidates: 

Waugh '22, leader, violin and tenor 

banjo. 

Pianos- Wendell *», Frost '24, Ken- 
nedy '24, and Parker '». 

VioliiiH -Norcross '23, Sears '28. and 
Loring '24. 

Tenor banjos— Hussey 22, Towne '23, 
and Woodworth '24. 

Comet— Noyes '24. 

Trombone— Kennedy '24. 

The third floor residents of the Abi- 
gail Adams House entertained the other 
co-eds last Friday evening with a clever 
vaudeville show in 12 acts. Seats were 
arranged along the central corridor, 
and one of the Blair landings provided 
a stage. SOBgS, dances, and humorous 
sketches were presented, but the Sot 
which secured the most attention was 
entitled "(iems from Below"or "Beauti- 
ful PearlB of the Deep," in which resi- 
dents of the first and second floors were 
presented in caricature. The proceeds 
were contributed to the Y. \V. C. A. 



Two Year Loses First Game Despite 

Fast Play by McCarthy 

and Adair. 



Outplayed by a superior and more ex- 
perienced team, tbe Two-year eleven 
lost its lirst gams of tbe season with 
Stevens Memorial Institute at Ludlow, 
Mass.. last Saturday. October loth, by a 
score ul 1*1-7 



Former Head of Student Labor Com 
mittee Addresses Students. 

In order to acquaint the students 
with the methods used by the M. A. C. 

Employment Committee, Prof, bean 

gave the students a rather lengthy talk 
last Thursday afiernoon in Assembly. 

For the past few years, Prof. Sears re- 
marked, th* number of needy students 
has increased so rapidly ihat iheprob 




Although he struck a Methodist commu- 
nity, he still Bads time for an occassonal 
party or game of cards. 



TOWN HALL. 



Tbe home team scored ■ safety two lees of plsclog these msn on jobs is an 



touchdowns, and two goals from touch 
down. \ fumble by a Short Course 
back in the Brsl quarter due la ■ bsd 
pass from center, was recovered bj s 
Ludlow en.i. who ran eighty yards for ■ 
touchdown. The only touchdown msdc 

by Ihe visitors w;i^ scored by McCarthy. 



unsolved one. In older (hat a si ndeiil 
may receive work on the cam p its he is 

required to (ill out a ejaestlonalre regard- 
ing his need for work. It was discov- 
ered Ihat some students in Ihe past who 

bad b. bolding dOWS jobs were in BO 

linancial difficulties, thus causing 



who Intercepted e forward pees on I bo hardships among those sladsste who 

thirty-yard li'"' and went ovei fot a realty nssded work t<> finish their 

touchdown. The other touchdown course. This was Ihe cause for Un- 
made hy t he Insl it ul e was I he result of formation ol the Student Labor Cnn- 
a blocked kick, when the ball was pal mittee. For the present, Prof. Sears 



Boroes the line In two Brsl downs. \ 

safely molted when Bangs, a Two Year 
back, was tackled behind his goal. 

The game showed Bp many weak- 
nesses and rough spots la the Two-Yeai 

defense, which will be polished up this 
OOmiBg week. The lineup: 



claimed that the student labor problem 

baaaot ysl be solved, although some 

progress has been made. 



I, M. 1. 

K. Gendreau, b- 
F. Qesdrsaa, it 
Lahrossisrs, lg 
T. Brown, e 
J, Brown, rg 

Ollilettc, it 
A. Ceiidreau, n 
Hoarle, Ojb 
Wilson, lhb 
Seymour, rhb 

Drecnsler, fb 



AOOIS TWO-1 I vi; 

re, Gai ts moaty 

re, Si rout 
it , Adams 

rg, Gallagher 

c I'.aker 

c ( mi bouse 

in. Bastings 

It, Betterly 

le. Pierce 

qh, Bangs 

<ib. McCartbj 

rhb, Adair 
rhb, Trull 



GLEE CLUB SELECTIONS 

Continued from page 1 



I HI TKIM'ltomHTION DAY! 

Priicilla Dean.Lon Chancy 
anil Wheeler Oakmtn In 
"Ouulde the Law." s reals. 

A tin illtntc tale of Hun Kian 
rtaco'i iiucli'i«(.ri(l. it has 
taken the country l.y BSSml 

Newt, Hult and Jeff. Toptct 

Ethel Clayton ami Herbert 
gawlinton In "Wealth." l.y | 
Coamo Hamilton, a drama 
of the care-free life of New 
York's lireen wlcti Ylllaire. 
Of the nmd futile life of 
New York's inllttoiiatifK. 

•I reel Buster Keaton Com- 
edy, "Convict 13." Scenic 

Justine Johmtone and 
Crawford Kent In "The 
Plaything ef Broadway," 

from the atory "Kineritenry 
House," l.y Hldney Moruan. 
Hattinss are lavlahly extreme. 

Newi. "Do ar Die." Comedy 



., . Bert Lytell in "The Han 

Monday Who." from l.loy.l Osborao'a 

Satuidity gesntns I'oat atory. 
An iMitertalliliiK comedy of a 
mail who made New York 
w;ilk harefoot to beat out the 

Mime i met 



Thursday 

Hat. at 3 

Eve. I shows 
6-45. 8-30 

Friday 

Hat. at 3 

Eva. t shows 
6-45. 8-30 



Saturday 

Hat. at 3 

Eva. •.' shears 

6-4S. 8-30 



Hat at 3 

Eva- 2 allow a 

6-45. 8-30 



Patha Review 



Comedy 



K. S. Islam-hard. 

190: C. K. Russell, R. F. K. Martin, 
|; (.. Wendell, V. C. Sears, .1 15. Kaneuf, 
II. (. Norcross. I. W Made. L. II. Ar- 
lington A.Sandow, J. M. \V hittier, J. 

S. Bensett, P. Gold, B.H. Sargent, <:. 

\V. Keith, L. K. Hroderick, K. W. Kl- 
drsdge, I>. <i- Nowers. 

1»'24-\V. 0. FroHl, K. B. Loring, I.. K. 
Kennedy, K. Noyes, II. I). Stevenson. 

19S4— B II. Ilray, J <i. I'arsoiiH. U. 
Armstrong. 



Student Barber Shop 



YE 

OLD 

TIME 



HAIR 
CUT 
35c 



HARRY A. ERYSIAN 

North College 



ALUMNI NOTES. 

Among last year's graduates to lake 

lhb, Henry positions, in teaching are Ihe following: 

fh. Feeney i Lawrence If. Ooopsr, to he reached by 

Touchdowns Wilson, Cendreati, and Box BOB, Clay, W. Va. 

McCarthy. (ioals from to.,,1 wn-l ltichard C. Feck. Dick is making a 

BeymooeS, end Adair. Ssfety-S. If . I. bit in the metropolis of Maw Bales.. 

„^„— , „, OrriB C. Davis. "Buck" has got no 



M. A. C. C. 0. C. ORGANIZES 
AND ELECT OFFICERS. 

A new club has been tormed in the 
College: The M. A. 0. Cadet Oliiceis 
Clnb. The following ollieer* were elect- 
ed: President, II. B. Wenteeb ; Vice- 
President, .1. S. Hale; Secretary. N. D. 
Ililyard; Treasurer, K. F. It. Martin. 

Gilbert was elected manager of the 
1'oloTeam. This team will play iheir 
first real game with Northampton the 
latter part of this month. 



tart her away than Hadley, where he In 
taming the young people hh principal of 
the Junior High School there. 

Irving B. Cray. "Bennie" i» teach- 
ing "Km" in Del'au I'niverHily, Minn. 



A. MIENTKA 

Shorn RmpmMng Whllm U Wmli 
NKW rKKKS 
Men'a Whole Hole*. Kuhher Heela . . . !£•*• 
Men s Half Hole*. Itubber Heell • f*.00 
Men's Kubber Holes. Hubber Heela . . f*-*5 
Men's Half Holea fl.50 

Work (Juaranteetl— AMHKH8T HOlHE 



SING LEE 

Main Street 

Quick Laundry 



ANNOUNCEMENT! 

Shoe Repairing Prices Dropped, Beginning the 

First Day of October 

They are as follows: 

Men's Sewed Soles with Rubber Heels $2.00 

MARTIN PRESIDES AT Men s Half Soles, Sewed $1.50 

CATHOLIC CLUB MEETING u ^ a Whole Neolin Soles with Rubber H eels $2.25 

The Catholic Clnb h«l.l its lirst meet- ^^ who , e leather Soles Sewed and Rubber Heels— best work. . $2.75 

leg of the year last Wednesday evening. ' __ 

Oct 12, In French Hall. Martin 22, antee and stan d back of any kind of work that goes out of our shop 

presided, and plans for the coming year v^e^u*! 

were discussed. A committee consist- 
ing of one man from each of the regular 
classes was sppoiatod to extend the 
principles of the Clttb to the Catholic 
men on the campus. The next meet* 
ing will he held in Memorial Hall, 
tonight at 7-80. 



TRY US ON YOUR NEXT WORK 

FOR SALE ALSO— Shoe Laces of all kinds, Polishes, Brushes, Inner 
Soles, Water Proofing, and whatever else necessary for your shoes. 

Amherst Shoe Repairing Co. %£?££. 



The Massachusetts Collegian. Wednesday, October 19, 1W1. 



S. S. HYDE 

OptiolHii and Jeweler 

9 Pleasant Street <uj> one flUtat'. 

Oculists' Prescriptions Filled 

Broken Lenses Accurately Replaced 

Big Ben Alarm Clocks 
AND OTHER RELIABLE MAKES 

Fully (iuaranteed 



DR. A. E. CANCE 

ATTENDS CONFERENCE 



THE MILLETT JEWELRY STORE 



J. K. MILLS, Photographer 

Class Groups 
Amateur Developing mnd Printing 

Mills Studio- Phone 456-R 



GREAT PRICE REDUCTIONS 

Men's Half Soles Hewed * 1 -** 

Men's r.oodyear Kubber Heels »• 

Men's Whole N.-olii. BoVw »«4G '>'% ft0 

Kubber Heels * 4 ' wu 

Men's Whole Leather Holes S.w.d ;-ml 

Koodyeai Hubbev Heels .... ■*• 

All Work Ouarmntmrnd I 

High-grade Line of Men's Shoes 

for Sale at Low Prices. 

J. GINSBURG 

19 Pleasant Street. Oa rsw way up town. 



Aggie Stationery 

with Class Numerals 
1922 TO 1923 



A. 



J. HASTINGS 

Newsdealer and Stationer 

Amherst • - • MaRK 



STANDARD DAIRY SANITATION 

It is impossible to overestimate the 
value of the herd test. "It Html nates 
the senib and culls out the boarder. '" 
and insures 10 the Dairyman a produc- 
tive herd. 

Vet these bcnelieial results cannot be 
fully realized unless the increased milk 
yield is protested by such sanitary 
methods of production that have them- 
selves met the test of day to day per- 
formanee. 

For over eighteen years 

WvaMoffJ 



C/eaner and C/ejnseC. 



has provided this needed protection to 
the Dairy Industry, and the sweet, 
wholesome, sanitary cleanliness it cre- 
ates is recognized by Agricultural Col- 
leges of the United States and Canada 
as the standard dairy sanitation. 

Wyandotte Dairyman's (leaner and 
Cleanser is guaranteed to meet every 
test in the dairy or the trial will cost 
you nothing. 



Indian tn ctrcle 




Order from your supply 
bonne. 



It cleans clean. 



In every pkg- 

The J. B. Ford 



Co., Sole 
Wyandotte, Mich. 



M. A. 0. Professor is made Executive 
Secretary. 
On the invitation of the Secretary of 
Commerce, Dr. Caneewent to Washing- 
ton last week 10 attend President Hard- 
ing's Conference on Unemployment, 
held under Secretary Uoover of the 
Department of Commerce. The confer- 
ence, as is well known, consisted of 
about 00 people representing various 
industrial and commercial interests, 
agriculture, and labor, who were called 
togetnei to discuss emergency measures 
for the relief of unemployment. Asa 
matter of fad , a large number of fun- 
damental questions concerning the ec- 
onomic progress of the country were 
consi.leieil and reported on. 

Dr. Cense was appointed Kxecutive 
Secretary of the Committee OS Agricul- 
ture. President H. A. Pearson of Iowa 
State College was Chairman. The 
general conference unanimously ap- 
proved almost word for word the report 
Of ths committee OS agriculture. The 
principal items wire as follows: 

•Tiie farmers' ditliculty and the 
cause of much of the industrial distress 
and employment in the cities grows out 
Of the fact that the prices received by 
farmers enahles them to buy only about 
half as many inanulact ured prod Sett at 
the prteea asked as they purchased in 
normal times. 

'•The purchasing powei of the farmer 
has bees so greatly reduced that he is 
uot buying bis usual supplies, lie can 
not. is the case of farm implements, 
the purchases have been reduced to 
one-third of the amount bought in pre- 
vious years. Many fanners have lost 
t heir savings of a life time. 

"The farmer can not continue to exist 
on the present basis. His share is too 
low or others are receiving too much. 
A lessened agricultural income has 
slowed down all lines of business. Gen- 
eral prosperity cannot return until ag- 
riculture, by far our great, nt pr ic- 

tive Industry, resumes normal condi- 
tions. In the interest of the ureal labor 
employing industries of the country 
everything possible should be done to 
place agriculture on a proper ratio of 
exchange of products v»ilh other in- 
dustries. 

IIKC'IMMKM'AI IONS 

'1. All prices and all wages should 
he so ad justed that a normal reasonable 
ratio will be established between the 
incomes of farmers, laborers, manu- 
facturers and the merchants in order 
that the purchasing power of the 
farmer may be restored, thus hasten- 
ing the resumption of normal trade, 
inanulact nring, and the employment of 
labor. 

"2. Railroad freight rales on com- 
modities transported to and from the 
farm must be substantially reduced 
without delay. 

"3. The prices of materials, farm 
implements, and supplies must be 
adjusted to the price level of farm 
products. Manufacturers and dealers 
must realize that farmers can not, at 
present price levels, resume normal 
buying and thereby restore normal 
employment. 

"7. Any tariff legislation which may 
be enacted should develop and main- 
tain a just economic balance between 
agriculture and other industries and 
treat fairly both producers and con- 
sumers. 

"The production of our tarms supple- 
mented by raw materials from the 



Via* Watch Repairing, also iroKen Lenses 

Replaced Promotly 



32 Main Street. 



Amherst. Hats. 



— TKY— 

C. H. GOULD 

for first-class 
Watch, Clock snd Jewelry Repairing 

13 Pleasant St., Amherst, Mass. 



Fine Groceries 

Candies AND FRUIT* 



MASON A. DICKINSON, Proprietor 

NOVICK & WARREN 

CUSTOM TAILORS 



LABROVI 

THE LEADING TAILOR 



Cleaning, Pressing, Repairing and Dyeing 

Neatly and ptomply done. 
Work called for and delivered. 



Pressing promptly done on Hoffman San- \ 

Hary Pressing Machine. 6 suits $3.25 \m^ m ^ ^ buying i PreSSlng IICMT. 

Caps and Gowns fsr Rent - alse 
Fnll Dress Snits and Tuxedos, 

and a full line of dress supplies. 

We Specialize on Cleaning White Flannels. 

hull line (ientK , Furnixhini/s. 
If you want full satisfaction on ( 'leaning*. 
Pressing and Kepairinn of Clothes. eOSM ». 



4 Suits Pressed for $2.25. 

Dress Suits for Hire. 



II Amity St. 



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Formerly Colasibta < »fe. 



THE COAT OP NO EEGRETS 

That is what you get when you buy one tailored by Hart 
Schaffner & Marx. Big, roomy, heavy all wool coats tail- 
ored with the best possible taste and at a price to suit you. 
pocket book. These coats are absolutely guaranteed and 
we guarantee to save you money when you buy one. Have 
one for the game. All-wool coats, low as $22.50, high as $50 

Interwoven Sox. Hallory Hats, Parser, Tyson and Arrow Shirts, 
OaKes Sweaters, H. a P. Gloves. Munsingwear and Dnofold Underwear 



F. M 



Official M. A. C. Outfitters, 

THOMPSON 



& SON 



Each 

year makes its 

own crop prices 

Fsrming history shows that over-production and low prices 
one year are almost invariably followed by much smaller 
crops and higher prices the next. To the far-seeing farmer 
this means opportunity. While others wait, he acts. HA 
plants; and when the rise comes hi* crops are grown. 
Do you see the situation in that light? 
E. Frank Coe's Fertilizers are ready to help. They *"» 
good fertilizers — formulated, mixed, 
cured right. They'll not only give 
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keep right on feeding them to suc- 
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gredients and over SIXTY YEARS 
of manufacturing experience go into 
E. Frank Coe's Fertilizers. 



IW» 



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Order now for Spring planting. If RWM 
no dealer near you. write for the agency. 

THE COE-MORTIMER CO., Inc. 

lubtidiart el The American Agricultural CXtmUnl Oe. 
51 Chamber* St. New York City 



HAT Is a safe em. ■»*- 
llr grown. ■••<*)♦*. 
ttored. Always ■■rtatiBta 
Or. fMd It. Sod »J*> •»• 
rlcbM soil for oast an*. A 
rauonaM* application afB, 
rtink Om'i Special TeM 
Drafting thoold aaarly 
doubla yield. Mention yoat 
tolls and writ* tor raloaaat 
book "Tilt Hatlartad Ma» 
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Fertilizers 

"Increase the yield of every field 



T h„ Massachusetts Collegian, Wednesday, October 19, 1921. 




How about the College Ices and Ice Cream Sodas? We 
have all the customary varieties. Save the trip down town. 



mines can provide the subsistence which 
will enable all industry to prosper. 
The adjustment will be hastened by 
the honest cooperation of all intelligent 
and thonghtfal people. One of the 
Chief factors will be the renewal and 
promotion of the habits of industry 
und thrift by citizens and by the 
t'nvernineiit. 

'The chief of all factors to hasten 
readjustment will he an earnest purpose 
throughout the whole Nation to take 
only what is fair and to assist others to 
win* what they are justly entitled to 
have. ' 



FALL TRACK MEET 

Continued from paite 1 



ley "23, a transfer this year from the 
University of Minnesota showed excep- 
tional ability in field events, winninu 
the trigs Jump OB an inch BMfglfl from 
Barker '86 and easily Captsriag the 
broad jump and discus. 

The men to receive their numerals 
tad jerseys as a result of the meet are: 
Gordon "'23, DeLano 2-year, Lotiag '24, 

Pierce '*,Tlsdale f», BUI "24, Barker 

•26; Nolte "25, Kelley "23, Dickinson "23. 

Owing to duplications there will be 

no award in the broad jump, and some 

of the men placinu second in an event, 

In case of the winner havinn previously 



won an event, will be awarded their 
numerals and jerseyB. 

The results of the track meet are: 

100 yard dash-lsl. Gordon "23; '2d, 
CahiiriS; 3d. Wood worth 24. 

120 high hurdles- Ht, Del.a.m '2-year; 
2d, Bill "24; 3d, Murray "22. 

Mile run-lsl, Losing "24; 2d, "Steven- 
son "24; 3d, Bates "23. 

440 yard mn -1st, Pierce "25; 2d, Isaac 

'24; 3d.Slade "25. 

220 yard run-lst, Gordon "23; 2<l,Tis- 
dale "23; Id, SiniB "24. 

880 yard run-lst, Bill "24; 2d. De- 
Lano 2-year; Id, Partisgtos "23. 

I'ole vault— 1st. Barker "25, height 8fi.; 
Id, Murray "22, 7 ft 9 in.; 3d, Kemp "22. 

Shot put-lst, Nolte II, 32' 6"; '2d, 
Brunner "24, 20' 5'' ; 2d, Dickinson '23, 

IT* «". 

atgb jump-lst, Kelley "23, 5' 5"; 2d, 
Barker "25, 5' 4" ; M, Salmon "25, 4' 10". 

Broad jump-lst, Kelley "23, I* 10"; 
2d, DeLano 2-year. 1«'»"; M, BU1 14, 

10' 2". 

Discus-lst, Kelley "23, »0' 4"; 2d, 
Diekinson "23,81' 10": 3d, Brunner "24. 

77' 3". 



KINGSLEY'S 

SODAS SUNDAES CANDIES 

Luncheonette 



shine: as-u-go 

Kemeiuber 

The College Shoe Shine Parlor 

for your 
Hat Renovating. Shoe Dyeini.Shoe Shining 

Al i:t Amity St.. l»y Am. Kx.Olilce. 



140 Main SI. eel, Northampton, Mass. 



High Grade 

COLLEGE FOOTWEAR 

AT 

Economy Prices 

:. m. 

The Shoeman. 
Note Books Fountain Pen* Main St., Amherst 

"BIDE-A-WEE" 

| creamed Chicken and Waffles Our Specialty 

And other -rood things to eat. 

MRS. I_. M STEBBINS 

Middle Ht reel. ct-.I. 41B-W) Hadler. Mass. 



AMHERST BOOK STORE 



C. F. DYER 



ALUMNI NOTES 



"21. -C. Donald Kendall spent the 
light at the Davenport en route from 
Montreal, Canada, to Worcester, with 
his father and mother. 



"After Every Mea!" _. 

WRIGLEYS 



Clx flggte Fair 

Friday. Saturday and Sunday 

of Cols Ulctk 

On the Campus 



COLLEGIAN DIRECTORY 



Associate Alumni, 
Memorial Building, 
M. A. C. Athletic Association, 
Non Athletic Association, 
The College Senate, 
Baseball Association, 

Football Association, 
Track Association, 

The Collegian, 

Hockey Association, 

Basketball Association, 

Roister Doisters, 

The Aggie Squib, 

Musical Clubs, 



Telephone 

Richard Mellen, Ass't Sec. 175-J 
Richurd Mellen, Manager 175-J 
C. S. Hicks, General Mgr., 403-M 




Nash Block 
AMHERST SHOE REPAIRING CO. 

Your Shoes Repaired 

WHILK YOU WAIT 



TEN 

FOR 

FIVE CENTS 



• B130 

The Flavo r Lasts! 



s 

H 

E 
SHEPARD 
A 
R 
D 

Furnishings, Shoes 



F. P. Rand, Manager 

A. W. Smith, President 
C. F. Clark, Manager 
William H. Peck, Manager 
Richard Newell, Manager 

B. F. Jackson, Editor 
F. S. Tucker, Manager 
S. L. Freeman, Manager 
Gustav Lindskog, Manager 

C. R. Vinten, Editor 
J. G. Lowery, Manager 



Nineteen Hundred Twenty-two Index, H. W. Spring, Manager 
Nineteen Hundred Twenty-three Index, O. E. Folsom, Manager 
Y M c A K. W. Moody President 



,36-R 

8377 
280 

8325 
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280 

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=HARDWARE= 

Come to us for 

Fireplace Goods, Coat and Tronser Hangers 

Ever Ready Flash Lights and Paint 

Clothes and Shoe Brushes 

Anything in Hardware and Cooking Utensils 

Always glad to see you. 



THE MUTUAL PLUMBING & HEATING CO. 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Wednesday, October 19, 1921. 



THEY'RETHOT and going fast 

, v. ««*.«.« tor-a real ready-made suit, cut on tailor made lines, and 

PrLd a'$35.00 and up. P And we are also headquarters for smart overcoats. 

SOUTH WICK BROTHERS A GAULT 



WORCESTER GAME 

Continued from page 1 



was taken acroBB by "Lavvy" for the 
first score. "Dame" kicked the goal. 

Tech showed a flash of power in the 
second period when Perry carried the 
ball 45 yards from the kick-off to the 
M. A. C. 9 yard line before being held. 
Immediately after Sargent entered the 
game, he ran back a punt for thirty 
yards which paved the way for the sec- 
ond touchdown. With the ball on the 
45 yard line, "Hubba" passed to 
"Dame" who advanced to the 8-yard 
line, and then by a series of line plunges 
the ball was carried over by Sargent. 
Soon after, with the ball on their 10-yard 
line, Worcester punted. The kick was 
short and to the left and Tumey got to 
the 1-yard line with the ball before be- 
ing downed. "Lavvy" carried the ball 
over for the third score. 

A feature run by Sargent resulted in 
the next touchdown. "Huck" received 
a punt on Tech's 40 yard line and raced 
across the line for the fourth touch- 
down. The final score came in the last 
period when Marshman intercepted a 
Tech forward and ran 40 yards to the 
6-yard Hue before being downed. A 
forward to Grayson, who caught the 
hall behind the goal post gave Aggie 
six more points, and "Dame" also 
kicked the goal, his fifth of the day. 

The Aggie team was in fine condition, 
and time and again the backs tore 
through the Tech line for substantial 
gains. Collins played a tine game both 
on the offense and defense. Lavvy's 
wonderful kicking and the ability of 
Sargent to run back kicks for long 
gains were largely responsible for the 
Aggie victory. 



North End Lunch 

120 Pleasant Street. 



Our food is right — 
Our prices reasonable 

TRY US OUT 



W. B. DRURY 



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— on — 



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PLAZA 

Northampton . • Mass. 

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Where the Best 

PHOTO-PLAY 



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Program changed daily awapt Monday 

and Tnetday 



KRKU'K H. BKI.MONT. Manager. | 




Line-up: 

MASH. AGOIK— 35 

Marshman, le 
Cotton, It 
Mudgett, lg 
Freeman, c 
Salmon, rg 
Mohor, rt 
Grayson, re 
Clark, qb 
Collins, lnb 
Tumey, rbb 
Lewandowski, fb 
Substitutions — Aggie, 



\v. p. I.— 

le, Scott 

It, Sanborn 

lg, Hanson 

c, Hill 

rg, Jeppson 

rt, Wilcox 

re, Latimer 

qb, Rizzi 

lhb, Morrison 

rbb, Perry 

fb, Spurr 

Porges for 



Marshman, Nowers for Mudgett, Hardy 
for Freeman, Sargent for Clark. Bent 
for Collins. Tech. Adams for Wilcox, 
Johnson for Morrison, Putnam for Rizzi. 

Score by periods 1 2 3 4 
Aggies, 7 14 14--35 

Touchdowns— Lewandowsk 2,Sargent 
2 Grayson. Goals after touchdowns— 
Grayson 5. Referee— A. G. Johnson of 
Springfield. Umpire— T. J. Larkin of 
Holy Cross. Linesman— F. W. Lewis of 
Williams. Time— 12 and 10-minute 
periods. 

'15.— George "Deadie" Melican is 
spending several days at Aggie as a 
member of the Alumni Advisory Coach- 
ing system. 




MRS. PRUDENCE P. CASSIN 

•ELECT CATERING 

at Reasonable Prices. 
Inform*!* m 8pmclmlty 

12 8o. Prospect St.. Amherst. Mass. 

t*i. bob-m 



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the quality cigarette 

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Nothing is too good for Camels. And bear this 
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Take the Camel package for instance. It's the 
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there's nothing flashy about it. You 11 find no 
extra wrappers. No frills or furbelows. 

Such things do not improve the smoke any more 
than premiums or coupons. And remember-yon 
must pay their extra cost or get lowered quality. 
If you want the smoothest, mellowest, mildest 
cigarette you can imagine-and one entirely free 
from cigaretty aftertaste, 
It's Camels for you. 

amel 

R. J. REYNOLDS TOBACCO COMPANY, Win.ton-Salem, N. C. 





MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 



Vol. XXXII. 



Amherst, Mass., Wednesday, October 2b, 1921. 



No. 4 



QUARTERBACK GOOCH IS 
MAINSTAY OF U.V.M. TEAM 

Saturday's Game on Alumni Field 

Sure to be a Battle. Aggie Won 

Last Year 25-0. 



COUNTY GOVERNMENT 

COMMITTEE IN ASSEMBLY 



Students Hear Several Interesting 

Addresses in Short Special 

Assembly. 



Aggie lines up Saturday afternoon on 
Alumni Held against Vermont in tbe 
flftb game of the season. A hard week 
is being put in by Capt. Cotton's team 
in preparation for ihe name which in 
one of the hardest on tbe schedule. 
The team is out to vindicate itself after 
its defeat by Amherst, and will break 
back again into the winning column if 
all goes well. Saturday's Kame is the 
tirnt one played at home in three weeks 
and will be one of the fastest games to 
be played in the Connecticut Valley 
this week-end. 

Vermont lias played three games this 
season, losing two and winning one 
Tbe first game of is* season was played 
Oct. I against Yale at New Haven. Fur 
two periods Vermont held the Bull Dog 
scoreless, but in the second half Yale 
put over two touchdowns, defeating the 
ureen Mountain boys 14-0. i»» weoks 
later Vermont defeated Tufts 0-0 in the 
game played at Medfoid. Saturday 
New Hampshire handed Vermont a '21-7 
setback at Bui -lington. This was about 
tbe same score as last year, but the 
Maroon and White won the |IM on the 
last trip to Burlington and is out lo 
repeat this year. 

Vermont has a new coach this year, 
Thomas Keady, who coached the Lehigh 
University football. baseball and basket- 
ball team for the last II yeais. He has 
on the team five veterans of llasl year 
and a clever quarterback in tbe person 
of Uoocb, a Freshman. Gooch is by far 
tbe best man on the team, a clever run- 
ner, and tbe man around whom tbe 
entire team is built. Capt. (iarrity of 
Brook line, plays either guard or tackle. 
Tbe probable Vermont lineup will be 
Semanski le, Purcell It. Nowland lg. 
E. Johnson c, Carrity rg, Margolski rt, 
Tryon re, Gooch qb, Anderson lhb. 
Kyan rbb, O. Johnson fb. 

The two Sophomore candidates for as- 
sistant manager of varsity baseball to 
be voted on at Assembly tomorrow are 
Norman H. MacAfee and Perry 0. 
Bartlett. Assistant track manager will 
also be elected at this time. Tbe two 
candidates are Albert Waugh 24 and 
Charles Steele '24. 



Tuesday morning at 1140 the student 
bodj met in special assembly to bear 
several speakers from tbe Special Joint 
Committee on County Government 
which has been on campus lately. The 
committee was tbe recipient of loud 
and prolonged applause when it cann- 
on tbe stage led by Act. l'res. Lewis. 
By request Bay. Vinten led tbe stu- 
dents in the College Song. 

Tbe committee is composed of the 
following men : 

Alvin K. Bliss chairman of the Senate 
committee, and OOO. B. Chamberlain 
also of the Senate committee; from the 
House, Frank L. Brier. James T. K;m- 
sbaw. Dexter A. Snow, Clarence P 
Kidder. Frank N. Coiilson, Koland B. 
Sawyer, and James A. Goode ; also 
Messrs. Criswold and Howard. 

Mr. Lewis introduced Senator bliss 
as tbe first speaker of the assembly and 
tb» -< n,,< i..i.. ftdftl SndttTt >• a :« 
as follows : 

"l)ean Lewis and students, as we ate 
reminded by Dean Lewis t bat I lie din- 
ner hour is near at hand 1 imagine that 
a lengthy talk would make n« OOO* 
siderably unpopular. Fortunately, 

therefore you are not lobe paylned b| 
havii g to listen to all ol the cominillee 
(applause). My advice to you is this: 
Qo to dinner when the bell ring! re- 
gardless of whether we are talking or 
not. I suppose that you are wondering 
what we are doing here in Amherst. 
We are a committee of the legislature 
investigating county and state institu- 
tions, particularly penal institutions 
Continued on page 7 



WING'S SENSATIONAL WORK AND ELLIOTTS 
TOE 13-0 TOO MUCH FOR M. A. C. THIS YEAR 

Davidson Runs 70 Yards for a Touchdown. Lewandowski's Punts and 
Cotton s Work Feature Aggie Play. 



THOUSANDS OF STUDENTS, ALUMNI, AND FRUNDS ATTEND 




( Ml. B. F. GVHKITY, K. 0. 

University of Vermont. 



MANY ALUMNI BACK 

FOR AMHERST GAME 



S0PHOM0RFS INAUGURATE 
THE "POND PARTY CRAWL" 



Sahrina smiled on the Purple and 
While Satuiday afternoon with the re- 
sult that the Aggie eleven was forced 
to return from 1'ratt Field with a 18-0 
defeat, her first set-back this year. 
About r»(HX) people saw Hie game, tbe 
cleanest, and one of the most bitterly 
contested contests ever played between 
the two institutions. Tbe score is little 
evidence of tbe comparative strength 
of the teams, and of the way the 
Maroon and White fought every second 
of the battle to stave off defeat , Am- 
bers! scored twice in tbe second period 
both scores being the result of field 
goals from placement kicked by Elliott 

ft the Annie H.Vyard I'm- I >. • *»*- 

' Una I t|U»r(ri AggH ' ■•*•■ " 

victory was shattered when Captain 
Davidson intercepted a short pass and 
raced 70 yards for t he only touchdown 
of the name. 

U>HR betore ihe stall of the game the 
Aggie stands were packed with alumni 
ami students, all doing their best lo 
hel( I be team along. 

Too much credit can not be handed 
to Lewandowski who was the greatest 
Aggie player M thetield. Time after 
time, it was "Lavvy"who got off one of 
his beautiful long kicks which drove 
Amherst back lo their own goal line, 
and seldom was he given tbe ball but 
that he carried it Tor a gain. All credit 
for an Amherst victory can justly he 
given to Wing, who always seemed to 
carry the ball when distance waB 
Continued on page * 



OUR OPPONENTS 

SCORES LAST SATURDAY 

TUFTS 

Norwich University 

RHODE ISLAND STATE 
Worcester Tech 

NEW HAMPSHIRE STATE 
UNIV. OF VERMONT 




Younger Graduates Followed Closely 

in Numbers by the Older Men 

Back. 

Tbe interest of the alumni in tbe 
Aggie-Amberst game was well evi- 
denced by the numbers in which they 
Hocked to tbe game and by the enthus- 
.asm which many of Aggie's former 
football men displayed in helping coach 
the team and get it into shape. 

In last Saturday's game, Amherst's 
attempts at line plunges met strong re- 
sistance. Much of the ere. lit for the 
strength of our line boloofll to the 
coaching of such men as Dole, center of 
the 1914 team, King, tackle of last fear, 
and J. R. NovitBki, guard of Oskosi 
(Wisconsin) Normal's crack 1906 team. 
In fact, the alumni were so eager to 
help prepare for tbe struggle that vet- 
erans of every position on tbe team re 



Six Freshmen Receive Traditional 
Baptism in College Pond. 

To the expectant ears of tbe waiting 
multitude, lining the banks of the 
campus pond, came the Boom! Boom! 
Booml of Ihe big bass drum. And 
then the crowd began to laugh, for 
what did they see but a circus parade, 
with four bear cubs and a two-piece 
hand. Or thus it would seem, for the 
Sophs decided to try something new, 
and led their victims lo tbe pond via 
the l'""d I' ;ir, .V trawl, assisted at inter- 
vals by Sophomore paddles. 

Arrived on the scene of action, the 
Sophs lost uo time and tbe strong- 
armed squad was immediately called 
forth. However, before the actual bap- 
tism took place, the first victim was re- 
quested by the audience to speak his 
little piece, and then, encored heartily 

,of e 7\ po8 ' U 7;; a8 l t UC on 7;;; k ! by8a id audience, favored with a short 
turned lo Amherst at least one week , oy ConthHwd on pft ,. 2 

Continued on page 8 | 



ALUMNI SPEAKERS CLOSE 

THE DAY AT DINNER 



Banquet at Draper Hall a Success. 

Speakers in Auditorium Comment 

on Football and Pledges. 

World Aggie Night in Amherst was 
a tremendous success. In spite of tbe 
fact that ihe enthusiasm was somewhat 
dampened by the gridiron defeat of tbe 
afternoon about one hundred seventy 
alumni sat down to a sumptuous ban- 
quet in Draper Hall. This number was 
considerably increased bystudenls and 
faculty members at the speaking which 
followed in Bowker Auditorium. 

P. F. Whitmore '16 presided and 
called first on Prof. W. L. Macbmer. 
Professor Macbmer, speaking for tbe 
College, commented on tbe Increasing 
strength of the Alumni organization, 
Continued on page 8 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Wednesday, October 26, 1921. 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Wednesday, October 26, 1921. 



AMHERST GAME 

Continued from page 1 



needed. He raced through quick open- 
ings in the line, be skirted the end*, 
and he made long gainB of from 10 to 
40 yards by his wonderful broken field 
running. Few forwards were completed 
and these only for short gains. In the 
second quarter Amherst shot 12 for- 
wards, only one of which was com- 
pleted aud that for a gaiu of but four 
yards. Aggie opened up her aerial at- 
tack in the last half. Eight of her 
forwards were grounded, three were 
intercepted, and four went for but 17 
yards. 

Both (earns fumbled badly, the Am- 
herst backs losing the ball twice within 
easy striking distance of their own 
goal, and the Aggie team making fatal 
fumbles in midiield. When it came to 
the pinches both lines held wonder- 
fully, and 'Lavvy" was called upon to 
try three drops for the goal on an 
Aggie fourth down. The Aggie for- 
wards hurried Elliott's punts, which 
were very poor at times, and were very 
nearly Mocked on several occasions. 
Few gains were made through the 
Aggie line, most of the plays going out- 
side tackle. This was due to the won- 
derful defense put up hy Captain Cotton, 
"Stan" Freeman, "Bob" Mohor, "lied" 
Mudgett, and "Ken" Salmon. "Mace" 
Alger went in at guard in the second 
half and kept up the spleudid defense. 
Hay by periods : 
On the toss Amherst chose to defend 
the west goal and Aggie kicked off. A 
poor-kiokofl was taken by Elliott to the 
40-yard line. After several plays and a 
first down the ball wbb advanced to 
Aggie's 20-yard line, where the team 
held and gained the ball on downs. 

yard line. After three plays, Elliot 
kicked to Sargent and "Lavvy" punted 
back. Amherst could not gain, and 
kicked to the 15-yard line. After gain- 
ing a first down, "Lavvy" punted, this 
time to Amherst's 38 yard mark. A 
fumble by Wing gave Aggie the ball in 
midiield. Again "Lavvy" kicked to 
the five-yard line. Elliott's return kick 
was hurried and poor, netting but 15- 
yards. Now was Aggie's chance, but 
the Amherst line held, and a drop by 
"Lavvy" went wild. Elliott ended the 
period by punting. 

Second period: "Lavvy" punted back 
to Amherst's 35 yard line, and after 
three plays Elliot kicked. On the third 
play "Lavvy" kicked aud by straight 
playing Amherst went to the Aggie 15- 
yard line, but were held for downs. 
"Lavvy" tout the ball in a dash down 
the field for 25 yards, where he was 
finally stopped by Wing and lost the 
ball in the melee. Amherst lost the 
ball but regained en a fumble and 
Elliot kicked the first goal. After the 
kick-off and an exchange of punts, 
Elliot kicked bis second placement. 

Third period: Elliott kicked off to 
"Lavvy," who after two plays kicked 
back. A fight up and down the field 
finally ended when Amherst fumbled 
on her 15-yard line and Aggie again 
threatened to score. "Lavvy" finally 
tried a drop which went wild. Again 
the ball was carried up and down the 
field, the period ending with the ball 
on Amherst's 25 yard line. 

Fourth period: Elliott kicked to the 
Amherst 46-yard line and after two 
plays, Tumey made first down. After 
three more plays, a short forward 
was intercepted by Davidson, who ran 
for a touchdown. A few plays after 
the kickoff, and again Aggie had the 
ball, on her opponents' 15-yard line. 



"Lavvy" recovered an attempted drop, 
which was blocked, but four plays 
could not push the ball over, aud the 
period ended, when Elliott punted to 
midiield. 
The lineup was as follows: 

M. A. 0. 



AMHKRBT 

Davidson, (Capt.) le 
Adams, It 
Plimpton, lg 
Winch, c 
Worcester, rg 
Clapp, rt 
Leete, re 
Winslow, qb 
Wing, lhb 
Jillson, rhb 
Elliott, fb 



re, Grayson 

rt, Mohor 

rg, Salmon 

c, Freeman 

lg, Mudgett 

It, Cotton (Capt.) 

le, Marshmau 

qb, Sargent 

lbb, Tumey 

rhb, Collins 

fb, Lewandowski 



Old Deerfield Fertilizers 

"Reasonable in dollars and sense" 
A. W. HIGGINS, INC., 



South Deerfield. Ma«» 



CUTLER 



N & 

DKA.LKKS IN 

DRV AMD FANCY GOODS 
Trunks Bags Suit Cases 



Touchdown — Davidson. Goal from 
placement— Elliott 2. Goal from touch- 
down-Elliott 1. Beferee— H.U.Bankart 
of Dartmouth. Umpire-J. R. Keegan 
Chautauqua. Linesman— H. A.Swafield 
of Brown. Time— 15 minute quarters. 
Substitutions — Amherst: Freuch for 
Plimpton, McCormick for Worcester 
Boeman for McCormick, Beusswig for 
Wing; M. A.C.: Alger for Mudgett, 
Acheson for Marshman, Clark for Sar- 
gent. 

SIDELIGHTS ON THE GAME 

The absence of "Stubby" Clark was 
felt keenly by the Aggie team. The 
plucky quarterback's knee is fast com- 
ing into shape and it is hoped that he 
will play this week. 



C*rptrvtcr 5t Morchous*. 

PRINTERS, 

No i, Cook Place, Amherst, Mam 



Candy Shop 



Sodm Pmrlor 



BEICKM AN'S 
Candies and Ice Cream 



Northampton, 



Mmmmmchummtta 



257 Main Street THE PARK COMPANY, IflC. Northampton, Miss. 



An optical Hhop which measures np to the 
blithest standard of modern service. You 
can rely on oar skill and good taste in all 
optical matters. 



Oar Art Department Is filled with pictures 
suitable for the decoration of "f rat" bouses, 
or for birthday and wedding gifts. Greeting 
cards for particular people. 



Speaking of sidelights, the sun gave 
the Aggie rooters plenty of tbem, right 
in the eye. 



It is lucky that the next informal is 
quite a way off. Just at present funds 
are low around the campus. 

To "Willie" Marshman goeB the 
credit of making the best tackle in the 
game. A few more like that and the 
Amherst team would be composed of 
substitutes. 



Deuel's Drug Store 



TOIL 



ARTICLES 



It took six cheer-leaders to get any 
noise out of the Amherst cheering 
section, but when It came it was worth 
hearing. 



The Orchard Street gate did not seem 
to be large enough to accommodate the 
crowd. We wonder if anyone was 
forced to use the fence on this account. 



Tisdale must have bad fire drill prac- 
tice back in the home town. He cer- 
tainly is right there with the water. 



Coach Gore la trying to find out what 
the demijohn that the Amherst players 
used so often contained. It must be 
pretty good stuff judging from the final 
score. 



Shaving Sticks and Creams 



Razors and Razor Blades 



VICTOR RECORDS 



Kodaks and Supplies 



Fountain Pens 



F^ajEe's* 8SI10© Store 

SPECIAL 



Saddle Strap Oxfords 



$5.98 



POND PARTY 

Continued from page 1 



musical selection. Then splash ! and a 
bead was seen to bob above water— 
the Aggie frog had received his first 
scare of the season. 

Not to be outdone by their classmate, 
each of the following subjects ventured 
his luck at entertaiument, with a more 
or less startling effect on the spectators. 
Some good dancing talent was discov- 
ered incidentally, but no very artistic 
diving ability. Despite the temper- 
ature, swimming seemed to be in vogue, 
and some of the beBl ducks made a sec- 
ond appearance on the stage. The un- 
ruly yearlings who performed were: 
Craig, Cooke, Love, Lovell, Simmons, 
and C. F. Ross. 



THE NEW M. A. C. SONG BOOK 

At the Treasurer's Office— $1.00 

LEARN TO SING ALL THE AGGIE SONGS 



When Vou Are Down Town 



DROP IN 



The Candy Kitchen 



— FOR — 



Lunch, Candy, Ice Cream and Smokes 



COLLEGE CANDY KITCHEN 

"The Home of Sweets" 



Pies ! Pastry! WeBake Our Own— Mother Makes Them 

YE aggie: inn 



Gowdy '22, Mgr. 



Mosei.t '22 



By the Campus Entrance 

COLMMB '22 CABKT *22 



Sakoknt '23 



8tkk.uk '^4 



ORCHESTRA SELECTIONS 

RETAIN TWELVE MEN 



Mandolin Club to be Replaced by 
New Organization. 

Au orchestra will replace the Mandolin 
Club this year on the Musical Clubs. 
The main function of the Mandolin 
Club in the past has been to furnish 
music for the dances which have fol- 
lowed each concert and it was deemed 
best to organize a musical unit which 
could best f nihil this duty. The or- 
chestra will appear M the program, 
however, with several select pieces in 
conjunction with the Glee Club. 

At the fiist call for candidates 35 men 
signified their intention** of coining out 
for the orchestra. Among this number 
were several excellent banjo playersand 
talented musicians. It is regretted that 
the first cut eliminated all but 11 nun, 
yet a larger orchestra is obviously im- 
possible. Those retained are food 
players and have had a great deal of 
experience. Many have given up 
chances of earning money in order that 
they may be with this orchestra. 

At present the orchestra consists of : 
IMano— Wendell '28, Parker '25. 
Banjos- Waugh '22, leader. Hussey 22, 

Towne '23, YVoodworth '24. 
Saxophone— Wood '22. 
Violins -Norcross'23,Sears'23,Loring'24. 

Drums Mooeley "£Z. 

Trombone— Kennedy '24. 

Under the leadership of "Freddie" 
Waugh the orchestra is working into 
first-class shape, and it is expected that 
these live jazz artists will attract much 
larger audiences to the Musical Club 
concerts. 

HEAD OF WORLD PEACE 

CONFERENCE IN ASSEMBLY 



poisonous that three drops is enough 
to kill any living object on which it 
lands, and that people behind the lineof 
battle will have to live in a steel suit to 
protect themselves. He spoke of the 
uselessness of battleships today, and 
said that 1000 aeroplanes can be ball! 
for the price of one battleship; thai 
Uncle Sam is spending *33.(KM),ttO0.O00 
to prepare for the next war, while Gel* 
many spent the same amount on the 
last war. His tinal words were: 
'Blessed are the Peace-makers for they 
are the Children of God; and Cursed 
are the War-makers for they are the 
Children of the Devil." 



Full Line of 

COLLEGE JEWELRY 

Let us serve you. 

ARTHUR P. WOOD 

197 Main St., "Hamp." 



THE HOME 

of Aggie Men 



IN 



DIRECTORY OF THE 

MEMORIAL BUILDING 

The rooms of Memorial Building are 
numbered bejfinning with the room at 
the southwest corner of the building, 
opposite the Drill Hall, and extending 
to the opposite corner. The rooms are 
occupied as follows: 
No. 1. Com, KOi an. 

No. 2. Roister Doisters, Musical Clubs, 
Public Speaking Council, and Index 

No. 3. Non-athletic Activities Board. 

Major Clubs, Si/uib. 

No. 4. Manager of Memorial Building. 

No. 5. V. M. C. A., Catholic Club, 

Menorah Society, Student Volunteer 

Organization. 

No. 0. Junior Prom., Sophomore-Sen- 

ioi Hop, li.formol Ci.inmit tec, Short 

Course Student Council. 

N'o. 7. Y. W. C. A., Women's Govern- 
ing Council. 

No. 8. Senate, Adelphia, Honor Coun- 
cil, Interfraternily Conference. 

No. 9. Alumni class headquarters. 
2nd lloor. 

Room 3, 0, and 7 are available for 
meetings in case of conflict in other 
rooms. 

Ki< iiakii A. Mki.i.kn, Mgr. 



ONE-CENT SALE 

Nov. 3, 4 and 5 



SPRINGFIELD 

IS 

Hotel Worthy 

Drop in for a meal or over 
night. 

TARIFF REASONABLE 



THE REXALL STORE 



SEE THIS BARGAIN ! 

Heavy Wool Jersey 

BROMLEY DRESS 



Main and Worthington Streets 

(Give as • trial) 



-KOIt- 



ONLY S9.98 

Colors— BR OWN, NA VY, HENNA 
G. EDWARD FISHER 



THE 
DRAPER HOTEL 

Northampton, Mass. 

The Leader for College Banquets 



Wm. M. Kimball, Prop. 



Mr. Cummings Gives Interesting 

Facts and Opinions Regarding 

Armament. 

The speaker of last Thursday's as- 
sembly was Mr. Cummings of the 
World Peace Conference. Before being 
introduced, he asked for a song so 
"Ray" Vinten'22led the student body 
in '"Dear Old Massachusetts." 

After being introduced the speaker 
discussed disarmament. There were 
three points to his speech: (1) The 
History of Disarmament, under which 
he spoke of trials by Court, instead of 
trials by battle, family principle and 
agreement, devotion of strong to weak, 
inter-individual agreement, all of these 
in place of 'The Jungle Law." as it was 
in olden times. (2) Inter-family agree- 
ment, municipal peace in state and 
city. (3) The Peacemakers, great men 
who have brought about the idea of 
disarmament, in country, state and 
city— Benjamin Franklin. Alexander 
Hamilton and George Washington, all of 
whom tried to showwhat inter-state and 
International agreement was, and also 
tried to make international cooperation. 
Then he told what the next war 
would be like, and how the Kaiser was 
influenced by the Devil, to rule the 
World, and lost. He went on to say that 
8cience has advanced so far that the 
chemicals tobeused in the next war are so 



A. WORD F0M C. G. FIELDER 
FORMER "Y" SECRETARY 



Amherst Man is Stationed on Banks 
of the Brahmaputra. 

C. G. Fielder, former Aggie Y. M. C. 
A. secretary, sends greetings to all 
Aggie men from his station in Assam, 
India. He is a foreign missionary, and 
is full of enthusiasm for his work, as 
may be seen from the following extract 
from a recent letter: 

'We have a great place, on the banks 
of the Brahmaputra river. Our bunga- 
low is large and comfortable. The view 
as gloYious. The new Hostel near us is 
full of students;Hindus, Mohammedans, 
Aiiitnists and Christians. They are a 
good lot and I like them very much. 
The work here is great. The men with 
whom I come in contact are burning 
with zeal for their country's freedom. 
They are earnest and the real thing. 
But it is tremendously difficult for the 
boyB to become Christians as it means 
their being cut off by their families in 
their communities." 

Mr. Fielder has been in India once 
before as a missionary aud was anxious 
toreturn. He wished to be remembered 
to all his friends in Amherst, especially 
those among the students at M. A. C. 



Brother Alumnus ! 

Do you happen to 
know of any other 
Alumni who are not 
subscribers, and who 
ought to be? 
"Do a 

Good Turn 
Daily." 
Please notily us and 

we'll do the rest. 
Copies of the Semi-Cen- 
tennial Issue are 

still available. 

Bound Volumes at 

$4.00 

For any year. 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Wednesday, October 26, 1921. 



TBE MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIAN 



Published eyery Wednesday by the 
Students of the Massachusetts Ag- 
ricultural College. 



BOARD OF EDITORS. 

Beldi*o F. Jack™ 'M Ed.tor-ln^htef 

Hosart W. Bpb.no ti Managing Kditor 

Abbociatk. Kditobb. 

Luthkk B. ABR.NOTON "2S Ass't Man'g Kditor 
Kenweth A.. Bahkabd '28 I oii.|>etttlon Kditor 
JOH«M.WKITTIKK'2S Athletic Kditor 

Ruth M. Woo.. M Kxthange Kditor 

Htanlkt W. Bromlet "M 
Ikvino W. Hlaok '23 

Solomon Cohkn fj 

■ l.lSHA F. Hi.ihh. .Ik.. '24 

BC8INKBB DEPABTMKWT. 

Charles A. Bk-k '22 Business Manager 

Myron O. Murray '22 Advertising Manager 

OWEN K. Folbom '28 Circulation Manager 

HOLDtfN WHITTAKER *28 

t'LIKFOKI) I.. IJE1.KEN '24 

KOHKKI K. HTKERK '24 



Alumni Field it lUtl. wnll. .go, a fen 

of the yotinifer memln'iH ot our student 

body "kidded along" eertaia of the btgh 
school Rlrta. Thai was wrong BoaM- 

linies we let men come onto and leave 
the campus without meeting our men, 
seeinu the bettdlnge, or receiving prop- 
er entertainment. That is wn.nu, too. 
Uere Ib a feature, that we must not 
neglect. Such men should Of allowed 
to Hee what we have here, get a I Mil 
of real college life, and go home, say- 
ing, "'Aggie looks good to me." 



WORCESTER N. H. S. LOSES 

21-0 TO GRAYSON'S MEN 



Gerremonty and Adair -Play Well in 
Two-Year Victory. 



Sportsmanship. 
We liked the way Amlieisi acted lust 
Saturday when we were singing our 
slowest song, and their varsity was 
marching onto the field at the same 
time. They waited until we had fin- 
ished and only then gave their cheer. 
It made us wonder if we should have 
done the Hame thing under like condi- 
tions. It was a mighty tine display of 
sportsmanship, a thing which, indeed, 
the whole game retltcted. 



Subscription $2.00 per year. Single 
copies, 10 cents. Make all orders paya- 
ble to The Maasachuaetta Collegian. 

In case of change of address, sub- 
scribers will please notify the business 
manager as soon as possible. 

Entered as second-claw matter at the A inherit 
Poet Office. Accepted for mailing at special 
rate of pontage provided for tn eection 110S. Act 
of October. 1917 authorlied August 20. 1918. 



Assembly Speakers. 
Dr. (•ummings brought no sleeping 
powders with him 10 assembly last 
week. The b.»y beside u , siyhed deeply , 
"Qoafc! Why don't lliey have 'em like 
him all the time'. 1 " 



Proapecta. 
The personnel of our student body 
depends almost entirely on the impress- 
ion Aggie makes on high and prep 
school students during their prepara- 
tory courses. In several ways we put 
our-selves in a favorable light before 

prospective Aggie jnen. 

First and most tar reacning is puunc- 
ity, through the press. This feature 
was run here in a most slip-shod manner 
for several years, with articles appear- 
ing more or less at random in the pub- 
lications of vaiiotis sections. But, at 
present, the Extension Service, inter- 
ested alumni in the more remote cities, 
and special correspondents on the 
campus are doing this work belter than 
ever before. Hardly a day goes by but 
Mass. Aggie stares out at the public 
from prominent headlines. 

Then, our different delegations, such 
as musical clubs, athletic teams. Y. M. 
C. A. deputations, and so on, create 
their impressions. These have always 
been our chief pride, and rightly so, for 
years ago and right now they are rep- 
resenting "Living Aggie" to all the 

state. 

Of course, our alumni, especially 
those who have become leaders— and 
these are many for a young college- 
make their mark on the receptive brain 
of youth, uncertain of its educational 
future. All these are important but 
like the healthy parts of a human body, 
in functioning properly, they attract 
little notice. 

There is one matter in which the col- 
lege may be well advertised, that we 
occasionally neglect. That is the enter- 
tainment of delegations from high 
schools to the Aggie campus. High 
School Day does more concrete good 
than any other form of our advertising. 
But there are constantly arriving here 
teams from high schools to compete 
with our Freshmen or to U8e our field. 
It is upon these men that we should 
strive to make our impressions. They 
are the leaders in their schools or they 
would not be sent here. 

Sometimes we grow careless. For 
example, when Amherst High used 



Ver-r-r-mont! 
Last year Vermont was fairly stunned 
by the Aggie pep at Burlington. It's 
up to us 10 keep it up on Alumni Field 
uext Saturday. 



RESULTS OF Y. M. C. A. 

CAMPAIGN PROGRESS 



Incomplete returns for the financial 
campaign of the Christian Association 
show a tolal of slightly over 1400.00 in 
casii ami pledges, as against a budget 
of $525.00. The personal canvassing of 
all the students, while demanding con- 
siderable extra work to be carried out. 
has at least given every student the 
chance to know more of what the Chris- 
tian Association is doing and will do in 
the future. 

The Association wishes to lake this 
opportunity lo thank those who have 
helped in the canvassing, and also 
those who have made it possible for the 
Association to go ahead with its work 
by subscribing their ■bare of the 
budget. 

Life problem discussion groups and 
world fellowship groups are to be or- 
ganized in the near future. Announce- 
ments will be made regarding these 
groups at an early dale. 



In a game with the Worcester North 
High Eleven last Friday, Oct. 21, on 
Alumni Field, the Two-year aggregation 
completely outplayed the visitors, and 
defeated thein by a score of 21 0. The 
Aggie team showed considerable im- 
provement over last Saturday's game, 
and the new back field combination 
worked pretly well. The line. however, 
is still slow and too high. Although 
two forward passes were perfected dur- 
ing the contest, there is room for con- 
siderable improvement in this depart- 
ment. 

The home team started strong.scoring 
two touchdowns and as many goals in 
the first quarter. The first touchdown 
was made by means of a forward pass, 
Trull to (ierremonly, who carried the 
ball over from the 10-yard line. He 
also kicked the goal. Shortly after, 
Captain Betteily broke through and 
blocked a Worcester punt, and recovered 
the ball on the one-yard line. The sec- 
ond touchdown followed, Bangs taking 
the pigskin through center after faking 
an end run. Gerremonty kicked the 
goal. In the second quarter, there was 
no scoring, the ball being mostly in 
Worcester territory. The third and last 
touchdown was made in the third quar- 
ter, when Adair took the ball over on 
an ofT-taekle play, after the ball had 
been steadily moved down the field on 
straight line plays. Again the goal was 
kicked by Gerremonty. 

In the fourth quarter, Worcester tried 
to stage a comeback, and had the ball 
in Aggie territory for a few minutes. 

They WCt. held for «W»«rM .." AkK>«'» 

10-yard line. Immediately after gelling 
the ball, the Two-years punted, Gallag- 
her sending a beautiful spiral over the 
bead of the enemy quarterback to the 
10-yard line. The game ended with 
tt.e'2-yr. in possession of the ball on Wor- 
cester's one-yard line. 

On the offense. Trull was the most 
consistent gainer, while Bangs, atquar- 
I ter, scintillated on the defense, running 
' back punts in great shape. On the line. 
IMerce and Baymond played a tine de- 
fensive game. 

The 2-yr. lineup: Pierce le, Bet- 
terly It, Baymond lg, Baker c, Gallagher 
rg, Trout rt, Gerremonty re, Bangs qb, 
Trull rhb, Westewelt rbb, and Henry 
lhb. 



DEAN MACHMER IN 

FRIDAY CHAPEL 

"Lend a Hand" waB the subject 
delved upon by Prof. Machmer in a 
brief talk to the students last Friday lu 
chapel. 

"The most hopeful spirit is the spirit 
of helpfulness,— lend a baud!" Prof. 
Macbmer said in part: "One need not 
necessarily be an athlete to be helpful; 
on the contrary he can cooperate in 
other branches of the activities of the 

school. 

•"The opportunities are here without 
their coining to you. Do not hesitate 
to leud a hand. Do not expect a return 
or reward, because it is the thing to do". 



CORRECTION 

Tbe Leader of the College Band is H. 
S. Moseley 1022. 



Theta Chi announces the pledging of 
George Graves '23 a transfer from Den- 
uisoii, Ohio. 



OWN HALL 



Thursday 

Oct. 27 



Mat. 3, Kve. 
6.45, 8-30 



Friday 

Oct. 28 



Mat. 3. Kve. 
6-45. 8-30 



HUFKR-PKOnrCTION DAY! 

Wm. S. Hart and Eva Nova. 
in "0'Mallay «f the Mount- 
ed." by Win. H. Hart. The 
smashing tale of a red coated 
horseman who rode for the 
law on < anada's wild frontier. 

News. Mutt and Jeff. Topics 



Saturday 

0«.t. S9 



Mat. 3. Kve. 
6-45. 8-30 



Monday 

Oct. 31 

Mat. 3, Kve. 
6-45.8-30 



Constance Blnney in "Sacks 
a Little Queen." from tbe 
play by < banning l'olloek. 
From a tottering throne in a 
tiny Kurooean kingdom to the 
office of an American meat 
magnate was a queer journey 
for this royal little lady. 

2-r'l ■•star Keaton Comedy . 
•• The Scare crew." Sce alc 

Mary Miles Hlater in "Daa't 

Call lie Little Cirl."f r«>in the 
stage nlay/Merry." In which 

lMlllij Itume Bt*rw»d. Tfc» 

comedy of a mad-cap flapi>*r 
who appointed herself gen- 
eral manager of the family 

romances. 

Mews. "Pa cc Pie." Cesssey 

Alice iraiy ln"Tke Laa« aff 
Hope." by Kred'k and Kanny 
Hatton. A powerfully realis- 
tic and colorful story of two 
young immigrants. 

Paths teyiew. '2-r'l Cesssey 



Tenor and Mandolin Banjos 

Ssxophonss, Drum*, ere, Rmhmmdlmm 

DEAN'S MUSIC HOUSE 

Cor. Main and State Sts.. Springfield. 

Local Agent. 
Edward Landis. II Asslty Street. Asaherwt. 



SOPHOMORES HOLD 

SECOND CLASS MEETING 



SPIRIT OF GRADUATES 

RUNS HIGH IN NEW YORK 



Challenge is Sent to Freshmen for 
Rope Pull This Saturday. 
The Sophomores held a class meeting 
in (lark Hall Tuesday evening, Oct. 18. 
Edward Bike of West field was elected 
sergeant-al-aniis. "Pat"' kfyrlck, class 
captain, spoke on relations with tbe 
Freshmen. Weatherwax, Wood worth, 
and (litTord were chosen as a committee 
to make arrangements for a pond party. 
The smoke* committee announced that 
preparations are being made for the tirst 
smoker to be held at some future date. 
It was vofed to challenge the Freshmen 
lo a six man rope pull to be held Mur- 
ing tbe halves of the Vermont game. 
"Dick" Siniih was elected manager of 
the rope pull team. Salmon spoke of 
tbe Memorial Building pledges. An 
effort will be made to have those who 
have not pledged do so at once 



Acting Preaident Lewis Addresses 
Students Monday Morning. 

Acting President Lewis returned 
to chapel Monday morning after a brief 
absence attending an alumni meeting 
in New York on World Aggie Night. 
"The meeting last Saturdaywas one of 
extreme forcefulness. It was an old 
fashioned meeting that throbbed with a 
passion of loyalty for M. A. 0." 

The spirit that our grads were imbued 
with twenty years ago was one of loy- 
alty, friendship, and good will. Today 
we are in fear of losing this spirit be- 
cause of t he growing membership of our 

college." 

In closing Dean Lewis remarked, We 
cannot afford to lose the universal con- 
tact of a small group. Let us weld to- 
gether that same spirit that was shown 
by the Alumni on World Aggie Night". 



Edith Hamilton Parker 

Graduate Teacher of Dancing. 

Studio, MASONIC BLOCK .Northampton 

FRIDAY EVENING, Assembly Class 

Popular with M. A. C. Men 



Private lessons by appointment. 
Tel. 761 Northampton 



Gampus Views 



OK THK 



SEMI-CE NTENNI AL 



FOR YOUR 



IV." BOOK 




The Massachusetts Collegian, Wednesday, October 26, 1921. 



OPPORTUNIT1KS LOOK FOR YOU WHEN YOU ARE WORTH 

FINDING! 

tOU have been found. Are yon ...akin* the most ol ! your W^'*™ 1 ""; 
at M. A. C? Are you availing yourself of THE HOU^E Ut* 
WALSH quality and prices? 

••Who nee kit. and will not lake when once 'tia offered, 
Sh«II never find it more." 



u 







See BLISS '24, A 2 * House 

I LINCOLN W. BARNES, Stockbrldge Hill 



THREE DAY FAIR A 

DRAWING CARD FOR MANY 



N 



s/ho eoald bit the bolleeye* with loath- 1 
.red aad, while lee LaesbdaCnl alpha 

had the famous »aii.e ni break inn •* 

balloon with a baa* ball. A ureal source 
11L „ , ,,f attraction was elimblng lb. rope lad- 
umerous Side Shows and the [ der witll , ml r.lll.g off. simple enough 

to see il done, bill to do il your*. -It 9M 



COMMUNICATION 



Midway Oam^s Interspersed with 
Exhibits. 



another matter. Tbe non-fraternity 

members put on an exhibition ol 'var- 
ious characters which eoeld be LU by i j 

baseball it one had ihe priee and dex- 
terity. Other uroiipn had tents where 
hot tloiis. eider, ice-cream, ele.. were 
sold. 

The daoee held in Memorial Hall Fri- 
day and Saturday niehts was also well 
attended and WM wry successful linan- 
eialh. 



Tbe Aggie Fair held last Friday. Sat- 
urday and Sunday was in many reapeoU 
ihe most sneeessful of its kind ever held 
>n Ihe M. A. O. campus. The field in 
jack of Wilder Hall presented tbe ap- 
pearance of a mammoth circus and the 
lir wax Idled with characteristic sounds 
i,f tbe Midway. Tno feet, containing 

[be exhibitions were arranged along tbe 

jroad midway runninn north and south 

posted by l wo more eld. aisle* at rtgbl , ttp<i||M p N W|N n .o 
BK |0.. Botertni from the North one FRESHMEN WIN ld\) 
..countered OS the left tbe exhibition FR QM NORTHAMPTON H. S. 

lent of the agricultural Education De> 

jartinent. in which were charts showing m c 3 aoucn Scores Twice as a Result 
listrihution of teachers trained by that 



of Fine Open Field Runs. 
BWnnurimenl and i>l.otot>ia|>lis, showinu 

rrk,'>; th-.se, eaehe'rs and others The FreshW U, I Nor, ..amnion 

E like interest. Opposite this tent was UI K I. Sc I here las, Hula, Li 0b„ 

•Jhal » Profess,, Hames in which .be plucky No,, ham, I. held 

were exhibited official photfW-. of their much heavier opponents a, hay 

The campus and vicinity, which were on for three per s. . .til .ben .be Ires,, 

\ 1 The -Ko-Fd Kitchen- occu,,ie,, a -nan u, xhiluted a , ■ ...and of 

!ar*e ten, in which was sold candy.pas- ball. I'-r u'enera ship, ea.e.ess an. - 

ry , other delectable. . gigantic Hag oftheball.aad the geeeral lledlffer. 

„„',, , r> and an eno.nmus Bengal ««• of. . be team al, spel led deiea. 

Tlier ' we're .« he seen for lb. .light for .be hoinetalcnU .he line d,d not 

TLi of ten cents in.be large lent run exhibit its usual bub. an, , be p.ay,n« 

by the Theta Chi Fraternity. Prof—or Of the back.iel.l was med,oc.e. Ihe 

Thompson had an attractive exhibit of p.ntl.| of I be High School man was 

Plan. Material., while, he Departments exceptionally good, while .bendecep- 

Lf Pomology, Floriculture, Poultry. >ive plays more .ban one. OSWght the 

VeKeLble Gardening, Dairy, Ki.ton.olo- Freshmen oil uua.d 
Ly,A K ronomv,and Horticulture Man.. M-uridian was Ibe bnuh, |,«b. on be 

factures had line exhibits. The Animal line. Taylor, left end also played a line 

Husbandry Cub bad s.xteen e ga... Bin attempt a. a held goal ... 

headofea.He and IWO pens of sh.ep th. >i.s. ouar.er m.ssed by inches. 

wln.e the Ratal Engineer!.. Depart, while his defensive play,,.* was worthy 

Lenthadaline display of iractors and ^^^ ^ ^^ ^ ,„„ 

fa Therwr!,.way S a lar.e crowd hack, broke through tackle in the third 
i around the ride gallery and it was a dit- ■*•*•« f«l ■ to.o hd„wn. and a«a,n » 
' ncult stunt to hit. be a.rln* Iron, which the four,!, period s,u„med ofl tackle 
the apple was suspended. A -Still" and ran «0 yards for a touchdown, 
was in Operation under the management ».«« Fr.day the heavy and unde- 
Uf ... Menorah Society, and contents fe.ted Deerlie. Aeademyeleyentuss.es 
sold. The kick was to he supplied by with th. Frosh, on „ ere I. what 
one of the mules from the stables but promises to be a st.ft battle. 
Ithemule demurred and the plan was Ihe lineup: 
V-venup. Tbe Kappa Kpsilon pu. on a Taylor, le; Marx. 1, Sbumway, lg 
.mysterious show, one of ureal interest Hoss, c; (Reason, r, : Monr...... rt, 

to judge from .be spectacular parade C.eayes, re • SuHivan, .,b; Kblrtd.e, rbb 
' ,f ts members. A monsler sideshow McOeoucb fb; Sheldon, lhb 
m.1*. by the Sigma Phi Bp.Uo. I. Substitutions: Bpragn. tor lay) or 
^bich could be seen "seven distinct at- Ward for Shumway. Holbrook for 
tractions for the price of one admis- Sul.ivan. 

lion." Emery '24, the ballyhoo man fJMNUS DONATION 

for the exhibition was in many respects ALUMINUS UUNAI1UN 

the stellar attraction of the fair. The On. of tb. in,,st Interest In. mctdents 
KolonyKlubwasoffering.hree chances al the aggk lair was the con.r.but.on 
for a nickel of hitting the helm.fd "' ■ 1~»«H " »-nu,ac.ured K oods, 
ead of one of its members will, a base- euU.ly jams and fmll jyrnpe. sent by 
all. The Kappa tiau.ma Phi passed K. C. Kdwards 14. Ned is a sale, 
u, the cigars to anyone who could »aaager for Logan, Johnson Ltd 
. , :.„ ,„, „f ti.p "Ibe Jam House of New England," of 

nock the clay pipe out of the i»c « 

,outh of "Sally" Q. T. V. had Boston who are in the manufacturing 
game of skill 'in which if two base .business putting up jams jellies, 
alls out of three were lauded in a crushed fruits etc. a. who esale Thl. 
ucket. a prize was given, while , Le ■ 1. a ll.e of work m winch he colleKe .. 
appa Sig-s bad a gen* of strategy! at present much interested aside from 
Jch consis.ed of placi.m seven pen- 1 the fact that the present shipment was 
ies on eight points. .The Alpha donated gratis and sold fort he benefit 
amma Kho awarded prizes to those ; of the Memorial Building rurnl.hing 

Fund. 



ToTa.CoLi.Bna BretwiaritoraiiBfttcA: 

Art !/">< pofn. l» '""t/» defent the rail- 
/■on-/ sfricef 
Th. creep wheelg. thl. ooninin.lea- 

lion to the men college sludenls of 
America are all tv.llege graduates. 
They are all interested in social and in- 
dustrial problems ; they are jealous of 
the welfare of the nation, of the i-ood 
name of American colleges. 

Siudenls la many of ihe colleges are 
placing themselves on record as being 
ready 10 help break Ihe railroad strike. 
It seems like good sport to tire an en- 
.In. of throw switches for a few days. 
Newspapers and employers will ap- 
plaud you fordoing so. 

But remember that when you do so 
you are taking the places of men win. 
expect to follow these occupations all 
their lives, who have to support their 
families from their earnings. Ask 
yourself whether you would be willing 
to work permanently at tbe jobs, under 
the conditions ami for the wages which 
these men will be forced to accept if 
Ibe strike is lost. If not, is il good 
sportsmanship In help the employers 
defeat thorn? It may be sport, but is 
it sportsmanlike? 

When you help these employers you 
are throwing in your lot with the rich 
and powerful against those who have 

no olhei tlefcnnc llirtii Itlcli collective ' 

power to cease to work. 

The wages of these men are very low. 
Section men receive only *104» a year. 
Sixty thousand men among Ihe strikers 
of one craft alone -the trainmen -re- 
ceive only U100 n year, M:«»y thous- 
ands of others make no more than 
«1»HX), others no more than »L400. Is 
this enough t How many of you would 
receive a college education if your 
fathers received wages like these? The 
Tinted Stales Bureau of Labor Statistics 
gives *222«. 47 as the minimum amount 
necessary lo maintain a normal family 
in health and decency. 

Wages were reduced last July. Now 
tbe railroads want lo reduce them still 
more. In addition they are attempting 
to break down agreements gained by 
tbe workers during the war on Upwards 
of 7"> railroads. 

Operating expenses could be cut down 
to a point where no wage reductions 



would be necessary, if the employers 
had a genuine conception of public ser- 
vice. Instead Ihey waste a billion dol- 
lars a year through operating ineffici- 
ency. Tbe (iovernment guarantees the 
owners 54 per cenl return on Invest- 
ments which include millions of dollars 
worth of watered stock. What are the 
workers guaranteed? 

This strike is a serious matter to the 
2,tXX),000 men who have called il. it 
involves their whole livelihood and it 
would not have been called unless they 
believed they had real grievances. Do 
you know what these grievances are? 
Do not rely on the newspapers for the 
whole story. Find out the issue in- 
volved, and then act. when you are 
sure. 

If you want to know more write to 
the address below. 
(Signed) 



Bonaa N. Baldwin, Harvard, '06 
Tosca.n Bknnktt, Yale, »8 
A. L. Bkuni.kim, Columbia, T3 
Stkw akt L'.iahk, Harvard, '10 
Kvans Ci.akk, Amherst, 'it. 
Aktuik tii.KABON, Yale, '01 
Puoaaacn Kki.i.ky, Cornell, '82 
Hakby W. Lamm. ait, Wesley..., '07 
J. L. Maonks, Cincinnati, 'IW 
Wm. P. Monta«i;k, Uarvard, '«« 
A. J. MtHTK.Dak Coll., '05 
Qnoana Noui.k, Yale, '08 
Nokman Thomas, Princeton, '05 
Sav.i. Zimank, U. of Berlin, II 
Collegiate Committee.Koom »31, 70 Fifth 
Avenue, New Tuik <U) . 



Student Barber Shop 



YE 

OLD 

TIME 



HAIR 
CUT 
35c 



HARRY A. ERYSIAN 

North College 



A. MIENTKA 

ft.pmlrlno Whllm U Wmll 

NKW TRICKS 
Men's whole Boles. Rubber Heels . . . !*•*• 
Men s Half Hole.-, Rubber Heels . . . |*«J* 
Men's Rubber Holes. Rubber Heels • I**" 

Men's Hslf Soles ■••*• 

Work Guaranteed— AMHKRBT HOCBK 



ANNOUNCEMENT! 

Shoe Repairing Prices Dropped, Beginning the 

First Day of October 

They are as follows : 

Men's Sewed Soles with Rubber Heels $2.00 

Men's Half Soles, Sewed $»'$0 

Men's Whole Neolin Soles with Rubber Heels $2.25 

Men's Whole Leather Soles, Sewed, and Rubber Heels— best work. $2.75 

We guarantee and stand back of any kind of work that goes out of our shop 
TRY US ON YOUR NEXT WORK 

FOR SALE ALSO— Shoe Laces of all kinds, Polishes, Brushes, Inner 
Soles, Water Proofing, and whatever else necessary for your shoes. 

Amherst Shoe Repairing Co. foYoTo^cV 




The Massachusetts Collegian. Wednesday, October 26, BM. 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Wednesday, October 26, »21, 



S. S. HYDE 



» Pleasant Street (up one rli«ht\ 

Oculists' Prescriptions Filled 

Broken Lenses Accurately Replaced 

Big Ben Alarm Clocks 
AND OTHER RELIABLE MAKES 

Kully Guaranteed 



PRIVATE DANCING LESSONS 

MABELLE LOVEJOY MILLS 

Individual Dancing a Specialty 



Mills Studio, Phone 45tt-K, P. O. Block 




great price reductions 



HWI Half Soles Sewed. . * ui 

Men's Coodyeai Kul.ber Heel* 

Men's Whole NtoUl Soles and cioodyeai 

Kul)t>er Heels • •• 

Men's Whole l.eatnei -MM Sewed fti.n 

(i.M.dyeai Hul.lier Heels . . • • 

All ¥fork Ouurantmrntl I 

High-grade Line of Men's Shoes 

for Sale at Low Prices. 

J. GINSBURG 



NATION WIDE CAMPAIGN 

FOR EUROPEAN RELIEF 
The eeaooUi end eollegei <> f ,he 

Mitotic Ooasl slates are IB* ftwl ><> 

o„ M lM lo a nation-wide camp*!*" f" r 

.W relief of more. han 100.000 European 

itudenU struggllog lot ea edueatloa 
against prewar conditions. At a meet- 
•„,„ i B New York this week, Kenneth 
W Moodv.of Hie Massachusetts Agri- 
cultural College, wi ippolnted to 
organise the student body '" ,1,,s 

college. . 

In the advisory committee, becking 

this eaapalgn, are Herbert Hoover. 

Woo.lrow Wilson,. lane addslUS, Kdwln 
| Uderman, .lames Rowland aegall, 
Sarah Louise Arnold, Valentine Chan- 
dortJooB H . Kinley. B k. ButmW. 

I v Grew, John liner Blbbeo, Mrs. 
Sober! K. Speer. M. Cary Thomas, and 

l.ucv Madeira Wing. 

The desperate shortage of profess-on- 

Sl | men in. he countries of central and 
eastern Kurope makes this relief work 
!M .,.,.ssiirv, nnt so much to overcome the 

phy.io.1 •*«•*»■ »»»« iUm s^l ' l, ';.": 

„,,: enduring, hut to safeguard the life 
|lll( | HTeciency ol this generation 

future leaders of Europe. 



THE MILLETT JEWELRY STORE 




r*lLri« J«welry-<ufT lank*. Soft Collar Flm. 
D^uKESRiiSE. Ban^o. Mandolin String 

Fin* Watch Repairing alao lrok-n Learn 

Replaced Promptly. 
32 Mala Stre.t. Amh.r.t. Ma... 

— TUY— 

C. H. GOULD 

(or first-class 
Watch, Clock and Jewelry Repairing 

H Pleasant SI., Amherst. Mass. 



Fine Groceries 
Candies and Fruit* 

MASON A. DICKlNSON.^roprletor 

M. NOVICK 

Custom Tailor 



LABROVI 

THE LEADING TAILOR 



Cleaning, Pressing, Repairing and Djelng 

Neatly sad prosaplf <!"»«• 
Work called for and delivered. 



Pressing promptly done on Moll n, an San- 
itary Praaalai Machine. 6 suits *i.U> 

Caps and Cowls for Rent - also 

Full Dress Suits and Tuxedos, 

and a full line of dress supplies. I --• 

We Specialize on Cleaning White Flannels. DreSS Suits tor Hire. 

i-nii line Beats' Fuw i t aMaas . 



Saw monej bj buying a Pressing Ticket. 
4 Suits Pressed for $2.25. 



if m want full natisfaction on < •leaning. 
Illiwii.il lte,*i. l»ir of. lottos, COM In. 



l.An.l.ySt.-LABROVITZL-H.oneHO.-W 



19 Pleasant St. 



Tel. 9-J 




19 Pleaiant Street 



On your way up town. 



Aggie Stationery 

with Class Numerals 
1922 TO 1923 



THE COAT OF NO REGRETS 



A. J. HASTINGS 

Newsdealer and Stationer 

. , . Mass. 

Amherst 



STANDARD DAIRY SANITATION 

Ii is Impossible to overestimate the 
value of the herd test. "It ittmlnetes 
the scrub and culls out the hoarder, 
and insures to the Dairyman ■ produc 
lite herd. 

Yet these beneficial results cannot be 
fully realised unless .he increased milk 

yield is protected by such lanltarj 
methods of production tbal have then 
selves met the test oi day to day per- 
formance. 

For over eighteen years 



C/eaner dnd Cleanser 



BM provided this Deeded protection to 
,l,e Dairy Industry, and the sweet, 
Wholesome, sanitary cleanliness it cre- 
ates is recognized by Agricultural Col- 
leges of the United Stales and I ana.la 
as the standard dairy sanitation. 

Wyando.te Dairyman* (leaner and 

cleanser is guaranteed to asset sverj 

,est in .he dairy or the trial will cost 
you not king. 



nrlian in ctrrle 




ord.r from your supply 

iini.se. 
It cleans clean. 



In every pk« 

The J B. Ford 



Co., Sole Mnfrs., 
Wyandotte, Mich. 



CAMPUS NOTES 
Paul Burnett, •», who ••■ " n "' 

,,,„„,„„ over the weekend, is aettng 
M apprentice teacher at <he Kssex 
County Agricultural School dWrlsg «M 
fall term. 

Prof. W. H. Hart, head of the Depart - 

„„.,„ „, Agricultural Rdueatfoa, was 
elected a ■ssmberof ibe board of true- 

,eesof Hopkins Academy, Hadlev, at 
their last meetiiiH. 

U,., W eenlhe halves of the Vermont 

u .,,, 1( . iiie^.nuuio-.ni.nKre^hman.sopi.- 
omore rope-pell will take place. Doth 
leemaare practicing faithfully, and the 
wealth of material to be chosen fro in 
i„ ,|,e Freshman class is sure lobe ■ 
Dt| r»ctor sgalnst Ibe eaperleneed 
Sophomores. 

Tb ere will be nslodesl ainss meet Ins 
Friday eight si 7-:«». i>. preparation for 

th« Vermont ISSSC on Sal. ..day. The 

mess meetlnai haw brew very poorly 
tended eofai ibis »»"»»■ !l iH l,,ul ' 

, ini(1 tll ai we star, to get bsbiu* OUI 

„,;„„ a. sol the. tune besides the 

gami S on Saturday. 

Professor Re«a« id »he Entomology 
Department has recently retnrsed from 

Montana State College, at bo/.e.nan. 
Mont where he has tpSUl . he summer 

is geld work. His territory covered the 

w hol« 01 l'.itterroot Valley . in Western 
Montana, where he was assistteg fmll 

growers with Ihelr entomological pro- 
blems, especially the control of t he 

fruit leal rowler. Professor Regan was 

rationed at the Bockj Mountain Spot- 
ted Ferertlck Laboratory, with Dr. B.B. 
Parker. M A. C. 

Wanted: Ben and women trained in 
agricultural economics. Under the 
present Secretary of Aarlculare, agri- 
eulmral economics will be gl*en a more 

important place in agricultural W 
search and service than ever before 

Tbe expaasloa of the bureau of Ag. Re. 

will rail for I large number nl 

men and women trained In farm 
management, rural aoelalogy, bus- 
la** accounting* statistics, marketing, 
fann finance, transportation, and coop- 
erative organisation of farmers. It is 

h( ,pe,l that the excellent reputation 

which the Ag. Be- Dept. «'* M *■ ( ' 
bas established through the men It has 
plaesd to Washington, will be upheld 

in the future. 



The, is what you get when you buy one tailored by Hart 
ScharTner & Marx. Big. roomy, heavy .U-uooI coats tail- 
ored with the best possible taste and at a p.ice to suit your 
pocket book. Tnese coats are absolutely guaranteed and 
we guarantee to save you money when you buy Off*. Have 
one for the gatae. All-wool coats, low as $22.50, htgh as $50 

mterwnven Sos, Mallnry Hats, ParRer, Tyson ^TZ^r 
OaRes Sweaters, H. tt P. Gloves. Muuringu^ar and Duofold Underwear 

Official M. A. C. Outfitters. 

F. M. THOMPSON & 



Each 

year makes its 

own crop prices 

Farming history shows that over-prcductionandUrwipriee. 
one year are almost invariably followed by ■«* m*~ 
crops and higher priees the next. To the ***** £™J 
this means opportunity. While others wait, hjact.. He 
plants; and when the rise comes his crops are grown. 
Do you see the situation in that light? 
E. Frank Coe's Fertilizers are ready to help. Thry *r* 

good fertilizers— formulated, mixed, 

cured right. They'll not only give 

your crops a quick start, but they'll 

keep right on feeding them to suc- 
cessful maturity. The very best in- 

gredients and over SIXTY YEARS 

of manufacturing experience go into 

E. Frank Coe's Fertilizers 



Order no» for Spring .P* *""": ./' •jjj 
no dealer near you, wrtte for tht agency. 

THE COE-MORTIMER CO., Inc. 

•dlxtdiary *t The American Agricultural Chemical 0*. 
51 Chamber. St. New York City 



HAT U » •«♦• cwmy Si*, 
tlf !"•». »••«■•«• 

itor»«d Alwui mar******' 
Or. f»«l It Sod ulao •- 
rletMS »otl f Of ooit et«e. S 
roosontbl* tppUcaOoa ofS. 
Frank Co»'» SpocUl Tep 
DrcMlDg ihould BOoMf 
doubl. fltld. Mention i •«• 
■olio and writ, foe J****** 
book "TM M«tl»««^ Hit 
Crop." Fro*, wit* ma tk*> 
tllliar succaatlona. 



E.FRANK COES 

Ja— t • m m. ws P^t.Off. 



Req.U.S P^t.Olf. 



Fertilizers 

nrmnse the yield of every held 




When in the Memorial Building just drop in 
and see us. All sorts of student supplies, ice 
cream sodas, candies, and college ices. 



COUNTY GOVERNMENT 

COMMITTEE IN ASSEMBLY 

Continued from page 1 

This is our last stop so is not included 
among ihe penal institutions. We have 

visited all the agricultural schools la 
the state aud all the tuberculosis hos- 
pitals. There would be no need of the 
latter if all people were to come to 
AgRie. You all look healthy. 1 con- 
gratulate you for the great opportunity 
which you have to show Massachusetts 
your appreciation of the money which 
she spends for these schools. The Com- 
mittee recognizes the need for new 
buildings, in particular the need for a 
Chemistry Lab. Pardee me for calling 
the present labratory a building. M. 
A. 0. is not the only place that calls 
for money so it is necessary that a 
division of funds be made. Try for it 
again next year. Some of tbe men 
which you see before you are responsi- 
ble for its not going through the 
House. Appropriations are large 
lately. I am reminded of the library 
At least I suppose it is a lihrary 



know their aim and en successful la 
imparting it to the students. Mr. Bliss, 
here, has only consented to come up 
here after eleven years. He will go 
back now willi his sul.stantial shoul- 
den and help to put across some of the 
things that you men want. w*e visited 
the chemistry huilding. It was an ob- 
ject lesson to us. Kach man here 
should try to see thai the whole legis- 
lature at some time has the chance to 
visit this campus and see some of these 
ihin«s. We want this an all around 
institution for citizenship. 

Chairman t. L. Brier then ipoka as 
follows; 

"There is always rivalry between the 
House and the Senate. We are de- 
lighted to come here today. These 
questions of appropriations are usually 
paaaad OS to th« Ways and Means Com- 
mittee which we like to call the Mean 
Ways Committee. So the Amherst ap- 
propriations are usually lost and laid 
onlbelable. \\ e have seen you. col- 
lege and the wonderful views from its 
campus. It is ideally located for a col- 
lege dealing in nature Study and 1 con- 



KINGSLEY'S 



SODAS 



SUNDAES 



CANDIES 



Luncheonette 



SHINE AS-U-GO 

K<' infill tier 

The College Shoe Shine Parlor 

for your 

Hat Renovating. Shoe Dyeing. Shoe Shining 

At |l aSMU K.. SI Am. Kx.otnre. 



140 Main SI. eel, Northampton, Mass. 



AMHERST BOOK STORE 

Note Books Fountain Pens 



High Grade 

COLLEGE FOOTWEAR 

— AT — 

Economy Prices 
E. M. BOLLES 

The Shoeman. 

Main St., Amherst 



• «i 



tt 



C. F. DYER 



here. 

for there were a lot of hooks stacked up gra.ulate you for the iplri ami inspire- 

there. We nearly got lost several ion of your college v. huh we have 

times in the crowdedness of the rooms, caught from the faculty. 



BIDE-A-WEE 

Creamed Chicken and Waffles Our Specialty 

Anil otlier iinml things to eat. 

MRS. L. M STEBBINS 

ma*fS a»||Bl. tTel.415-W> Hadle». Mas.. 



So keep up your courage. Do good 
work for yourself and show the com- 
mittee of Ihe state that you appreciate 
their work. This is without a doubt 
the best Agricultural College in tbe 
state. No one will dispute that. It is 
up to you to make it tbe best in the 

country." 

Mr. Chamberlain was the next 
speaker: he is an Amherst graduate. 

"The speaker preceeding me is a good 
politician. He spoke bis piece before 
there was any chance of Ibe dinner oell 
ringing. M. A. C. makes for tbe best 
type of American citizen. Tomorrow 
we celebrate the birthday of Theodore 
Roosevelt, a great disciple of outdoor 
life. There is now a demand for the 
man who is trained as an all around 
citizen. He can take his place in any 
eomrounity. We are getting here the 
foundation of an agricultural training 
and the broad outlook on other sub- 
jects. Tbe men of your faculty are 
men of great devotion to Aggie. They 



it hack to boston with us. 1 hope thai 
it will help in hastening funds for the 
bettermenl of your campus. (Dinner 
bell rings). IMease don't go for 1 have 
but one more thought for you. We coin 
BOOly b«>k up W successful men and 
point up to their achievements as the 
result of gaatUS One of boston's meet 
successful business men presented Sold- 
iers' Field to Harvard diversify. Al 
Ihe presentation he said 'Young men, 
what is genius? (ienius is the power 
and ability to work longer, harder and 
better than the next man beam to 
work hard and well and you will get the 
rewards.' It gratulatl you for hav- 
ing eboeefl Ihe bardet work rather than 
the easier. If you keep up your work 
each one of you will nodoubtedly repaj 
your debt to tbe Commonwealth, for 
educating you. '' 

Acting l'rcs. Lewis concluded : 
" l regrel that we can hear BO more 
of these men. I am sure I hat we arc ex- 
ceedingly grateful to then, for their 



-fitter Every Meal" . 

WRIGLEYS 




COLLEGIAN DIRECTORY 



Associate Alumni, 

Memorial Building, 

M. A. C. Athletic Association, 



Telephone 

Richard Mellen, Ass't Sec. 175-J 
Richerd Mellen, Manager 175-J 
C. S. Hicks, General Mgr., 4°3~ M 



CENTS 



B130 



The Flavor Lasts! 



Nash Block 
AMHERST SHOE REPAIRING CO. 

Your Shoes Repaired 

WHILE YOU WAIT 

s 

H 
E 
SHEPARD 
A 
R 
D 

Furnishings, Shoes 



Non Athletic Association, 
The College Senate, 
Baseball Association, 
Football Association, 
Track Association, 
The Collegian, 
Hockey Association, 
Basketball Association, 
Roister Doisters, 
The Aggie Squib, 
Musical Clubs, 
Nineteen Hundred Twenty 
Nineteen Hundred Twenty 
Y. M. C. A., 



F. P. Rand, Manager 

A. W. Smith, President 
C. F. Clark, Manager 
William H. Peck. Manager 
Richard Newell, Manager 

B. F. Jackson, Editor 
F. S. Tucker, Manager 
S. L. Freeman, Manager 
Gustav Lindskog, Manager 

C. R. Vinten, Editor 
J. G. Lowery, Manager 

•two Index, H. W. Spring, Manager 
■three Index, O. E. Folsom, Manager 
K. W. Moody President 



HARDWARE 



, 3 6-R 

8377 
280 

8325 
8316 

404 W 

8377 

8325 

53° 

8330 
170 

280 

83'4 

832S 



Come to us for 

Fireplace Goods, Coat and Trouser Hangers 

Ever Ready Flash Lights and Paint 

Clothes and Shoe Brushes 

Anything in Hardware and Cooking Utensils 

Always glad to see you. 



THE MUTUAL PLUMBING & HEATING CO. 






The Massachusetts Collegian, Wednesday, October 26, 1921. 



STYLE. WEAR. COMFORT 

• i Q ^ fl.rr,w Pntrenched in our faultlessly tailored ready-mades— thus 

to everything we ofler. You can be satisfied here. -.-...-. 

SOUTHWICK BROTHERS & GAULT 



interest in the college. In paBBing 1 
might say that the Chemistry Building 
appropriation was blocked in the 
Senate. The Way* and Means Com- 
mittee did not block it. The legis- 
lature alwayB agrees that tbey are 
ignorant before seeing M.A.C. and alter 
leaving here they feel that our college is 
worthwhile. They are willing to go 
back to Boston as missionaries in our 
behalf. Can we have the college cheer 
for the joint committee. (It was given). 



MANY ALUMNI BACK 

Continued from page 1 



before the game and by their efforts 
got the team into the pink of condition. 
An all-star combination, including 
many of Aggie's big men of the last 
eight years, could be picked from the 
coaches that have been handling the 
team for the last two weeks Foremost 
in such a line-up would be: 

Em. Grayson '17 or Mansell '21, e 
Daufortb 'IB, t 

Novitski or Chubby Long '21, g 
Dole '16, c 
Holmes '20, g 
Star King, '21 t 
Day '16 or Cascio '21, e 
Melican '15, qb 
Lent '21, bb 
Maginnis '20, bb 
Jakeman '20. f 

The general spirit of cooperation with 
lUe coaches was ihw noticeable atlliude 
of the alumni in preparation for the 
last week's game. All the football 
men helped coach, and all the men who 
did not coach helped cheer, with the 
result that the alumni agregatiou at 
last week's game was oue of the big- 
gest aud best ever present at an Aggie 
athletic contest. 

The following are some of the other 
alumni who were on the campus over 

game: 

Dr. Root '73, who is practicing medicine 

in Connecticut 
James S. Williams '82, a manufacturer, 

of Glastonbury, Conn. 
H. F. Hubbard '76, of Providence, K. I. 
Dr. Tuckermann '78, of Boston 
Dr. Joel E. Goldthwait '85, of Boston 
E. F. Richardson '98, of Millis 
Phillip Whitmore '16, of Sunderland 
A. J. Farley '08, L. G. Schemerhorn '10, 
and M. A. Blake '04, all of New 
Brunswick, N. J., are Rutger B Col- 
lege Professors 
Donald Candee '16 

Earl S. Draper '15, a landscape archi- 
tect of Charlotte, N. C. 
"Bill" Hayden '14, a lawyer 
"Ned" Edwards '14, who is with the 

Logan-Johnson Company, Boston 
"Bud" Ross '17, a broker 
Jay M. Heald '12, of Lincoln 
George W. Edman '21, a teacher in 

Greenwich 
Frank Anderson '16, a broker 
"Skinny" Rogers '15, has a fruit farm 

Id Connecticut 
W. S. Beauregard '20, is connected with 
the Stale Board Health of New York 
at Albany 
"Pete" Cascio '21, "Bill" Glaven '19, 
and "Cherry" Dodge '12, are arbor 
culturists 
"Dick" Walle'21 

Arthur Frelllck '21, coach of the Dalton 
High School 



"Buck" Davis '21 

Harry Harrington 20, who is doing 
county agent work in Worcester 

county 
"Heinie" Walker 'ltt, is in business in 

Boston 
F. W. Jerome '16, of South Hadley 
'Curley" Hunter "21, of South Hadley 
E. M. Buffum '20, of Waban 
"Abe" Preston '21,1s connected with 

the Princeton High School 
H. L. Geer '21, of Three Rivers 
Walt Hulburt '18 
Miss Susan Smith '20 
"Ernie" Clark, Jr., '14, Windsor, Con... 
"Joe" Evers '21, is studying hard at the 

Harvard Graduate School 
Ralph Leavitt ex'21 
John W. Holloway ,20 
"Jerry" McCarthy '21, is finding ihe 
whys and wherelores of the hrown- 
tail moth 
H. N. W. Rideout '87, assistant pay- 
master of the B. A M. Railroad 
Phil Newell '21, is surveying 
N. W. Gillette '21, of Littleton 
A. C. McClond '92, of Amherst 
"Bill" Munson '05, of Walpole 
J. H. Lockhart, ex'22. 
'Johnny" Stockbridge, unclassified. 
R. U. Sanford '21, and J. Coombs *21, 
expect to make an extensive tour 
of the apple orchards of the Smith 
andwest in the near future. 
Harry Stiles '21. 
"Fat" Phelps ex-'2:i 
H. M. Dean '21, Oakham. 
R. M. Gould '21, West Boylston. 
Chester Spofford '15, teacher at the Es 

sex County Agricultural School. 
"Herb" MacArdle ex-'22, is an assistant 

tuilk inspector in Worcester. 
"Finky" Hale '20. 
"Bill" Harris '16. 
Pratt, Smith, and Bogholt all of the 

class of '21, are in Amherst. 
Winford Adams '13, is farming in East 

Leverett. 
"Bill" Baker '19. 
H. F. Coles ex-'22. 
George D. Melican '15, Worcester. 
S. P. Batchelder of A. W. Higgins, Inc., 

Deerfleld. 
L. W. Spaulding '18, South Hingham. 
"Dick" Arms ex-'22, will return to Cuba 
soon. He is at present studying in 
the United States. 
"Don" Smith ex-'22. 
Donald Davidson '21, is at the Harvard 

Medical College. 
George Lockwood '21, is banking in 

Boston. 
Robert B. Collins '19. 
C. W. Lewis '05, of Boston. 
A. W. Hubbard '09, Sunderland. 
K. S. Williams '19, Sunderland. 
Roy R. Brown ex-'20 
Edwin F. Ribero ex-'23 
Charles H. Anderson '21, is at the Harv 

ard Graduate School of Business 
"Phil" Armstrong '21, is connected 

with general nursery inspection 
"Chick" Mallon '21, is with Swift & Co. 
"Dave" Buttrick is the owner of a 

Creamery 
"Don" Campbell is president of the 
Connecticut Valley Onion Company 
Almon W. Spaulding '17 
"Freddie" Howard 21, of Mansfield 
F. R. Callendar '75, Northfield 
Charles A. Huntington, Jr. '16, Wind 
tor, Conn. 



(J. Willard Patch Of, Arlington 

M. S. Pixley '77, Springfield 

George P. Smith '70, Sunderland 

II, B. Kingman '82, Amherst 

1). V. < at penter '86, North Adams 

S. H. Field '86, Bradstreet 

C. A. Magill "91, New Haven, Conn. 

John S. tioodell n -'94, llolyrood, Kans 

Arthur C< Curtis "•*, Bpri»ii«M 

George A. Drew '97, Greenwich, Conn. 



make new or additional 



alumni to 
pledges. 

"Bill" Munson '05 was then called 
on with his former teammates Patch'06, 

Wliiltaker'05, and Lewis '05 and told ol 
football at Aggie in his time and of 

former Aggie- Amherst gameB. All 

four were members of the last team to 

defeat Amherst in 1901. 
Singing "Sons of Old Massachusetts' 



JohB W. Allen '97, Nortbln.ro 
Harry F. A lieu '97, North boro 
Philip H. Smith '97, Amherst 
0. Q. Clark '98 Sunderland 
Arthur A. Phelps ex-'(«, Norlhboro 
L. S. Walker '05, Amherst 
C. W. Lewis '05, Melrose Highlands 
F. C. 1'ray , 0S, Trinidad, Cuba, Novem- 
ber to July: North Amherst, July 
to November. 
Arthur W. Hail Jr., '00, Chapana Cuba 
November to July; North Amherst, 
July to November. 
A. D. Farrar '08, Amherst 
P. W. Farrai '08, Sprint-field 
Paul E. Alger '09, Greenfield 
Wilfred H. Learned '09, Florence 
S. P. Puffer '12, North Amherst 
L. F. Drury '13, Blackstone 

B. F. Parker '14, l'oqtionock, Conn. 
U. N. Dermoid ex-'14, (ireenfield 
Louis A. Webster '14, Blackslone 

C. L. Whitaker '05. West Medtord 
Charles A. Huntington, Jr., 10. Wind- 
sor. Conn. 

Charles W. Moses 10. New Brunswick, 

N. J. 
lUymoml L. Clapp 16, Northfield 
F. s. ltussfU '10. Hadley 
George N. Danforth '10. Dover, Maine. 
Carlton N. Gunn 10. Sunderland 
Harold T. Stowell '17. Essex Co. Agri- 
cultural School. 

W. 1. Mayo, Jr., 17. Northampton 

M. O. Lanpheai 18. Amherst 

Weston C. Thayer 18. An. heist 

David M. Lipshires ex-'18, Northamp- 
ton. 

Nathan W. Gillette '18. Littleton, Mass. 

Kalph T. Howe '19, Melrose 

Robert H. Collins 19, Rockland, Mass. 

Louis Baker '21, Salem, Mass. 

F. C. Hale '20, Rowley, Mass. 



closed the program. 



The Division of Agriculture is giving 
a Hallo-ween party to the faculty next 
Saturday evening in the Drill Hall 
This is an annual entertainment, and all 
members of the faculty are invited. 
The party will be in the nature of a 
huskiug bee. Professor Foord it- chalr- 
mau of the committee in charge. 



IN 

Main Street 

Quick Laundry 



MRS. PRUDENCE P. CASSIN 

SELECT CATERING 

at Reasonable Triors. 
informal* m Spwclnlty 

U So. Prospect St.. Amherst. Maaa. 

Tml. BBtt-M 




Northampton MaM 

60LDSTEIN BROS. AMUSEMENT CO. 

Where the Beat 

PHOTO-PLAY 



Are shown. 

Program changed «*U|f •"«•»« »•»*•» 

and Tuesday. 

KRKD'K P. BKLMONT. Manager 



WORLD AGGIE NIGHT 

Continued from page 1 



You can save from 

$3.00 to $5.00 a pair 



and commended it for its loyal support 
of the college at a crucial time. He 
also pointed out the high scholastic 
ideals upheld at Aggie and noted the 
ignorance and misunderstanding which 
is common throughout the state in 
regard to the work of M.A.C. 

The next speaker was Prof. C. S. 
Hicks and his remarks were directed iu 
praise of the players and the student 
and alumni bodies for the clean hard- 
fought game and the tine spirit and 
sportsmanship displayed by all con- 
cerned during the Amhersl game. 
Coach Gore seconded this in a short 
talk following. 

Dr. J. E. Goldthwait '85 presented 
the report of the Memorial Building 
committee. The cost of the building | 
was in round numbers $149,000. Some- 
what over $150,000. was pledged but the 
last three payments have been $24,000. 
in arrears. Tbe new campaign, voted 
last June, to raise $20,000. has uo far 
resulted in pledges amounting to $5,000. 
An opportunity wag offered for 



— on — 



Young Men's 
College Footwear 

by buying at 

FLEMING'S, Northampton 



North End Lunch 

120 Pleasant Street. 

Our food is right— 
Our prices reasonable 

T RY US OU T 

w. bTdrurv 






MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 



Vol. XXXII. 



Amherst, Mass., Wednesday, November 2, 1921. 



No. 5 



VARSITY TO PLAY AT 

KINGSTON SATURDAY 

Tie Game of Last Year Makes Re- 
venge the Object of Both Teams. 

With two wins, two losses, and one 
tie so far this season, M. A. GL will face 
Uhode Island State next Saturday after- 
noon in Kingston, and is out to vindi- 
cate itself for the defeats of the last 
two weeks. Khode Island it also out to 
stage a comeback after its defeat Satur- 
day by H. U. 

The Stale Collegians have won only 
one game this season, smothering Wor- 
cester Tech 27-0, two weeks ago. They 
played their first regular game of the 
season against Brown, on Sept. 24, and 
were defeated 6-0 in a very close game 
in which Brown received all the breaks. 
In the second game, Rhode Island suf- 
fered a 9-0 defeat at the hands of 
Bowdoin, ami the next week they were 
again narrowly beaten, this time by the 
University of Maine, 7-3. In a close 
game Saturday at Boston, B. U. won a 
14-0 verdict over the State Collegians. 

Last year the Aggie vareity was 
forced to play a 7-7 tie with Hhode 
Island, and though their team is su 
perior to that of last year, our team will 
probably be in much better condition 
than it was at this time last season. 
Simpson is tbe best man on the Rhode 
Island team, and besides being a good 
broken field runner, he kicks well. 
Johnson also shows up well and does 
the brunt of the kicking. 



LARGE GATHERING AT 

WASHINGTON DINNER 



Director Haskell, Oueet of Honor, Of- 
fer* Toast to Old Aggie. 



PROF. GARRETT DROPPERS 
ADDRESSES STUDENT BODY 



HARD FOUGHT GAME 
GOES TO VERMONT, 14-7 



Former United States Minister to 
Greece Receives Long Applause. 



The largest alumni gathering ever 
held south of New York City took place 
in Wellington, B.C., on Saturday even- 
ing. October 22. when 4:1 Aggie follow- 
ers had dinner at the Kl>l»ilt Hotel. It 
was the eighteenth annual meeting of 
the local M. A. 0. CH«b, which was or- 
ganized by Dr. K. VV. Allen '85, back in 
1904. 

Singularly enough, UHI4 was also the 
year in which S. B. Haskell, Director of 
the Experiment Station, who represen- 
ted the College, was graduated. His 
long association with the College, as 
student ami teacher, had given Pvof* 
Haskell an acquaintance wild the major- 
ity of the alumni present at the dinner. 
In bringing the greetings of old 
Aggie, Prof. Haskell told of the situa- 
tion in which the College finds itself at 
present with regard to supervision, 
courses of study, and college activities. 
He praised Draper Hall as one of the 
3 b«*t eollege dinning halls in the coun- 
try, due directly to the present manage- 
ment. Shortage of rooming space, 
causing students to live fi or 7 in rooms 
Continued on page 8 



INFORMAL COMMITTEE 

PERSONNEL IS COMPLETE 



Law, Mosley, Spring and Thompson 
are Seniors Elected. 



DR. E. R. FLINT PRESIDENT 

OF WASHINGTON CLUB 

Dr. E. R. Flint, tbe newly elected 
president of the Washington M. A. C. 
Alumni Club and son of former Presi- 
dent Flint, is a man of wide training 
and experience in several fields of en- 
deavor. Following his graduation from 
M. A. C. in 1887 he served as assistant 
chemist at the Experiment Station. 
Three years lator Mr. Flint went to 
(iermany where in 1892 he became Dr. 
Flint by winning a Ph.D. in chemistry 
at Goettingen. A year in commercial 
work followed, after which we find him 
back at M. A. C. as assistant professor 
of chemistry, where he remained until 
1H9H. Desire for medical training then 
sent him to Harvard and his M. D. de- 
gree, which came in 1903. Dr. Flint 
commenced to practice medicine in 
Salem, but shortly thereafter was called 
to the University of Florida, where the 
next 14 years were spent as professor of 
chemistry. Three summers during this 
period he served as physician with the 
Isthmian Canal Commission at A neon 
Hospital, Panama; two summers as 
physician on the "Red D" Steamship 
Line running between New York and 
Venezuela, and one summer as acting 
assistant surgeon with the Marine Hos- 
pital Service at Cienfuegos, Cuba. In 
Continued on page 2 



Immediately following l'rof. (iarrett 
Droppers" address to the students 
Thursday, Die three upper classes held 
a meeting for the purpose of electing 
members to the Informal Committee. 
C. R. Vinten is chairman, and C. H. 
Gowdy treasurer through senate ap- 
pointments last spring. The rest of the 
committee as elected last Thursday is 
composed of four men from '22: llervey 
Law of Longmeadow. Henry S. Moseley 
of Glastonbury, Conn., Hobart W. 
Spring of Braintree, and Geo. H. 
Thompson, Jr. of Lenox, ami from 102:5: 
Donald 11. Alexander of Boston, .lames 
A. Beal of Abington ami Richmond H. 
Sargent of Buxton, Me. 

Plans and arrangements are already 
underway for the next informal which 
will take place on the Saturday after- 
Continued on page 8 



Professor Droppers of Williams Col- 
lege was the speaker in Assembly last 
Thtusday. He was formerly president 
of the University of South Dakota, and 
during the war the representative in 

Greece. 

His address was based on the words 
of his nre»( teacher, William James, 
"Ideals have their dangerous side 
unless you are able to translate Ihein 
into action." We must make our ideals 
function inaction or they will lead to 
decay. It is a question whether we 
appeal too much to ideals today. 

Professor Droppers spoke familiarly 
of the tendency of the students to net 
up at the last minute, rush through 
their breakfast, and run to chapel, lie 
said, "Some people ate made miserable 
because they cannot live up to their 
ideals of getting up in the morning. 
This leads to moral decay. Many col- 
lege students have suffered from decay 
OMMOi" by littlo things." 

He pictured a sentimental lady read- 
ing a sensational book. She had al- 
ready ordered her carriage, but when 
the buller announced that the . -arriage 
was waiting she said. "Eel the carriage 
wait, I want to read a little more." 
When she finally finished her book she 
went out to her carriage and found the 
coachman frozen to death. This epi- 
sode well illustrates "if you can not 
translate your sentiments into action, 
they evaporate into cruelty." 

"We think more of our ideals than of 
our translation," said the speaker. "It 
is not the educated people who can best 
translate their ideals. Many educated 
people walked past the sufferer, but 
the Good Samaritan, uneducated and 
without any theory, stopped and allayed 
his suffering. 

In closing, the speaker again quoted 
William James. "There is no more con- 
temptahle human than thesentimental- 
1*4 and idealist who spends his life in a 
sea of seiitimentalism and ncvci does a 
good piece of work. Translation of 
ideals leads to a successful life; debat- 
ing loses opportunities." 



Aggie Shows Better Football. Lew- 
andowski and Driscoll Star. 



OUR OPPONENTS 

SCORES LAST SATURDAY 



14 




Boston Univ. 

RHODE ISLAND STATE 

NEW HAMPSHIRE STATE 14 
Bates ° 



Wesley an 
TUFTS 



11 
14 



COLLEGIAN STANDING 

Com.koian competition has now been 
in progress for three weeks and the 
standing of the competitors to date is 
as follows: 




1024. 
White, 
Kennedy, 
Darling, 

1925. 
Corwin, 
Taube, 
Batel, 



Credits. 

4. 
3.H 

l.H 

3.8 
1.8 
1. 



More competitors are wanted, espec- 
ially men who are IntPrexled in tbe col- 
lege curriculum and student life. 



A blue atmosphere pervaded Ihe 
Campus Saturday Bight, but under- 
neath it all was Ihe realization that 
Aggie has a team of power, which, 
though defeated 14 to 7 by Vermont, 
outplayed their opponents almost every 
minute of Ihe game. Il was the breaks 
in Ihe game I hat went to t tie Green and 
Sold, and but for the bungle of a punt 
in the early part of the llrsl quarter . 
Aggie would have undoubtedly come 
through a winner. 

The feature of Ihe game was a touch - 
down from the kick-off, one of those 
sensational plays seldom witnessed in 
such a tight game. After Ihe lirst 
touchdown, which Vermont made by 
recovering a fumbled punt, Aggie again 
kicked of, and Driscoll, receiving Ihe 
ball on his own five yanl line, raced 
through Ihe entire defense for his 
second touchdown of the game. 

I» w»n again "l.uvvy" who nlmnr for 
Aggie, kicking well, and carrying the 
ball time and again for long runs nett- 
ing from 15 to 45 yards. He threw his 
passes well, ami his paiticipation in a 
play always threw a fear into I he big 
Vernioni learn. The Aggie line held 
well on the defense, ami time after 
time opened up holes for Ihe backs 
when in possession of the ball. The 
Man.on and White was out-weighed al- 
most to a man, ami although playing 
against a team of vastly greater ex- 
perience, they showed what a loyal 
college spirit will do for a team. Only 
for a few minutes in the first and third 
periods did Vermont show power, and 
that of only short duration. They re- 
sorted mainly to straight football, two 
of their passes which I hey did try being 
intercepted by Acheson, who played I 
tine game at end. 

The Maroon and White pushed over 
their only totichdowh at the first of the 
final period. "Lavvy" started on a 
beautiful run from his :$0-yard line and 
was brought down only after he had 
covered 45 yards to Vermont's 25-yard 
line. "Jiininie" Beal, playing his first 
game of Varsity football, went through 
for 18 yards, and after another gain of 
ft yards, went over for a touchdown . 

Capt. Cotton started the game by 
kicking to Vermont on their 20-yard 
line. They fumbled but recovered and 
after failing to gain and also being pen 
alized for off-side play.Grcig kicked to 
"Htu-k" on the 25-yard line. After 
two plays, "Lavvy" posted back to 
Vermont's 25-yard line, where the 
Green and Gold started a march that 
carried the ball to the Aggie :U yard 
line. Here the line held and M. A. C. 
took the ball on downs. A poor pass 
prevented "Lavvy" from making but 
20 yards on his punt, and Vermont held 







The Massachuge^CoHegianJVgdnesday, November 2. 1921. 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Wednesday, November 2, 1921. 



the bull «>n the A K Kl«40-yiinlline. X "\ 
able to g«la. ibey punteu to "ll.uk 
who fumbled, Vermont recovering 00 
the lG-vanl line, and Driscoll went a- 
mmi ,l end for the lirnt score. Again 
Cap kicked oft, Drieeoll taking the ball, 
and following .lone to the side-lines be- 
hind perfect interference, eovered »5 
yards f..r a touchdown, lie also kicked 
his second goal, n.akin« the score 14-0 
for his team. The ball passed back and 
forth fot ibe rest of 1*0 half. "I.avvy 
and Onlg paatlBg most Of the time. 

\i the start of the second half, Ver- 
mont carried the ball up toward the 
Aggie goal but was halted, and a march 
in the opposite direction commenced. 
Two lirsl downs by Aggie begaa to 

brtghtea thlagi ap, but a tt-yard pea- 

alty toned them to lose the ball. U 
the last period, "Lawy- tore otf his 4.. 
yard run which paved the way for the 
Aggto touchdown by taking the ball to 
Vermont's 27-yard line. Heal went 
throuuh for fifteen, and on the loaftb 
do«B .linunie agata carried the ball, 
this time a.ioss the line. Dame kicked 

lbs goal. 

In the last minute, "Lavvy again 
came throuuh by itopplng Qrslg who 
had intercepted a pass and started 
for the Aggt* goal with a deal -held. 
The gaaM ended with the ball in VOT- 
monfs possession on the 83-yard line. 

Summary: 



HANDICAP TRACK MEET 

SATURDAY AFTERNOON 



Varsity Men Are Promised Close 

Competition in Nearly All 

Events. 



Old Deerfield Fertilizers 

"Reasonable tn dollars and sense" 
A. W. HIGGINS. INC.. Sooth DeeRF.ei-d. Mai 







VIUMONT 

Semanski, le 
Dorgin, It 

l'urcell, In 
K. .bdinson, c 
Monsley.rg 
(iarrlty. rt 
Tryon, re 
Driscoll, <|b 
Byaa, Ibb 

(;reiu.rhb 
O. Johnson, fb 
BOOM by periods 

Verinont 

M. A. C 



M. A. 0. 

iv. Qrayson 
it, htohof 

ru. Salmon 

S, Freeman 

If, Alger 

It, Cotton 

le, Acheson 

i|b, Sargent 
rhb, Marsh man 
llil., Tumey 
fb, Lewandowski 
12 3 4 
14 o 0-14 
7-7 



Touchdowns-Driscoll 2, Ueall : goals 
from touchdown. Driscoll 2,(irayson; 
referee-P. H. Carpenter, Harvard; um- 
pire, H. C. McCrath, Boston College; 
bead linesman, A. C Johnson, Spring- 
field. Time-12 minute periods. Sub- 
stitutions; M. A.C.-Mudgett for Aluer, 
Alger for Mudgetl, Nowers for Salmon, 
Beal for Tumey, QUaa for Marshnian, 
Clark for Sargent, Collins for Beal; Ver- 
mont-Mood, for Driscoll, Deasy for 
Durgin, Mosley for Deasy. Anderson for 
O. Johnson, Driscoll for Goocb, Cooch 
for Anderson, Hyan for Driscoll, Driscoll 
for Ryan. 

DR. E. R. FLINT 

Continued from page 1 



tbe midst of this activity he found time 
to conduct fertilizer experiments with 
citrus fruits. Dr. Flint came to Wash- 
ington in the fall of 1017 to become ad- 
ministrative and seientitic assistant in 
the office of the Experiment Stations, 
V. S. Department of Agriculture. The 
University of Florida had not forgotten 
bin however, and in 1919 conferred 
the degree of LL. D. upon Dr. Flint in 
appreciation of his work. His many 
years spent in tropical and inotropic*! 
environments have developed a strong 
liking for the warm climate, and pari 
of his vacation is often spent in Florida. 



The climax of this fall track Mason 
comes this Saturday in what .111 b« 
known as the Handicap Meet. All >• 
HI! track men and place winners m in 
novi( . t . meet held two weeks igO w.U be 
S ohandicappedin.l.iHn.ee» that con, 
p.tUioawill he very keen between le 
„,,„, experienced and new men fo th, 
, )rizl .s ,d .irst. seeon.1, and thud places 

to be awarded la each eveat Goodop- 
por-uni.yishere offered to a vary track 

Lpirant to win something worth ..... 
1(V scoring in any .d. he, birteen event. 

lobamaoft. Kn.rics in Saurda „ 
,„,,., should be made a. tbe ah 
,;,,.• office no. later than Thursday 

"'I'nUie UH.-yard dash, competition , will 
he keen between Kobe.. VYoodWOrtb 24, 

(;(|1 , loll - 2 ; 5 ,whowas.irs. in.hedash.n 

tlu . novi , ( . im ,et, and Chill -2.,, who 

tt^Qordoaaoloaarablatbataraat. 

" Tiu . WoodWOrtb bro.hers. Leveie.l 
fj, and Kobe,, -24, promise ,o give an 
ill( crcs.ing family eon.es, h, tb* 2*>, 

argedoaward aodoabt byGordoaand 

Tisdalc '», who placed in ,he„ov,ce 
"".tree '25, and Irish and Mae('ready 

a,alwaldaa»baaa»lyaraaiatba4i0. 

Hill "24. .he sensational runner ot lb* 
novice ...ee.. should »< I hard pace for 
MacCready -2:5, LoHog 24. and Kelso 
->.-,, ,o keep up to. in the halt m, I-- 

.,.,„. „„„. rilI1 should arouse cons.dera- 
,,,,. •„,„.,,.«,. with Friend "23, Ba.es 2.1 
U:U , ,4. Fuller li, and l-.ru.g and 
S,ev.. I ,son-24,whowere.irs,an.l second 
inthl . novice meet, entered among the 
early contestants. 

Del/ano. Two-Ycar. who won he 
novice. nee., will give the i^Hrff- 
iate veteran, L. 8. WoodWOftb, »J 
;;,„..,.., for Mrs. place in the 120 high 

lmrdles. ,, , 

The name of .wo famed all-round 

track men appear heading the llat ol 

of entries for the 220 low hurdles, nan.e- 

,y Wood worth and MacCready of »■ 
Bilski, a Freshman, is also expeCed t., 
!U ake a good showing in M*™**' 

Barker "26. Chase "24, and Paddoek 
'23, are contending for honors .» the 

pole vault. . 

The high jump is bound ,o be one of 

the biggest attractions of the meet, with 
:lt leas, four big men scheduled ,o corn- 
pee. Barker ■», who jumped aft. 4,n. 
„, the novice meet is due to make a dc 
cided comeback against Kelley f», who 
defeated him in that event by one inch. 
Captain Sullivan will most certainly be 
a place winner, while Salmon -2:., has 
been showing remarked improven.cn. 
over his previous record. 

The broad jump has entered Captain 
Sullivan, DeLano Two-Year, and Kelley 

^Considerable rivalry is bound ,o ap- 
pear in the shot put. Kroeck "22, Brun- 
„cr -24, Nolle '25, and Bel.len "24. are 
scheduled to compete. 

I„ the discus. Kelley '», who won the 
novi ,, event. Kroeck -22, and l,Dick,n 

son '23. have registered. 



THE COAT OP NO REGRETS 



That is what you get when you buy one tailored by Hart 
Schaffncr & Marx. Big, roomy, heavy all-wool coats tail- 
ored with the best possible taste and at a price to suit your 
pocket book. These coats are absolutely guaranteed and 
we guarantee to save you money when you buy one Have 
one for the game. All-wool coats, low as $22.50, high as $50 

Interwoven Sox, Mallory Hats, ParKer. Tyson and Arrow Shirts, 
OaKes Sweaters, H. « P. Clovaa, Man.ingwea^and Duofold Underwear 

Official M. A. C. Outfitters, 

F. M. THOMPSON A SON 



257 Main Street THE PARK COMPANY, IN. Northampton. Mass. 

"' . ..._,. «.., a r,nH„ a ,tment If. filled with picture 



An optical ■hOBWjnrt m.. ! is.ir.-s.l|. to the 

highest standard '>f modern wrvte*. \" 
!',n rely ».a our .kill and good taste Is HI 
optteai matters. 



,)ur Art De.art-nent I. ntledwltb picture. 
HU.table for the -lej-ration of f rat hoM«, 
or for birthday and weddinu gifts. Greeting 
oarda f<>. i>a.ti<ular people. 




Deuel's Drug Store 

TOILET ARTICLES 

Shaving SticKs and Creams Razors and Razor Blade. 

VICTOR RECORDS 



Kodaks and Supplies 

jge'«a Shoe 

^ SPECIAL 

Saddle Strap Oxfords 



Fountain Pens 

Store 

$5.98 



• • 



THE NEW M. A. C. SONG BOOK 

At the Treasurer's 0ffice-$1.00 

LEARN TO SING ALL THE AGGIE SONGS 



When You Are Down Town 



DROP IN 



The Candy Kitchen 



Pal MfM Kappa beld a house dance 
last Saturday evening. About 20 
, couples attended and enjoyed the music 
furnished by Woodwork's orchestra. 
The ihai'.ions were: Mrs. Cameron, 
Mt. Uolyoke; Miss Chase. Smith. 



The at. A. 0. Pol' 1 (:1,lh wiU l llny th * 
NortiK.n.pt.." Polo f'l" 1 '- Baadaf.HoT. 
.5 at two o'clock in the ftfUmooOOn tbe 

Northampton Fair Grounds. '1 he lirsl 
teamof M. A.C. iscoini.osed of: Wen- 
tsch, Hale, Johnson, and llallet. 
Wentsch is captain. 



FOR — 



Lunch, Candy, Ice Cream and Smokes 

COLLEGE CANDY KITCHEN 

"The Home of Sweets' 



STOP! DROP INTO THE AGGIE INN 

on these cold, frosty mornings for a piping hot cup of coffee 
and an order of crullers. AGGIE INN-By the campus Entrance. 



AGGIE REVUE GROUPS | FRESHMEN DEFEATED 14-6 

COMMENCE ACTIVITIES »V COSTLY FUMBLES 



R. D. Fuller and J. L. Williams are 

Junior and Sophomore Chairmen 

Respectively. 

All classes held nice. lagl I Lis week 
and elected play coiiiiiiiiitt's to pul Oil 
tbe class acts at I he AjNttfl Kevue. This 
Hevue is taking the place of .he old 
Student Vaudeville, and last v. -ai 
proved itself worthy of keeping its 
place in AKK'e as one of the l». nI shows 
of the year. It is pal on as a regular 
Aut'ie show under the direction of tl*« 

Etoiatar Dotatara, and all .he actsara 

well rehearse.l a»<i censored luloie l.e- 
lag staged. 

The ••oiun.ittees clee.ed have already 
started work, and so far we have prom- 
ise of a couple of good one act plays, a 
eo.iple of ... usieal numbers, and a 
farce or two. A week more should 
ti,,, | t lit- comini.lees all decided 
as to the part .heir classes will take in 
the production, and they should l.e 
ready to heifin work on I he rehearsals. 
The Junior cominiiiee consislsof: — 

Fuller, chairman; Sears, and Ndi.ross. 
The Sophomores elected Williams. 

chairman; DaiHaf, Helden, and W. C. 

Frost . 



STEREOPTICON LECTURE BY 

MR. LEETE-MISSIONARY 



Representative from Shansi, North 

China Gives Interesting Talk 

to Aggie Students. 

Sunday afternoon there was an inlei 
estinjj s.ereopticon lecture jjiveii on 



Swetzer's Work Stands Out in Prep. 
School Play. 

The Deerfield Aeademj Boyi waw li 
dead fortunate in balag oa the long ead 

Of » 14-6 victory over the Freshmen at 
Deerfield Friday. The Flush eleven 
oiiirusheil their opponents almost lour 

to oaa, galtlag eighteen first dowse to 
Desrfleld'i Bve, while tbe lias found no 

di.licul.y in tsartag lame yaps in the 

Deerfield rlefeoee. Itut all this was in 
vain sine the yesrllsgt persisted la 
fambllai the ball, aflat the traaas n 

was foiiinl by the sioie keepers, dial 

the Aggie yooogsters bad fumbled tbe 

ball nine limes. Of coii.se all these 
fumbles were well taken care ol l.v die 

alert home team. 

Swet/cr. of Dccrlield, was the out- 
standing figure in die game. Be seored 

twice through the Freshman lint? <>n 
cross bucks, while his work on the de- 
fence was starllinu. 

"Ked" Sullivan, <|iiarlcd»ack of the 

fteahmaa team played ■ snappy gams 

ably assisted by Bldrtdge and Mc- 

Gtooueb. For his lirsi game at tackle 

Shnmway showed the goods, while 
Taylor, left end, played his usual line 

gams. 

The 1986 team winds up its schedule 
in a gaaM with Willisloii Academy fo 
be played Is Amherst Saturday. This 
last gams will not he an easy allaii fOI 

the yearllags, for the vlsltisg team is 
credited with baviag w » lbs best 

teams in die rsllej , 

The line-up: 
M. v. < . 
Tayler, Is 
Shnmway, li 




THE HOME 

of Aggie Men 



IN 



SPRINGFIELD 



IS 



Letter perfect I 

We have to be ( otherwise we'd 

soon oo broke Cutting up line 
woolens and tailoring '.hem into 
suits and ..vet coats lor college 
men. 



Hotel Worthy 

Drop in for a meal or over 

night. 

TARIFF REASONABLE 



Main and Worthington Streets 

t.ive u« • trUIi 



Sporting goods ol every de- 
scription. Also luggage. 

Hail order* Ailed. 

KouKits Pkkt Company 



THE 



Broad way 

at i:?ih si. 



Broadway 

at :Ulh St. 



"Four 

( (iiiveiiient 

Broadway Coraers" Fifth Ave. 

at Warren a! 41sl St. 

NKW YOHK CITY 



Nortliani|)ton, Mass. 

The Leader for CV.lege Banquets 



Wm. M. Kimball, Prop. 



Cmndv Shoo 



Sodm Parlor 



BECKMAN'S 

Candies and Ice Cream 

NorthmmKon. M...-ol»— .«- 



China hy Mr. Leete, a missionary from 
Shansi Province in Northern China. 
He ehuwed slides of the of the moun- 
tainous country in the north of China, 
also of his own mission work, and 
others depicting the almost unlimited 
opportunities for service in any of the 
various types of mission work. Mr. 
Keete was one of the missionary stall in 
Northern China who offered their ser- 
vices iu checking the ravages of the 
plague. lie was decorated by the gov- 
ernment for this service, as the disease 
is extremely contageous and always 
fatal. His lecture was greatly enjoyed 
hy all present. 

Two new phases of tbe Christian 
Association Work to be begun th's 
week are a series of Life Problem dis- 
cussion groups and a World Fellowship 
group. Several students will lead the 
former groups. The purpose of these 
is to have a series of informal discus- 
sions on questions which are in the 
minds of many students. Any men 
interested in these groups should see 
Mr. Cook or any other member of the 
C. A. Cabinet. 

The World Fellowship Group will 
meet in the Christian Association Boon 
in the Memorial Building on Wednes- 
day evenings at 7 p. m. This group is 
organized through the realization ot a 
group of students on the campus that 
in order to be true college students, we 
must also be WOffd students. The tirst 
meeting of this group will be this Wed- 
nesday evening at 7 in the Memorial 
Building. All are welcome in these 
groups. 



Marx, It 
Rosa, ■ 
Qleason, ru 
Hourldfaa, rt 

Cleaves, re 
Sullivan, i|l> 

Bldrtdge, rhb 
Sheldon. Ibb 

IfeGeoueb, f'» 
Bupstltutiosi 
for Oleasoa. 



Waul for Marx. Lord 



COLLEGE ORCHES- 
TRA PROGRESS 

fjodet the direction of Leader I". V. 

Want:!., the college orehesira has been 
making rapid progress ss a lirsi class or- 
ebestra. The policy of tbe orchestra 

this year is to entertain the students 
with good daaoa music. The orchestra 

has boas playing. SO far. some ol the 

most popular dance music, bol it will 

soon begin work on some orchestrations 
for the future concerts. 

The club in conjunction with the Glee 
Club will probably put on two or time 
specialties, which will he undoubtedly 
popular. Some college musical clubs 
have been putting on specialties within 
the paM few years, and diev have taken 
well everywhere. Vinten and Waugh, 
the leaders of the Gle< Club and or- 
chestra respectively, have arranged for 
some original selections. These pieces 
were recently rehearsed in Btockbridge 

HaJl before the regular meeting d lbs 
Grangers. 



200% Profit 

The equivalent of a bushel of corn, worth from 30 to 
411 cents, when fed to \:on6 cows will produce about three 
pounds of butter worth from $1.00 to $\ SO at least 
2W'/ ( , clear profit, as the manure, skim-milk and cab pay 
for the Coal of care and housing. 

How can you make money easier? There nevei *as 
a time when the production of butter-fat was more profit- 
able, with cheap feed and high prices for butter-fat 

\ l)e Laval Separator enables you to yet the most 
profit from your cream it skims cleaner, turns easier 
and lasts longer than any other. 

De Laval Prices Reduced 

Take advantage of the 1922 reduced prices, available 

now, which put De Laval Sepa- 
rators on practically their pre- 
war basis. You may be paving 
for a De Laval and not getting 
it by using a cream waster. 

See your De Laval agent or 
write us for full information. 

The De Laval Separator Co. 

NEW YORK CHICAGO 

165 Broadway 29 E. Madison St. 

SAN FRANCISCO 
61 Beale Street 

Sooner or luter you will use a 

De Laval 




'14. — P. o. Peteraoa 
ard, born July 27. 



has a son. lticli- 



Over 2.SOO.OOO 
tn use the world over 



Thr m „,.^....h. Collegian. Wed P e.d»y, November 2. IML 



The' Massachusetts Collegian, Wednesday, November 2, 1921. 



TBE MASSACHUSETTS COUKM 

Published every Wednesday by the 
Students Of the Massachusetts Ag- 
ricultural College. 

BOARD OF EDITORS. 



Kdltor-ln-Chlef 
Managing Kd»t° r 



Bll i.mu V. Jacr»on '22 
HOBART W. 81'BIH.J "tf 

ASSOCIATE EnlTOKB. 

„ i.« Au«*t Maii'll Killtor 

LVT..K.KHAKH.NOTON N A M *""• 

Kknnstii A. B*«" A "° Athletic K.lltor 

Kuril N. Woui.'-M mmrnm 

8TANI.KV W. BROMI.KV 'It 
ll(MN<i W. 8I.AI.K '2» 

loLoao* (oiikn *■ 

Ei.ihiia K. Bum. -Hi.. 24 

Business Department. 

. 2 2 Buitnew Manager 

CHAR..K- A. B < « ,„„ Man „er 

S7AST* tlreulat,,,,, Manager 

HUH WlllTTAKBK 2» 

CUffffOW i- ■»■«* " 24 

ROBKB1 K. HTH.KKK '24 



Subscription $2.00 per year. Single 
copies, 10 centB. Make all order, ^paya- 
ble to The Massachusetts Collegian. 

In case of change of address, sub- 
.oribers will please notify the business 
manager as soon as possible^ 

"Entered a. second -class matter at the Amherst 
Poet Office. Aeees*ei for mailing at specla 
SSof^ns-e S~ MM M * -««•" 110. Act 
of October. 1S17 authorized August 20. WW. 



Mass Meetings. 
When it is necessary for a ohoOT 
leader to stand before the student body 
and complain because interest in mass 
nM .,.,U.g8 is lacking, it is time something 
was done, some change in att.ttulc 
wrought A mass meeting Las always 
been a IMOffnMd great factor In creai- 
ing that bond of sympathy and support 
between students and athletic teams 
that Is essential to best results. A 
player may not think at all of the cheer- 

| M crowd as he plays but he has valu- 
able hunch when and when not he is 
being supported by his cohorts in the 
stands or on the campus between 

games. 

What an inspiration it must be, what 
an incentive to give the best one has. 
to be sent away on an invasion as 
gloriously as the Center team last week ! 
Results told in that case, too. 

We have been thoughtlessly neglect- 
ful at M. A. C. When a mass meeting 
has been announced, we have said to 
ourselves, "O, well, there'll be a bunch 
there, anyway; gMOs I'M g« to Hamp 
(Mt Uolyoke, movies, bullfest, etc.). 
Consequently, only a handful has been 
on hand, and the valuable time of fac- 
ulty members and coaches has been 
practically wasted. 

By bo doing, we are at cross purposes 
with our watchword of Enthusiasm. 
We are saying with the actions that 
have ever spoken louder than words, 
•'To thunder with the team." Let's 
get behind the cheerleader. 



tbis annual lack of initiative, is IgM- 
ranee of the value received for becom- 
ing a Collkoian man. The Coi.i.KuiAN 
does give something worth trying for. 

There is Si present no department .if 
Journalism on the campus. When 
,bers was one here, a great many major 
advisers strongly recommended the.r 
students to take courses in journalism, 
because forceful, abbreviate.!, joiirnal- 
istic diction is-useful in almost any walk 
of life. One can never tell when it will 
be necessary to express himself on 
paper. The Coi.i.k.u.vn now offers prac- 
tically the only chance, outside of a 
very few English courses, for men to 
bNOBI accustomed to this soil of clear 
thought expression. 

Moreover, the Coi.i.kuian puts one in 
touch with practically every activity on 
the campus In gathering news, u.o.e 
than in any other way. we have found 
,| ie true scope of the Experiment Sta- 
n.Hi.andKxlcnaion Service, the work 
.lone by all the departments, and the 
whole truth about student life here. 

While a Com.kuian board member 
does not go here and thereon trips as 
often as first string athletes or Musical 
Club men, the Seniors are sent out to 
coverall the principal varsity contests. 
Last of all, the Com.kuian offers a 
chance for many Freshmen who are not 
athletes, musicians, or orators to get 
int() the "Every man in an activity 
movement, which is boomed as much 
by faculty as by students. It offers a 
worthwhile, not too time-consuming 
activity to entering men who have any 

natural ability at all la UUktoi with 
people and writing the English language. 

Why not help your college, your col- 
lege paper, and yourself by signing up 
with the competition editor - .' 



blank stare and no more. Why drop a 
valuable custom that places companion- 
ship on the Aggie campus above the 
rank and file in this respect? 

I. W. 8. 




TOWN HALL 



JUNIOR SMOKER HELD 

IN MEMORIAL BUILDING 

Class Characters Elected for Index 
Snapshots. 



Thursday 



Mat. 3. Kve. 
6-45. 8-30 



Ensssemsat EatrasritoarT 

Pola Msgrl. the famous con 
UnenUl star, and cait of bow. 
In the wonderful film, '•■" 
•ion." a mammoth eoectacle 
In 9 reel*. The mightiest epic 
of the icreen— two years to 
produce-beautiful and pew- 
erfulbeyondcom pare— marks 
success never before reached. 

News. Matt and Jsff. Toele. 



Friday 



Holidays. 
Once upon a lime we all thought how 
line it would bo to have a holiday on 
Armistice Day before the New Hamp- 
shire game. But that's all over now. 



The Special Assembly. 
Doesn't it seem good to hear otlicial 
recognition of our needs each year. It 
makes it look as though somebody 
would see a change— some day. 



A Junior Smoker and class meeting 
was well attended last Friday evening 
la the Memorial Building, and proved 
,o be of more than usual interest. The 
chief business of the evening was in 
connection with the 1923 Index. It was 
voted that this Index be dedicated to 
l)r Torrey, of the Botany Department, 
whose relations with the class of IM 
have always been of the best. 

Flections for class candidates for the 

Index were next in order. A list of 19 
of these was made out, to till certain 
general cases and also a few special 
cases warranted by this class. Four 
men were nominated foreach' position 
and in all but a few cases competition 
ran very close. The list follows: 

Ulonis, Carroll A. Towne, Auburndale. 
Athlete, Wilbur 11. Marshman, Spring- 
field. 

Bolshevik, Ernest T.Putnam.Greenfield. 

Business man, Owen E. Folsom, Rosl.n- 

dale. . 

Fusser, J. Stanley, Bennett, South Meri- 

den, Conn. 
Grind, Richard D. Wendell, Belmont. 
Idler, Ilolden Whitaker, Newton High- 

lUistiTFrederick A. Hollis. Charlton. 
Optomist, Howard Baker, Marshfield. 
orator, Trescott T. Ahele, Quincy. 
Parson, Reuel W. Eldredge, Winchester. 
1-ep Conrad L.Wirth,Minneapolis,Minn. 
Poli'tician, John S. Hale.South Glaston- 
bury, Conn. 
Popular co-ed, Dorothy V.Turner, Am- 

Pessimist, Donald F. MacCready, Eliza- 
beth, N. J. 

Smoker, CharleT. l'icard, Plymouth 

Terpsichorean, Philip B.Dowden, Sand- 
wich. 

Unsophisticated, Thomas L. Snow, 

Greenfield. 
Wit, Warren M. Barllett, Roslindale. 



Mat. 3. Kve. 
6-45. 8-30 



Saturday 



Miit. 3, Kve. 
6-45. 8-36 



Monday 



Mat. 3. Kve. 
6-45, 8-30 



Wanda Mawley in "T*{| 
Home that Jaiz Built. 

from the Saturday Kvenlnic 
Tost story. "Sweetie Feach. 
by Sophie Kerr. 

Scenic. SMfhlnt Comedy 

Tom Nil ami Pauline Starke 
in "The Untamed." from the 
great novel l»y Max Hran.t. 
A whirlwind tale of the wild 
and of three strange pals, a 
man. a horse and a dog. 

Newt. "Do or DW." Comsdy 

Clara Kimball Yonag with 
Herb't lawllBMa and Nigel 
Barrie in "Charlie It." 

Hilda Cowan'e glittering dra- 
ma of human life In which 
Minn Young plays 4 distinct 
parts. lavishly produced 

Paths Review. I'-r'i Comedy 



Tenor and Mandolin Banjos 

Smxophonm*. D rumo, mto ., ttohomdlng 

DEAN'S MUSIC HOUSE 

Cor. Main and State Sts.. Sprlngrteld. 

Local Agent. 
Edward LandL. II Ami ty Street. Amherst. 

Have Your Next Suit Made to Order 

—AT— 

LABROVITZ 

THELEADING TAILOR 
Fine assortment of Woolens on hand 

Foil Dress Suits and Tuxedos 
to Rent 

FULL LINE OF DHE*» SUPPLICS 

Cleaning, Pressing, Remodeling, Re- 
pairing and Dyeing promptly done. 

Single Suit* »■■■■* roduood *• BOe 
On Prmnmlng Tlckmtm . . . BOO 

It will pay you to buy a ticket. 

We do expert work of all descriptions. 
H Amlt, St.- LABROVITZPhon. 8W-W 



Too Oood for the Dump. 
One Of Agg'e's time-honored tradi- 
tions, that of greeting fellow students 
with a cheery "Hi," is being neglected 
by the Freshmen. There is no custom 
on the campus more worthy of perpetu- 
ation than this. It denotes a demo- 
cratic- atmosphere and a spirit of good- 
fellowship present at all the best col- 
leges. Aggie has made every attempt 
to put each student on an equal basis 
and this is one of the methods by which 
.. ._ i.~ j... n« total reir.stration 



ADAMS HOUSE HOLDS 

GAY AUTUMN FESTIVAL 



About the Collegian Competition. 

Every year the Coi.i.koian holds a 
competition for new members on its 
editorial staff, and every year the enter- 
ing class sends forth two or three men 
to struggle valiantly for the two or three 
positions open. When it comes around 
time for election, the paper is left with 
two paths to choose between, getting 
along with a smaller but efficient staff, 
or taking everybody on, good or bad, 
that has competed. There should be 10 
or 12. at least, out for the editorial po- 
sitions. The only reason we can see for 



it can be done. The total registration 
of the college has increased perceptibly, 
yet this only makes the task more diffi- 
cult, not hopeless. 

When the Freshman arrived on the 
campus for the first time, he was 
greeted with a volley of "Hi V which 
had as a purpose the desire to make 
him feel at home. He was surprised 
at being addressed by these seeming 
strangers and found it difficult to fathom 
his wide acquaintance in a Btrange 
place. The time has come now when 
he is expected to leturn each "Hi" of 
the upperclassmen in the same spirit 
with which it was addressed to him. 

It is especially noticeable at the pres- 
ent time that many wearers of the pea- 
green seem to care little or nothing for 
this tradition. Instead of an answering 
Hi" the upperclaBsmen gets a glum, 



Girl StudentB in Weird CoBtumee 
Indulge in Halloween Festivities. 
Delta Phi Gamma held a novel Hal- 
loween party in the Adams House, last 
Friday evening, from 8 until 11. All 
the women students were guests, and 
they appeared in a great variety of un- 
usual costumes. Among the many 
clever costumes might be mentioned 
two Bets of "Gold Dust Twins. A 
prize was awarded for the best costume 
,o Miss Booth of the two-year class, 
who dressed as an Indian woman. The 
prize was a large-sized lolly pop. Games, 
dancing, and singing were enjoyed, 
and much merriment was creaUd by 
weird stunts in the darkened basement, 
where a very realistic Satan held sway^ 
Doughnuts and cider were served and 
the ambitious were allowed to bob for 
apples, toast marshmallows and pop 
corn. 



Edith Hamilton Parker 

Graduate Teacher of Dancing. 

Studio, MASONIC BLOCK.Northampton 

FRIDAY EVENING, Assembly Class 



Popular with M. A. C. Men 



Private lessons by appointment. 
Tel. 761 Northampton 



Student Barber Shop 



YE 

OLD 

TIME 



HAIR 
CUT 
35c 



HARRY A. ERYSIAN 

North College 



There are still available a few copies 
of the war history of the Massachusetts 
Agricultural College, which may be 
obtained upon application at the 1 resi- 
dent's office. 



A. MIENTKA 

Shorn RopoMng WW* U *•« 

NFW PRICES 
Men's Whole Soles. »ahber Heels 
Mei -s Half Sole*. Rubber Heels 
Men's Rubber Soles. Rubber Heels 

Men Wo H iGua™nteeU-AMHKR8T HOUBK 



els . • fej} 




A DKHONAIR AIH IN NKW HBADWBARI 

CIIK better clusa of trmle in ull EUaforn Colleile» are railing for can*. 
A Niiuirt cap will keep your good looks ahead! Hals off fo the 



new eaps I 



CATERER TO COLLEGE CUSTOMS IN CAPS 




AGGIE IN FIT SHAPE 

FOR COMING GAMES 



New Men Have Shown up Well. Tufts 
Oame to be Played in Amherst. 
With the Vermont game Saturday 
the M. A.C. eleven passed beyond the 
half way mark on its schedule and now 
has but three games ahead. Only one 
Of these, the final lilt with Tufts, is to 
be staired on Alumni Field. 

The record thus far includes vi.-iories 
over Connecticut Aggie and \V. P. I., a 
tie game with Hates, and defeats at the 
bands of Amherst and Vermont. Aggie 
has scored a total of 55 points as against 
27 for her opponents. Those who wit- 
nessed the last gaine with Vermont are 
satislied, however, that Ageie has a far 
stronger team than her record shows. 
Though defeated, the HaPOOD and White 
outplayed her opponents Ihrough most 
of the game and showed a poweiful of- 
fensive in the last half which had the 
visitors battled and will prove no little 
puzzle to New Hampshire and Tufls. 

Coach Qort has developed a team 
largely of inexperienced men and the 
performances of most of these have 
been of the highest order. "Willie" 
Marshman at end and halfback. "Ken" 
Salmon, "Mase" Alger, "Don" N'owers, 
and "Red" Mu.lgett, linemen, are all 
playing their first season on the varsity, 
while "Pinky" Clark, the game little 
quarter, and Roger Acbeson, end, have 
been promoted In. m subs on last year's 
team. "Jimmie" Heal played his first 
varsity contest Saturday and made sev- 
eral substantial gains through the 
heavy Vermonters. In the line Capt. 
Cotton and "Hob" Mohor made a form- 
idable pair of tackles, and ".Stan" Free- 
man has been a tower of strength at 
center. The playing of (irayson al right 
end has been a feature of al) ihe Aggie 
games. "Dame" has yet to miss a 
goal from touchdown. In the back held 
the work of Lewandowski has been out- 
standing. "Lavvy" has outpunted all] Tlie 
bis opponents, scored two field goals, | j, o j (jj Uu> 



ROOSEVELT'S CHARACTER 

BY PROF. WM. L. MACHMER 

Last Friday morning Acting Dean 
Macbmei, in a short talk to the student 
body, expounded, the memory of Theo- 
dore Roosevelt. 

"We admire t lie man of strcnuth, be 
he statesman, philosopher, or poet. 
Hut what distinguishes Theodore fc to OO O 
velt besides being a man of action'.' He 
was a student of affairs. He was a 
lover of men and a lover of nature. 
Above all he was a Rood lather, always 
devoted to his home." 

In closing Prof. Maclimer remarked, 
"We love to remember the life of 
this man. He is a stimulant and 
a help to us. He emulates those 
characteristics which we admire. " 



Why go down town for a 

First-Glass Hair Gut or Shave? 

Patronize the 

College Barber Shop 

Memorial Building, M. A. C. 
II. J. DUVVELL, Proprietor. 

ONE-CENT SALE 

Tomorrow, Friday and Saturday 



Aggie Stationery 

with Class Numerals 
1922 TO 1925 



A. J. HASTINGS 

Newsdealer and Stationer 
Amherst - - • Ifaaa. 



CATHOLIC CLUB 

ELECTS OFFICERS 

A business meeting of t lie M. A. C. 
Catholic Club was held in the au.lito- 
liuni of the Memorial lliiilding on Wed- 
nesday, Oct. 19. The following officers 
were elected: Martin '22, president; 
HarriBfftoa '2:i, vice-president; Regan 
'24, secret ary-treasurer; Duffy '25, ser- 
geaut-at-arms. An executive commit- 
tee consisting of McCuinu '22,Hroderick 
2:5. Kane "2:i, Cahill '25, and Marshall 
of the Short Course, was also elected. 

A Smoker is to be held in the audito- 
rium of the Memorial Huileing at the 
next meeting on Wednesday, Nov. 9, at 
H o'clock and everyone is urged to be 
present. A good time will be in order 
for al), so "let's go." 

CAMPUS NOTES 

The following committee was elected 
for the Senior smoker: Holman, Wal- 
ker, and liowery. 

Miss Mary Foley of Worcester has 
transferred recently to M. A. C, from 
Tufls, entering the class of 11124. 

There will be a dance in the Memorial 

Huilding, Friday, Nov. 4th al 8 o'cloek. 

will go to the M. A C. 



THE REXALL STORE 

M. NOVICK 

Custom Tailor 



Cleaning, Pressing, Repairing and Dyeing 

Neatly and promply done. 
Work called for and delivered. 

Save money by buying a Pressing Ticket. 

4 Suits Pressed for $2.25. 

Dress Suits for Hire. 



Full Line of 



COLLEGE JEWELRY 



Let us serve 



you. 



ARTHUR P. WOOD 

197 Main St., "Ilainp." 






SEE THIS BARGAIN ! 



19 Pleasant St. 



Tel. 9-J 



Heavy Wool Jersey 

BROMLEY DRESS 

I OH 

ONLY $9.98 

Colors— BROWN, NAVY, HENNA 
G. EDWARD FISHER 



JACKSON & CUTLER 

OKAI.KKS IN 

DRY AND FANCY GOODS 
Trunks Bags Suit Cases 



and has 
gainer. 



been a consistent grouud 



H0LY0KE MAN TO BE 

MANAGER OF BASEBALL 



P. O. Bartlett Elected Assistant 
Manager, in Student Assembly. 

Perry G. Bartlett of Uolyoke was 

elected assistant manager of the 1!»22 

ibaseball team by the voteof thestudent 

body, the election taking place Thurs- 

[day afternoon at Assembly. Bartlett 

las been active in athletics since his 

irrival on the campus. This year he is 

>ut for football, being quarterback on 

)D team C. Last year be was a back on 

the Freshman football team and also 

dayed on the class basketball team. 

[n is a member of the Lambda Chi 

ilpha Fraternity. 



'The easiest thing to do," Dean Lewis 

said, "is to be a bad loser. Our men 

iave shown that they can fight and lose 

In a manly way. The team showed the 

It uft that makes it a successful team. 

Jb are proud of them." 



Prof. 0. 1L Michels from the North 
Dakota Agricultural College is handling 
resident teaching work and crops in the 
department of Agronomy. 

The Department of Agronomy has 
been concluding some interesting dem- 
onstrations on the college farm regard- 
ing the rate of planting silage corn, crop 
rotations and potato culture, and the 
results will be published soon. 

Dean Lewis has nothing but praise 
for Aggie's foot-ball men last Monday 
in chapel. He said that altho the team 
lost last Saturday the score does not do 
justice to the men playing. It was a 
victory for the team, another example 
of their manliness. 

Y. W. C. A. 

Miss Alice Uoyt, field student secre- 
tary of the National Board of the Y. W. 
C. A., spent Sunday, Monday and Tues- 
day as the guest of the women students. 
Sunday evening Miss IJoyt addressed 
a meeting of all the Association mem- 
bers, in the Abaigail Adams Dormitory. 
Each day of her visit she conductedanin 
tensely interesting discussion group in 
which a large number of girls took part. 



(&rp{rvter & Morehousf, 

PRINTERS, 

1, Cook Place, 



No 



Amherst, M 



ANNOUNCEMENT! 

Shoe Repairing Prices Dropped, Beginning the 

First Day of October 

They are as follows : 

Men's Sewed Soles with Rubber Heels $2.00 

Men's Half Soles, Sewed $1.50 

Men's Whole Neolin Soles with Rubber Heels $2.25 

Men's Whole Leather Soles, Sewed, and Rubber Heels— best work. $2.75 

We guarantee and stand back of any kind of work that goes out of our shop 
TRY US ON YOUR NEXT WORK 

FOR SALE ALSO — Shoe Laces of all kinds, Polishes, Brushes, Inner 
Soles, Water Proofing, and whatever else necessary for your shoes. 



Amherst Shoe Repairing Co. 



On your way 
to Post Office. 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Wednesday, November 2, 1921. 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Wednesday, November 2, 1921. 



S. S. HYDE 

opilolan .»i»«t j»w*»i*»r 

11 PlMIUl Street Hipotif MgM • 

Oculists' Prescriptions Filled 

Broken Lenses Accurateln Replaced 

Big Ben Alarm Clocks 

AND OTHER RELIABLE MAKES 



Pally <;ii:>i;uiteecl 



J. K. MILLS, Photographer 

Class Group* 
Amateur Developing and Printing 

Mills Studio Phone 456-R 

GREAT PRICE KKIHCTIONS 



Men's Hal! BoleaSewtwl . 



. . . $1.50 



Men's Uoodywu Rubber Heata 50 

Men'* Whole Neolln *ole» and Goodreer 

Rabbet 1 * . • . - 1 si • 

Men', Whole i,, 1 ti,-, i h..i.ss.«.-,l ft.. \ 

All Work Oumrmntamd I 

High-grade Line of Men's Shoes 

for Sale at Low Prices. 

J. GINSBURG 

19 Neasant Street. <>n row *■» «P <"»"• | 



TWO-YEAR ELEVEN LOSES 

TO C. A. C. SECONDS 14-7. 

In si elOM game 1:,sl B»l«td«j ;,t 
StorrswUh the CoaBectieal aggie *©• 
oadteam.ibe K. A. C. Two-year •leJ'ren 

was defeated 0J to« sore of 14-7. The 

Kama was .terted early, us ■ double- 
header was scheduled, the Ooaoectlcul 
Varsity playing Woteeatet 1*. L *■ 
eacu>abl« fumblt by Bangs, raaultad In 
a touchdown fortba bom« team.aad In 
,i„. Meond quarter ■ I*** paaa from 
oenteroa ■ Ui.k formation reeulted la 
Gallapber being thrown hack to! a loaa 
l .ida ii"' SO-yard line, from which 
place Connecticut took the bail orer 
, 1V repeated llaabacka. The ballwaa 
eonttnually ><■ Connacileol larrorllory 
in the aaeond half, but tb« two-year 
forwards dWa't haw lac punea and 
vim i.. p»u It over. The gama follows: 
Cosoaeileal kloked off, and Baaga 
received the kick. The two-years made 
two titst downs and were bald. Gal- 
lagher kicked ■ beautiful puat to his 
oppoueau' 80-yard line, audamlaula 



later, the boaw aggregaUoa whh forced 

to kick The punt was a shorl , low one 
to the 80-yard line, the visitors gateleg 
about 80 yards In the exi-l.anc-e. From 
ben the hall was pushed forward 0OU- 
itotently, and finally Trull, carrying the 

plglkln, went over the last while line. 
(ierremonty kicked the goal. Coimecli- 
etit again kicked off, and again Ihe 
Two-years started the hall going, Whan 
Trull, ••» attempting to throw a forward, 
•lipped and fell backward, the ball go- 
inu D p like a halloo... A Connecticut 
tackle recovered it and with practi- 
cally no rebalance, went over for a 
touchdown. The goal was kicked, thus 
lying the score. The quarter ended 
soon afterward. 

The second period was spent mostly 
in an exchange of punls.hut toward the 
end of the period, when Gallagher on 
fourth down dropped hack for a kick, a 
poor | ass from center resulted in the 

kicke. being tackled with the ball for a 

IOCS inside the visitor's it-yard line. 
Connecticut then took Ihe hall over on 
line bucks. 



[a the second period no scoring was 
done, but the home goal was constantly 
menaced by Ihe visitors. Ouce Bangs, 
receiving a punt, ran through all his 
opponent* and placed the pigskin be- 
hind lb* goal, only to be called back 
by (he .tticials for having stepped 
about an inch outside of the lines dur- 
ing Ihe run. Three-fourths of thetinie 
the visitors were within scoring dis- 
tance, hut a noticeable lack of drive 
prevented furlhei scoring. The Two- 
year lineup is as follows: 

Pierce, le; lietterly. It ; Raymond, lg; 
Baker, 0, (iallapher, rg ; Straut, rt ; 
(ierrenionty, re; Bangs, <|b; Trull, ikb: 
Henry, reb; and Weeterrelt.fb. 

Substitutions: Outhuse for Baker, 
Adair for Henry, Adams for Straut. 



'17. -VV. I- Mayo, who has been con- 
nected with the Federal Board for Vo- 
cational Kducation as regional super- 
visor at the Philadelphia office, has 
taken charge of the Animal Husbandry 
Department at the Smith Agricultural 
School in Northampton. 



THE M1LLETT JEWELRY STORK 

Fine Watch RepairinK. al»<> iroKen Lenses 

Keplaced Pi otlf. 

Amherst, Mate. 




32 Main Street. 



— TRY— 

C. H. GOULD 

lor Brat-clam 

Watch, Clock and Jewelry Repairing 

18 Pleasant Bl., Amherst. Mass. 

ORANGE STORE 

Fine (irocerles 

CANDIES. AMD FRUITS 

MASON A. DICKINSON, Proprietor 

I plaza" 



M;i»* 



Northampton 

60LDSTEIN BROS. AMUSEMENT CO 

Where the Bmt 

PHOTO-PLAY 
FEATURES . . . 

axe r-howti. 

Protram changed daily except Monday 

•nd Tuesday. 

ki:ki>k p. ejOJrOVI. Hamisr. 

mrs. prui^nceT. CASSIN 

.ELECT CATERING 
; ,t i;. Moaabta Prteee. 
Informal* a Spmclmlly 



, 2 ..,,. prospect 8t. 



Amherst, M.i 



Tml. SBB-M 



North End Lunch 

120 Pleasant Street. 

Our food is right— 
Our prices reasonable 

TRY US OUT 

W. B.1)RURY 



Why Is Iron Magnetic? 

A horse-shoe magnet attracts a steel needle. But why> 
I W* ? don't know exactly. We do know that electnety and mag- 

netism are related. 

In dynamos and motors we apply electromagnetic effects. All our 
power-stations, lighting systems, electric traction and motor drwes. 
even the ignition systems of our automobiles, depend upon these 
magnetic effects which we use and do not understand. 

Perhaps if we understood them we could utilize them much more 
efficiently. Perhaps we could discover combinations of metals more 
magnetic than iron. 

The Research Laboratories of the General Electric Company investi- 
gate magnetism by trying to find out more about electrons and their 
arrangement in atoms. 

X-rays have shown that each iron atom consists of electrons grouped 
around a central nucleus-like planets around an infinitesimal sun 
X-rays enable us to some extent to see into the atom and may at last 
reveal to us what makes for magnetism. 

This is research in pure science, and nothing else. Only thus can real 
progress be made. 

Studies of this kind are constantly resulting in minor improvements. 
But some day a discovery may be made which will enable a metallur- 
gist to work out the formula for a magnetic alloy which has not yet been 
cast, but which will surely have the properties required Such a result 
would be an achievement with tremendous possibilities. It would 
improve all electric generators, motors, and magnetic devices. 

In the meantime the continual improvement in electrical machinery 
proceeds, in lesser steps. These summed up, constitute the phenom. 
enal progress experienced in the electrical art during the past twenty- 
five years. 

General#Electric 

fO «f* WTrVr^ 51 TIV Schenectady, N. Y. 

General Office K* O " * \f «* ■ */ 



95-453H 



East Entry 
NORTH COLLEGE 



THE COLLEGE STORE 



Basement 
MEMORIAL BUILDING 



M. M. RICHARDSON, Mgr. '23 



P. L. BURNETT 22 
H. A. MURRAY '22 



T. T. ABELE 23 

H. D. WKATHERWAX 24 



AMHERST MASQUERS GIVE 

TWO DELIGHTFUL ACTS 

The Amherst Masquers of Amherst 
College gave two one-act plays at Col- 
lege Hall on Monday evening from 8-30 
to 10 00. The plays, "The Kising of the 
Moon" and a French translation, exe- 
cuted in a pleasing style with quite a 
display of talent, were appreciated hy 
(lie audience. Students from Amherst, 
M. A. C, Smith, ami Mt. llolyoke; and 
townspeople made up the attendance 
which tilled three-quarters of the hall. 



JUST BITS. 

The M. 1. T. Glee Club also makes a 
Christmas trip, and stopovers at pres- 
ent are planned for Kochesler, Akron, 
Detroit , and Chicago. 



ALUMNI NOTES 

'05.— The class of 1905 was repre 
-ruled at the Aiuherst-Aggie football 
game by nine of its members and of 
these four were old football players and 
played on the winning team of HMD 
which beat Amherst by a score of 5-0. 

U V. Drury 'If. and U A. Webster '14 
are in the fruit growing business to- 
gether in Ulackstone. 

15.— Seth Bannister was married to 
Miss Elizabeth T. Montgomery, on Oct. 
14, at West Somerville. 

Trj.— K. K. Selkregg announcen the 
birth of a daughter, Susan, on Oct. '24, 
ai Macon, <Ja. This is bis third child 
and he is anxious to know if any 1010 
man has more. 

A son, Kichard Thomas, was born to 
Mr. and Mrs. Richard W. Smith, '17, at 
Cambridge, N. Y., on Oct. 14, 1921. 

'17.— A. 8. Coleman anil Miss Kuiily 
llatnu.in announce their engagement. 

'17.— K. 0. Webster has a son, Dobson 
Lindley, born Sept. 25. 

'17. — H. Korsr.im is teaching horti- 
culture at the Smith Agricultural 
School. 

18.— C. Raymond is successful as a 
tanner in Beverly. 

'21. — F. Howard has started a horti- 
cultural manufacturing business in 
Mansfield. 

II. (I. Wendler, unclassified, who was 
liere last year, has continued at the 
West Roxbury High School, where he 
was an apprentice last spring. He has 
lieen granted a year's absence from 
college. 



The registration at M. IT. ibis year is 
:Ui:55, 98 more than last year besides 
graduate students. The Seniors have 
1000, Juniors 000, Sophomors and Fresh- 
men each 7(H). The course in electrical 
engineering is the most popular there. 
Technology claims to be the most cos- 
mopolitan college in the country with 
207 foreign students from :*7 nations. 
China 58, Canada 41, Norway 10. The 
number of women students dropped 
from 40 to :IS. 



KINGSLEY'S 



SODAS SUNDAES CANDIES 

Luncheonette 



shine: as-u-go 

Bomtnilm 

The College Shoe Shine Parlor 
toi row 

Hat Renovating, Shoe Dyeing. Shoe Shining 

AI IS Amit> St.li> Am. K\. tillice. 



140 Main Steel, Northampton, Mass. 



" Here lies the body of Kdward Jay, 
He tlied maintaining the right of Way. 
He was right, sure right, and he aped 

along. 
Rut he's just as dead as if he were 

wrong." 



TheN is only one ten yard penalty 
in football and that is for intentional 
grounding of a forward pass by the 
passer, who sees there is nobody to re- 
ceive it. To tlo this is a sign of bad 
sport and would spoil the whole idea of 
the game. The fact that this is the 
only ten yard penalty is cap taine d by 
saying that it is meant to attract atten- 
tion and unfavorable criticism by its 
singularity. 



AMHERST BOOK STORE 



Note Rooks Fountain Pens 



Advertisement of the Kagle I'rinting 
and Rinding Company in the Williams 
Pecord, *MU OT It Which T It takes 04 
muscles of the face to make a frown 
and only 1 to make a smile. Why work 
overtime '.'" 



Mr. A. L. (Jray is a graduate assistant 
in the Department of Agronomy from 
I'urd.ie University. 



SING LEE 

Main Street 

Quiok Laundry 



COLLEGIAN DIRECTORY 



Associate Alumni, 
Memorial Building, 
M. A. C. Athletic Association, 
Non Athletic Association, 
Ihe College Senate, 
Baseball Association, 
Football Association, 
Track Association, 
The Collegian, 
Hockey Association, 
Hasketball Association, 
Roister Doisters, 
The Aggie Squib, 
Musical Clubs, 



Telephone 

Richard Mellen, Ass't Sec. 175 J 
Richtjrd Mellen, Manager 175 J 
C. S. Hicks, General Mgr., 403-M 



F. P. Rand, Manager 

A. W. Smith, President 
C. F. Clark, Manager 
William H. Peck, Manager 
Richard Newell, Manager 

B. F. Jackson, Editor 
F. S. Tucker, Manager 
S. L. Freeman, Manager 
Gustav Lindskog, Manager 

C. R. Vinten, Editor 
J. G. Lowery, Manager 



Nineteen Hundred Twenty-two Index, H. VV. Spring, Manager 
Nineteen Hundred Twenty-three Index, O. E. Folsom, Manager 
Y. M. C. A., K. W. Moody President 



13° K 

8377 
280 

8325 
8316 

404-W 

837 7 

8325 

53° 

8330 

170 

280 

8314 

832S 



C. F. DYER 



-After Every Meal" 

WRIGLEYS 



High Grade 

COLLEGE FOOTWEAR 



-AT — 




TEN 

FOS 

FIVE CENTS 

B130 

The Flavor Lasts! 



Economy Prices 
E. M. BOLLES 

The Shoeman. 

Main St., Amlu-rst 

"BIDE-A-WEE" 

Creamed Chicken and Waffles Our Specialty 

Ami nthCI u<ind thoiiiH to Mt, 

MRS. L. M STEBBIISIS 

Mhlille sti.et tTcl. 4l. r . W > Until,-). Mass. 

WEBSTER'S STUDIO 

Nash Block 
AMHERST SHOE REPAIRING CO. 

Your Shoes Repaired 

WHILE YOU WAII 

S 
H 
E 
SHEPARD 
A 
R 
D 

Furnishings, Shoes 






=HARDWARE= 

Come to us for 

Fireplace Goods, Coat and Tronser Hangers 

Ever Ready Flash Lights and Paint 

Clothes and Shoe Brushes 

Anything in Hardware and Cooking Utensils 

Always glad to see you. 



THE MUTUAL PLUMBING & HEATING GO. 



WORTH wn/i-^ ZZZS*-** ii— *- * 

proP er appareZ u*en ft. does </re„ up. A.u,t >»»»* * Conjuft „, , or * t ««r ,o« need. 

sol;thw/c^^ 

1 /, halloween c»..te»t 9 , HtuntH ami refresi. | >tlnned fr0B p. 

WASHINGTON DINNER 



Continued from page 1 



I HUSKING BEE AND 

DANCE BY DIV. OF AGRI. 



where only 2 oriS should sleep, einpha 
si/ed the need for more dormitories 
Prof Haskell deplored l lie inadequate 
faulty salaries which were drawing 
aide men to other institutions. Keler- 
ring to college traditions, he stated that 
although serious dissipations such as 
smoking and apple stealing continued 
to | ie in evidence, the essence of the old 
college sprit was still there. 

1„ closing, P»f. Beekell offered the 
following toast in which alumni and 
alumnae everywhere will gladly join: 
•'To old Aggie --molder of minds ami 
maker of men - - to her alumni may 
Hhe ever he, in the future as in the past, 
a fountain sprim; of eternal youth." 

l>rof. Iliird, who described hi.nselt as 
oflhe .lasV llHHl-l'.tlif, said that in the 
course of extensive travelling over the 
,., lU utry be has seen nothing of wh.ch 
,-ollege graduates should be as proud as 
|| A.C men should be of the new 
Alumni buildiiiK. Major A. Q. Mona- 
han'OO, C. A. Bowman '81, G. A. Bill- 
Is*! *», II. T. Edwards 'U0, O.M. Camp- 
l„.ir20,also spoke briefly. Mr. hd- 
wards, who spends the majority of his 
lime travelling in the tropics for- the 
Department of Apiculture, told ol 
•MUM M A. ('.men in widely scat- 
tered parts of the world. 

During the course of the evening the 
following officers were elected to serve 
for the ensuing year: President, Dr. h. 
K. Flint '87; 1st vice-president , Dr. K. 
A. Back '04; 2nd vice-president, G. M. 
Camphell'20: secretary-treasurer, 11. J. 
Clay '14:ehoragus, W. I. Ooedw«B 'W- 
Ten' new active members were taken in- 
to the club. 

Those present included: C. A. Bow- 
man 81. ami Mrs. Bowman ; Dr. I. W. 
Allen '85, and Mrs. Allen; Dr. K. U. 
Flint '87; B. U- Billings '95; H. T. hd- 
wards ''.Mi; Dr. VV. A.Hooker »S», and 
Mrs. Hooker; Maj. A. C. Monaban '00, 
ami Mrs. Monahan; Prof. Hurd and Mrs. 
Uurd;Mr. W.H.Beal; Il.b- Knight '02, 
and Mrs. Knight: 8. B. Haskell '04; l)r. 
K I Back '04; J. A. Uyslop '08, and 
Missllyslop; J. W, Wellington W; 
Carleton Bates '08; H.J. Mendum 10; 
Dr S C. Brooks, and Mrs. Brooks; J.L. 
Folso... 10; Dr. J. F. Martin '12, and 
Mrs. Martin; Dr. D. A. Coleman '14; U. 
.1 Clay '14; F. W. Marsh '15; Perez 
Simmons '10; W.I. Goodwin. '18, MBJ. 
Goodwin and Mr. Goodwin Sr. ; *. J. 
Bink8T8;.Ioh..Yesair'll»; C. D. Stev- 
ens 'lit ; G. M. Campbell '20; J. J. Win- 
dow '20 and Miss Window 

You can save from 

$3.00 to $5.00 a pair 

— on — 

Young Men's 
College Footwear 

by buying at 

FLEMING'S, Northampton 



Chairman Foord and Committee Ar- 
ranged very Successful Halloween 

Party. 
The Division of Agriculture gave a 
liarly to the rest of the staff of the col- 
Ueand their wives last 9**** •£ 
B | BR in the Drill 11.11. Ahou W 
llW1Il ,e attended the third annual hurt- 
I,,,, bee of the division and enjoyed the 



h alloween contests, stunts and refresh- 
m(Mlt8 . Dancing concluded the enler- 
la , lline „l of the evening with music 
furnished l.yMoseley's Orchestra. Ibe 
(M>lllII1 |„ee in charge of the arrange- 
ments was headed by Chairman Foord 
and included Messrs. Gunness, BM* 
„ w „ lt , S alisbury, .ludkins and Mont ague. 

M O. Lanpbear '18, is here as an 
instructor in the Agronomy Depart- 
ment He is teaching soil and crops. 
Since his graduation he has been con- 
nected with a fertilizer concern. 



INFORMAL C0NMITTEE 

Continued fromj»agal_ 



^oToTthe^ruTrs game. Tbis informal 
which it is hoped, will eclipse all pas 
, i „Ml he carried out in cabaret 

:r a ^wHlluiot be served at 
,rl,er Hall, but a caterer wui have 

charge at the Memorial »•»•*" 
chaperons will be an.uiunced later . 

Carlton M.Stearns is in charge of the 

greenhouse plant at Dixby's (a™,Me 
Le,Mass.,and lives at 208Grove street. 



Here's why CAMELS are 

the quality cigarette 



@m*^Ur> ] 



rf> 



TURKISH & DOMESTIC 



BLEND 



RB TTCS 



BECAUSE we put the utmost quahty into this 
! one brand. Camels are as good as it s pos 
ribl. for skill, money and lifelong knowledge of 
fine tobaccos to make a cigarette. 

H „tbing is too good to<££j$£& 

simply for show. 

Take the Camel package for instance. It s the 
^perfect packing science can devise o P£ 
tect cigarettes and keep *™ f ™**™\l s P ea i 

-secure foil ^^^T-K^ But 
the fold and make the package a 6 
there's nothing flashy about it. You 
Sa wrappers. «o frills or furbelow, 

-^cfi things do not ^££££££ 

cigarette you can imagine 
from cigarette aftertaste. 

It's Camels for you. 



R . J. REYNOLDS TOBACCO COMPANY, Win-ton-Sslen, N. C. 






MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL 



Vol. XXXII. 



Amherst, Mass., Wednesday, Novemb er 9, 191 1. 



No. 6 



CABARET INFORMAL AFTER new Hampshire game 
AGGIE-TUFTS GAME wlLL BE A BATTLE 



"PHILOSOPHY OF LIFE" 

FROM REV. J. E. WARD 



One Hundred Couples are Expected 

at Aggie's Biggest Informal 

Dance— Two Orchestras. 

The Informal Committee met last 
Thursday in the Memorial Building and 
made the plaits lot ■ cabaret-informal 
dancethat isexpeeted to surpass any pre- 
vioiis college dance in informality, ori- 
ginality and rapacity for a good time. 
The committee has been divided into 
the following sub-committees to func- 
tion for each informal: Refreshments, 
Vinten; decorations, the three Juniors; 
orchestra, Most-ley ; publicity, Spring ; 
tickets, Gowdy; chaperons, Law; Fresh- 
man, Thompson. 

The dance is to be run as follows: 
dancing will commence immediately 
after the conclusion of the Tufts game 
and will continue until the usual time, 
when the college girls leave for North- 
ampton ami South Hadley. There will 
be an orchestra on each floor. Tables, 
f„r two sesplei each, will be place*' 
around each hall and In the Ionia: M 
on each tloor. A caterer will serve 
during thecveirng from about 5-80 or 
640 on. The dance to continue be- 
tween courses. Punch will be served 
at all times. 

Tickets will cost 13.75 until after 
Wednesday, when the price will go up 
to*4.tX>. Kach member of the commit- 
tee has tickets to sell. Next week < II. 
tlowdy at the Aggie Inn will give dame 
programs to each ticket bolder upon 
presentation of the same, and at that 
lime will take the names of the girls 
and chaperons; and also any remarks 
Continued on p»g« 7 



ALUMNI ! 



i 



We expect many of you at the 
Tufts game. Do you want the time 
of your life after the game? 

Does the statement, Cabaret In- 
formal, appeal to you? 

If it does, and we hope it will, plan 
to stay after the game for four or five 
hours and dance with us the stu- 
dents, and other alumni, in a new 
teatureof Aggie dances, the CAB- 
ARET INFORMAL. The Memorial 
Building will hold every one of you. 



Granite Staters to Dedicate their 
New Memorial Field in Game 

with M. A. C. 
Aggie will meet their stillest opposi- 
tion of the year when the team plays 
New llampshiie Slate College Saturday 
at Durham. The t.-a-in troin the (iianite 
Stale lias had an enviable record so far 
this season and the only game lost has 

been to Dartmouth. 

New Hampshire's season opened Oct. 
1, when they defeated the Army 10-7 at 
West Point. The next week ihey were 
handed their single defeat by Dart- 
mouth at Hanover, Coach ("anneHs men 
winning 24-0. On Oct. 15 Lowell Tech 
was swamped 41-7, and the following 
Sat unlay Vermont was beaten 21-7 at 
Burlington. Two weeks ago Bales was 
defMfed 14-0at Lewiston, and Saturday 
Colby was overwhelmed 24-7. <>f the 
games appearing on the New Hamp- 
shire schedule, Aggie has played only 
Bales and Vermont, tying the former 
0-0. ami losing to Vermont 14-7. New 
Hampshire ban a wealth of experience! 
players from last years team, including 
(apt. Connor, L. S. Bell, Gadois, Chris- 
tense!.. Neville, Cotton, Farmer, Berry, 
Broderiek, tlustavsoii ami Kuma/./.a. 
Capt. Connor. the best man on the tt am. 
and weighing easily 1X0, has been a hard 
man to stop, and has been the big factor 
j„ ,.\ery win. Me plays fullback and 
can run, kick, and pass wilh the best of 
Mllege backs. The New Hampshire 
team is heavy throughout, and will 
easily outweigh the light Maroon and 
White team of Aggie. 

Saturday's game will mark the dedi- 
cation of the tine new Memorial Field 
which is being built in honor of the New 
Hampshire men who(?ave up their lives 
in the war. The held has been built 
under the direction of Dennis Enwriyht 
Continued on page ^ 



Oxford Graduate Gives Two Interest- 
ing Talks in Chapels. 



NINETY-FIVE YARD 

RUN DEFEATS M. A. C. 



At the Friday and Monday morning 
Chi.pels I lie college body had a talk from 
Rev. .1. K Ward on "A Working Philoso- 
phy of Life." Mr. Ward, who saw five 
years' service with the British ami 
Canadian armies, after gtedvfttlag from 
Oxford, based his discussion on needs 
found eaaoeg students elsewhere, and in 
army life. 

Starting with the modem physicists, 
in omnipresent and exhaustless energy, 
and the biological conception of a vital 
foree, he led (he thought onto that of an 
Inlinite Spirit, pervading the universe, 
just as the spirit of man pervades his 
body, and acts, consciously or uncon- 
sciously, la every atom of it the spirit 
"in whom we live ami move and have 
our being." 

I.ookiim on every hand there is to be 
seeu a marvelously interrelated system 
ol intricate forces, answering in a most 
wonderful way to law. Evolution is 
■Ten more wonderful than summary 
.nation. Moreover, there is a more 
eonstant progress to libber life. The 
sludent must decide whether this won- 
derful universe, includiiiK man. came 
by chance or shows evidence of an 
eternal mind; whether there is purpose 
evident, and thought, and reason. He 
must decide whether the meaning of 
the vast progress to elf Bet life is to be 
sought and found in the slime of some 
muddy diKh water or in its culmina- 
tion in personality. 
Greeted ee ieflolte eetlvity of mind, 

Continued on page 8 



Maroon and White Outplays Lighter 

Opponents but Costly Fumbles 

Lose Game 7 to 2. 



FROST, WILLIAMS, VINTEN 

AND COTTON, QUARTET 



HOCKEY CANDIDATES TO 

BE CALLED OUT SOON 



Price $3.75 ($4.00 after Nov. 16) 

Two Orchestras. 

Caterer's Service— Four people at 

a table. 



Tickets from Gowdy, address "The 
Aggie Inn"; or from Law, Moseley, 
Spring, Thompson, Vinten, Alex- 
ander, Beal, and Sargent. 

NOVEMBER 19. 



Captain Collins, Lyons, Gordon and 
Haskins Form a Nucleus For 
Coach Mansell. 
Hockey prospects for the coming sea- 
son are beginning to look good despile 
the loss of five varsity men by gradua- 
tion last year. Candidates will be called 
for in about two weeks for the first prac- 
tise to be held in the Drill Hall. A 
squad of at least 18 men is expected out 
from the first. Among those who tea 
be defeaded on as first hand material 
are Captain Collins, Lyons. Gordon, 
Haskins, Cotton, Goldsmith, Lamb, 
Tewhill, Xicoll and others, including 
several football men. 

With the rink put into condition, and 
ready to be flooded at the first oppor- 
tunity, the squad should have a good 
, chance for any early start. One of the 
Continued on psge 8 



FourMen of High Class Ability Chosen 
to Comprise the Quartet this Year. 
The (Jlee Club Quartet tryotils were 
held about two weeks ago and the 
quartet has just been chosen. It com- 
prizes the following men: "Buddy" 
Frost '24, first tenor; "Jim" Williams 
24, second tenor; "Hay" Vinten "22, 
lirst bass; and George Cotton '22, sec- 
ond bass. Two men out of the four are 
on the club for the first year. They are 
"Buddy" Frost and "Jim" Williams. 
It is a rare thing that men on the (ilee 
Club for the first time ever make the 
quartet, because there is so much other 
good material in the club. Frost -is a 
musician by nature; Williams is an 
athlete, and a Roister Doister man; 
Vinten is leader of the Glee Club, and 
is on other non athletic boards, and a 
member of the Senate; Cotton is the 
captain of the varsity football team. 



For I lie second time in two years the 
little state of Khode Island has proved 
itself entirely without regard for the 
feelings of her pompous Massachusetts 
neijtbbor,aiid Kid Lore's men lost their 
third straight name by a 7-2 count, in a 
name which was intensely interesting 
because it was so hard fought and be- 
cause Mr. Johnson, feeling the need of 
a little sprint, took an Aggie fumble 
from out the pile and raced for W» yards 
while the entire Khode Island section 
rose and cheered htm to the echo. 

That costly fumble ia the story of the 
scoring, otherwise there is noone but 
who atjrees that M. A.C. should have 
won by at least a 94 score. As in the 
two games proceeding, the big "break" 
went to our opponents. Gilkey scored 
the other point for his team while a 
:iafc'.y H ♦»'" b.si .,.v>r»*T r»v« Agg»* 
her two lone points. 

The day was clear but a high wind 
and predominance of dust made the 
playing hard for the men and disagree- 
able to watch from the sidelines. The 
unusual cold probably accounted for 
several of the costly fumbles which the 
Maroon and While made. 

John bewandowski as usual gained 
a great deal for Aggie, both from his 
rushing and his long spiral punts. 
"Dame" Lrayson played one of the best 
games of his season and several tiroes 
was successful in making first down. 
"Jimraie" Beal gained well in an open 
field while Clark's judgement was good. 
In the line Freeman and "Bob" Mobor 
played a good game and Acheson's de- 
fensive work was fine. Marshman, who 
alternated at end and halfback got 
along well at end but could not make 
much headway in the backfield against 
the plucky Khode Islaud line. M. A.C. 
made over twice as many first downs as 
her opponents and gained over twice as 
many yards in rushing, while "Lavvy" 
easily was the peer of Johnson at the 
kicking game. 
The play in detail: 
mar PaBSOB. Acheson received 
Sllkey'l kickoff and rau back a few 
yards before the Khode Island forwards 



Alpha Sigma Phi announces the in- 
itiation of Dr. Joel K. Goldthwaite '», 
following the alumni meeting Oct. 22. 



— — 


m _ 


OUR OPPONENTS 




SCORES LAST SATURDAY 


Bostou Univ. 


M 


TUFTS 


7 


NEW HAMPSHIRE STATE 


24 


Colby 


1 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Wednesday, November 9, 192L 



reached big*. Sreyeoa *» ln#d knre Jj 
yards through center and "Larry 
kicked offside on Rhode Mend', aa-j tfd 
line. Chendlef made Be* fnrd. a " 11 
Johaeon wan thrown lot I i" ss - *• 
kicked to "Larry." ".m.imie" Beal 
an.l "Lavvy" mad. tbottt ll.reeya.ds 

between then end theaGrayeon weal 

around end lot 10 yards and first down. 

on the third roeh BeeJ wen! throngh 
tor 11 yards, an.i s.h.i. alter Grayson 
mad.- ii Bret down egein. BeeJ mad. 
l wo vards nod "Larry" live through 
taekle. With the bell within Boorlag 
dtctanoe the team fonght hard. They 
reeehedthe three yard line, but a costly 
fumble gare the home teamtheball. 
Altera toaehbaek Ihe bell was pal In 
play on the 20-yard line and soon John- 
■on went through the Aggie teem lor 

SB vanls and OH the next I'lay 

added another yard. Gllkej then took 
the ball tour time, but made no greal 
B ntn. Johaeon kicked te "Larrr" nn 
the Li-yard line, "Larry" s """ hlcked 

for BO vards and Johnsons return kick 
w,.nt off. ideal Bldfield. A Her several 

galaaol bat one yard "Larry" kicked 
t,, Johaeon who was downed in his 

traeks. A penally lor cutting down 
worked in Aggie', favor and t he hall 

was in M. A. C.'e possession at quarter 

time. 

Skidnii I'i i:.oi>. QrayeOB made 7 
j aids around right end. With the hall 
in the shad. -wot the Khodo Island goal- 
poatl Johnson, not to he out. lone by 
Darldeon and DIaooll, captured aa 

Aggie fuml.le and splinted «.'•". yards to 
a UWCbdoWB. Kcstacy reigned supreme 
in the Rhode Island eheerin- seetion 
while Qllkej look his time and added 
the goal point. "Law.V and "Willie" 
each gained a yard and then Real 
■BOWed liis heels in ivvo beautiful runs 
,,, pi and live yards. "Lurry' BOO* 
kicked to Johnson and Johnson and 
Gilkey in alternate ruches gained some 
IB yards. After an incomplete forward 
pass Totman tried a drop-kick which 
missed by inches only. "Larry" made 
six yar.ls. Bargeat went in at .piarler. 
Baal was thrown tor a loss and "Larry" 
kicked. The half ended soon afiei 
"Lavvy'' and ."Dame" had made live 
yards between them. 

Tuir.i' PaaiOD. Cotton kicked off to 
l.alliee who ran hack H yar.ls before 
be was brought back to earth. Johnson 
kicked to Clark who ran back 10 yards. 
Marshman made two small trains and 
LaBree got BeaTi fumble. .several 
loama a i«0 fumbles followed and a drop- 
kick failed. "I.avvy" then made one 
of his ■eaaatioaa] end runs for IT) yards. 
He and Beal made several short 
wains. "Larry" fumbled and recovered. 
He soon kicked offside near the 10 yard 
line. Johnson kicked to Clark. After 
a short gain B fumble lost 15 yards but 
a penalty of 1." made up the loss. Heal, 
'Willie" and Ed. Tumey made short 
gains and "Lavvy" kicked. Johnson 
Immediately returned the punt and 
Grayson and "Lavvy" went through for 
10 yards. The same combination made 
eight more and Beal and "Lavvy - ' 
added nine yards to this. For the BOO- 
on. I time in two minutes Grayson made 
first down. Four downs Betted but nine 
yards and the ball went to Hhode Is- 
land. Johnson kicked to Clark and the 
quartet ended with the ball in Rhode 
Island's possession owing to a fumble 

which LaBree pounced upon. 
Pot i:th Psbxod. "Lawy'' kleked 
" toon atier the opening of the last 
quarter and ■ tumble wan gathered In 

byCapt. Cotton. "LarVy," "Dame." 

a „d "Jimmie" made 19 yards and the 
ball was lost on downs, just three yards 
from the coveted goal line. Aggie's 



last big chance had come and gone 
Johnson kicked from behind his goal 
and Ihe ball hit the east goal post. A 
saletv resulted accounting for the two 
points made by M. A.C. bewandowsk. 
and Qllkey made several short gains 
am l i.nallv the latter intercepted a for- 
ward paae from Beal. Beat went In at 
halfback. Beat and -Lavvy" made 
two gains netting seven yards. "Lavvy 
mndeflmdown. Bent was thrown tor 
no gain. An attempt at a forward pass 
failed, "Larry" only gained a yard and 

,|„. i.all was in Khode Island's DOa» 
ion when the whistle blew. 
The lineup: 



Old Deerfield Fertilizers 

"■Reasonable in dollars and sense." 
A. W. HIGGINS, INC.. South Deerfield. Ma»». 



VI. V. <'. 

Gray eon, re 
Cotton, (Capt.)rt 

Salmon, rg 
Kniinan, c 
Mudgett, lg 

liobor, It 

Acheson, le 
(lark, <|b 
beal. lhb 
Marshman, rhb 
l.ewandovvski, fb 



K. I. HTATK 

le, Kirby 

It, Coonor 

lg, (Capt.) l'otter 

c.Tobey 

rg, Flynn 

n, Perry 

re, Kennedy 
qb, llaslam 

rhb, Qllkey 

lhb, Chandler 
fb, Johnson 



THE COAT OP NO REGRETS 

That is what you get when you buy one tailored by Hart 
Schaffner & Marx. Big, roomy, heavy all-wool coats tail- 
ored with the best possible taste and at a price to suit your 
pocket book. These coats are absolutely guaranteed and 
we guarantee to save you money when you buy one. Have 
one for the game. All-wool coats, low as $22.50, high as $50 

Interwoven Sox, Mallory Hats, ParKer. Tyson and Arrow Shirts, 
Oakes Sweaters, H. « P. Cloves, Munstngwear and Duofold Underwear 



F. M 



Sere-- Rhode Island 7, at. A. C. S. 

Touchdown Johnson. Goal from 

tonobdowu-Gllkey. Safety— M. A.C. 

KH.-ne - Kelly. Umpire - Hurley. 
Substitutions-lt. L: Smith for Klynn. 
UBree lor Connor, Totman for Kirby, 

Ihase for Chandler, Cardner for Chase, 
M \ c. • Nowers for Salmon, Sargent 
tor Clark, Tumey for Marshman. Bent 
for Tumey. 

SIDELIGHTS ON THE GAME 

It was diflicult to distinguish the 

plnyera of the different teams lor the 

Kbode Island men wore lb- same color 
|«teeyf as were worn by M. A. C 



Official M. A. C. Outfitters, 

THOMPSON 



& SON 




257 Main Street THE PARK COMPANY, IflC. Northampton, Miss. 

_ . . ... .in... i ,..iti, i.i.'turo 



An optical shop which measures up to U 
blshett standard of ......tern service. You > 

,'m rely on our skill an.l *imh1 taste In all 
optical matters. 



Our Art Department 1 ? «»•*.. V^ri- 1 "™' 
,utt*ble for the decoration of '»» *««"£ '• 
or for birthday and wedd.mr gifts. Oreettng 
cards for particular people. 



The BaodB Uland snake dance alter 
,i,e gare* aw. aa aalmated eablMtlon 
oltbaatateof eahaneraaee which they shavin g s t i c Ks and Creams 

felt. It was quite some dance. 



Deuel's Drug Store 



ARTICLES 

Razors and Razor Blades 



President K.lwar.ls of Rhode Island 
State college remarked upon the gen- 
,.ral spirit of the two teams and the 
hard fought quality el tbe name. Me 
was please.l by both qualities as shown 
on the field. 



VICTOR RECOR 



Tbe offensive work 01 (irayson and 
Lewandowski still excites the admira- 
tion of our opponents where we go. 'Ihe 
two heavy backs surely can "hit the 
line,'' while the work of Heal in an 
open tiebl is also worthy of note. 



Kodaks and Supplies 



Fountain Pens 



Store 



It should be noticed, especially by 
those who are likely to crab the cach- 
ing system, that the long runs which 
have featured the opponent's play and 
have upset Aggie's chances of a win In 
the last three games were the result 
once of an intercepted forward pass and 
twice of fumbles. 



The plucky Rhode Island quarterback, 
who weighs less than our own pilot, 
has been unfortunate in his two games 
with If. A. C. Last year he was spiked 
and this year the results of his injuries 
are feared to be of a more serious 
nature. 

BAND 

It there is to be a band, MKN Ml'ST 
BE HAW 111 Aggie wants to have a 

hand at the Tufts game I ! ! Therefore 
,,,„„. ,„ rebearaaUm Anybody who 
• an play a instrument come around. 
We cannot do much as it is now,because 
we haven't tbe men. Everybody who 
can play an instrument come 
Social bnion Looms at 4-30, Friday 



Page^ Shoe 

SPECIAL 

Saddle Strap Oxfords ^^^$5^)8 

irNEwTATc. SONSlif 

At the Treasurer's Office— $1.00 

LEARN TO SING ALL THE AGGIESONGS 

When You Are Down Town 

DROP IN 

The Candy Kitchen 



— FOR 



ly wno 
to the || 
lay!'.!l|l 



Lunch, Candy, Ice Cream and Smokes 

COLLEGE CANDY KITCHEN 

"The Home of Sweets" 



T^Massachusen^^ 

= — Z 7T -d^ „-+<? We have a fine assortment of 

KS£^«55t-S Con^Pet and PenciU. 

Pens and Pencils, moore, __ ^^ By the Campns Entrance. 




FACULTY AND SENIORS 

READY FOR THE BIG CLASH 



HANDICAP MEET CLOSES 

FALL TRACK SEASON 



Betting Seema to be About Even. 
While tbe Senior team is rapidly being 
rounded into a* trim, l.ardd,i.»in« and 
Mgraealee an eleven aa ever maa.lu-d 
victoriously from the iooo.l.all Held 
theeoaehof thefaeuliyteam,(- . I, 

,. being confronted with a stn, done 

problem. With a wealth el ■elerlal 
among the faculty, every one of whom 
are aching to K et a crack at tkeeheet] 

Senior*, he iawonderinu which ones... 

B| seforhiKallsiariea.n. If he does 

aot.Booeeeeene he is afraid their feel- 
| B « Will he hurt, while he knows that 
If he does choose them they are sure to 

lie hurt. 

\1. hough the beUlngn even on ihe 
two teamn.O to 0, the unden-raduates 
,eem to he the favorites tor the coming 
contest. Many of Chubby l,mg'* vara- 
iiv mincemeaf have turned on their la- 
Htrucorand have signified their inten- 
tloaetofoeadget. al §»Uh hae heee 
wearinK over size j.ads lately and prom- 
ises to have all the dimensions of a big 
man a. Thursday's |ftaM. Field wil 
most likely wear Lavvy's M,uare toed 
boot-ior good luck. On the onnos.m, 
team, Em Grayson, with bis tavor.te 
slogan, "Chase me kid," is likely to 
keep the Seniors hot on his trail. 

Collins has been coaching the Senior 
, cam. while Hooper has been elected 
manager, and, as there Is ao telllag ■ 
coach how to play football, each man is 
coaching himself. 
The probable lineup will be: 

K.\< II. TV 
SKNIOKS 

Holman.re ,e - llaU 

Andrew., n ** barter 

Talmadge.rg l u , Novitski or Lentx. 

Packer, c »^ 

Conan.,lg - *£«* 

Leland.lt rt Shufelt 

Smith, le re,Mag.nms 

»• u i <|b, Uice 

Field, <jb ' 

Krasker or Thompson, rh lb, Mansell 
Lyons, lb rh, (irayson 

Chapin,fb fb, Holmes 

Subs for facul ty-Mack, French. 

A CHICKEN FOR ' 

EVERY TOUCHDOWN 

"The average person's idea of 'noth- 
ing at all' seems to be a dressed market 
poultry show" are the exact words of 
the Poultry Department. Therefore, to 
dispel this popular illusion, the Poultry 
Department is planning to run, under 
the auspices of tbe Senior poultry class, 
a market poultry and egg show in 
Stockbridge Hall, Nov. 18 and 1S>. 

To make this the most popular poul- 
try show ever held at M. A. C. there 
will be several roasters awarded as 
prizes in a contest of guessing the 
weights of various fowls. 

Then, also, tbe Poultry Department 
is planning to present a chicken for 
every touchdown scored by M. A. C. in 
the Tufts game, to the man making 
it. Provided any birds are left after 
these prizes are awarded, Thanksgiving 
chickens, ducks, geese, and turkeys 
will be Bold to the highest bidders. 



New Men Show up Well 

The Fall track season came to a mh- 
MMfw] close on Saturday afternoon hist, 
with the Handicap Meet held .... VI- 
u.nni Ficl.l. The ...ana-cment le.ls 
W ell satistic.l with the results which 

different events brought forth. 



bolting scratch runs between Friend 
;ul(1 r^rlog, in the mile run, and be 
(w ,,„ Irish and IVirce in the 4411-yar.l 
run. featured the afternoon. Cah.ll », 
was in Hne form, and with a three-yard 

handicap o*er Cant. Sallttaa we. labia 
,„ „, (S , oui t'.rst lathelOO-yarddaeh. 
[a the r.sis of elaelaga glwn ™» w > 
"H" rtaade lor lae handicap glrea eaeh 

man .a„d is counted in with his regular 
score. The results of the meet are a. 

follows. 



Ti; vc k 

HK)-Vard Dash 

Time 10 1-5 
LSD-High Hurdles 
II 

Mile Hun 

5 in. 14 2 as. 

M0- Yard Ran 
r>7 :'. I 

•j.>t» Low Hurdles 

27 4-.". s. 
| Mile Kun 

ii B.alt-i »• 
221) Yard Daih 

HHtl Yard Baa 
2 in. 21 4-5 



Pole Vauli 

8 ft. 7 in. 

Shot Put 
88 ft. Ill in 

High Jump 
;, It. •"> in. 
Broad Jump 

20 It. U in- 

Discus 
W) ft. 7 in. 



1st 

Cab ill ■-:.-. 
H-:5 yd. 

1111 '24 
■10 yds and 1st II. 

Mead tl 

Scratch 

Irish '2:5 
Scraleli 

Woodwolll. 2.1 
Scratch 

Hates '2:» 
Scratch 

Cab HI "2- r . 
II sy<l. 
Tisilale '2:5 
U-2U yd. 

Paddoek -i 2i 
lid in. 

Armstrong '25 

I l-r. It. 
Barker 16 

111 in. 
Wooilwortb '18 

Scratch 
Kroeck'22 
Scratch 



2nd 

Sullivan '22 

Scratch 
W'oo.lwortb '88 

Scratch 

Lories '-' 

snatch 

Peine 'SB 
Scratch 

Hill '21 
11-20 yd. and 1st II 

Newell 'Si 

Scratch 
Sullivan '22 
Scratch 

Lories - 1 
Scratch 



Barker ''2f> 
Scratch «it.ii... 

Rolt. ''/fi 

scratch :;:t ii.7lii. 
Kelley '2:5 
Scraleli 

Sullivan '22 
Scratch P.tll.'.Hn. 
Dickinson '24 

li-iuii. awft.Tln. 



atd 
Qordon ''2:t 

I1-2.V.1. 
Del. ano 2 -Yr. 

Scratch 
Mcvciison '24 

ii -20 rd. 

M act ready '88 
Seralch 

Isaac "24 
U-20yd ., lsl and 10 II 




^^ 



Qordon 

II .Vyd. 

Hill -t 
ll-io vd. 

Cbaea '21 

11 1 rt. -7 ft. 

Kiock 22 

scat.!. 88ft.ni 

Sullivan '22 

11-1 in. 
Kellcv 
S.-ralch- 19 ft. 84 In 
Kelley '2:5 
Scratch- 88 ft. 



In the sun— a handsome l;m- 
weathef overcoat. 

In the rain — a rtinproofed 

ovetcoal. 

►Scotch Mists — realty two-in- 

onc coats at I single price. 
Our own itlea ! 

•Regutered TrademarK. 

Hail order* filled 

" Rogkrs P»8rT Company 



Broadway 

at Hltli St. 



"Four 

Convenient 

Corner." 



Hroadway 
ai '.Htb St. 



Hroadway 0or-n«" V ^Z 

et Warren ,.,-rv 

new yokk cm 



FRESHMAN FOOTBALL 

LEADERS ARE ELECTED 



Gam* With Sophomores is Expeoted 
To Be a Hard One. 



C. W. STELKE ELECTED 

ASST. TRACK MANAGER 

To Automatically Become Manager 
of the 1923 Varsity. 



Eaeh flea believes that be lives .... 
the most wonderful dog in the world. 
That's patriotism. 



Donald (Bad) Sullivan of Amherst 
was unanimously elected captain ot the 
l-Tcsinnan Football team at a meeting 
held in the Drill Hall last Thursday al- 
larooott following their regalar practice. 
Oalytheae race who are eligible for the 
Frnsh eleven voted. Lewis II. Keith of 
of Bridgewater was .hose., manager by 
an overwhelming majority. 

Both men are popular anion" their 
classmates and each has distinguished 
himself for eflicient work accomplished 
thus far. "Bed" Sullivan has prov, u 
hilU self an ahleKeneralontbeurid.ro... 
and with another seasons trelnlngh« 
ought to be a valuable, nan lor KW 
(i ,„,. HI. jadgemeat la his chole. •> 
ploy. aeqaerternaek have been at all 

times effective and opportune. 

AtarecenUnee.inuheldby.Ler.esb- 

ma n class in dark Hall. Heeer.. Balll- 
vanand Keith wee elected as » com- 
Britice of two to make complete arrange- 

mentsfor.be annual Soph.m.ore-r resh- 

man football gam«- 6w * 1 " ,t, ' n " t 

already beinu n.anifeste.l by the ...em- 

b«n Of both classes. The FrcBmen 

are leaving no stone nnturn,! in order 

,0 insure victory. The Freshn.a.. h. 
not forgotten the defeat in tbe rope p. 1 

ooateri and they are oat fof -weei re- 

venge. 



Charles W.Steele of Marbb-head was 

,. l( . ( . H ,i assistant manager of the ItJSS 

track team. Under the new rulinu h. 

boeomee manager In his junior year. 
s.eeic wee elae.trea.ttwr for two term. 

,a„ year and manager... , be class ten- 
nis, earn. He is also class ebeer leader. 

|| ( . placed in Ihe i.ltetelass Hack meet 
last spring, winning third place ... the 
half mile. He 1. a member ol the 
Lambda Chi Alpha Fraternity. 



Flashlights 

Interiors 

College Scenes 

Arrange with expert through 
ELISHA BLISS '24 

THE HOME 

of Aggie Men 

IN 

SPRINGFIELD 

IS 

Hotel Worthy 



ECONOMICS CLUB MEETINGS 

The faculty of the Ag. .cultural Boo- 

nulni ,s Depaatmen, entertained the 

• \,M,ie Be." major men at asocial last 

Weunes.lay evening in the Memorial 

Bnlldlng. 
[ 8 addlUoa to the social tlmeaadtb. 

( , in sump.io„ of cider and doaghnote, 
.business meeting was held and the 
following offleere elected to take charge 
oft l„ "Aggie «c." Club for thej coming 
,,,„,: President, .1. Dwyer "22 : \ ne 
Preetdeat, folnom '»; Secretary and 
Treaenrer, Miss F. Marti.. »SS. 
n was decided to hold meeting, twice 

! t week for the coming year, and . series 
Of talks were planned Which are to be 

nive.. on subjects of wonomlc Internet, 

by well-known economoists. 



Drop in for a meal or over 
night. 

TARIFF REASONABLE 



Main and Worthington Streets 

Gir« m« • trial) 



THE 
DRAPER HOTEL 

Northampton, Mass. 

The Leader for College Banquets 



iWm. M. Kimball, Prop. 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Wednesday, November 9, 1921. 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Wednesday, November 9, 1921. 



THE MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIAN 



Published every Wednesday by the 
Students of the MaHsachusetU Ag- 
ricultural College. 



BOARD OF EDITORS. 



BEi.niwo T. Jackson '22 Editor-in-Chief 

Hobakt W. Bfhino "U M»nagln B Editor 

AasociATK Editors. 
Lutiikr B. Arkinoton •» Ass't Man'g Kdltor 
KBNNSTH A. BARNARD V < ompetltlon Editor 
JohnM.W.,.tt,*h'2S Athletic Editor 

R,rn. M. Woo,. >>H Kxclwnse Kditor 

BTANI.ET W. BKOMI.KY *» 
IRVINU W. Bl.AI.K. 'TA 

■ovonoa Ooas* ti 

El. ism A K. BUSS, .Ik.. '24 

Business Department. 
Charles A. Buck '22 Business Msnsesr 

Myron G. MURRAY '22 Advertising Manager 
Owen E. Kolsom '28 Circulation Manager 

HOLDEN WlllTTAKBR '28 
CuffORB L. BEI.I'EN '24 
ROBERT K. BTKKRE '24 

Subscription $2.00 per year. Single 
eopies, 10 cents. Make all orders paya- 
ble to Tbe JVlassachuaetta Collegian. 

In case of change of addreae, sub- 
•oribers will please notify the business 
manager as soon as possible. 



Entered as sscond-class matter at the Amherst 
pott Office. Accepted for mailing at special 
rate of poetage provided for in aection 110S. Act 
of October. 1»17 authorised August 20. 1918. 



well. The cheering section at the 
Rhode Island EMM made the coaches 
and players feel line. Ami now comes 
the New Hampshire, tilt heralded by 
the ('ramie Staters as their greatest 
light— and it is a game with a holiday 
before it and a Sunday after it. giving 
an almost unprecedented opportunity 
for a record showing of Aggie rooters at 
an out-of-state contest. Nobody in 
Aggie athletics is offering any alibi for 
the recent setbacks. Let's not be giv- 
ing alibis ourselves for not showingour 
unstinted support to our lighting var- 
sity. 

u B«a" l'oud, who died on our campus 
after showing himself one of the gritt- 
iest athletes Aggie has ever known, lias 
;. poem that he called his favorite. It 
had in it that which appealed to his 
red-blooded spirit, and the one Verse of 
it may well be read by any who have 
doubt as to the real worth of the team, 
they are trying to support. The Aggie 
varsity has met the test. 

"tiik tkst." 
It isn't the victory after all 
But a light that a brother makes. 
The man, who crushed against the wall, 
Still stands up erect and takes 
The blows of fate with his head held 

high, 
Bleeding and Bruised and pale, 
Is the man who will win in the bye and 

bye, 
For he isn't afraid to fail. 



tire college. While it may be deviltry 
which prompts one to break a class rule, 
it is nothing less than sheer lack of de- 
eescj which incites a freshman tobreak 
such a college principle. 



COMMUNICATION 



TOWN HALL 



NOTICE 



Wed'sday 

Nov. 9 



A Man May be Down. 

Aggie football is down Flat on its 
back! YesSir!!! Walked over in the 
lasl two games, the little "football col- 
lege" apparently has every right to be 
prelty glum. And that in mid-season, 
too, with the hardest, toughest due of 
contests yet before it. Isn't it enough 
to make the most moderated kind of 
crab rear up on its bind claws and wave 
its mandibles in hysterical, ironical, 
satirical rage ? Of course ! Yes Sir ! ! 

But just a minute ! Crab if you must , 
but we've a hunch that a couple of 
weeks hence all the little crabs will 
have turned into bantam roosters, crow- 
ing their valiant loudest for M. A. C. 
Even the lowdown earthworms turn. 
And if you have watched the varsity 
work in the last three, end-on-end water- 
loos, you will agree "them fellers ain't 
no worms." Just for example, did you 
realize that in that Uhode Island game 
last week. Aggie ran up fourteen first 
downs to Rhode Island's four, gained 
250 yards to Rhode Island's 80 and were 
set back only by fumbles in the most 
critical moments? And you surely saw 
the Amherst and Vermont contests. 

The Aggie varsity reminds us a bit of 
one of our presidents. We read some- 
where: "When Abraham Lincoln was a 
young man he ran for the Legislature 
in Illinois, and was defeated. He next 
entered business, failed, and was seven- 
teen years paying his debts. He was 
engaged to a beautiful young woman 
—she died. Entering politics again, he 
ran for congress, and was again de- 
feated. He then tried to get an appoint- 
ment in the United States Land Office, 
but failed. He then became a candi- 
date for the United States Senate, and 
was badly beaten. He ran for vice- 
president, and was once more defeated. 
"When you think of your hard luck, 
think of Lincoln." 

Such a plucky, hard fighting, well 
coached and well trained aggregation 
as our eleven will not be denied forever. 
Depend on that. Somebody has a sur- 
prise coming soon, and we must all be 
there at the killing. The student body 
has backed the losing team exceedingly 



Billboards. 
We are informed lliai an application 
is now pending before the Selectmen of 
Amherst for permission to erect a bill- 
board on North Pleasant Street some- 
where near the entrance to the Aggie 
Campus. We believe that the students 
of M. A. C. have serious objections to 
such a procedure, and if they have not 
they certainly should have. 

Arguments against the erection of 
such an unsightly addition to the land- 
scape are two-fold. In the first place, 
it should be the earnest desire of every 
Aggie man to keep this locality as clean 
and wholesome and homelike as poss- 
ible. This is an aesthetic view of the 
matter. The other argument is an 
economic one. We feel that the intru- 
sion of advertising bill-boards would 
seriously impair the value of the pro- 
perty in this vicinity. 

The nine fraternities represented in 
the Interfraternity Conference own and 
pay taxes on properly in this neighbor- 
hood on North IMeasant St. Therefore, 
such a decrease in property value would 
seriously affect our societies. Moreover. 
much of the college life centers around 
North Pleasant Street, where it ispro 
posed to erect the advertisement. It is 
up to us to keep (he place free from 
such eye-sores and if every loyal Aggie 
man will bring his influence to bear in 
the proper manner, public opinion will 
be formed which will condemn the 
affair as unsuitable from every poiut of 
view. 



Freshman:'.: 
Walking with Co-eds may be sport- 
manship, not jumping nines may be 
sulkiness, failing to appear at early 
morning sings may be laziness, but for 
a freshman to appear in assembly wear- 
ing a sweater and no coat, violates col- 
lege spirit. In the first place, the fel- 
low broke a college rule; in the second 
place, he defied a Freshman rule; and 
in the third place, he, as President of 
bis class, made himself a bad exam- 
ple to incite the rest of his classmates. 
His misconstrued class spirit has right- 
fully aroused the indignation of the eu- 



Editok Tiik Coi.i.kgian: 

How still the chapel bell has been 
these last three Saturday evenings. 
Aggie has been beaten on the gridiron 
by Amherst, Vermont and Uhode Island. 
Has she been beaten in spirit as well as 
score? Judging from the bitter ex- 
clamation.- that escape from those who 
know nothing of our situation, yes; but 
by all that Aggie tradition holds 1 
should say absolutely and positively, 
HO, Our song says, "Maroon and White 
has won the tight, her boys have played 
the game." Could anyone doubt that 
our team has 'played the game?' 

We beat Connecticut Aggie, tied Bates 
and won from Worcester. In those 
three games the breaks were either even 
or with us. Now, for the first time in 
years, an Aggie team has suffered three 
consecutive defeats. But were these 
all true defeats? Amherst played a 
great game and when our opportunities 
to score came something always hap- 
pened. In the Vermont game our team 
played mighty good football but again 
'old man jinx' was on the job and we 
lost OB the breaks. At Rhode Island 
the boys played their best, carrying the 
ball well until the crucial moments, 
when 'blooey' and our score remained 
the same. The Aggie team has carried 
the ball three yards to every two of its 
opponents, so you can judge for your- 
self, Student Body, whether or not old 
Aggie has gone down to defeat in every 
sense of the word. 

There are men on that team that 
know the game from A to Z, and every 
name so far we have expected to win. 
The team expects to win against New 
Hampshire and the men on a team cer- 
tainly know its power and ability. 'Old 
man Jinx' is the only thing that is 
wrong and he is due to depart right 
now if not before. 

What I bav6 been driving at is this: 
we have got a team that we know can 
win no matter how many defeats we 
have already suffered. There are al- 
ways breaks in a game that are costly 
but right now is where the other side 
starts to pay. The Student Body can 
see that defeat is no black eye for some- 
one has got to lose. Forgetting our 
losses thus far, let us back that team "En 
Masse" at Durham and watch it win. 
November 11th is a holiday so dress 
warmly, put on heavy shoes and start 
in plenty of time to get there for the 
game. It will he a summer for New 
Hampshire's confidence, our backing, 
and the teams ability will ring that 
chapel bell as it never rang before. Let 
us make "Aggies' cheers-go thundering 
upward like a cannon's roar" that will 
make New Hampshire bow in defeat 
and realize that, to Aggie, a few set- 
backs are an inspiration, not a deadener. 
ON TO DURHAM!: 

R. M. Darling 



Mat. 3, l-'.vc. 
6-45, 8-30 

Thursday 

Nov. 10 

Mat. 3, Eve. 
6-45. 8-30 



Saturday 

Nov. 12 

Mat. 3, Kve. 
6-45. 8-30 

Monday 

Nov. 14 

Mat. 3, Kve. 
6-45. 8-30 



Owing to the ArmlBtice Hall. 
Friday, in the Town Hall, the 
Friday picture will be shown 
this week Wednesday. 

Marion Daviei in "Buried 
Treaiure." from the novel 
by»F. Britten Auuten. The 
story of a g irl who slipped out 
of modern New York into the 
thrillsof theoldSpanish Main. 

Scenic reel 
2-ree) Butter Keaton Comedy 

Agnes Ayres, Theodore 
Roberts. Forrest Stanley. 
Theodore Kosloff and Julia 
Faye in "Forbidden Fruit," 

s reels. A itorireous Cecil B. 
De.Mlllestor.v M iiiitrried life! 

News. Mutt and Jeff. Topics 

Bryant Washburn a ad Ann 
May in"An Amateur Devil." 
The hilarious tale of a "spot- 
less youth" and his scandal- 
ous quest of a blemish— all to 
win a ifi'l "ho landed he was 
too itoiul ! 

Newt. "Do or Die." Comedy 

Wm.FarnumandAnn For- 
rest in"TheRainbowTrail." 
by ZaneOrey. Tbrtltlnceequel 
to the great teieta success. 
"Riders of the Purple Hajre." 

Fathe. Mermaid Comedy 



Tenor and Mandolin Banjos 

Saxophone*, Drum*, etc., Reheadlng 

DEAN'S MUSIC HOUSE 

Cor. Main and State Sts.. SprinitMeld. 

Local Audit. 
Edward Landis. II Amity Street. Amherst. 

Have Your Next Suit Made to Order 

— AT — 

LABROVITZ 

THE LEADING TAILOR 
Fine assortment of Woolens on hand 



Full Dress Suits and Tuxedos 
to Rent 

FULL LINE OF DRESS SUPPLIES 

Cleaning, Pressing, Remodeling, Re- 
pairing and Dyeing promptly done. 

Single Suit* Preened, reduced to BOc 
On Preamlng Ticket* 50c 

It will pay you to buy a ticket. 



We do expert work of all descriptions. 
11 Amity St.- LABROVITZ-Phone 802- W 



Edith Hamilton Parker 

Graduate Teacher of Dancing. 

Studio, MASONIC BLOCK, Northampton 

FRIDAY EVENING, Assembly Class 

Popular with M. A. C. Men 



Private lessons by appointment. 
Tel. 761 Northampton 



ORCHESTRA 



After rehearsal last Thursday night, 
it was decided definitely to have Ray 
Switt coach the College Orchestra. 
From now on less time will be given to 
dance music, as this is running very 
smoothly, and more time will be spent 
in orchestrative work fof the concerts. 
The schedule has not been announced 
as yet, but will be soon. A real good 
one is in store for the clubs, thanks to 
the manager. 



Student Barber Shop 



YE 

OLD 

TIME 



HAIR 
GUT 

35c 



HARRY A. ERYSIAN 

North College 



A. MIENTKA 

Shoe RoamMng Whllm U Welt 

nkw men 

Mens Whole Soles. Rubber Heels . . . $2.50 
Men s Half Soles, Rubber Heels . . . $2.00 
Mens Rubber Soles, Rubber Heels . . $2.25 

Men's Half Soles $«-50 

Work Guaranteed-AMHERST HOUSE 




STAMPEDING the barer l>y «i» onslaught of hectic advertising is 
one wuy; VAWJE-GIVIVG with reul service is another— 
"THE WALSH WAY" of mm nring business. The recognition 
shown us is proof conclusive Hint w« make friends with the class of 
merchandise which we sell. With Iloo*e Uaiuo in order you should 
not delay selecting that *uit. CONSULT WALSH 




DELTA PHI GAMMA 

ON MOUNT TOBY 

Lest Saturday tome off the msmbert 
of t lie Delta Phi Qaiaata Sorority took 
their friends oa a" Baeon Bat" oa Ht. 
Toby. Tat whole party, chaperoned by 

Mr. and Mrs. ('. I. Thayer, left OB the 
;>-:«) car and arrived in camp at :!-:»>. 
Proa then until supper lime, Ibt hours 
were apeat in exploring the mountain, 

as man v who were on the party had 

never I D there. The clans assembled at 

,VlHI and a roaring lire was built, as a 
cold west wind was sweeping across t he 
valley. Soon alter, hot-dogs ami bacon 
I. aeon weresizzlingon I lie lire, and were 
followed by doughnoia, toffee, and a 
dewerl of toasted mereb mallows, n 

was a most enjoyalde feasi . Alter it 
was over a sing followed, ending with 
tht COl!ef« sunt;. 

The trip home was ol a different 
nature. The cars refused to run so 
everybody walked boms and the after- 
noon spree ended with an hour's dance 
at the Abbey. 



DR. LEITCH IN ASSEMBLY 
bast Thursday'* assemble speaker 

was Hev. Dr. f, A. I.eilch of the Metho- 
dist cliiirchiii AssbeiSt. Assembly was 
opened in the usual man net with a 
song, and then I bi* speaker was intro- 
duced. His subject was" The Fight for 
Hread." The loan ..I his talk was t lie rop* pall 
proposition thai •'Men shall not live on 
bread along." This was brought out 
in a well delivered speech. 



FRESHMAN CLASS MEETING 
The Freshman plats held its most im- 
portant meeting <»f ibt year last Thurs- 
day evening In Clark Mail. PrsetlesJlv 

trery member of the class was present 

and much business of Importance was 

transacted. President Kenneth B.Craig 

.ailed the meeting to order and pre- 
sented at the speaker of ll \ellillg 

Mr. Robert Martin 2:i, vice-president of 

the Bolster Bolsters. In a short speech 

he explained the real purpOM of this 

organisation. Me stated thai tbt Bolster 

Doisteis is one ol the most important 
clubs about the campus and srged all 

Freshmen who bars drams tie sbtitty lo 

join this organization which provides 
much amusement lor the students In- 
humation cards were passed out to all 

Freshmen for the purpose of obtaining 

information about each one's talent 
■long histrionic line-. 

It WSS decided 10 hold an election of 
I committee of four which in coiijunc- 

llon with the officers ol tbt Bolster 

Doisteis, Is to make plant and arrangc- 

meats fof a short play at lbs Aggie 

Ucmi i Dec. 17. The committee 

Sleeted was as follows: Helen .Snow, 
chaii man, Kmil J. Corwin, Harold 
Waite. and Kathleen P. Adams. 

Carlisle A. l'eekmaii of Melrnse High- 
land was elected msaagei of the rope 

pull team. He will have ibsolutt 
charge In arranging the details i«>rtiie 



FOOTBALL! I Aggie Stationery 



Seniors vs. Faculty 
THURSDAY, NOV. 10 

AT 1(1(1 O'CLOCK 



Receipts to help pay for furniture for 
the Memorial Building. 



with Class Numerals 
1922 TO 192S 



Admission 



25c 



THE NEW $3.00 GEM RAZOR 
SI.OO 

HENRY ADAMS & CO. 

The Rexall Store 



A. J. HASTINGS 

Newsdealer end Stationer 

Amherst - - Mast. 



M. NOVICK 

Custom Tailor 



SENATE 

The senate at their last meetinu ap- 
pointed a student committee of three to 
plan for a Mid-winter Alumni Day, to 
be held tOtSCtlmt next term. This 

committee is co m p o s ed ol took 22. 

Woodworth '2:5, and Nicoll '24. and will 
SOt la conjunction with a faculty com- 
mittee headed by I'rof. Sumner K. 
Parker. 



SENIORS 

A Senior smoker will be held Wednes- 
day at H-(X) p. m. in the lower ball of 
the Memorial Building. The meeting 
is to be addressed by some members of 
the faculty. Plans for the coming year 
will be discussed. The smoker com- 
mittee it, Uolman. Lowe ry, and Walker. 



FLORICULTURE CLUB. 

The semi bi-weekly meeting of tbe 
Floriculture Club, held Tuesday eve- 
ning, Nov. 1, In French Ball was very 
well attended by about forty student*, 
and much spirit was shown. The North- 
ampton and liolyoke Florists' and Gard- 
en, rs Club met in conjunction with the 
M. A. €. club, and twelve of the com- 
mercial men from the neighboring 



POMOLOGY CLUB. 

A meeting <»1 the Pomology Clnb look 
place Wednesday evening last. Nov. 2, 
in French Ball. About 25 students 
were there and made the occasion quite 
enjoyable. Pome fruits, vatiety Apple, 
Wsre served during the evening. 

Protestor Drain of the Department, 
addressing the dub. told some of tbt 

interesting experiences be had while 
working St Chicago last summer. Me 
also displayed the silver dips which 
have been won by the college during 
the last decade, and told about Hie 
teams which have represented Aggie in 
this blanch Of activities. There is a 
good tlSSd collection ol these cups, and 
just at present the club is looking for a 
suitable trophy room in which to dis- 
play them. 

GLEE CLUB 

Uegular rehearsals are being held 
twice a week under supervision of Har- 
lan Worthly ends the progress is well 
marked. Several pieces have been 
worked up and can be put on at any 
time for a concert. 



Cleaning, Pressing, Repairing and Dyeing 

Neatly and prom ply done. 
Work called for and delivered. 

Save money by buying a Pressing Ticket. 

4 Suits Pressed for $2.25. 

Dress Suits for Hire. 



Full Line of 

COLLEGE JEWELRY 

Let us serve you. 

ARTHUR P. WOOD 

197 Main St., "Hamp." 






SEE THIS BARGAIN ! 

Heavy Wool Jersey 

BROMLEY DRESS 



19 Pleasant St. 



Tel. 9-J 



— KOK- 



ONLY $9.98 

Colors— BROWN, NAVY, HENNA 
G. EDWARD FISHER 



JACKSON & CUTLER 

DKAI.KRH IN 

DRY AND FANCY GOODS 
Trunks Bags Suit Cases 



C&rptrvter & Morchousf, 

PRINTERS, 

No i, Cook Plsce, Amherst, Mass 



cities were preseut. 

, L t ,. also be put on sale. 

1 tie purpose of the meeting was f 01 ^^ 



SQUIB 
Tbt first number ol tbe 8qvib is at tbe 

printers and will be read; for distribu- 
tion at the Tufts game Copies will 



Candy Shop 

BECKMAN'S 
Candies and Ice Cream 

Northampton, Mmmomohuootto 



j an exhibition of chrysa tithe niunis which 

the visitors brought with them. These 

[were judged by the four-year class in 



POLO CLUB 

The game between the Northampton 



Commercial Floriculture, and a general and M. A. C. polo clul.s to have been 
discussion follwed. Refreshments of | played last Sunday was postponed, due 
apples, doughnuts, and elder were then to Dean Lewis* objection to M. A. C. 
enjoyed by all present. participating in Sunday athletics 



Tufts Game Infornnal ! 

Memorial Building 

SATURDAY, NOV. 19, 1921 
Two Orchestras 

CONTINUOUS DANCING BUFFET SUPPER 

Tickets, $3.75 until the 16th; after that date, $4.00 
Send checks for reservations to 

C. R. VINTEN, 86 Rleasant St. 



T-. M.^l,.,«,tts Collegian, Weaet^NwM*" 9, MM. 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Wednesday, November 9, 1921. 



S. S. HYDE 

opllolnn anaaeJ J»w»l«r 

a Hea»ant Street (up one flight. 

Oculists' Prescriptions Filled 

Broken Lenses Accurately Replaced 

Big Ben Alarm Clocks 
AND OTHER RELIABLE MAKES 

Fully (iuaranteed 



PRIVATE DANCING LESSONS 

MABRLLE LOVEJOY MILLS 

Individual Dancing a Specialty 

Mills Studio, Phone 466-R, P. O. Block 

GREAT PRICE REDUCTIONS 

Men's Half fMeeSewee * l - s * 

HMlGoodyMi ■""I''"'' ,Um,s 

M,. n - H \\ hole Neolln Bol« SB* flO»*rnar 

ItuMier Heels ' 

HhI whole Leather Holes Sewed ;<'.«! 



A// (for i ©« 



mtmmd I 



High-grade Line of Men's Shoes 
for Sale at Low Prices. 

J. GINSBURG 

19 Pleasant Street, on your way up town. 



WILL1ST0N FINALLY DE 

FEATED BY FRESHMEN 

McOeouch Scores Twice From Bril- 
liant Open Field Runs. 

Tin- Ki-fhlniiiiii eleven fiip|'«'d ■ mo8t 
Dttlag climax U) their football season. 

the unexpected happened when the 
heavy WIIHiton Academy lea* was 
.mothered by ihe agg« yearlings 20-0. 
Thla is the s.Ton.l time that an Aggie 
Freshman team bat defeated Willis.,,,,, 
,,„. am defeat being la 1915. Tan now- 

a rfa l Willislnn otlenee eonl.l do very 

in tie Ihrosgh the strong aggie line, 
while the Freshman l.aekliel.l was a 
poaale to their defence. Without a 
doubl t b. yearling, outdid tbnusealjes 

aad exhihite.l the linest brand of hall 
that ever a Freshman team had. 

Muuiidian and Marx were an inspira- 
tion on the line, whileTayloiand Cleave* 

eoTered Ihe arlai pcelttoae in excellent 
t.shion. Little llolhrook who repla.ed 
Sullivan at quartet la the first period 
played a beady laesa, aadCaaaaaoal 
centarwMooaepkoonaby bUnnetaek- 

!,„„. MH.eoiieh, wl.oerossed the goal 

twice, did some ipeetaenlai open field 
running, aod was reapoaalble for many 
Aggie trains. 



POMOLOGY TEAM AGAIN 

UPHOLDS AGGIES' "REP' 



MENORAH 



THE MILLETT JEWELRY STORE 



32 Mela Street. 



Amherst. Matt. 



—TRY— 

C. H. GOULD 

for first- class 
Watch, Clock and Jewelry Repairing 

13 Pleasant St., Amherst. Mass 



The liue-np: 

I |!l S1IMKN. 

lav lor, le 

Sham way i it 

Marx, lg 

Caaaaao, o 

(.leason, ry; 

Itonrldlaa, rt 

cleaves, re 

Sulliviin, <upt. <|h 

HoGeoach, Ihb 
Bldredge, rhh 

Taylor, fl> 



UII.I.ISTON. 

re, Strong 
it, Galbraitb 

m, May her 

<•, Tellayan 

lu, Starrett 

11, II. Telfayan 

le, Tike 

qh, Mills 

rhh, l'autney 

lhl>,Tiinmons 

fl>, Vlalog 



Wood and Warren Star 
The college was iudeed well repre- 
sented hy the two teams which it sent 
to the New England Fruit Show this 
year at Concord. N. H., Nov. 7. These 
teams captured first place in both the 
judging and the packing contests held 
at the fair, while first prizes in the In- 
dividual judging and packing also went 
to Aggie men. Wood '22, and Warren 
'22, heing the honored ones respec- 
tively. 

The personel of the teams is as fol- 
lows: Judging, Peck, Warren and Wood 
'22; Peeking, Peek, Warren and Barnard 

22. 

For the packing teams, M. A. ^ 
placed first, New Hampshire second and 
(onnecticut third. The order of the 
judging teams was; M. A. C, Maine. 
Connecticut, New Hampshire and Uhode 
Island. Wood was high man in the 
individual judging, with Warren fourth 
and Peek fifth. 

Although the teams came through 
this vear as usual, they did not bring 
home the cup. A new system is now in 
vogue, wherehy a much better cup is 
awarded, but only to the team which 
has won three years in succession. 
.Induing from the excellent performan- 
ces of this and previous teams, Aggie 
abouM very soon possess this cup, 



The second regular meeting of the 
Menorah Society was held in Memorial 
Hall on Sunday, November 6. Mr. 
Goldstein 25 and Mr. Corwin '25 were 
elected to memhershir, on the executive 
committee. Mr. Krasker '22 gave an 
interesting talk on "Oopport unities in 
Settlement House Work.'' 



AGRONOMY DEPT. NOTES 

Prof. J. B. Abbott hasten absent 
from the campus for some time on ac- 
count of sickness at home. 

Mr. Von Mechow has come from Syr- 
acuse University to take graduate work 
in the Agronomy Department. 

Mr. Ali of the International College 
at Smyrna. Turkey, is doing special 
work in soils at M. A. C. 



ALUMNI NOTES 



Fine Qrocerles 

CANDIES AND FRUIT* 

MASON A. DICKINSON, Proprietor 

PLAZA 

Northampton . Ma * ,> 

60LDSTEIN BROS. AMUSEMENT CO. 

Where the Best 

PHOTO-PLAY 

• • • 



Beori M. A.C. Freshmen 20, Willis 
ton t». Toueh.lowns-Medeouch 2. Kl- 

dredge, Goals """» loaebdowa- M<- 
Qooaefc 2. Goals missed- MHJeuucb. 
Time— four l.Vminute periods. 




Are shown. 

Program charted daily except Monday 

and Tuesday. 

KKKD'K r. HKI.MOM. Manager. 




WORLD FELLOWSHIP MEETING 

The second of a series of World Fel- 
lowship meHiims will be held Wednes- 
day at 1-08 r. m. i" " u> Memorial Ball* 
,,,.. The diacuaslon will be on '^Amer- 
ica's Popularity la the Far East." 

Mr. David Owen of the Student Vol- 
„„„.,.,• Movement is to be on the 
campus from Tuesday night to Wednes- 
day night. Up hi :l vntmatm of the 
Denison University in Obi", and has 
acted as the Christian Association sec- 
retary in the institution so he conse- 
quently knows the student's problems. 
He will be available for interviews with 
the students up to Wednesday night. 



1922 INDEX 

There are a number of copies of The 
1«.)22 fades still on hand at the Q. T. V. 
House. There is opportunity now for 
anyono who wishes extra copies to gel 
them at the regular price of three dol- 
lars from Spring, business manager. 

The management feels that the high 
aoboole of the state would be interested 
in ,he rude*, Because of this feeling 
the business manager is asking one 
man from each high school to take 
charge of raising *3.25, upon receipt of 
which, an Index will be sent to the 
High school. Any volunteers for this 
work will be gratefully appreciated by 
the board. 



CAMPUS NOTES 



BACK TO NATURE WITH 

THE LANDSCAPE ARTISTS 

The Landscape Club will hold a dog- 
roast at the Ml. Toby sugar camp Wed- 
nesday afternnon. 

Profs. Waugh, Harrison, and Macb- 
mer and about 20 landscape men wil 
leave Amherst on the 4-30 car and will 
return about 7. 

The primary object of the trip is to 
study the relation of trees and shrubs 
t„ their natural surroundings. 

Profs. Waugh and Machmer will give 
short talks. 



Albert W.Dodge '12. and Bill Cavin 
'19, were welcome visitors on t be campus 
over the week-end. 

•|| —Dr.Clarence A. Smith was elected 
President of the Philadelphia Alumni 
of M A. C. at the World Aggie Night 
supper. At that time Dr. Smith an- 
nounced the safe arrival M the Huh of 
a son. Kichard Norman. 

•15.— Edgar A. Perry Superintendent 
of the Walker-Gordon Laboratory Com- 
pany,.! uliustown, N. J . has been elected 
Secretary of the Philadelphia Alumni. 
He is just now making strenuous efforts 
to have the Aggie Hockey team make a 
trip to the Philadelphia Ice Palace for 
the purpose of showing the Quaker City 
bunch how the game should be played. 
If the plans materialize the game will 
he made the occasion for another get 
together of the Philadelphia Alumni. 

> 16 —Thomas C. Uphara is teaching 
English, Latin, and civics in the Hunt- 
ington School in Boston. 

Ex-'18.-C. T.Smith is at the Harvard 
Medical School. 

• 19.— V. I). Callanan is in charge of 
the Field Station at the Bureau of 
Markets and Crop Kstimates in Greeley, 
Colo. Address, P. O. Box 505. 

'21 — K. B. Baker is principal and 
teacher of science at the High School, 

Casco, Me. 

»2i —p. W. Brown is teaching science 
and agriculture in Bradford (Vt.) High 
School. 



Columbia has 22,000 students regis- 
tered; New York University 15,000; 
Princeton, with less than 2000 students, 
has turned away 1500 this fall. It must 
he necessary to pay speculators' prices 
for a class room seat. 



HOCKEY CANDIDATES 



MRS. PRUDENCE P. CASSIN 

sEL ECT CATERING 

at Reasonable Prices. 
Inform*!* • Sumolalty 

12 So. Project St.. Amherst. Mass 

Tml. BBB-M 

North End Lunch 

120 Pleasant Street. 

Our food is right — 
Our prices reasonable 

TRY US OUT 

w. bTdrury 



Alpha Sigma PM announces the 
pledging of Leon Ashley Began '24 of 
Walpole. 

gtglOl PW Kpsilon announces the 
pledging of Harold K. Atkins '24 of 
Weehawken. N. J. 

The Sophomore smoker, scheduled 
for this Wednesday, has been postponed 
until next Wednesday, Nov. 1«. 

The annual Six-man rope pull which 
was to have taken place between the 
halves of the Vermont game was post- 
poned at Ihe request of the Freshmen 
until the Tuffs game. Up to a recent 
date the freshmen had done nothing 
toward obtaining the rope for the con- 
test, and the excuse ottered the Sopho- 
mores by the yearilogS was to the effect 
that they ..ere Ignorant of the con- 
ditions governing the pull. 



Continued from page 1 



M. A. C. IN FRANKLIN COUNTY 

At a sectional meeting of vocational 
teachers at Greenfield, Oct. 31, the fact 
was discovered that all the teachers of 
agriculture in Franklin County are M. 
A. C. graduates. The following were 

present: 

R A. Lundgren, '13, of Orange. 

\V A Buchanan, '18, of Bernardston. 

A. M. McCarthy, '19, of Shelburne Falls, 

(j. \V Scott, '20, of Ashffeld. 

R. C. Peck, '21, of New Salem. 



The news competition for the Dart- 
atOUt* attracted 56 candidates from the 
Freshman class. Io picking men for 
the board, ability, personalty, and gen- 
eral aptitude for work are taken into 
consideration. 



team's greatest needs is for a good sec- 
ond-string goal-tender, who would get 
valuable experience working with tin 
varsity, and would undoubtedly hav, 
an excellent chance to make the varsity 

next year. 

In order to see that the team can make 
the most of its opportunities, more 
Sophomore candidates for assistant 
manager are needed. This is a much 
better opportunity than ever before, 
owing to the new system of electing one 
assistant manager at the close of his 
Sophomore year, who automatically be 
comes manager of the team after work- 
ing his year as assistant. 

Several good trips are being planned 
for the season, and the complete sched- 
ule, as far as possible, will be announced 
soon. 



East Entry 
NORTH COLLEGE 



THErCOLLEGE STORE 

M. M. RICHARDSON, Mgr. '23 



Basement 
MEMORIAL BUILDING 



P. L. BURNETT 22 
H. A. MURRAY '22 



T. T. ABELE '23 

H. D. WEATHERWAX 24 



JUST BITS. 

Twenty-eight members of the Am- 
herst College Glee Club will be taken 
on the spring trip through the South 
this season. Concerts will be given in 
New York, Philadelphia, Baltimore, 
Washington, and possibly at the Univer- 
sity of Virginia, The club will compete 
in the Intercollegiate Competitive Sing 
in New York City. 



INTERCOLLEGIATE NOTES 



Sophomores at the University of New 
York this year inaugurated a "reign of 
terror." It has been a University cus- 
tom to call the first Monday of the Year, 
'Bloody Monday." The Freshman chair- 
man was kidnapped hy the sophs and 
taken to a cellar in Brooklyn, N. V. 
Other Freshmen were seized here and 
there and thrown into the fountain or 
else had their facea blackened. 



NEW HAMPSHIRE GAME 

Continued from page 1 



of Harvard, builder of Soldiers Field. 
The new field is equipped with a grand- 
stand having a seating capacity of 3500, 
and also bleachers capable of seating 
almost an euual number. 

Memorial Field will surely witness 
one of the hardest fought football games 
to he played in New England Saturday, 
and the score Is likely to be in doubt up 
till the last minute of play. It will be 
a real little Harvard-Yale contest, with 
the scores of past games of little value 
in judgiug the outcome of the game. 



CABARET INFORMAL 

Continued from pace 1 



us to preference of tables (who you are 
to sit with). If no preference is stated 
the committee will assign tablet}. It 
will be the affair of the season if it 
works out in proportion to the commit- 
tee's preparations for it. Come early for 
your tickets and make sure of going, 
for a success this time will mean sev- 
eral more equally novel informals. 



A bolshevist is a man who has noth 
ing, and wants to share it with every 
one else. 



From the N. Y. U. New*: "Four 
Sophomores were ducked in the pond 
at the Heights by the Freshmen " It 
looks as though the tables were turned. 
At the call of candidates for the Yale 
Crew, more than 300 men reported. 
Some of these are veterans, and there 
are many capable substitutes from the 
old squad. 

Ohio University boasts of a seven foot 
drum for use in the cheering section. 
The drum is mounted on a wheeled 
carriage, making the top nine feet from 
the ground. 

Williams College is to have a new 
gymnasium to cost about $400,000. The 
plans calls for a baseball infield for in- 
door practice, two basketball courts, 
seven squash courts, an In d o or running 
track, and two tennis courts besides the 
regular gymnasium equipment. 

The Tech, the M. I. T. college paper, 
has apparently tried something novel 
by instituting a rotogravure section, of 
"pictorial supplement." This contains 
views of athletics, and other college 
activities, pictures ot the faculty and 
students prominent in college affairs, 
and an occasional snappy cartoon. It 
has made necessary a new department 
for the paper, the members of which 
have special privileges in attending 
various functions around the Institute. 
Withal, it seems to be a successful 
undertaking 

The annual Freshman - Sophomore 
rope-pull is one of the most interesting 
interclass contests at Rhode Island State 
College. It is planned to have the pull 
take plase each year soon after a thin 
coating of ice gets on the pond. Con- 
trary to the custom here, the two cap 
tains toss up for sides. If at the end of 
twenty minutes neither team has suc- 
ceeded in pulling the other through , t he 
side which has lost ground is pulled 
through voluntarily. The Freshmen, if 
they win the pull, do a snake dance 
over the campus, with their caps turned 
inside out. But in case of losing, all 
Freshmen who step out at the Sopho- 
more Hop must decorate their arms 
with crimson bands. 



KINGSLEY'S 



SODAS SUNDAES CANDIES 

Luncheonette 






SHINE AS-U-GO 

K, •member 

The College Shoe Shine Parlor 

for your 
Hat Renovating Shoe Dyeing. Shoe Shining 

ai is a i>iit > si.. i» An,, ga. q ts. e e. 



140 Main Street, Northampton, Mass. 



AMHERST BOOK STORE 

Note Books Fountain Pens 



High Grade 

COLLEGE FOOTWEAR 

AT — 

Economy Prices 



C. F. DYER 



M, 



"After Every Meal" __ 

WRICLEYS 



The Shoeman. 
Main St., Amherst 

M BIDE-A-WEE " 

Creamed Chicken and Waffles Our Specialty 

Ami other good things to em. 

MRS. a-. M STEBBINS 

Middle Ht reel. (Tel.4UVW> lladley. Mim 



COLLEGIAN DIRECTORY 



Associate Alumni, 
Memorial Building, 
M. A. C. Athletic Association, 
Non Athletic Association, 
The College Senate, 
Baseball Association, 

Football Association, 
Track Association, 

The Collegian, 

Hockey Association, 

Basketball Association, 

Roister Doisters, 

The Aggie Squib, 

Musical Clubs, 

Nineteen Hundred Twenty-two Index, 

Nineteen Hundred Twenty-three Index, 

Y. M. C. A., 




TEN 

FOR 

FIVE CENTS 



B130 



The fl avor last s! 



WEBSTER'S STUDIO 

Nash Block 
AMHERST SHOE REPAIRING CO. 

Your Shoes Repaired 

WHILK YOU WAIT 

s 

H 
E 
SHEPARD 
A 
R 
D 

Furnishings, Shoes 



Telephone 

Richard Mellen, Ass't Sec. 175-J 

Richard Mellen, Manager 175-J 

C S. Hicks, General Mgr., 4°3~ M 

F. P. Rand, Manager i3°- R 

A. W. Smith, President 8377 
C. F. Clark, Manager 280 
William H. Peck, Manager 8325 
Richard Newell, Manager 8316 

B. F. Jackson, Editor 404- W 
F. S. Tucker, Manager 8377 
S. L. Freeman, Manager 8325 
Gustav Lindskog, Manager 530 

C. R. Vinten, Editor 8330 
J. G. Lowery, Manager »7° 
H. W. Spring, Manager 280 
O. E. Folsom, Manager 8314 
K. W. Moody President 8325 



=HARDWARE== 

Come to us for 

Fireplace Goods, Coat and Tronser Hangers 

Ever Ready Flash Lights and Paint 

Clothes and Shoe Brushes 

Anything in Hardware and Cooking Utensils 

Alwaya glad to see you. 



THE MUTUAL PLUMBING & HEATING CO. 



WINTER WEAR 

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REV. J. E. WARD IN CHAPEL 

Continued from psge 1 



then, there must be the two kinds of 
thought activity, as there are in man's 
own couscious or subconscious being. 
Subconscious being tiuds expression in 
form according to an impressed prin- 
ciple or law-developed within the con- 
scious sphere An infinite spirit would 
necessarily tind life expression within 
himself, and as an ideal must be satis- 
tied with nothing lower than image of 
himself. The absolute spirit must seek 
his relative. Personality must seek 
personality-and must come from per- 
sonality. 

So there is an evolution (1), a process 
and (2) a goal (a spirit personality). 1" 
other terms the Infinite spirit is seeking 
life expression. But having attained 
unto a free being further advance must 
be by the tree acceptance of an ideal. 
Has such an ideal ever been known.' 
The infinite being demands not alone 
one relative, the ideal must spread to 

the race. 

Psychology has taught that an ideal 
tends to realise itself. A man will 
grow into his own ideal himself. Here 
the speaker emphasized the necessity 
of possessing a personal Ideal of oneself. 
"One would be a fool to choose a 
lower Meal if a higher one were avail- 
able" -the figure of Jesus challenges 
man's thought of evolution. Is the 
perfect relative personality attained? 
The studeBt of history and of life must 
answer for himself. At any rate the 
self applied ideal, as presented to the 
race, must mean the only possible ad- 
vance or attainment of the race 

Moreover this is an immortal concep- 
tion of the self carrying one on to full 
kinship with the infinite and absolute 

spirit. 

Mr. Ward made a plea for every man 
to go behind his studies to his wider 
education and try to work out the 
meaning of life in the interests of his 
own advance. He took the stand that 
every modern gain is prompted with 
some such conception and all human 
effort becomes, thus, an expression of 
the divine life. 



SING LEE 

Main Street 

Quick Laundry 



INTERCOLLEGIATE NOTES 

Dartmouth has no dilhculty in ©rgea- 

king the college »-»»' ir - M '" ,lMVS ot 

the glee Blab automatically become 
members of the choir. 

Students from the I'niv. of California 
numbering 1500 journeyed all the way 
from San Francisco to Seattle I. back 
the team against Washington. Cal.tor- 
nia won, which shows what support of 
the team can do. 



A new track is being built around 
the old football field at Vale, which 
W ill he Completed sometime durum 
November. Features of the track arc 

twoMO-yard straightway*, with add© 

vanl oval at the north end of the .tit-Id. 
The. width of I he course is 24 feet, which 
allows loon for six hurdlers. The 
,. lllinie is designed so that all ra.es 
( .„,.pt I he 890-yard .lash will finis!. ... 
front Of the grand stand. 

An interesting device is being aaed 



j„ huildings at Stevens Institute. Hobo- 
ken. N. J., M a fire-alarm. The me- 
chanism consists ..f ■ copper oapiiiarj 

tube, containing ....thing but pure ftlr. 
The expansion of this air, caused by out- 
side heat,iu raseof afire, automatically 
closes an elect ric eirc.il, and causes 
a bell alarm to be rung in the janitor s 
olh.e. The mechanism is very sensitive 
to heat. In experiments will, the BB- 
|i;ll atus the alarm has been given ... 
sixteen seconds. 




You can save from 

$3.00 to $5.00 a pair 



— on- 



Young Men's 
College Footwear 

by buying at 

FLEMING'S, NorthMipton 



If s ProteinThat Makes 
Milk -Not Color 

Variation in color, from a light yellow 

to a brownish, will occasionally be found 

in Buffalo Corn Gluten Feed. 

This is due to the corn solubles. These 

contain a small amount of sugar, which 
is affected by the heat in drying. 

The corn solubles enrich the feed. They 
give it more protein, more phosphates, 
and greater digestibility than are con- 
tained even in the corn from which it is 
made. 

This concentration of the corn solubles 
in the feed, with their rich qualities, is of 
far greater value to the dairy farmer than 
is a feed of absolutely uniform appearance. 



100 POUNDS NET: 






&**« 



aM$&^ 



C If you select your feed 
on these standards, you 
will buy Buffalo Corn 
Gluten Feed. Because 
then you will be getting 
the most milk at the 
lowest cost. 



PROTEIN MIHWUM 230 
gT" MIHIMI* iift; 



Corn Products Refining Co. 

New York Chicago 






MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL 



Vol. XXXII. 



Amherst, Mass., Wednesday, November 16, 1921. 



No. 7 



M. A. C. IS FIRST CHOICE 
IN THIS SATURDAY'S GAME 

Tufts Has Won but One Game. Ag- 
gie Regulars May be Forced 
to Keep to the Bench. 

lHl»*t!>tfffMM"f tbeyeat •»» *• 

it . Ion Alumni Field Saturday whew 

M \ c. and Tdftaelanta la tbelraaBaal 
roolba li struggle. Botb mm are In 
.,,„„„ the MOM situation Ibii real M 
,.,, - :|H wmiimiiu u...»*.aml hh lM.lli.-l«-v«-ti^ 

bavebeea pretty well riddled with de- 

,,, l!s . a win f..r either toaro.Satordaj, 
will mean at leael epartleJ tladloatlon 

„, gather unsuccessful season's record. 

For the Bret ItwM tbhi year, eggle 
wi il ba forced to MM lo ■ badlj bet- 
u-.,.,l ami erlppfed team agalnel bar old 
,,vai. end many ot lha reejalan will 
probably he forced la ell oa the rida- 
i ill( . s M | reealt of Injuries Melted In 

,i„. game InM Batarday. Bel " ■"" l 

Kohor, both Mar taeblee, arw ool of tbj 
game.' Kee'^awerlnt troai a wrenched 
knee, end u Bob' 1 fro* a badly ipralned 
ankle, received la Iheeeeoad quarter o« 

tl„. New Hampshire game. 'Dame - 

Qrayaoa was also tbreed oat <>f the 

Durham game when he received two 

broken rib.; aad "Plaby" OlarhtalaW 
U| , ia the Infirmary with a dteloeated 

knee. received in the same game. 

'•Stan" rreeaian oompletee the injured 

list, the varsity renter nursing a badly 

Infected hand. 
The eatlre Tafti team was rather 

Mverely battered la their nam* agataei 
B. r. t w .» weeks ago, bai all thereto- 
Ian era expected to he ready (..start la 
Saturday's game. Barrett, Capt. Baeeo, 

|.,('ain.C..hen, Ktelman, Vita, and Weal- 

er have i.een playing wall. "Baeh 

Wealer. who was hadly hurt in the 

i;. r. gama, has been the star of lha 
kfedford teem, be?lag haaa called upon 
to do the broal of the paeelo| and kick- 
ing in every name. 

I nils has won hut a single name this 

,„, defeating Korwlch to 0. 

rwo ties, one with Amherst and the 
..(her with Wesleyan. ami four defeats. 
received at the baada of Batea, v.i 
lll( .i.t. B. i'., an. I Bowdote, have re- 
sulted in a nther gloomy season. 

FR\TERNITY CONFERENCE 



JOIN RED CROSS DRIVE 

IN FIFTH ROLL CALL 



M. A. C. was Fourth Last Year. Wil- 
liams Won Banner. One Hundred 

Per Cent Wanted at Aggie. 
Once more •'The (Ireatest Mother in 

the World" is aahiog th<- people <-t lha 

United Stales to give their annual 

TbenkegtvlBi eoatrlbatloa f<>r the par- 
poae of aiding the rtrlekea peopled 

I he world Bach year thousands of in- 
valids are made more comfortable, 
Ihoiisands ot NCB are made well, and 

tboaeanda trf refageea are provided 
with bomee by this orgaolaatloB. Be- 

Udee, manyol the men who foagbl in 
tb« World War, who are maimed for 
life, and are now forgotten and ne- 
glectad, are made more eheerful and 

nappj by this eeet aympathetle aad 
helpful bead of lae aaaarleaa Bed 

( loss. 

Those men who were oeereeee, aepec- 

ially those who were wounded, will 

testity to the woaderfal aid ll ";> "'- 
oalved from thbi"Greateel Hother M .Thal 

is II. ...son why the Federal Hoard 
men at M. A- C. hist year ■wbecrlbed 
almost 100% memheiHhip. 

The meat work of the Ked doss must 

go OB. Millions are <hiii« of famine in 

some parts of the world; Hoods are 

BWhiBg thousands «»f people homeless 

Continued on page 3 



M. A. C. PROMINENT IN 

ARMISTICE DAY PROGRAM 

College Orcheetra Play* lor Dance. 
Faculty Among Patrone. 

Armistice Day was littiimly ohseived 



Amherst by esereises ..n the town 
common. The American l-e^iou men 



SOPHOMORES WIN CLOSE 

GAME WITH FRESHMEN 



Tarplin, Barrows and Bartlett Feature 
Offensive Work of Winners 



It was decided at the last Interfra- 
tcinity Conference BBOtlBg to semi a 

note to the bill-board committee re- 
qaeetlag them not to Breet a Mil-board 

on I'leasant street near the Colonial 
Inn, 

li was also voted that any student 
who is not a fraternity meinher and is 
now rooming with a Freshman will not 
be able to pledge a fraternity until after 
rushing season the second term. 

The .piestion was Drought up as lo 
whether or not Kappa Kpsilon (formerly 
Commons Clttb) should he admitted to 
the Interfiateinity Conference. 



With the memories of night shirt par- 
ades and pond parlies still fiesh in 
their minds, the Freshmen tried their 
utmost to even things up with the 
Sophomores in the class gBM plated 
last Tuesday on Alumni tield. But the 
playing Of r.artlett. the alert .Soph 

quarter, lha fieatfootedBeai of Narrows 

and the broken tield running of Tarplin 
piOTOd to he too much tor the yearlings. 
who were defeated 20-14. The Kresh- 
„„... weie ...nlident from the start and 
hut for an unfortunate fumhle by Sulli- 
van in the third quarter the eeore might 

have been even. 

\t the beginning of the game it ap- 
,,,.,,,.,.,1 as though the Freshmen were 
t p heavy favorites, for not only did 
,hev smother the Soph plays, but OBOB 
or twice threw the opposing backs for 
loawea. it did not take long, however, 
,,„. ,i,e Sophs to overcome their stage 
Irigbt, for, in B gradual ascent ap 
tD « gridiron they acquired enough 
punch to put the ball across the Fresh- 
man goal. The yearlings not to be out 
dooe started the second period with ■ 
bang It WM here that the Freshmen 
showed their best, for after Katta, the 
stellar Freshman end, recovered a fum- 
Continoed on page 2 



i i i i » i i ■ ■ • ■ ■ ■ - ..--- 

assembled in the court room of the 
town hall at 1140 and escorted the 
«-,,l.,iH. to the common. Here they 
lined ap in company front 

tormatio.i and the breeze un- 
rttrliag the Hags lent appropriate 
solemnity lo the occasion. At 11 45 a 

volley was tiled and taps sounded. 

From li-tHI to T2-02 the assemblage 
stood in silence in commemoration of 

tboM who made I he supreme sacrifice. 

Immediately following the eoee hour 
service 1). C.8. Walker, Uev. Mr. Ives, 
ebaplata of the Poet, and tfajei Ward 

Of the Canadian Army, addressed the 

gat hart ae;. 

During the afternoon, graves of the 
Amherst men were decorate.! by indi 
vidual members of the I'ost. Ihe exer- 
,-ises of the day were in charge of Com- 
n.ander F. .1 . Montague, farm superi.i- 
, emlent at M. A.C Other men repre- 
senting the college on the Armisl.ce 
Day committee w.ie K D. Harris, in 
st.uctorin market uardening, K Avery 
„f the Microbiology Department. Prof. 
C. S. Hicks, Dr. Gage, and Harlan 

W'.rthlev '2I». 

In the evening the l'.-st held a ball in 
,he Town Hall, which was well at- 
tended by students and faculty as well 
as townspeople. All were well pleased 
with the eight piece orchestra from the 
M. A. C Musical Clubs. During inter- 
mission a series of lableaus were pre- 
sented. Ihe first depicted the call to 
arms in 1»1». The second, mother and 
tather bidding good-bye to (heir son. 
The third, a scene at the front, at the 
„„,„„.,„ W hen the armistice wai signed. 
\,,.l fourth, the decorating of graves, 
"Lest We Forget". The patrons and 
patio. messes of the dance were I'rof. 
ami Mrs. Patterson, and Mi. and Mrs. 
Keiiney from this college. 



GRAYSON'S SCORE ONLY 
BRIGHTNESS FORM. A. C. 

Sturdy M. A. C. Team Fights Way to 

a Touchdown After Trailing 

by Seven Scores. 

New Hampshire proved its contention 
to having the best stHte college team in 
New Knglaml by decisively and over- 
whelming'y trouncing MA C, W-7, l« 
their annual grid clash on the new Me- 
morial Field la Durham laul Saturday. 
The game was one of the best exhibit- 
ions ot football seen by Aggie enibu«l- 
asts this yenr in spite of Ihe distressing 
fact that the Cranite Staters were by 
far (he strongei team, and Aggie could 
only excel in grim, plucky fighting; 

spirit. 

The game was played on a wet, 
slippery tield, although a thick cover- 
ing of hay was removed only ju«t he- 
fore starting. A eold dri/./.le fell dur- 
ing most of the playing time, and 
slowly melted away the snow which 
wee giving a decided wintery appear- 
ance to the northern lamlecaue. The 
had playing condition* hampered Aggie 
defensively a« the heavy New Hamp- 
shire hacks literally "leaned" the 
lighter Aggies, who dug frantically for 
toe holds in the mire, hack for yards, 
time after lime. But, pm.r conditions 
aaide, New Hampshire had the goods, 
produced Ihe best brand of football that 
Coach tiore's men have been up against 
this season, showed off "Dutch" 
Connors as the best back we have seen 
this fall, and generally gave the Im- 
pression that M. A. C. was outclassed. 

The New Hampshire Stale rooters, 
led by a lug hand, were jubilant 
throughout. Aggies sons were there 
on their soaking little bleacher, over 
llM) strong, including a truckload of co- 
eds, who braved the worst weather in 
months to travel 170 miles and support 



COLLEGIAN COM- 
PETITION STANDING 

The standing of competilois lor the 
Massachusetts Collegian, to the current 
issue is as follows: 

K.litorial Department. 
1H-44 
Kennedy thi* 

Darling "^ 

White eJ 

Head U 

ISM 
Corwin 7.3 

Batal 5.3 

Taube 4.6 

Business Department. 
1925 
Slade 7.3 

Simpson CG 




CABARET-INFORMAL 



Tickets go up tomorrow morning 
to $4.00. 

SEE Vinten, Oowdy, Lew, Beal, 
Mosely, Spring, Thompson, Alex- 
ander, or Sargent, NOW-Tonight, 
and get your tickete atill at $3.75. 



ALUMNI ! 



We hope that many of you are 
coming. We know that aome fif- 
teen or so are, but we want FIFTY 
or ao. 



Dancing commences immedi- 
ately following the Tufts game. 



Tin Mrffnrji^ Wednesday, November 16, 1921. 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Wednesday, November 16, 1921. 



their team. The Au'gie section had ealjP 
one chance to be joyous, that in the 
last quarter when "Dame" (Irayson 
plunged across for a tally, after a New 
Hampshire fumble, and some good 
offensive foothall. During the contest 
M. A. (.'. was not penalized mice, while 
New Hampshire lost over 100 yards in 
this way, once being oenalaed for cut- 
ting <lown '-bob" Motor, and losing a 

touchdown, which Litchfield had made 
on a Ion n run. 

New Hampshire started the game 
by kicking oil to Abie's 20-yard line. 
After two plays had Betted but live 
\ai.ls. "Lavvy" kicked back to New 
Hampshire's 80 yard line. New Hamp- 
shire at once started a march, but were 
linally beld for three downs on the 86- 
yard line, and tried a field goal but 
failed. The remainder of the half was 
a slaughter \. II. S. gaining livelouch- 
doWM. Litchfield, Connors, Farmer. 
Went wort h,:.nd bell each gol one, work- 
inn long end runs and smashing line 
plays, while the AyL'ies, when they 
held the ball, could make little im- 
pression on the heavy N. H. S.line. 

between the halves, t lie N. EL B. 
band uave a baud concert and solids 
were hii nu, and later Aggie rooters 
lustily ta«g their college solids. The 
•Mead half started where Hie first half 
left Off. Two more scores came rapidly . 
Then the Angles threatened for the 
first time, but wcie forced to kick. New 
Hampshire started back with it, but a 
fumble gave aggie the ball on the N. 
H. S. 91-yard line. A forward succeed- 
ed, and nave a lirsl down. (irayson 
pushed through for the score. New 
Hampshire gained one more score late 
iu the game, and the student body 
showed twice the enthusiasm over this 
comeback as over any previous score. 

The aggiee fottght namely to the 
Md,«*lag 21 mum; in atleiiiptinn to stem 
the tide. All the men .lid very well. 
As a result of the fray Mohor, .Salmon, 
(.rayson, (lark, and Freeman are pretty 
well crippled. Connors was the big 
man for New Hampshire. 
The line-up : 



SOPHOMORES WIN 

Continued from page 1 



,,!,. his lean, ploughed up the held in 
sweeping gftlM Hon, the 20 yard line, 
M()t to he stopped until they scored a 
, 1(I1 ,.| 1( |„ W1 ,. The qnartW ended with 

the teams tied 7-7. 

TheSophomores,reali/ing the liiimili- 
itl0 „ th:(t would necessarily be resul- 
tant from a defeat, commenced the sec- 
ond parlod Wllb plenty of ight. lbe 
i(( ,. liril , v with which bartlet. threw his 

forward., and the deftness with which 
,..„.,, Ua grabbed them, more than oi.ee 
itartled the strapping Freshmen. 

ta a Fnshman play during tins per.o.l 
Sullivan, the Frosh captain, was tackled 
ho hard that he fumbled the ball,wh,re- 

„,„,„ Bartlett,the opposing quarterback, 

looped up. he ball ami raced halt the 
jeo-iB of the field for a touchdown, 
■mi's was an unlucky break tor. he 1MB 

team fori! piwod t" be 'be martin by 

which the Sophs won. 

The third period was full of t hulls. 
The Freshman rooters held, heir breath 

when the rearltegi beld oa the two 

yil rd stripe, but . he class of l'.»2». jumped 
will, joy a little Inter when barrows the 

„ dv'end raced arouml the Frosh 

..leven lot another touchdown. WttB 
Bldredge au.ISullivano.it, (he yearling 
mad* a dying attempt to score. Mc- 
Qeoacb the reliable little fullback, 
whose work during the entire game was 

excellent, look lbe ball on •oeeeeelw 

rushes and planted it in .he shadow of 
, he Sophomore t;oal|M.s.s. It was I, civ 
,hat little llolbrook. who replaced 
Sullivan, slipped around his left end 
lor a touchdown. 

The fourth quarter lasted hut lor a 
minute OWlBg to darkness. 

The lineup: 



Old Deerfield Fertilizers 

"Reasonable m dollars and sense" 
A. W. HIGGINS. INC.. South D«RF. E ld, Ma.* 



THE COAT OP NO EEGEETS 

That is what you get when you buy one tailored by Hart 
Schaffner & Marx. Big, roomy, heavy all-wool coats tail- 
ored with the best possible taste and at a price to suit your 
pocket book. These coats are absolutely guaranteed and 
we guarantee to save you money when you buy one Have 
one for the game. All-wool coats, low as $22.50, high as $50 

Interwoven Sox, Mallory Hats, ParKer, Tyson and Arrow Shirts, 
OaKes Sweaters, H. % P. Cloves. Munsingwear and Duofold Underwear 



M 



Official M. A. C. Outfitters, 

THOMPSON & 



SON 




257 Main Street THE PARK COMPANY, IllC. Northampton, Mass. 



An optical ■BOf which MIHM >P to t lie 
bltfbMt standard of Modern *.-ivi,e \.m 
!,m rely .... our skill and BOPi ta»te In all 
optical matters. 



Our Art DMrtbMt is «**#»*■**?*!? 

suitable for the decoration of f»t to Men. 
or for birthday and we.ldum Utfts- <.reetin« 
cards for particular i.eople. 




Deuel's Drug Store 



TOIL 



M. A. <'. 

re, (irayson 

rt, Mohor 

rg, Nowers 

c. Freeman 

ly. atadgetl 

It, Cotton 
le, Salmon 
.(b, Clark 



\ I m II AMI'SllllJK 

Neville, le 
Qadhoia, H 

Campbell, Ik 

Patrick, c 

Cotton, rg 

Bell, rt 

Broderick, re 

Fanner, <|h 

Went worth, Ihb 

Litehfield, rhb 

Connors, fb fl>. Lewandowski 

Score: New Hampshire 5ti, Mass. 
Aggie 7. Touchdow us — Connor- I, 
Stevens, Litchfield, Farmer, Went- 
worth, Bell, (irayson. (ioals from 
touchdown— Connors B, (irayson. Sub- 
Bttlatiosa: N. II. .S.- Perry for Neville; 
C'risteuseu for Patrick : (iustafson for 
Went worth: M. A. C.--(iiles for (iray- 
son; Salmon for Mobor; Leland for 
Nowers; Hardy for Leland; Alger for 
Muduett; Salmon for Alger; Field for 
Salmon ; Packer for Field ; Achesoii for 
Salmon; Bent for Acheson: Marshman 
for Tuiney ; Sargent for Beal. Referee, 
Carpenter of Harvard; umpire, Swaf- 
field of Brown ; linesman Green of Penn. 
Sold judge Ingalh) of Brown. Time— 
15 minute periods. 



FuKSllMKN 

Italia, re 
Shu in way. rl 
Marx, rg 
Cassano, c 

Qleaeoa, Ig 

Moiiradian, It 
Oleavee, le 

Sullivan, qb 
Sheldon, Ihb 

ateGeooah, lb 
Bidredge, rhb 

Touchdowns, Barrows 2, Bartlelt, Mi- 
(ieotich and llolbrook; fOftll &0U1 
tonehdowea, Bttim », hfeGeooca 8; 

substitutions, Freshmen, Nolle for (ilea- 

so„, Ward for Bidredge, Hale tor 
rll | Tumt . v (leaves; Sophomores, Nelson for Wilson, 
.J,,, Beal Donaldson for barrows, Whitman tot 
VlM.n, Williams for Wilson, Wood 
worth foi Tewhill, Chase for Porgee; 
score, Sophomores 20, Freshmen 14. 



BOPHOMOBKI 

le, bike 

ll, Kilbourine 

lH, Wilson 

c, Slael.ner 

rg, Forces 

rt, My rick 

re, Barrows 

qb, Bartletl 

Ihb, (jryzwacz 

ihb, Tarplin 

lb, Tewbtl) 



ARTICLES 

Shaving SticRs and Cream, Razors and Razor Blade, 

VICTOR RECORDS 



Kodak, and Supplies 



Fountain Pen, 



iS 



hoe 

SPECIAL 



Saddle Strap Oxfords 



tore 



$5.98 



SENIOR CLASS SMOKER 

IN MEMORIAL HALL 



THE NEW MA C. SONG BOOK 

At the Treasurer", 0ffice-$1.00 

LEARN TO SING ALL THE AGGIE SONGS 



NOTICE TO HOCKEY MEN 

All candidates for this years hockey 
team, including candidates for man- 
agers, will meet in Flint Laboratory at 
.-,-00 o'clock on Thursday, Nov. 17. This 
does not include football men. 

F. S. Ti'ikkk, Mgr. 



Trio of Faculty Speakers and Sweet 

Cider Account for Successful 

Evening. 

The senior class enjoyed its first 
smoker of the season in Memorial Hall 
last Wednesday evening. About BO 
members were present with Professors 
McLaughlin, MacKimmie and Patter- 
son as the speakers of the occasion. 
Pro! McLaughlin jaw ■ Ml of |ood 
advice that the seniors take an inven- 
tory and determine what they are to do 
before uraduatinu. Professor Mac- 
Kimmie emphasised the value and in- 
terest of the old traditions of the col- 
lege- 

An abundant supply of sweet cider 

kept the tongues |ot»g freely until late 
in the evening. 




When Vou Are Down Town 



DROP IN 



The Candy Kitchen 



FOR — 



Lunch, Candy, Ice Cream and Smokes 

COLLECE CANDY KITCHEN 

"The Home of Sweets" 



WHY GO UP TOWN ? 

Between classes drop into Aggie Inn for a bite to eat or your smokes 

/^QdE INN By the Campus Entrance 



CLASS PICTURES TO BE TAKEN 
AFTER SUNDAY CHAPEL 



I SIX LETTER MEN FORM NU- | CHAPEL SPEAKER, REV. W. H. 
CLEUS FOR VARSITY QUINTET DAY, GIVES INSPIRING ADDRESS 



Students to Notice Particularly Their 
Own Organizations. 



Practice Starts With Exceptionally 
Likely Candidates Out. 



Next Sunday. Nov. W, inimcdiaieh 
alter Chapel, pictureH of the Senior. 
j aB lor, Sophomore and r'resl.ii.a.i 
Hasnes will be taken on the step, ol 

Btoekbridge Hell, la ie« older na I. 

Also, on Nov. 20, the following pic- 
tures Will be taken at Mills" Studio in 
Amherst : 

Adelphia, il-M 
Senate, 1S-CQ 
Honor Council. H6 
Inleriiaternity (olitelence, 2*0 
On the first three Sun. lays iu Decem- 
ber, th« following pictures will he laken 
at Mills' Studio: 
Dec. 4: (ilee Cluh, 1040 
Orchestra, 11-00 
Roister Doisleis. 1 1 4W 
Women's Student Council. 12-00 
.bunt Coinuiillee 00 Intercolle- 
Uiate Athletics, 2-:i0 

i\>inoh>uy Jodgieg Team 8-48 

Dec. 11 : Cm. 1. K<;i an board, l©4fl 
Squib board, 11-00 
l,»les Hoard, 11-20 
Holders of Non-Athletic Med- 
als, 12-00 
Non-Athletics Activities Hoard, 

MO 
pae. 18: Peblk Bpeeklsg Cooaell, IOJ0 

Informal Commit lee. this 

year's, 11-0O 
Junior l'rom Committee, last 

year's, 1140 

Stock JttdgiBR Team, 12-(H» 
Wearers of the "M ". 140 
Ml students please make a BOteof the 
day ami hour on which any iroUp in 
which you are in is to be takea ; and 
be present on time. Help the Info* 
Hoard uet Rood representative pietaret 
for their College Year Book. 



MEN NEEDED FOR HOCKEY 

MANAGER COMPETITION 

Tlie hockey season is cominu, and 
next Thursday the call will go out for 
candidates for the team and for assis- 
tant managers. There are good op- 
portunities for makints the team, and 
the Bhorl season offers a strong induce- 
ment to the Sophomores to try for the 
assistant managership. Candidates for 
both the team and assistant manager 
are wanted. 

This week there will be practice in 
goal shooting in the Drill Hall, and 
this, with "dope" talks, will take up 
the time until the ice comes. 

FACULTY DANCE 

A Faculty dance was held last Satur- 
day evening iu Masonic Hall, with 
about 86 couples ftUeodiag. Profeaaora 

Harrington and Viets sponsored the 
dance, which was one of the best ever 
enjoyed by our faculty. 

The music was furnished by a school 
orchestra composed of some of our 
campus talent, and every one agreed 
that it was "certainly good". 

In fact, the dance went off so well, 
the music was so good, and the refresh- 
ments so satisfying, that a committee 
was appointed to make plans for an- 
other dance sometime in December. 



Hasketball promises to be the most 
successful sport iu College Ibis year. 

Lael Jane only one of the regular play- 
in, -Ued" Hull, was graduated, ■ feel 

which is very tlgalftOMt, in thai it 
leaves practically a veteran team com- 
posed oi letter men. As New Hamp- 
shire was situated in football with an 
experienced eleven, so M. A. C. is tort- 
unate to start (he season with an eXPC 
rieneed quintet. Captain Cnwdy .IJosei . 
Thompson, Smith. Marsliinan. and Hale 
are lbe men who already have been 
awarded I heir " M's. With a wealth ol 
experienced material from lbe three up 
,„., classes, these Idler men will have to 
U oal top speed to retain their positions. 
Sigh teen candidates are striving for 
a place OB the first leain. Tfcej air 

L982— Ooardy, Hooper, Randall, Boaer, 

Sn.il h. Thompson, and Weber: 190 
Heal, Dickinson. I laic, Marsbnian. and 
fane) : IBM Harrows, Hike Hrunnei, 
Hayes, Kane and Whitman. The re- 
sull should be a club capable of tum- 

iag the tabid on the strong Bteveai 

[BftlitUte team, which has proved such 
a llnmbliag block to aggie basketball 
teams in the past lew years. 

Menage! Freeman has succeeded in 

arranging abont Wgnaeeeajitb perhaps 

two ..pen dates. He had planned oa 

several more names, but on account of 
difficult lea with the athletic board, the 
schedule is somewhat shortened. [I is 
,,,,, n .ady to be published yet, hut 

among tbe colleger lo be played are: 

Amherst, Weslevan. Harvard, Vermont, 

si. Lawrence, suvens, Tufis, M. 1. T., 

and Connecticut. Two names have been 

arranged w'nh the laiier three oollegee. 

The date of the lijst name is .Ian. 7, and 

tbelaat game will be played on March 

4. 

Practice ii being beldToeeday.Tbura- 

,lav, and Saturday ai the Drill Hall. 
At the close of the I ball season Sat- 
urday, Coach Qore Will turn all his 
energy lO basketball, and all candidates 
will enter lh« competition. When the 
college open- lor the winter lerm. he 

should have a last aggregation »hi<h 

« e hope will surpass t he besl ever t urned 
out at Aggie. 



"Faith in Moral Law and Ability to 

Co-operate Must be Ideal of 

Conference. 



"If the Disarmament ( oiitiMencc suc- 
ceeds it will depend upon a two fold 
(alt fa of I he members of the coiilclcnce 
thai the moral law is supreme, and thai 
man has unfailing ability l<> co-oper- 
ate." Thus spoke the Hev. William 11. 

Day of Bridgeport, Conn., lad Sunday 

in < hapel in an inspiring address lo the 
•tndeeta. We have got to believe, and 

Ibadelegatee nvnel believe thai rigbi 

and mil mlgbl l« Bolng •" '" 1 »' l!,, ' 
world. We mnsl have a great faith 
thai lbe moral law is strong •aoUgfa to 
HUtde international relatione. Any other 
belle! is suicidal. The world is stag- 

gering under the .inshinu weigh! ol 
sustaining inilil arisiii. The O real War, 
with all its teuilic aoat Oi live- ami its 

drata of nealtb, thus tar baa produced 

M e beok la tbe niad race of nations lo 
arm anainst each other. Tbe great na- 

ttoni are eraberkfrd oa ■ Iremendoui 
program of mlllllarlam. The Halted 

Btatee, Japan and (.leal Britain are en 
R aged la high shipbuilding projects. 
Tbe Hnited Slates is ahead with all the 

power ol its resources, ami ll lbe! 

nations are following us as closely as 

Ibcv can. 

"'l see." exclaimed Mr. Da v . a " French 

Poilu, returned to his little farm, bold- 
lag a plow in a lurrow. iliawii by a dis- 

earded, limping, army borne. On '" 

,s I •, a ten hangs ..s.-less. and his 

back is bent low undel a tax of 1860.00 
per year, going towards I he Boat of past 
and future wais." 

The great men assembled al Washing- 
Ion have within their hamlsai. op porta- 

llilv (o check this cosily, hideous pro- 
gram of armament, but they must hold 

to a deep conviction thai nations may 

live together oaeelneblj and peaeably; 

ami thai the cili/.ens ol I In world can 
,,,.„,„.,,,,,., and live together withoul 

arming againa ■ another. With such 

a faith, I new .lay will surely come to 
tbe world, the new day which was 
propbealed centuries before Christ in 
the Hook Of Isaiah, ami which is .-ailed 
the New < ity Of the .Jerusalem in the 
Hook of Hevclations. Thus will be ful- 
filled a yearning of manhood which has 
existed since the dawn of civilization. 




You judge a trie by the fi nit 
it hears ! 

A suit, by the way it wears! 

No higher standards ol fabric, 
fit and tailoring than those ob- 
taining here. 

Wr are our own manufac- 
turers. 

■rue i.e»t nt •ventalaa eoUeae men wear. 

Mail orden filled 

R.OOBRI I'kkt Company 



broad way 
at 18th Si. 

Broadway 
at Warren 



"Four 

Convenient 
Corners" 



Broadway 
a I :«4th St. 



NEW YORK CITY 



Fifth Ave. 
al 41sl St. 



You can save from 

$3.00 to $5.00 a pair 



— on — 



RED CROSS DRIVE 

Continued from page 1 



HERBERT M. (DOC.) EMERY 

„ „,„v: » ...'.■•.. i GIVES DANCE TO M. A. C. MEN 

cancer, and other ,-lauues Kttal be eep- 

pfi ->ed. 

Your annual opportunity to be of aid 
to the unfortunate ■ttflereia la al hand. 

The rift li bed Cross Call for nie.nbei- 

B bip for ItW began Nov. ll and andaon 
Tbaakagiriag Day. There is to be 

, otu ,,etition aaaong the New England 
ooliegea tor a beautiful banner, which 
la to be presented to the college with 
.he hlgbeet per cent in.'.i.bership. 
Last year Williams won it. M. a. C. 
maintained second plane until the laal 
day, when she dropped to fourth place 
in the ■tending, aggie must win the 

banner this year. The membership lee 
181.00. bay it aside until yo.n can- 
raaaer sees you. Let's subscribe 1007 
at M. A. C. this year. 



Following the M. A. C. New Hamp- 
shire stale football lenseal Durham, 
Saturday, Herbert M K.nerv tendered 
an informal dance 10 the Mass. aggie 
students who were present at the uame. 
The scene of this social was in Thomp- 
son Hall, which was prettily and artis- 
tically decorated for the occasion. 

The music tor this informal was 
furnished by a three piece orchestra. 
\ short intermission was held, daring 
which dainty refreshments were M*- 
ved. It was a typical Itaee. aggie 
gathering of about M couples. bvery 
one present had an enjoyable and 
pleasant evening 



Young Men's 
College Footwear 

by buying at 
FLEMING'S, Northampton 

THE HOME 

of Aggie Men 

IN 

SPRINGFIELD 

IS 

Hotel Worthy 

Drop in for a mt-al or over 
niglit. 

TARIFF REASONABLE 



Main and Worthington Streets 

Giv« «• a trial) 



DRAPER HOTEL 

Northampton, Mass. 

|The Leader for College Banquets 



'He a live wire 
stepped on."— V((./" 



and you wont lie 



mnh 



Wm. M. Kimball, Prop. 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Wednesday, November 16, 1921 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Wednesday, November 16, 1921. 



TBE MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIAN 

published eTery Wednesday by the 
Students of the Massachusetts Ag- 
ricultural College. 



BOARD OF EDITORS. 



Kdttor-tn-Onlef 
Managing- Editor 



BBi.nmo F. Jackson "22 
Hob art w. 8prin(» "n 

Abbociatk Editors. 

Luthkr B. AR«. koton '28 Ass't Man'* Mtt« 
KBNJIBTH A. BARNARD '22 Competition hd tor 
Jo" 1.WH.TT.-.-- Atretic Kduor 

ruth M.WOOI.tl Kxcl.ange hditor 

BTAKI.KV W. BBOI1I.BT '22 

lUVIN.I W. Hl.AI-K fB 

Solomon Conks '23 

BUM* K. BUB*, J*.. "H 

Bo*in«sb Dbpartmkwt. 

C.AKI.k. A. Bi.ck '22 Bn.ine„. **■»«*> 

Myron G. MtTBRAY -22 Advertising Manager 
OWEN E. KouaoM '23 Circulation Manag.r 

HOLDKN WH1TTAKSR '28 
CLIFFORD I.. BRIKSN '24 
ItOHKKT K. STK.KHF. "24 



Subscription 12.00 per ye*r. Single 
. .opies, 10 cents. Make all orders paya- 
. ble to The Massachuaett* Collegian. 
In case of change of address, sub- 
scribers will please notify the business 
manager as soon as possible. 

BiiUr«dasse«ond-c1aM matter at tba Amnerat 
Post Offles. Accepted for mailing at sr-ectal 
rate of pontage provided for in section UOS. Act 
of October. 1M7 authoriaed Angust 8 0. 191». 

A Commendation. 
It was a gieat display of loyalty and 
enthusiasm that the students of Aggie 
gave lo New Hampshire last Saturday. 
The little throng that braved the el- 
ements to witness a had defeat must 
have been a revelation to outsiders of 
the Bpirit that reigns here, in spite of 
reverses. The co-eds again proved their 
devotion, and raised themselves still 
higher in the estimation of everyone. 
Everything considered, the student 
body deserves all the commendation 
that it can he given, for rejuvenating 
the "Never Give In" spirit at Aggie. 



COMMUNICATION 



The Dean'* Board. 
Bonos Thk Coi.i.koian: 

The Deau's Board of laBt Saturday 
portrayed a "bloody" struggle on the 
part of many students, all of them up- 
per classmen. Being one *>ardly hit, 
not a few of my hours have rfessed with- 
out uneasiness over the impression. It 
seems that I cannot find peace until I 
have written these few ideas, and I 
hope that someone will kindly lead me 
straight if I am now on the wrong path. 
My belief is that a great majority 
B eined are not to be blamed for their 
misfortune. The instructors and the 
administration retlect their inefficiency 
in this abomination. This radical state- 
ment will bring condemnation, hut 1 
am to be convinced to the contrary. 
Here are my reasons. 

The administration in lequiring so 
many hours of work weekly are doing 
an injustic to the students and to the 
institution. What instructor in his col- 
lege days carried twenty-two hours 
weekly of collegiate work and felt sat- 
isfied that he gained a maxium benefit 
from same 1 .' Did be spend one hour 
outside, which is theoretically required, 
in preparation for each class hour? If 
so did he not receive eight hours sleep 
daily and be surely sacrificed body for 
mind! for twenty-three hours remaining 
i„ the week would hardly give the 
needed exercise and time for other mis- 
cellaneous activities, Sundays being 



maintained as a day ol rest I And yet 
students at M. A.C. are encouraged to 
do this sort of thing. What is the in- 
evitable result? Nature takes its 
course. She will not rob her eb»W of 
provisions necessary for health. Ac- 
cordingly studies are neglected. Canny 
instructors see an incentive, more work 
—and the Dean Board; some give no 
other encouragement. 1 pay tribute 
here, however, to a noble few who pos- 
sess the spark of youth and truly under- 
stand nature. Bebel-tbe college is no 
place for you. Instructors cannot con- 
ceive cause for mediocrity in work. 
Their counseling is, "more time in 
work." A few geniuses can cany bur- 
dens twice their weight. But all col- 
legs cater to the norm. It is belter that 
we receive slight knowledge of many 
subjects, or substantial knowledge of I 
few subjects applicable to liking of in- 
dividual students? Who is the edu- 
cated man: one who knows not and 
thinks that be knows, or, one who 
knows and knows that be knows? Ap- 
parently this college is producing the 
the former. Many subjects students 
are required to study are a result of 
scheduling. Work of the Schedule 
Committee deserves admiration, but the 
powers beyond (hen. decree against the 
student. Castor oil to the child is dis- 
tasteful but it relieves congestion. 
"(Jut" courses to upperclassmen relie- 
ves the congestion of their aeedmic 
work, but out in the great Alumni class 
the realization of neglected buty brings 
remorse. The administrative officers 
reply to our moans for less hours of 
work with the story that labratory 
hourB require no outside work. If such 
could be the case, a solution would be 
reached, but instructors seem to load 
into the labratory hours what appar- 
ently is forgotten in the lectures. 

The maximum benitit from college 
cannot be reaped unless one obtains the 
more liberal cull ure, the broader out- 
look, or the philosophic atmosphere. 
How can students attain these qualities 
when they are --told" in the classrooms 
and do not have any lime to delve fm- 
thtrinour lihrary of books. If this 
college is to inhibit college tactics, 
which it is fast doing, and adopt school 
methods it is time a change be made. 
When upperclassmen fail lo attain pass- 
ing grade, surely there are factors other 
than that too little time is devoted to 
studies by the students; cannot there 
be some fault with the instructors. 
Perhaps they are not pulling the mat- 
erial across to the students, or feeding 
material faster than students can digest. 
We are here, professors, to learn, to re- 
ceive inspirations, to prepare ourselves 
for the solution of life's problems to 
come, to make the most of our time. 
We cannot do it by all work and no 
play. Perhaps that is the reason why 
so many students here are dull; too 
much work and no play. Recall your 
college days and do not expect your 
student to absorb as readily your know- 
ledge from a more mature mind to one 
still in developing process. Possess a 
human element and not a "laissez-faire" 
policy. Lelusmake the gory display 
of the Dean an affair of the past. Co- 
operation of students, of instructors, 
and of administrative authority would 
encourage the higher standard of schol- 
arship necessary. Will that incentive 
be in the form of less credit hours per 
week ? "• ■• ' 22 - 

We print the above only to show one 
point of view, not to give the impres- 
sion that we uphold any changes sug- 
gested. With Roger de Coverly, we 
agree that, "Much may be said on both 
sides." T»k EnrroB. 



CATHOLIC CLUB SMOKER 



The M. A. C. Catholic Club gave a 
successful smoker in the auditorium of 
U.c Memorial Building on Wednesday, 
November «.». Mi. Hickey of Northamp- 
ton addressed those present, giving a 
very effective talk on the outlook for 
I he Catholic Club hire at II. A. C, He 
...penally emphasized a very prosper- 
ous future for the club. 

Mr. Fearring of llolyoke rendered 
several vocal selections which were 
very good indeed and were greatly ap- 
preciated. Refreshments, consisting of 
coffee and doughnuts were served and 
I he most BBJOJftble evening was con- 
cluded With everyone singing, a lew of 
l he popular songs, around the piano. 

The Catholic Club has "got away" 
with an exceptionally good start Ibis 
year, but they need the backing Of 
every Catholic In college, The way we 
can give ihtin this backing is to attend 
every meeting. Let's all plan on at- 
tending the next meeting to be held on 
Nov. 81, the detail! of which will be 
announced later. KYKKYONK BE 
THERE AND MARK TOT CLUB A 
SUCCESS. 



TOWN HALL 



Thursday 



M:it. 3, Bve. 
6*45. 8-30 

SPECIAL 



Friday 



Mat. 3, Kve. 
6-45. 8-30 



Priscilla Dean Hint Nijes 
Welch in •'Reputation." « 

nets. Stuart I'atou'H tremen 
amis drama of woman against 
woman. i:»'nieiiil»er "Otitniil** 
the Law," and don't miss see 
In* this BTtAt drama. 

News , Mutt and Jeff. Topics 

Claire Adams, Robert Mc- 
Him. Joseph Dowlins and 
Mies iUlch in "The Spend- 
ers," from tba novel l>> Hai 
iv Leon v» llson and produced 
by Bon Hampton, prodoeet 
of Zane Grei't plcterat. 

Scenic. Sunshine Comedy 

Bebe Daniels and Marry 

Cotnrrlnv Myer * " ' The Harch Hare ; 

>aiUrCldy T |„. amazing adventures of a 

millionaire's daughter who 

made a bet that slie could 
lis i- for a week OH T. r . cents, 
and in New York City at tbat '. 



Mat. 3, Bve. 
6-45. 8-30 



Monday 



Mat. 3, Kit'. 
6-45.8-30 



News. "Do or Die." Comedy 

Justine Johnstone In 
"Sheltered Daughters, by 

i,,. i, |; son Howard. A 

story of New Vol*, allowing 
some of tbeadventures wbi< b 
came to I ill I ■ BO bad been 

, ■insdv ronflned at borne bi ■ 
to., rareful father and per- 
mitted no know led * ! ol llle. 

Palhe Christie Comedy 



POLO TEAM USES ARMY 
STYLE AND LOSES 5 TO 1 1-2 



Northampton Polo Club has Advan- 
tage Through Use of English 
Style of Play. 

The newly organized M. A. C. Polo 
U-an. played its first match last week 
Tuesday la Northampton with the 
Northampton Polo Club. The match 
resulted in a loss for (apt . Wenisch's 
men by a 6 to li score. 

The BjaiDa which was played on the 
fair grounds was started at 2-00 o'clock. 
Difficulty arose owing to t he fact that 
tbe Northampton men played the Kn- 
glisb style of game while the Aggie 
men were playing according the l*. B. 
Army rules. Because of this the 
victors were constantly riding across 
the field which of course was disad- 
vantageous lo the M. A. C. team. 

Hale IS. made the only goal for the 
team from Aggie. This came toward 
the latter half of the game and counted 
live points. The other half point came 
as the result of a Northampton safety 

on Aggie. 

The team wore the regulation uni- 
form with maroon ami white jerseys 
and white helmets. Eight horses were 
taken over to the fair grounds by 
troopers before tbe match. 

The M. A. C. line-up: 
Hale, No. 1. 
Wentseh (Capt.), No. 2. 
Jobnaon, No. 3. 
Hallett, Capt. Shufelt,Sgt.Cahan,No.4. 

Ililyard, Gilbert, and Pickup went 
over with the team but did not get into 
the match. 

Major Kobbe of M. A. C. was referee. 

There will be no mote matches this 
fall, bttt next spring it is hoped thai 
matches can be arranged with the 
teams from Norwich, Harvard, Yale, 
Princeton. West Point, and Other*. 



Why go down town for a 

First-Class Hair Gut or Shave? 

Patronize the 

College Barber Shop 



Memorial Building, H. A. C. 

H. J. DUWELL, Proprietor. 



Tenor and Mandolin Banjos 

Saxophone*. Drum*, etc.. Reheadlng 

DEAN'S MUSIC HOUSE 

COT. Main ;oi<l State St*.. Of* inuneld. 

Local aft 
Edward Landis. II Amity Street. Amherst. 

Have Your Next Suit Made to Order 

— AT — 

LABROVITZ 

THE LEADING TAILOR 
Fine assortment of Woolens on hand 

Full Dress Suits and Tuxedos 
to Rent 

FULL CINE OF DRESS SUPRLIE* 

Cleaning, Pressing, Remodeling, Re- 
pairing and Dyeing promptly done. 

Single Suit* Pre**ed. reduced to BOc 
On Pressing Ticket* *Oc 

It will pay you to huy a ticket. 

We do ex pert work of all descriptions. 
1 1 I n.lty St.- LABROVITZ- l'l.one 302-W 



Student Barber Shop 



SENATE 

Several Frosh reported at the Senate 
rooms last Tuesday evening and as a 
result a number are slated for an Arena 
parly which will take place in tbe near 

future. 

AH Sophomores take notice and dock 

some more Freshmen so that when it 

does come off it will be worth the 

trouble! ! LeVinjo tto ph o mor ett ! 



YE 
OLD 

TIME 



HAIR 
CUT 
35c 



HARRY A. ERYSIAN 

North College 



A. MIENTKA 

Shoe Repairing While U Walt 
M-.W PHICflfl 

Men's Whole Soles. Ittil.l.er Heels . . . |2.50 

Men-a Half Bolea. Bobber Heels . . . **•«« 
Men's Rubber Holes. Rubber Heels . . **••" 

Mens Half Soles **" :,v 

Work (iuaranteeii-A.MHKKST HOUSE 




WHAT YOU WANT WHEN YOU WANT IT ! 

*rHAT*8 what you find in our *tore. Full selection* and cons.aii. replci.i«.hiT.eiit» 

CL to keep up with the demand. No •1CUW, no alihiN but Hood*! the best there 

are, and all we hove rapacity to carry. Small profits, hi* volume, is our policy. 



HOLIDAY HIKE LEADS 

TO THE OUTING CLUB." 

v- a resuli of ■ most enjoyable and 

pleasant hike to I he llolyoke EUng* on 
Arn.istiee Day. a group of 15 Freshmen 
have banded together and have made 

preliminary arrangements and plana for 
the formation of aa "Onuag Club." 

The p 111 pose of this club is to stimulate 
greater interest among tbe Freshmen to 
visit lb* different mountains and other 
places of interest within a few miles ol 
Amhersl. It is planned I'- have the 
hikes always lake pine* OB Sunday aa 
that they will not interfere with studies. 
In order thai the Online; Club may 
|,e permanently organized, a committee 
of three was el. ..sen to draw up a con- 
stitution and a set ol by laws. Mollis 
B. Lovell ol Fain. .»nt I. was unanimously 
appointed temporary chairman. lie 
will be assisted by John F. I.'.rd of 
Met hue... and Francis I'. Bilskie of 
lladley. Any Freshman who is inter- 
ested in this club is asked to hand 
his name lo some meii.be. of lb* 
temporary committee. lVrmaoei.t 

officers will b* chosen at I he next mcel- 
inu, which will be announced later. 

SHORT ASSEMBLY LED 

BY ALBERT W. SMITH 22 



LOWELL TECH 35-0 

VICTORS OVER TWO YEAR 



Pierce, Bangs and Gallagher Piny 
Well for Short Course Men. 



Student Body Contribution for New 
Megaphone for the Cheer Leader. 



The Senior-Faculty football gan»« was 
railed otT owinu lo "wet gnrand*", so a 
■hoft assembly was held in its place on 
Thursday, Nov. 10. It was condueted 
by A. \V. Smith who commenced by an- 
Boancing that the game would be post- 
poned until Tuesday, Nov. 1".. at :i-:i<> 
p.m. Vinlen g*V* a abort talk about 
the Cabaret Informal, which is lo be 
held Saturday. Nov. 10. This is ex- 
pected to he the best Informal that 
Angie has ever had. l'roRran.s may be 
obtained from Gowdy at the Aggie Inn. 
Weatherwax "24 enlightened the stu- 
dent body in respect to the condition of 
the cheer leader's megaphone, and sun- 
gested that tbe student body contribute 
enough money to buy a new one. 
Iloopei '22 put this into the form of a 
motion which was readily seconded and 
passed. A collection was made as the 
students left tbe auditorium. 

It was announced that there would 
be a special train leaving Amherst at 
1-00 p. M. on Wednesday, Nov SI, and 
running to Boston. It will return on 
the following Sunday, leaving Boston 
at 7-30 p. m., and will stop at all places 
desired by itB occupants. The fare will 
be the same as usual. All persons in- 
tending lo make the round trip were 
requested to sign a paper provided for 
the purpose. The student body was 
dismissed 20 minutes early, there being 
no further matters to discuss. 



Oat weighed twenty pounds per man 

yet tiolitii.o; all the time, lite Aggl« 

Two-Year F.leven lost iis last «ai I 

the season lo the Lowell Textile aggre- 
gation last Sat unlay altera 1 at Low- 
ell. Mass , by a score of tfMI. The game 
was played on a rather slippery Held 
which made bandlinu' of the plgeki* 
difficult. The lirsl half was hotly con- 
lost ed by both teams and lb* home 
team scored when I hey blocked a pOHl 
on Aooie's three yard line, and reeovei - 
cd tb* ball. They look it over on two 
line plnngae. 

In the second half W*lgbl loM, how- 
ever, anil I ho visitors allowed (heir goal 
to be crossed twice in each period. The 
Two-years made a spun in the last .|ii.ti 
t.r.euinplclim three forward passes and 

gaining four first downs by bneblng the 

line on fake end runs The home for- 
wards slillei.ed, however, when ll.e 
pit-skin was placed on their ten-yard 
line. Here the visitors essayed a drop- 
kick which went wide, and tbe name 
•nded shortly after. Pierce, tbe Short 
Course end, played an excellent name, 
while lianiis starred in running down 
punts. Qnllagbei also deserves credit 
forgetUagOff some line punts. Ohlsen. 
I lie rugged halfback of I he borne ag- 
gregatton, played a very good offensive 
gam*, Moring twelve points for his 
team, aed tbowing up especially we'd 
on off tackle plays. 
The line-up. 



ACTING DEAN MACHMER IN 
MORNING CHAPEL MONDAY 

Tba students ea* be beneliled by fol- 
lowing the affairs of tba armament con- 
ference, was the keynote of Prof. 
Machmers short talk to the students in 
chapel Monday morning, To point out 
the Importune* Of the present day world 
affairs, the speaker read a statement 
issued by Governor Ox, urging all 
schools and colleges to give weekly 
tests on 1 lie progress of the conference. 



Aggie Stationery 

with Class Numerals 
1922 TO 1925 



THE NEW $3.00 GEM RAZOR 
SI. OO 

HENRY ADAMS & CO. 

The Rexall Store 



A. J. HASTINGS 

Newsdealer end Stationer 

Amherst • - - Mass. 



M. IMOVICK 

Custom Tailor 



Full Line of 

COLLEGE JEWELRY 

Let us serve you. 



I ARTHUR P. WOOD 

j 197 Main St., "Hamp." 



Cleaning, Pressing, Repairing and Dyeing 

Neatly and promply done. 
Work called for and delivered. 

Save money by buying a Pressing Ticket. 
4 Suits Pressed for $2.25. 

Dress Suits for Hire. 



19 Pleasant St. 



Tel. 9-J 



SEE THIS BARGAIN ! 

Heavy Wool Jersey 

BROMLEY DRESS 

— roB— 
ONLY $9.98 

Colors— BROWN, NAVY, HENNA 
G. EDWARD FISHER 



M. A. < . IWO-VKAK. 

(Jeitemoniy, ie 
Strntit , rt 
Baatiaga, it 

Uellerly, rt 

Gallagher, rg 
Baker, 

Ontliiise, lg 
1'anl, lg 
Adams. It 
Pierce. Ie 
Donnellan, Ie 
Banf*,qb 

Henry, rhb 
Trnll, lhb 
Haymond, fb 



i.o\\ km. recti. 

Ie, .Snyder 
It, Villa 



lit, Schwartz. 

c, Lombard 

rpj, Hire 

rt, Farwell 
re, Barrett 

<|b, FlagK 

lhb. Smith 

lhb, IMlinarter 

rhb, Walker 

rhb, Ohlsen 

fb, Hart 

tb. Macber 



JACKSON & CUTLER 

DKAI.KKH IN 

DRY AND FANCY GOODS 
Trunks Bags Suit Cases 



Carptrvtcr & Morchou**, 

PRINTERS, 



No 1, Cook Place, 



Amherst, Ma** 



Cmndy Shop 



'16.— Harold Caldwell announces the 
arrival of a son, August 5, lftl, George 
Brown Caldwell. This makes a girl and 
a boy for Caldwell. He is superintend- 
ent with Beabrook Orchards, Bridgeton, 
N. .)., and would tike to hear from any 
Aggie men in that part of the country. 



Y. W. C. A. 
The Y. W. C. k. baa arranf ad lor a 

series of six talks on tbe Bible, to be 
iiiven by Mr. F. 1". Band on the Enjj- 
lish Department. The series is plan- 
ned as a brief introduction to modern 
Bible study, and is to include one talk 
on each of tbe following subjects: The 
Bible as a Library, The Bible as His- 
tory. The Bible as Literature. The 
Bible as Prophecy, Tbe Christ, and 
The Life of Paul. 

Twenty-two of the women students 
are enrolled in the course, which meets 
from 7-00 to 8-00 v. U. each Thursday in 
tbe Memorial Building. 



BtECKM AN'S 
Candies and Ice Cream 



Northampton, 



Mm* 



ufts Game Infornnal ! 

Memorial Building 

SATURDAY, NOV. 19. 1921 

Two Orchestras 

CONTINUOUS DANCING BUFFET SUPPER 

Tickets, $3.75 until the 16th ; after that date, $4.00 
Send checks for reservations to 

C. R. VINTEN, 86 Pleasant St. 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Wednesday, November It, 1921. 



-r... M^rM.setts Collegian, Wednesday. November It, Ml. 



S. S. HYDE 

<>,,|U U..» «.»«! jeweler 

'.i 1'leasant Street (up one flight • 

Oculists' Prescriptions Filled 

Broken Lenses Accurately Replaced 

Big Ben Alarm Clocks 
AND OTHER RELIABLE MAKES 

Fully Guarantees" 

J. K. MILLS, Photographer 

Class Group* 
Amateur Dmvmlonlno mnd Printing 

Mills Studio -Phone 456-R 



GREAT PRICE REDUCTIONS 

MOB'S Half S<.1.« S.-wed *'•*• 

Mm'tOooiyeM -i:uM..-i rHevu '" 

H «n'l Wt«»l<- N.-..UI. S..I.-H;.n(H;....<ty.-ar 

Babber n»-i-u • " 

Men's Wb»H i.fiitu*-r JMh Seas* and 

Uodyau Rsbbw Ho»H • • • ■ ■*•"' 

AM Work Oumruntood 1 

High-grade Line of Mens Shoes 

for Sale at Low Prices. 

J. GINSBURG 

19 Pleasant Street, on your way m> town. 



CAMPUS CALENDAR 



7-00 P 



B-45 i 

1 :tu i 

4-30 P. 

7-(H) r. 
8-1)0 I'. 

1-00 r. 
H-(MI I- 

10-(H) V 

S-SQ i' 
440 i 



t»-H> \ 



THE M1LLETT JEWELRY STORE 

r.ll.ri. In— III refl Links. Soft Collar f'tna. 
mess^oVeu" !«,,,„. Kan'o. Mandolin MrieS* 

Fint Watch Rtp^rtiit. also »'•■•» »•««*•• 

replaced Pron-otly. 



32 Main Street. 



Amherst. Has*. 



-TKY- 

C. H. GOULD 

(or lirst-claKS 
Watch, Clock and Jewelry Repairing 

IS Pleasant St., Amherst. Mass. 



1-2-1H) M 



W'l I.NKKDA Y, NOV. 16. 

H.—SopbooBore class Smoker, 

Memorial HuiMiim. 

TucKsniY, Nov. n. 

N1 . Assembly, utoekbrldge 

nall,<ieorue VV. Coleman ot 

Boston. 

M.-Hoekev Meeting, PIIbI Lab- 
oratory. 

„.— TWO Year elses meeting, 
Social Union Room*. 
. m. -Y. \V. 0. A. Meeting. 

H,- Orehaatra Heliearsal, Me 

morlal Building. 

Fi:ii»av, Nov. 1H. 
. m Annual Diesse.l Market 

Poultry and Eftl show. 

. H> — Glee Club Heliearsal in Mi' 

moiial LtaUdtaa,. 
S.vn ki>ay, Nov. 10. 
M.-Anmiiil D rese e d Market 

Poultry and Kgfl Show. 
M . -Tufts vs. M. A.C., Alumni 

Field. 

M.-Cal»aret-lnformal until B-W 

in the Memorial Building. 
bVVDAY, Nov. 20. 
m. Cbapal, 15isho|) Thomas H. 
Davies of SprinulieM. 

Monoav, Nov. 21. 
M.-Coi.i .Ktii.w editorial meet- 
|eg. Memorial Building. 
, k.— tenia board nseellog, Me- 
morial BulMlng. 
Trnsi».u, Nov. 22. 
M _Y. M. <'. A. Meeting Ifl Me- 
morial Bolldlng, 
. M . -Senate Meeting in Memo- 
rial BulMlng. 
,.. M.-dlee Cl«b Bebearaal la 
Memorial Building. 
Wkonkhay. Nov. 2:5. 
— Tbankegtvlng Recess begins. 



THE COLLEGE LIBRARY 

Tries to serve everyone expediiiously. 
Hopes to he ot re/j real help to all 

Kludents. 
Expe.islohuvean up -to-tluW BreplOOi 

building soos 



Circulates hooks to all M. A.C people. 

otters m. apology '»<"' »■ »«»wd*d 

quarters. 
Lets students borrow MOM than three 

volumes. 
Likes to have folks browse BBSOag the 

slacks. 
Expects everyone to return hooks 

promptly. 

Gets, buys or horn. ws needed material. 

■stands ■ cordial Invitation to all. 



Looks up facts ami (inures lor busy men. 

Invites you into the dellgbti of scien- 
tific research. 

Begins the .lay at ft-00 a. m. and closes 
ai WO P. m 

Renews hooks for those wlio need I hem. 

Alwavs anxious lo learn of new and 

better thinys. 

Relies upon the telephone ami telegraph 

to net tblaga quickly. 

Yes, it oaghl to have a line new build- 
ing rijjht away. 



Y. M. C. A. NOTES 

l, lS l Wednesday the World Fellow- 
ship Group had an interest inn discus- 
sion, in which Dr. l'ano told those pres- 
ent of tb4 present relations hel ween the 
United Stales and Japan. 

In th.- next two meetings tin- men are 
to consider India. 

These meetings are a result ol the 
realization of ■ group O* students that 
„, |,e true citizens we must he WfM 

citizens. 

The discussions are h, Id Wednesday 
evenings at 7 »H» ..Yloek in the V. M 0. 
A. rooms -n the Me rial Building. 

The l-ife Problems Wseusston O run pa 

which have heen recently organized are 
for the purpose ot dis<u>sin«; problems 
,,, [college lite and their heiirinu on our 
personal conduct . 

TboM interested should see any 
Senior of the V. H. C. A. Cabinet. 



Fine Groceries 
Candies and Fruit* 



MASON A. DICKINSON, Proprietor 



I 




GOLDSTEIN BROS. AMUSEMENT CO. 

Where tlie Nest 

PHOTO-PLAY 




Are shown. 
Program ehanied daily swept Mend.y 
and Tuesday. 
FKKD'K P. BKI.MONT. Manager. 



MRS. FTODENCEP. CASS1N 

SELECT CATERING 
at gwaaeaaMs l'rices. 
Intormmlo m Spoelmlty 

IS So. ProBpe.t 8t.. Amherst. Mass. 

Tml. BBB-M 



North End Lunch 

120 Pleasant Street. 

Our food is right— 
Our prices reasonable 

TRY US OUT 

W. Bri)RURY 



POULTRY SHOW ORGANIZED 
WITH ACHES0N PRESIDENT 

The dressed poultry show which will 
he niven the 18th and HHb of Nov., b> 
the class in Poultry 77, will he in Boom 
H J, Stoekbrtdge Hell. The officers of 
the organization are: 
K. M. Acheson '22, President . 

.1. T. Perry (unclassified), Secretary. 

E. A. Lyons '22, Superintendent. 

U. S. Davis "22. Premiums. 

C. J. Wikland (special), Treasurer. 

The show will be open to the public 
Friday at l-0<) l». M. 

Dr. benjamin, toimerly with Cornell 
University, but now with aogenbliek 
A- Co., Newark, N. J., will award the 
prizes and give demonstrations. Ex- 
hibits will be on sale from 10-00 a. m. to 
1-00 v. M. and from 840 i\ U. to *-<M) P. 
m. Saturday. There will he no auction, 
but all the birds will be priced so that 
the purchaser can see what he is «et- 
ttag and how much he must pay for it. 
Birds purchased may be kept in the 
Poultry Plant refrigerator until Wed- 
nesday, Nov. 23rd, for faculty ami 

students. 

A first and second prize, each a large 
rooster, will be given away in a contest 
of guessing the weights of various live 
birds in pens. 

The Poultry Department is to launch 
a campaign to encourage better market 
poultry and eggs and this campaign 
starts with the show. 

The men in poultry 78 class are going 
to contribute a large rooster for each 
man on the f.otball team making a 
touchdown against Tufts. 



SOPHOMORE SMOKER 

Soph. .more Smoker tonight at 7-tHi 
p.m. Kvery Sophomore Is wanted OUt. 

Refreshments. Claasorators aad speak- 

e.sol the faculty will be there to liven 
things up. ^^^^^^^^^^____ 

BAND 

Aggie wants a band at the game Sat- 
urday, so e ser yb e df who plays be s< 

Social Cnion rooms at 4 -30 Friday for a 
rehearsal. 

CAMPUS NOTES 

Acling-Prtsident Lewis, aermnpanie.1 
by Directors Haskell and Willard. was 
called to New Orleans last week, Nov. 
8 to 11. 10 attend the convention of the 
Association of American band (.rant 
Colleges. This is an annual affair, and 

| a attended by the Presidents, the Ex- 

perineal Station Directors, and the Kx 

tension Service Directors ..t the various 
colleges throughout the Union. 



DEPARTMENT NOTES. 

The Department of Fmestry has re 
eentlv received a collection of rare and 
,,,.,|v woods from the Philippines. 
Thisc.leetion consists of 120 specimens 
,,l fnrnitUM woods and was donated by 
B Mangum, Ra-'IO. The series was 
m . |()l . U! ,| >v the Bureau of Forestry in 
the Philippines. 

The members of the elaas ie Comsaef. 

eiai Floriculture visited Northampton 

last Saturday where they inspected the 

Chrysanthemum exhibit at smith c»\- 
lege. 

Mr. Nivody will speak on Flora of 
India at the weekly seminar <>f the 
botany Depart meet Tuesday afternoon 
at four-thirty 

The Botany Department recently re- 

Mlved.au fingerllng trout and several 

l iirs{ er specimens t-.r the Department 
\,;ua.iu».m, from Mr. Korsl of the 
Mate Fish Hatchery at Sunderland. 



\ student at T.itts is allowed 11 
ebapel cuts, and even then he may pal 
his score at /.ero by the forfeiture of one 
term-hoar's credit. 



Flowers are placed in the chapel at 
Tufts on the birthdays of those men 
iron the college who died in the war, 
asasiun that they are not forgotten 



sing i_e:e 

Main Street 

Quick Laundry 



'19— Robert Collins has announced 
bis engagement. 



FIFTH ANNUAL 

Market, Poultry and Egg Show 

Friday and Saturday, Nov. 18 and 19 

ROOM 312, STOCKBRIDGE HALL 

Bav vour Thanksgiving roaster early Saturday morning, and 
, JZ held in the refrigerator at the Poultry Plant till Nov. „. 

Show the folks at home how a real chicken tastes-raised, 
killed, and picked right. 

FREE Two Roasters FREE 



NEW COLLEGE STORE 

For a big noise at the Tufts Game, 

Get those Megaphones at the College Store 



OPPORTUNITIES FOR STU- 
DENT PUBLIC SPEAKERS 



A. W. Gilbert '04 Sends Letter to Stu- 
dent Body. 



Here is a good opportunity for all 

Aggie men or women who are oratori- 
eally inclined to put their efforts to 

good use. The following is a letter se- 

oelved from the Slate House by A. ting- 
Dean Machmer and read by him in 
Monday Chapel. Head it again, cou- 
I del it, and then signify your inten- 
tions of taking part in this contest. As 
the fakirs say, "You are bound to win; 
you can't lose.*' Moreover, the prizes 
ottered are well worth the effort. The 
letter reads as follows: 

The Slate Department of \miculture 
is offering three prizes of #25, $15, and 
-in respectively, for teii-minule ad- 
dresses by M. A. 0. students, to be 
gives at the annual banquet of the Ag- 
iMiiiturai Orgaalaatlons of ths state, 
on Wednesday evening, Jan. 1*, at F-.r.l 
Hall. Boston. 

We should expect a preliminary con- 
test at the college to determine the 
best three men to he sent, and these 
three men will be expected to appear 
on our program, each one speaking ten 
minutes. The contest will he judged 
on the basis of subject matter and ctTec- 
ilTS delivery. 

It is planned to pay I be expenses of 

.the contestants while in boston. Of 

I course, the contest will be limited to 

■MB and women students who arc ic^- 

lltered now at M. A.C. 

Sincerely yours, 

A. \V. GtxuauT, 

State Commissioner of Agriculture, 
Slate House, Boston. 



FOURTEEN CO-EDS MAKE 

TRIP TO DURHAM 
A truck-load, 14 venturesome and 

"peppy" nirls started for Durham, N. 
II, at 10 O 1 Clock Friday night to cheer 
for that team. With Mrs. Cameron as 
chaperon, and Mr. Hunt drivinu, they 
rode all Digbt, and until 1 i". M. on Sat- 
urday , without stopping except to eat. 
They did eat. al the home of one I he 
girls in Amesbury. 

After the game, our '"Doc" Kmery, 
who is now an instructor al New Hamp- 
shire lixed things up so that the yirls 
found places to sleep. Some of the 
gbrli went lo I be New Hampshire In- 
formal, others to a dance given in their 

honor by -Doc", and still others retired 

lo their beds of gym. mats and sofa 
pillows. 

Those that went by truck were the 
Misse- Chase, Lewis, Turner, I. Boles, 
L Boles, babrovilz. Slack. tieiuer, Flint, 

Pearman, smith. Logan, Snow, Bersjent, 

Misses Pollard .Towle, Batemen, Kpps, 
and Hubbard wenl to the game by 
machine, and after a l«Ule trouble from 
a breakdown, reached Durham just 
before the gMSC started. 

Both parlies returned to Aggie in the 
early hours of Monday morning, tired 
but happy, ami well content that they 
had upheld their reputation as loyal 
eo-eda. 



KINGSLEY'S 



SOOAS 



SUNDAES 



CANDIES 



Luncheonette 



140 Main Steel, Northampton, Mass. 



shine: as-u-go 

Ki'.iiel.ilx'l 

The College Shoe Shine Parlor 

for your 
Hat Renovating. Shoe Dyeing. Shoe Shinine 

At i:i An.it!. St.. l.y Am. Ex. (MB**. 



AMHERST BOOK STORE 

Note Books Fountain Pens 



High Grade 

COLLEGE FOOTWEAR 



-AT- 



Economy Prices 



CANINES SPARED 

The «iog roast scheduled by the 

j Landscape Club for last Wednesday was 

postponed on account ot the rain. It 

lis planned lo have one in the near 

1 1 in tire. 

The Athletic Association of Connecti- 
on Aggie holds an annual Football 
Hop at the close of the football season. 



AGGIE EC. CLUB 

Mr. David M. bipshires, IMS, will 
speak to the Aggie Be Club Wednes- 
day evening at tl.HOiu Koom 4, Memorial 
Building. He will discuss salesman- 
ship and will tell of his own experi- 
ences in selling. 

Mr. bipshires has been with a Balti- 
more firm for a few years and now is 
selling for K. Alberts' wholesale shoe 
house of Northampton. 

This is the first of the series which 
the Club is planning lo run this winter. 
when they plan to cover all phases of 
Economies thru speakers on various 
subjects. 

Alpha Sigma Phi entertained its fac- 
ulty members and local alumni at a 
card parly and smoker Monday evening. 



COLLEGIAN DIRECTORY 



[Associate Alumni, 
Memorial Building, 
M. A. C. Athletic Association, 

ion Athletic Association, 
[I'lie College Senate, 

baseball Association, 
Football Association, 
[1'rack Association, 

The Collegian, 

iockey Association, 

basketball Association, 

Roister Doisters, 

The Aggie Squib, 

^lusical Clubs, 

Nineteen Hundred Twenty-two Index, 

Nineteen Hundred Twenty-three Index, 

(. M. C. A., 



Telephone 

Richard Mellen, Ass't Sec. 175 J 

Richerd Mellen, Manager 175 J 

C. S. Hicks, General Mgr., 4°3- M 

F. P. Rand, Manager t3°- R 

A. W. Smith, President 8377 

F. F. Buckley, Manager 170 

William H. Peck, Manager 8325 

Richard Newell, Manager 8316 
11. F. Jackson, Fditor 8326-K 

F. S. Tucker, Manager 8377 

S. L. Freeman, Manager 8325 

Gustav Lindskog, Manager 530 

C. R. Vinten, Fditor 8330 

J. G. Lowery, Manager 170 

H. W. Spring, Manager 280 

(). E. Folsom, Manager 8314 

K. W. Moody President 8325 



C. F. DYER 



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And other good thtnics to rut. 

MRS. I-. M STEBBINS 

Middle Htreet. (Tel. 415 W) lladley. Mas*. 

WEBSTER'S STUDIO 

Nash Block 
AMHERST SHOE REPAIRING CO. 

Your Shoes Repaired 

WHILF YOU WAIT 

S 
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Ever Ready Flash Lights and Paint 

Clothes and Shoe Brushes 

Anything in Hardware and Cooking Utensils 

Always glad to see you. 



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ALUMNI NOTES 



'19. -Wendell F. Smith is substitut- 
ing for K. W. Swett In tbe Newtonville 
high school. Mr. Swett, who has been 
teaching drawing, has gone to Cali- 
fornia. 



'16.— W*. Kicbasd Sears, who is to 
spend the year in Europe, has passed 
through England, and is in Paris pre- 
paratory to making an extended stay 
in Rome. Address: care Morgan and 
Uarjes. No. 14, Place Vendome. Paris, 
France. 

•20.— "Jack" Crawford, managing ed- 
itor of the 1920 Coi.lkoian, spent the 
week-end in Amherst before starting] 
his winter's work. After severing bis 
connection with tbe Springfield He- 
publican, "Jack" went west, but spent 
last summer on a farm in Maine. He 
is planning to "rough it" in a Maine 
lumber camp this winter, "next door to 
the Ice-bergs," before resuming bis 
duties in the journalistic world. 

'20.— "Jim" Maples, also succeeded 
in taking a vacation from his duties as 
manager of a New York Telephone Ex- 
change, and visited tbe campus last 
week. 

'21.— Frederick K. Zercher spent tbe 
weekend on campus. He is district 
supervisor iu New York Stale for a 
southern firm and plans to be back 
here again for tbe Tufts game. 

AGRONOMY DEFT. NOTES 

Mr. Thelin of the Agronomy Depart- 
ment received a letter from his home in 
South Dakota saying that as the farm- 
ers are offered only nine cents a bushel 
for corn they will use it for fuel. 

Tbe Agronomy Department is at pres- 
ent instructing 331 students, drawn 
from all courses given at M. A. 0. 

The field work in soils which is being 
done by the students in Agronomy, con- 
sists of field work on faruiB in tbe vi- 
cinity. The students inspect the farms 
and return a report and offer tentative 
suggestions as to the system necessary 
for improving tbe soil. The depart 
ment hopes to have the Sophomore 
class do some of this work in the spring, 
as it is an important factor in the proper 
care of soils on the farms. 

FOR THOSE AT HOME 

While the girls who went to the game 
were away, those who were unable to 
go kept up their spirits with an in- 
formal dance and "spread" on Satur- 
day evening. 

Messrs. Wendell, Sears, Brunner, 
Chase, Fuller, Kennedy, Bennett, Hol- 
teen.and L. Woodworth, all helped to 
consume the fudge, cake, punch, and 
buttered popcorn that the girls had 

made. 

The Victrola furnished the music 
when Kennedy wanted to dance, and 
when the boys went home it was with | 
a feeling that after all there was com- 
pensation for those who could not go to 
tbe game. 

Tbe co-eds at Connecticut Aggie will 
take part in their Banquet Serap, but 
must fight their own battles and can 
neither be aided nor hindered by male 
members of either class. 



TWO YEAR ORCHESTRA 

For the first time since the OliaMUb- 
mentof the .wo year course in tins col- 
lie, an orchestra has been formed bj 
its students who possess mimical ability . 
The orchestra is composed of both Sen- 
iors and Juniors of the two year course. 
Considerable interest has been n>am- 
fested by tbe two year students since 
Us organization. It is the intention of 
the leader of the orchestra to present to 
the two year students dance inns.o of 



high ord«. The orchestra at the pres- 
ent time is rehearsing some light class. - 

cal numbers. 

The orchestra is ably manaucd by 
Allen W, Kilminstei of Brooklyn, N. \ ., 
and be bus accomplished wonders since 
It, organisation. Albe.st Carlson of 
Beverly, is the conductor and he hopes 
„, prod. It* a line program lol the con- 
certs which will be conducted in the 
near future. 

The meinbeiB of the orchestra and the 
instruments which they play ate as fol- 



lows" Director, Albert Carlson ; piano, 
A Barrett; violins, C. A. Hivei '«, L. 
A Hesse '23; cornets. N. C. Baker SB, 
B M. Woodworth -22, P. (i.Ki'o.les'22, 
W | Bcekiiian '23; H'»lcs. W. K. De 
Lano'22, C. E. Smith '2:5, II. Phiniiey 
■28; tn>inb<.ne, L. L. JooM '», 8»«»- 
phones, C. P. Wheeler •*», J Adinir'22, 
A. E. Edmester. 

Professor .Ian.es A. Fooid acted as 
Judge at the Rhode Island Corn Show 
at Providence, last Friday. 



(S» 



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TURKISH & DOMESTIC^ 



BLEND 

C ' U A R E T T I 



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THAT'S OUR IDEA in making 
CAMELS— the Quality CJgarette. 
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Camels wonderful and exclusive Quality wins on 
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Because, men smoke Camels who want the 
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amel 



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MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 



Vol. XXXII. 



Amherst, Mass., Wednesday, Nove mber 23, 1921. 



No. 8 



A BRIEF LOOK AT 

THIS SEASON'S TEAM 

Little Biographies of the Twenty 
First String Men on Kid's Squad. 

Although thin football season has not 
been entirely successful from the stand- 
point of victories, yet Coach tone's men 
have shown the ability to come back. 
Following are a few statistics of the 
players which will help to give a better 
perspective of their season's work. 

Cotton, Ueorge A., '22, captain and 
left tackle.- He prepared for college at 
Wobum HiKli School, but played no 
football there. "Cot" has made an ex- 
cellent captain, has shown fine fighting 
spirit, and is an excellent tackle. This 
year's record shows that he has played 
iu every ft. not being oul ol a (MM 
a single minute. 

Lewandowski, John N.. ft, fullback. 
—Coining to Aggie from Willistoii Sen. 
inary, with four years of football 
experience, "Lavvy" has become one 
of the best football men M. A. C. has 
ever had. His work in punting and 
carrying the ball has been exceptional, 
and in every game his brilliant work 
has figured prominently in offensive 
and defensive play. No praise can be 
too great in estimating his value to this 
year's team. 

Freeman, Stanley L., '22, center.— 
He is from Needham, ami played his 
lirst football at Aggie. "Stan" has 
worked up from the ranks, and his of- 
fensive work and passing has been of 
dependable nature. He is a typical ex- 
ample of Aggie football players- 
aggressive and hart! working. 

Acheron, Roger M., '22, left end. 

He entered Aggie from New Bedford 

with two years' experience at end. 

After playing one year on the second 

Continued on p.ge 8 



BOOK COMPILED BY 

AGGIE MAN PUBLISHED 



Dr. Fernald's "An Introductory Text 
Book of Insects in Their Re- 
lations to Man". 



THE IRRESISTIBLE AGGIES COME BACK 

WITH A 144) PUNCH AT TUFTS' EXPENSE 

John Lewandowski Ends His Football Career in a Blaze of Triumph. 



Df. II. T. Fernald's book entitled "An 
Introductory Text Book of Insects in 
their Uelalions to Man" I l'p. XIV-3WI, 
388 Figs.) was published this fall DJ the 
McGraw-Hill Book Go. It is easily one 
of the best of the recent works dealing 
with the conli >l of various insect pest- 
(of lai in, uarden, orchard, etc.) anil their 
relation to man in t he spread of disease, 
etc. A general survey of the structure, 
relationships, etc. of insects is given by 
way of introduction to the more detailed 
consideration of the different groups of 
inserts, and twenty-four chapters are 
devoted to the consideration of the diff- 
erent orders of insects, the most import- 
ant forms from all parts of the country 
being treated in detail, so that the 
scope of the work is country wide, in- 
stead of being restricted to the insect 
pests of tbe eastern part of the 1'niled 
Slates, as is the case with many text- 
books of economic entomology. The 
book has been adopted as a textbook in 
twelve collegeB even though it was pub- 
lished only a couple of months ago, and 
it is apparently destined to supplant 
many of tbe textbooks on the subject 
now in use, as a standard for student 
use and reference. 



Splendid Work of Entire Team Brings Joy to Campus. Tufts Completely 

Outclassed. Backfield Opens Wide Holes in the Enemy Line. 

Lavvy Breaks Up Aerial Tour and Sprints 25 Yards for Score. 



DRESSED POULTRY SHOW 

AT M. A. C. SUCCESSFUL 



VICTORY BONFIRE. 



Fifth Exhibit Draw* Many Entries 
— Amherst People Buy Thanks- 
giving Birds. 

The dressed markel poultry ami 
Kg show bold at Stockbridge hall 
November IX ami 1W, closed Saturday 
niuht after a very successful session. 
1'be large silver cup awarded for the 
high total awards in judging and pre- 
miums, was won by II- §■ l>avis, of 
Helchertown, a senior, who has had his 
name engraved on it ', Davis wins also 
a large roaster. Second prize and two 
birds went to Koger Achesoii, of New 
Bedford, a senior. 

The show was attractively arranged 
and demonstrated to tfcl visitors the 
difference between the birds placed on 
sale in the average markets and those 
properly dressed and packed. Kggs of 
Costiausd on p»f« • 



INFORMAL PROVES 

A DECIDED SUCCESS 



Cabaret Style Pleases Over One Hun- 
dred Couples. 



One of the biggest Informals in Aggie 
history was held last Saturday, begin- 
ning right after the game with Tufts, 
and continuing until i>-00 P. M. More 
than a hundred couples attended, with 
Miss Chase of Smith and Mrs. Cameron 
of HI. Holyoke as chaperons. Both 
floors of the Memorial Building were at- 
tractively decorated with palms and, on 
one Boor, Mosely's orchestra furnished 
the music, while Woodworlh's played 
for the ot her. The caterer, Bias, served 
supper. The menu included bouillion, 
chicken patties, peas, mashed potatoes, 
ice cream, crackers, cake, and demi- 
tasse. Tables for four were arranged 
•boat the sides of the rooms and danc- 
ing took place before aud after the inter- 
mission. 



Immediately after the name on Sat- 
urday, the Freshmen built one of tbe 
biggest bonlires ever touched off on the 
campus to celebrate a glorious victory. 
Three wagons were pressed into service, 
and the campus was scoured for mater- 
ial. 

When a goodly pile had been bu.lt, a 
ladder was braced up, and an effigy of 
Tuft's hung from it. 

The tire was lighted by Captain Cot- 
Ion, Kid Core, Jmiinie Heal. Willie 
Marsl.nian, and Al Spaulding '17, gave a 
short talk. Singing and cheering kept 
the crowd around tbe fire until late and 
then the couples from the Informal and 
the students left with the memory of 
another "Aggie" day to store up in 
their already full file. 



SOPHOMORE SMOKER 

The Sophomore smoker which was 
held last Wednesday evening in the 
Bppor ball Of the Memorial BolWiog 
was pronounced a success by all who 
attended it. Prof. F. A. McLaughlin 
was tbe guest of the occasion. P.O. 
liartlett spoke for a few minutes on the 
success of the Freshman-Sophomore 
football game. At the business meet- 
ing prior to tbe smoker, Bike and 
Staebner were elected to the athletic 
board The members of the smokei 
committee were Weatherwax, Waugh. 
and Stevenson. 



COLLEGIAN STANDING 

Cot. I. koian competition has been in 
progress for six weeks ami there are 
now nine men working to amass tbe 
necessary credits. In ihe Sophomore 
class a four cornered race has devel- 
oped, with Kennedy in the lead and al- 
ready with nearly half of tbe required 
number of credits. White started off 
strong but has been handicapped the 
last two weeks by trouble with his eyes. 
The Freshman class has been deplor- 
ably weak in responding to the call for 
candidates and has sent out only five 
men for four positions. Corwin and 
Made are leading at present in their re- 
spective departments. 

It is not yet too late for more Fresh- 
men to try out. 

KIlITOKIAI. I.KI'AHTMKST 
1924 



Kennedy, 
Darling, 
White, 
Head, 



10.«.» 
7. 1 

r>.» 

4.7 



».8 
7.3 
7.0 



1925 

Corwin, 

Batal, 

Tanbe, 

BUHINKHS IHCI'AKTMKM 

MM 

Slade, l'-*- 4 

Simpson, y -° 



The Aggie chapel bell which has 
held its tOOgM for four successive 
weeks worked long ami late last Satur- 
day night, (in fact the hell lope broke 
from wear) proclaiming to tbe valley 
that M. A.C. had walloped Tufts, its 
lime honored rivals, 14 (I. The victory 
brought a rosy tinge to aiatherblue 
season, and all the campus, lighted up 
by a huge bonlire, re-echoed "with the 
long yell and the score." 

The Aggies outplayed Ihe Medford- 
ites in about every depart ment and 
showed great improvement over any 
past performances. Besitles the two 
scores made, they were three times 
within Toft's 11-vartl line, wh.U 
Tufts, in spite of a varied ..flense, could 
not pass the Aggies' '26-yard mark. 

Lewandowski, Aggie's star fullback , 
ended his college football career iu 
a blaze of glory. In the last minute 
of play be brought Tufts' aerial of- 
fensive to an abrupt halt by inter- 
cepting a forward pass and racing 
25 yards for a score. His punts, end 
run* a&d line plunges also helped in 
the victory. Grayson and Beal were 
always behind "Lavvy" in the hack - 
held. Capt. Cotton, Freeman and 
Acheson did particularly well in the 
line. For Tufts. Weafer starred. The 
first tally of the game came after 
ihe Aggies recovered a Tufts fumble 
on the 18-yard line in the first period. 
Grayson, Lewandowski, anil Beal car- 
ried it 14 yards for a lirst down, then 
Beal carried it over. Tufts began an 
attack late in each half but was always 
held. 

The Game by Periods. 
Tbe Aggies won the toss and took 
the south goal with the wind at their 
backs. Tufts kicked off to Sargent 
on the Aggie's 35-yard line and he 
was thrown without' a runback. Two 
line plunges netted live yards ami 
a five-yard penalty for Tufts for 
offside play gave the Aggies a liist 
down on their own 45-yard line. On 
the next play Grayson carried the 
ball to the Tufts 20-yard line before 
he was brought to earth. Only 
the slippery condition of the field pre- 
vented Grayson from going over for a 
touchdown, Three more plays carried 
tbe ball to the Tufts five-yard line 
where the Aggies were held. 

Tufts started a march that advanced 
the ball to itB own 18-yard line, where 
a Tufts back fumbled, the Aggies 
recovering. Beal and Lewandowski 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Wednesday, November 23, 1921. 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Wednesday, November 23, 1921. 



made five yards on two plays. 
"Liivvy" :idded three more on a plunge 
«l guard and (irayaoi) made it first 
down on Tufts' six-yard line. On the 
next play lieal trashed over the Yuw 
for the first Aggie touchdown, Grayson 
kicking the goal. 

Koi lowing the score Tufts again 
kicked off to the Aggies, the kick go- 
lag outside atmidfield. "Lavvy and 
Qrtytoa made it first down on Tufts' 
41-yard line and Heal added five more 
on the next play. A forward pass 
grounded and Grayson was thrown 
for a loss M M attempted end run. 
Lewandowski dropped back to the S&- 
yard line aud tried for a field goal 
hut failed. Tufts took the ball on 
its 2ll-yard line and a five-yard smash 
at the line and a five-yard penalty 
gave the Medford team a first down. 
Weafer ran 15 yards to bis own 45-yard 
line as the period ended. 

Second Period. 
Tufts opened the second period by 
trying a long forward passing game' 
but it failed to work. Two attempts 
to circle the ends also failed and 
Barrows punted over the Aggie goal 
line. On the first lineup Ileal made 
10 yards through the line aud started 
an attack that carried the ball to 
the Tufts 10-yard line, where Beal 
fumbled and Tufts recovered. During 
the offensive rushes by Lewandowski, 
Grayson, and Beal and a forward 
pass, Beal to Marshinan, gained six 
first downs in succession. Weafer in 
four smashes at the Aggie line made 
three successive lirst downs, placing 
the ball on Tufts' 4H-yard stripe. A 
forward pass gained 12 yards and 
another failed as the first half ended. 



downs. The Aggies immediately 
started an attack that advanced the 
hall to the Tufts '26-yard line, where 
Tufts again held. Tufts punted to 
the Aggies' 35-yard line and Lewan- 
dowski returned the punt, the ball 
rolling over the Tufts goal line. 

With less than a minute to play 
Tufts started another forward pass 
attack in a desperate attempt to score. 
Three passes in a row grounded, but 
the fourth was intercepted by Uwan- 
dowski, who ran 25 y»ids for a touch- 
down, a fitting climax to the college 
career of one of Aggie's greatest stars. 
Grayson kicked the goal. The game 
ended after the first lineup following 
the Tufts kickoff. Summary: 

I 1 KTS. 

re, Cook 

rt. Vela 

rg, Brandt 

c. Husso 



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Cotton, It 
Alger, lg 
Freeman, c 



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Mohor, rt 
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Sargent, qb 
lU-al, lhb 
(irayson, rhb 
Lewandowski, fb 

Score by periods : 
M. A.C., 



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It, Barrett 

le, Macchia 

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Third Period. 
Lewandowski kicked off to the Tufts 
34-yard Vine, where the ball rolled 
outside. Tufts gained six yardB on 
three plays and then recovered an 
onside kick for a first down on the 
AgKies' 30-yard line. Another onside 
kick was recovered by Cotton on the 
Aggies' 25-yard line. Grayson made 
five yards at right guard and Lewan- 
dowski followed with an end run that 
put the ball on Tufts' 40-yard line, 
where Tufts held. "Lavvy" then punt- 
ed to Tufts on the 20-yard line snd 
Weafer ran the kick back 15 yards. 
Tufts' attempts to gain were futile 
and Barrows punted to the Aggies' 
518-yard line. Lewandowski punted to 
Tufts' 37-yard line, where the ball was 
fumbled. Capt. Cotton recovered for 
the Aggies but Tufts held and the 
Aggies lost the ball on downs. Wea- 
fer gained tive yards for Tufts as the 
period ended. 



Touchdown b — Beal, Lewandowski : 
goals from touchdowns —(irayson 2. 
Ueferee— Bankarl, Dartmouth; unu.ire, 
Swafheld — brown; bead linesman - 
Noble - Amherst. Time - lo-minute 

periods. 

Substitutions: M. A. C.-Nowers for 
Salmon, Tuiuey for Maishman, Bent 
for (irayson, Mudgett for Alger; Tufts 
Morrell for Cook, Stephans for Morrell, 
Andress for Veda, Perry for Andress, 
Thompson for Brandt, Stewart for 
Owen. Tyler for Barrett, Cohen for 
Kdelman, Kdelman forLeccian, I'etrone 
for Barrows. 



257 Main Streel THE PARK COMPANY, IDG. Nort»i.pto., Miss. 

_ «. I., till. ..I ..it I. ikii'tlirH.M 



An optiial shop wlii.li measures up to the 
hiirlM'st Mtiintlanl of modern service. You 
can rely on our skill ami iioo.1 taste in all 
optical matters. 



Our Art Department is tilled with Picture, 
suitable for the decoration of frat «£«•«•• 
or for birthday and wedding gifts. Greeting 
cards for particular people 



Deuel's Dbug Store 



ARTICLES 

Razors and Razor Blades 



FOUR MEN INJURED 

IN FOOTBALL M1XUP. 



Shaving SticKs and Creams 



VICTOR RECORDS 



Fourth Period. 

Tufts was unable to gain and Bar 
lows punted to Marshman on Tufts' 
58-yavd line. Marshman ran the kick 
back 10 yards and Tufts was penal- 
ized 15, yards for unnecessary rough- 
ness. Grayson made it first down on 
the Tufts five-yard line on a tackle 
play, but the Aggies again ran against 
a stone wall on the next three plays 
and lost the ball on downs. Bar- 
rows punted to Beal on the Aggies' 
20-yard line, where he was downed 
without a gain. 

Three rushes by the Aggie backfield 
advanced the ball to Tufts' 11-yard 
line where the Medford players held. 
Id hive rushes Tufts carried the ball 
to the Aggies' 38-yard line and a 16- 
yard penalty gave Tufts a first down 
on Aggies' 47-yard mark. Two more 

plays put the ball on the Aggie 35- 
yard line, where Tufts lost the ball on 



HaakinB '22 Receives Serious Break 
in His Shoulder. 

Tag football is gradually becoming 
an injurious sport. Heretofore, this 
game was thought to be gentle aud re- 
fined. But, Monday afternoon, on the 
old varsity field, this theory was utterly 
smashed to pieces by a game in which 
everybody who happened to be passing 
joined and whieh resulted in four 
serious injuries. Phil Haskins 22 met 
with the misfortune of breaking his 
arm and shoulder in a fall; l'eny 
Thornton '24 and Johnny Faueuf '23, 
while running for a forward pass, col- 
lided head on, the former being knock- 
ed unconscious, and receiving the 
"blackest of eyes" and the latter split- 
ting his head open. The fourth injury 
was received by Solomon Cohen '23 at 
at the base of the spine. It almost 
seems possible that next fall we can 
have two football teams, and incorpo- 
rate this rough sport of tag football in 
the liBt of Aggie's athletic activities. 



Kodaks and Supplies 



Fountain Pens 



« 



hoe Store 

SPECIAL 



Saddle Strap Oxfords 



• • 



$5.98 



THE NEW M. A. C. SONG BOOK 

At the Treasurer's Office— $1.00 

LEARN TO SING ALL THE AGGIE SONGS 



When You Are Down Town 



DROP IN 



GLEE GLUB 

The Club ia running very smoothly. 
Several excellent numbers are now 
ready to be put on at the first concert 
December 14. The quartet is also get- 
ting its repetoire into shape. 



SHADES OF RED!! 

Talking about nicknames, here is 
I'inky Clark laid up in the infirmary 
with scarlet fever. 



The Candy Kitchen 



FOR — 



Lunch, Candy, Ice Cream and Smokes 

COLLEGE CANDY KITCHEN 

"The Home of Sweets" 



What makes you think of Home and that Turkey Dinner ? 
Those pies and cakes that mother makes at the Aggie Inn. 

AGGIE INN— By the Campus Entrance. 

INTELLECTUAL SUPERIORITY I PROF. PATTERSON SPEAKS | FRESHMEN SEASON IN 

HMDLIil/Viv... ^.^mnwmm 1.111111(111 I & 



WINS FOR FACULTY 



OF THE CONFERENCE 



Educators 41 Points Better Than 
Their Fourth Year Prodigies. 

Nov. 15, 1921, will Ion !>«' remem- 
bered by the class of '22 as its day of 
greatest sorrow. For on Unit afternoon 
they did. as Seniors, accept mounting 
garments on the death of their (MftlMl 
hope-the long cherished desire to de- 
feat their faculty upon the gridiron. 

Would that one might discourse upon 
the tine playing exhibited by the Sen- 
ilis, but being a true chronicler, we 
must simply call attention to the score, 
41-0, and state that the Seniors were 
defeated -badly defeated. 

Surely the most casual observer ai 
last Tuesday's game will admit that 
with few exceptions the Seniors were 
certainly not deieated by a faster team. 
On the contrary, he will be likely to 
suggest that the faculty's playing re- 
minded him of the slow motion comedy 
slaved between the halves at Spring- 
field last year. 

The weight of additional knowledge 
enabled the Faculty's line to smash up 



FOOTBALL A SUCCESS 



the Senior's offense and defense. No- 
vitski was the Faculty's star lineman, 
and held up the line on several occas- 
ions. "Professor" Maginnis* catch of a 
long pass resulted In seven poNttfoi 
the Faculty. Mansell also played well 
while he wan in the same. 

Rice was the master mind of the oc- 
casion, and his plays, usually resulting 
from a conference with other members 
of the team, made many easy gains for 
the Faculty. 

The second half was more to the Sen- 
ior's liking, inasmuch as the Faculty 
was forced to call upon its subs. Smith 
made several good runs in this half. 
The line-up: 

KAdl.TY SKMOKS 

Maginnis, re le, Sullivan 

Lentz, rt It, Ueland 

Novitski, rg lg, Talmadtie 

Lo«f, <• «. Packer 

Dowd, lg rg, HlfTO 

Sb ufelt.lt rt, Andrews 

French, le re, Rose r 

Rice,qb '|b. Field 

Grayson, rhb lhb, Smith 

Mansell, lhb rhb, Krasker 

Holmes, fb fb, Chapin 

Touchdowns: Grayson 2, Holmes. 
Maginnis, Shufelt, Rice. Goals from 
touchdowns: (irayson I, Rice 8. Ref- 
eree—Collins. Head liuesman— Wirth. 
Substitutions: Faculty— Ball for Man- 
sell, Mack for Lentz, Robinson for 
French. Seniors— Conant for Andrews. 
Holman for Sullivan, Thompson for 
Krasker, Lacroix for Nigro, Murdock 
for Thompson, Lyons for Chapin. 

DANCES 

There has been a new idea formed in 
the college about running dances. Be- 
ginning December 10, there are to be 
dances every so often— perhaps every 
other Saturday night. These are not 
regular informal^, but dances which 
are open to the student body and em- 
ployees of the college. The one two 
weeks from Saturday is an experiment, 
and if it succeeds, there will be many 
of them. Music will lie furnished by 
the college orchestra. 



Helps to Keep Students in Touch 
With Affairs at Washington. 

Professor Charles II. Patterson gave 
some interesting and valuable fads 
about the disarmament conference in 
bis short talk to the students at the 
Friday chapel. Professor Patterson 
stated that the proposals made by Mr. 
Hughes have arrested the attention of 
the people throughout the world. Un- 
declared that the outstanding feature 
in these proposals is that they achieve 
the reduction of the heavy burden of 
taxation. Not only will the execution 
of these proposals reduce taxation, but 
they will also tend to reduce t he dan- 
ger of war. 

Professor Patterson then brought out 
the point that il the nations disarm in 
part, they would then involuntarily 
tiave the iciidency to break away from 
the militaristic spirit which has domi- 
nated the countries of Kurope for many 
.eiituries. The third point in his talk 
was that proportionate disarmament 
was net an insurance against war. 

( 'ontiiiuing, Prof—Of Patterson 
slated that the real, bard work before 
the members of the conference was the 
problem of the reduction of land arma- 
ments. Land armaments have been 
the sore spot in history of most Kuro- 
pcan nations. II is theicforc the duty 
ol the men in this conference to devise 
some way or means to regulate land 
armaments. 

Kven if the conference succeeds in 
reducing the armaments to t he lowest 
point consistent to a nations welfare, 
we must then guard against the possi- 
bility of an industrial war. An in- 
dustrial war if wae.cd effectively against 
a nation is a most terrible thing to a 
helpless nation. 

Professor Patterson concluded his 
talk by stating that a new curtain has 
risen on the logiea' necessity of Chris- 
tian humanity and the spirit of brother- 
hood. The gist of his conclusion 
seemed to be that is is fundamental to 
live together ami toco-operate logelbei 
If there is to be harmony among the na- 
tions of the world. He strongly ad- 
vised the students to keep in close 
touch with the activities of the dis- 
armament conference by reading the 
newspapers every day. 



Likely Varsity Material Shows in 
Work of Several Yearlings. 

The Freshman team' of MM will be 
remembered as the team (hat handed 
Williston Academy the second defeat it 
ever suffered at the the hands of an 
Aggie Kreshmaiiteam. The team should 
not be lauded so much from the fact 
that it accomplished this rare achieve- 
ment as il should for its game, uphill 
light throughout the season. Coach 
Mansell had no easy task in even weld- 
ing a presentable eleven from a group 
of awkward, inexperienced youngsters. 
The Frock outlit commenced the sea- 
son with a couple of unimpressive wins. 
Their inidseasoii form was mediocre, 
but their windup was a glorious one. 
And this is exemplary of true Aggie 
spirit. The yearlings were against odds, 
but determined to gain their objective, 
gave all that was in them and tri- 
umphed decisively over their rivals. 

(apt. Sullivan, Marx, McCeoiich, 
Mouradian, and Raffa contributed 
most towards the success of the team. 
Without a doubt these youngsters are 
excellent varsity material, and should 
be heard from in the near future. 

Mr<;eouch, perhaps, may be best 
likened to Tarplin, the former varsity 
back. He is a shifty youngster who 
knows bow to mn witti the ball. Marx 
and Mouradian, the two big linemen, 
have made names for themselves, while 
KalTa, who covered the wing position, 
made an excellent showing. 

The results of the games played this 
season ale : 
Freshmen 2. r ., Dalton (I 

13, Northampton 
fl, Deerfield 18 
0, Williston (» 

14, Sophomores II 




Stop worry in' ! 

We deal exclusively in worry- 
prnof clothing, furnishings, hats, 
shoes and sporting goods for 
college men. 

Hail orderi filled 

Rogers Pkrt Company 

Broadway Ilroadway 

at 13th St. "Four at 34th St. 

Convenient 

Ilroadway Comers" Fifth Ave. 

at Warren »' 4lHt st - 

NFW YORK CITY 



You can save from 

$3.00 to $5.00 a pair 



— on — 



RESULTS OF INTERCOL- 
LEGIATE RIFLE MEETS 



Few People Probably are Aware of 

the Fact that M. A. 0. Leads Both 

Indoors and Outdoors. 



REPRESENTATIVES TO LAND 

GRANT CONVENTION. 

Among Aggie men who were present 
at the Annual Convention of the As- 
sociation of Land Grant Colleges were 
the following: Dr. K. W. Allen »86, 
ChiefOfficer.it the Kxperiment Station, 
United States Department of Agricul- 
ture, and II. L. Knight «, Associate 
editor of the Experiment Station /.'"- 
ord; Dr. J. H, Hills Wi l>« an an(1 1)i- 
rector, Vermont Agricultural College 
and Rxperiment Station; B. L, Harl- 
well'Kff, Director of the Rhode Island 
Experiment Station; 11. J. Baker 1011, 
Director of Extension, Connecticut 
Agricultural College; S. Haskell 04, of 
the Massachusetts Kxpcriment Station; 
John Willard. Director of Extension of 
the College, and Dean Lewis, represent- 
ing the College as its Acting President. 



INIIOOK. 

Boor* 
lttOtt— State College of 

Washington, 040 

HMO- M. A.C, 1*4* 

11M1-M. A.C., 1*07 

101 2-M. A.C., 073 

l'.ii:; - Univ. of West Va., 9M 
1914— Mlob. Agr. College, 00-1 
1916 - Wash. State Col., 10,840 
lOlri Mi.-h. Agr. ('<>]., 12,00* 
1017 — Mich. Agr. Col., MM 
11MH— I'niv. of Iowa, 0804 

HMO — I'niv. of I'enn., S98I 
1020 — Norwich Univ., OO'.M 
1021 — Norwich Univ., 4601 

OUTOOOR. 

1000— George Washing- 
ton University, 73K 
HMO M. A.C, 782 
11M1-M. A.C, 701 
1012 — Harvard Univ., 7h« 
HiHi-M.A.C. OS 
HM4-M.A.C, 827 
1916— U. 8. N'aval Acad., 860 
1916— Norwich Univ., 841 



rnsetble. 

1000 
2000 
2000 
1000 
1000 
1000 
11,000 

1:1,000 

10,000 
10,000 
10,000 
10,000 
5000 



000 

900 

000 

1MH) 

5100 

000 

900 

000 



Young Men's 
College Footwear 

by buying at 

FLEMING'S, Northampton 

THE HOME 

of Aggie Men 

IN 

SPRINGFIELD 

IS 

Hotel Worthy 

Drop in for a meal or over 
night. 

TARIFF REASONABLE 

Main and Worthington Streets 

Civ« «• » trial 



DRAPER HOTEL 

Northampton, Mass. 

The Leader for College Banquets 




Wm. M. Kimball, Prop. 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Wednesday, November 23^1921. 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Wednesday, November 23, 1921. 



THE MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIAN 

published every Wednesday by the 
Students of the Massachusetts Ag- 
ricultural College. 

BOARD OF EDITORS. 

B......HG K. JKMON '22 ■****££! 

Hobaht W. BraiNo m M»n»gln B Bdit« 

ASHOCIATK EDITORS. 

U-THKK B. ARB.NOTON V A..'« ICtt'l MJtOf 
K.NN.TH A. BARNARD '22 ( .....petition Kd or 
JOHNM.WH.TT..K-M Atretic Mo 

roth M.WOODtl Kx.-hanueKn.tor 

8TAN1.RV W. HROMI.KT 'M 

IHUNO W. Hl.AI.K. '28 

Hol.OMoN t'ollKN '28 

EI.I8HA K. BI.IBR. .IK- '24 



BlJSINMH DBPARTIIKNT. 
CHAI.I.M A. B..K '22 Bt.ilnM»M»n»g.r 

Mtron (J. Mi-rrav '22 AdvertUing Manner 
Owen K. K.....OM '28 Circulation Manner 

HOI.DEN WHITTAR«K '28 
CUIfOB* I.. BEI.I.KN '24 
ROHFKT K. 8TKK.HK If 



Subscription $2.00 per year. Single 
copies, 10 cents. Mske all orders paya- 
ble to The Masaachuaette Collegian. 

In case of change of address, sub- 
scribers will please notify the business 
manager as soon as possible. 

Entered uwcond-flw matter at the Amherst 
Post Ollle.. Aerated for mailing lllsNll 
rate of i>o"«*« provided for In section 1108 Act 
of October. 1»H authorized Aogost 20. 1918^ 



Are We Leaving Agriculture in the 
Lurch P 
One of the most serious charges 
brought against M.A.C. of late years 
has been that we are turning away from 
agriculture and coming to look askance 
at that glorious basic industry for the 
furtherance of which Aggie was 
founded. This charge has led some to 
believe that there are undercurrents of 
"State 1'niversily-ism" here, that Aggie 
students aie perhaps becoming a bit too 
"white collared" for plebian toil, in 
short, that we are losing the practical 
in a fog of the unpractical, of the 
humanities. 

Such is the quite general belief 
among many people of the state. We 
bear it dinned in our ears every time we 
go home for a vacation. But facts do 
not bear out the argument. Instead of 
turning from agriculture, we have 
turned toward il decidedly in the last 

16 years. 

The Dean's office has recently made a 
little investigation of conditions here in 
l!Htr>-06, which will be of interest to 
friends of the college. 

In the first place, at that time 160 
semester hours were required for gradu- 
ation. Of these. 10 semester hours 
were absolutely required of every stu- 
dent in English, I in French, 7 in (ier- 
man,and 11 la physiology.econom.es 
and history, making 46 hours of re- 
quired humanities. Today, only the 
equivalent of 10 2-8 semester hours are 
absolutely required of every student in 
English, 9 in French or German, and 3 
1-3 in the so-called humanities, mak- 
ing a total of 20 hours in the humani- 
ties. 

In 1906-0©, then, practically three 
l i mes as many semester hours of human- 
ities were required as in 1021. 

In 1005-06, the Junior and Senior 
years invited the student to one of bix 
groups of courses. These were courses 
in Apiculture, Horticulture, Biology, 
Chemistry, Mathematics, and Land- 
scape Gardening. tfl each of these 
groups six different courses were re- 
quired each semester. In only three of 
the groups were practical agricultural 



ooaratta it-quired more than once. The 
courses in mathematics did nut require 
a single practical course. It was, there- 
fore, possible for a student to go 
through the last two years in 1906 with- 
out taking a single course of a practical 
nature. 

Today the studeut is invited to a 
major of 4. r > out of 120 hours in Agricul- 
ture, Agronomy, Auiiual Husbandry, 
Dairying, Poultry Husbandry, Floricul- 
mrei Forestry, Landscape Gardening, 
Pomology, Vegetable Gardening. Eco- 
nomic Botany, Agricultural Chemistry, 
Economic Entomology, Microbiology, 
Agricultural Economies, Agricultural 
Education, and Kural Sociology. 

Note the difference in the number of 
choices for practical subjects. Nole, 
,„„. how each big subject has been 
treated in its rural or agricultural 
aspects, not in its general MOB*. 

[■ the Senior yearin 1905 06 the stu- 
dent had to elect three courses, closely 
correlated with his Junior year course. 
Only one course in language could be 
elected. Agriculture, Horticulture, 
Veteiinary, Botany, Landscape Garden- 
ing, Entomology, Chemistry 'Miysics, 
Kngineering, English, French, German 
and Latin, each four hours, wore the 
courses. Attention is here called to 
the fact that agriculture and horticul- 
ture were not required, and hence a stu- 
dent need not have taken any agricul- 
tural work in the last year. Also, he- 
hold Latin appearing <♦•» the curriculum 
as a Senior subject at M. A. C. only 15 

years ago! 

The Coi.i.MJi \x feels that the above 

ligures, collected simply from college 
catalogues, forma tremendous rebuttal 
to all "Come back to Agriculture, 
Aggie," arguments. We are proud 10 
know that we are standing by the pro- 
fession of our choice, and approaching 
it. rather than retreating from it. 

But we also hope that the slide away 
from the humanities will not be as 
rapid in the next as in the last 15 years. 
The business of farming needs a little 
of the David Grayson element, and the 
humanities are always important for 
the insight they give the student in the 



This spirit is what made our 1921 
team come back and it is the power 
which in the fulure will make lighting, 
winning, and successful Aggie teams. 



OWN HALL 



COMMUNICATIONS 

Editor ov The Coi.i.koian: 

Your last issue comments on the size 
,,f the drum used in Ohio State I'niver- 
sity band. We have a drum similar in 
size and conveyed in the same manner, 
used by the Purdue cadet band. In 
(bis section of the country the Purdue 
band has a tine reputation and when- 
ever a M| parade is held in Indianapolis 
they call on the Purdue band to lead. 
11 was called for the recent parade given 
in honor of Marshal Foch. It has been 
invited at different times to the Masonic 
National convention at Indianapolis ; 
the Elks convention at Philadelphia 
and the convention of rotary clubs at 
Atlantic City. The band consists of 
about 125 pieces. There may be larger 
Cniversity bauds in this country, but I 
doubt if there are any more capable or 

more popular. 

O. G. Sanukkkon. 
Prof, of Horticulture, Purdue Univ., 
Lafayette, lnd. 



Thursday 



Mat. 3, Kve. 
6-45. 8-30 



Friday 



Mat. 3, Kve. 
6.45. 8-30 



Saturday 



Mat. 3, Kve. 
6-45. 8-30 



Monday 



ThanksvlvliiK I>ay Bpeclal. 

Marguerite Clara in"Scrsm- 
bled Wives." Marguerite la 
Lack again with all her spar- 
kle, her joy. skipping from 
lauich to laugh In the higgeat 
Broadway humor hit in year*. 

Newt. Mutt and Jeff. T»»U« 

Dorothy Dalion In "The 
Idol of the North." A thrill 
ing story of the Canadian 
wilds. A romance of gold 
and the great Northwest, and 
a dance hall beauty. 

Scenic. Sunshine Comedy I 

Hay McAvoy and Kaihlyn 
Williams i n"A FrWate Scan 
■al." The story of a little 
French girl In America. A 
terrible predicament, a won- 
derful sacrifice and-arltting 
reward. Suspense that grlt» 
and holds from one great 
scene to another. 

Newt. "Do or Die." Co»o4y 

Poultry Show 

NO PICTURES 



Nov. 4, H»21. 

KKSYON L. Ht TTKKKIKI.P, 

PitKHii.KNT, Mass. Aoki. i i.tiiiai. 
Coi.i.kok, Amiikust, Mass. 
Mi/ Dear Mr. liutterfiebl: 

I am extremely interested in the de- 
velopment of the Reserve Officers' Trai n- 
toff Corps, especially la regard to hav- 
ing as many students as possible avail 
themselves of the opportunities ottered 
by this organization. Student Military 
Training has proven itself to be of 
great value not only for the national 
defense but also for the betterment 
of the student in making himself more 
valuable for all the relations of civil 
life. I would like to see every able 
bodied student avail himself of the op- 
portunities offered by the KeBerve Offi- 
cers' Training Corps. 
give ,u« Biuue... ... — Our policy of national defense con- 
realm of the beautiful and the sp'ritual. templates a small regular army and the 

organization of a large citizens' army. 



Why go down town for a 

First-Class Hair Col or Shaw? 

Patronize the 

College Barber Shop 

Memorial Building, H. A. C. 

H. J. DUWELL, Proprietor. 



Tenor and Mandolin Banjos 

Smxophonom, Drumm, oto ., Rmhmadlna 

DEAN'S MUSIC HOUSE 

(or. Main a nd State Sta- Springfield. 

Local Agent. 
Edward Landit. II A«ity Street. Amherst. 



Wk have here at Aggie this season a 
come-back eleven, a team which though 
defeated in four straight games, finally 
tame through with the goods, and vin- 
dicated its season's record. There must 
have been something poweiful behind 
this team which was able to make it 
perform in such a creditable manner 
last Saturday. 

First of all, the team itself seemed to 
show a confidence in themselves and in 
their ability to win, which they had 
not displayed as well this fall. Every 
year there are heroes in every football 
team, and they are given their proper 
share of reward; but little or nothing 
is ever heard of those graduating Sen- 
iors who have spent their college career 
on the second team, never having the 
ghost of a chance to play in a regular 
game, simply working hard in an effort 
to build up the varsity. As "Kid" put 
it: "The only reward they will receive 
will be in Heaven." But they will re- 
ceive other rewards, if only the real- 
ization deep down in their hearts that 
they have helped their Alma Mater. 
Five men, Seniors this year, are worthy 
of mention because of the spirit they 
have displayed during the past season. 
They are: Andrews, Chapin, Conant, 
Krask-er and Nigro. The spirit wh'cb 
these men have shown is of the same 
high type which has been shown by 
the student body in backing their team 
week after week. 



The Amherst Tavern 



The organization of this large citizens' 
army is well under way, and there is a 
pressing need for our intelligent, col- 
lege-educated men to officer this or- 
ganization. The Keserve < inkers 1 Train - 
ing Corps is the principal source upon 
which we must depend for reserve offi- 
cers, and, although it has contributed 
many splendid officers, we must look to 
it to increase its supply. 

This year shows a marked increase in 
enrollment in every Reserve Officers' 
Training Corps unit established in the 
Colleges of New England. I am ex- 
tremely gratified with this excellent 
showing, and trust that next year will 
show another large increase. It signi- 
fies the desire of our youth to prepare 
himself to serve his country in the hour 
of need. I have written to the Profess- 
or of Military Science and Tactics at 
your institution, directing him to make 
a survey of the possibilities of increas- 
ing the enrollment the next academic 
year, and 1 have asked him to consult 
you in this matter. Any assistance and 
advice which you may render the Pro- 
fessor of Military Science and Tactics in 
making this survey will be greatly 
appreciated. 

I am firmly of the opinion that our 
present Military System for National 
Defense will make better citizens of the 
youth of the country. The fact that 
they will be a part of the Army of the 
United States and members of a definite 



EUROPEAN and AMERICAN PLAN 

Appetizing, Wholesome Meals-Cooked 
under modern Banitary conditions. 

Private Dining Rooms for "Frats" 
or special parties. 

Bright, comfortable rooms, single or 

double, at reasonable rates for 

the season. 

Courtm»y. Oloanllnmmm, Qumlltv. Quan- 
tity mnd Varlaty to our motto. 

We cordially invite your patronage. 



Student Barber Shop 



YE 

OLD 

TIME 



HAIR 
CUT 
35c 



HARRY A. ERYSIAN 

North College 



A. MIENTKA 

Shorn Repairing While U Walt 

NEW PRICKS 

Men's Whole Soles. Rubber Heels . 
Men's Half Sole*. Rubber Heels . 
Men's Rubber Soles. Rubber Heels . - 

Men's Half Soles **•»" 

WorkGuaranteed-AMHERST HOUSE 



. . $2.50 
. . $2.00 
. . $2.25 




AND IN A DAY LOVELY WOMAN PLAYS MANY A MOVE 



"Where is <he man who Hbn the power and Nkill 
To stem the torrent of a woman's will? 
For if she will, she will, you may depend on t ; 
And if she won't, she won't t so there's an end on t. 



Lovely Woman says "Wear WALSH'S Wares". 




..tuani/ation, such as a Company and a 
Regime**, where the exchange of views 
will take place, will develop public 
opinion with reference to military, eco- 
nomic and international attain. There I 
in also a distinct moral advantage in the 
contemplation of patriotic service. But 
perhaps the greatest benefit of Military 
Training to found in t lie opportunity tl 
gives for developing a gift of leader- 
ship and responsibility. 

The leaders of this great movement 
must be the educated college men. The 
opportunity offered them by Student 
Military Training, through the KeBerve 
Officers' Training Corps, gives them the 
distinct advantage of becoming the 
leaden Of the youth of »he 
country. To this end, the War 

the instilu- 



GEORGE W. COLEMAN, FORD 
HALL, BOSTON, SPEAKER 



Forum 



in Assembly Meets With 
Student's Praise. 



After a few announcements by Ait- 
tag-Deen Maebmer, among which was 
the announcement that there would be 
no college exersiscs from Wednesday at 
noon until Monday al7-:tt> a. m., next 
week, Mr. (ieorge W. Coleman was in- 
troduced. He iB the organ'zei of the 
Men's Forum Movement at Kord Hall, 
Boston, and is a resident of that city. 
His topic was "<;et To-getheror Per 

ish." 

He said, "Dean Machmer and Slud- 
i enls. it gives me great pleasure to be 
hack on this plalform again. Alter 



Edith Hamilton Parker 

Graduate Teacher of Dancing. 

Sin. Ho, MASONIC BLOCK, Northampton 

FRIDAY EVENING, Assembly Class 

Popular with M. A. C. Men 



Have Your Next Suit Made to Order 

— AT — 

LABROVITZ 

THE LEADING TAILOR 
Fine assortment of Woolens on hand 



Private lessons by appointment. 
Tel. 761 Northampton 



Department appeals to 
ttoeeof higher education to give >"« , Hpe nding a very enjoyable day on your 
college man such reasonable means of ,.. impU8 [ BI iall now try to demonslialc 
Student Military Training as will eI '- j a „ Open Forum with your co-operation, 
aide him properly to prepare himsell for lf yuu wl ,, Kive , ne your entire atten- 

• >i — ■>„..,..,.,.. i iftw*f> r i it . ■ ii. ii * _ . . i. .. l i il... i 1 iii j> 



his fulure duties as a Reserve Officer of 
the United States Army. 
Sincerely yours, 

C. K. Ki>wahi»s, 
Major Oeneral, U. S. Army. 



To riia Coi.i.koian: 

The Faculty-Senior game gale re- 
ceipts netted *».<». U *='« ,,,rne,, 
in to the Memorial Building Fund. 

This, together with the *440.W> al- 
ready received from the Aggie Fair, is 
being used to pay for the bowling 

alleys. 

Alumni OffWE 

Nov. 17, 1921. 

BISHOP DAVIES OF 

SPRINGFIELD IN CHAPEL 



Able 



Address on " Characteristics 
of a Gentleman." 



Bishop Davies of Springfield, in a ser- 
mon at chapel last Sunday, gave his 
version of the " Characteristics of a 
Oentleman." The details of his address 
were clear and explicit. He urged the 
college student to make a name for 
himself while at college; not a nick- 
name, but a record that will make him 
worthy of his name. He gave examples 
of figures in history who had made 
names for themselves, not only by what 
they had been, but by what they had 
Charles the Bold, William 



lion I shall talk for one half the lime 
alter which you may put new light M 
my subject, argue against me or ask me 
questions (hat 1 shall'try to answer to 
the best of my ability and fortf he benefit 
of those present. Thus everyone has a 
give and take. I was once invited to a 
dinner given by the Women's City Club 
and the Men's City Club and I was 
called upon to speak on the topic "del 
Together or Perish.'' That will also 
! be my topic for today. 

The mind of the American people has 
changed a great deal in the past 
five years. Our ideas are mixed and 
interfere greatly with one another. 
This is clearly illustrated by the defini- 
tions a man once gave of theJSocialist, 
and the Conservative. The Socialist does 
not know what he wants, but he musi 
have il ; whereas, the Conservative does 
not know what the Socialist wants but 
iB determined that he shall not have it. 
We are not satisfied with the truth but 
always have to read between the lines. 
There are a great many differences 
all over the country. We are at present 
in great danger of revolution. Potafer's 
Parables are funny because they are an 
unholy combination of holy things. 
Thus everything may be all right 
and good but not succeed. Think of 
America's resources and assets. She 
is protected by oceans and endowed with 
wealth; ber people have brains and 
brawn; and Democratic principles un- 
derlie everything she does, yet what 
are the conditions? We are the wealth 



NOW ON sale: 

A big assort mem of 

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Beautiful Gifts at Low Prices 
G. EDWARD FISHER 



Full Dress Suits and Tuxedos 
to Rent 

FULL LINE OF ORUi SUPPUCS 

Cleaning, Pressing, Remodeling, Re- 
pairing and Dyeing promptly done. 

Slnglm Suit* Prooood, rmducmd to BOo 
On Prmmmlna Thtkmto oOe 

It will pay you to buy a ticket. 



We <l<. M peit work of nil desci Iptloni. 
1 1 A n.ity Ht. - LABROVIT1 Phone 30J-W 



THE NEW $3.00 GEM RAZOR 

si.oo 

HENRY ADAMS & CO. 

The Rexall Store 



SING LEE 

Main Street 

Quick Laundry 



M. NOVICK 

Custom Tailor 



Aggie Stationery 

with Class Numerals 
1922 TO 1923 



A. J. HASTINGS 

Newsdealer and Stationer 

Amherst - - - MaM - 



Cleaning, Pressing, Repairing and Dyeing 

Neatly ami promply done. 
Work called for and delivered. 

Save money by buying a Pressing Ticket. 
4 Suits Pressed for $2.25. 

Dress Suits for Hire. 



1 9 Pleasant St. 



Tel. 9-J 



Full Line of 

COLLEGE JEWELRY 

Let us serve you. 

ARTHUR P. WOOD 

197 Main St., "Hamp. M 



( 1 ( ) I J ** SLtt * buw iw ■ ' — j ■ ' — — - — - 

the Conqueror, Edward tbe CoofeBSor, iest country in the world, 90% of the 
Lorenzo the MaRnificent, and Ivan the wealth of this country is held by 10% 
Terrible L of the population. Labor and Capital 



The biggest asset of a man who is 
desirous of making a name for himself 
is that he be of gentlemanly character 



are ready to fight al any time if any- 
thing goes wrong. The people of the 
United States know very little- of the 



KSON & CUTLER 

DKAI.KKS IN 

DRY AND FANCY GOODS 

Suit Cases 



Trunks 



Bags 



He must therefore be a man of courage j race troubleu, or if they do they are try- 
and valor, gtrengtb and power. ing to forget them. Colored folks are 

The concluding remark of the Bishop printing newspapers and fighting for 



was, "Whatever else you do, I hope 
you will win the name of gentlemen." 



VISITORS FROM SMITH 

A group of Smith students came over 
on the 2 o'clock car from Northampton 
Tuesday afternoon to vihit tbe Microbi- j 

ology Department, in connection with j lne country. This is the object of the 
their work in Biology. Open Forum. 



the nation and the whites are not try 
ing to help them. Everybody hates Re- 
ligious wars, but every one is in them, 
so what can we do? We must have 
likeness of ideas and ideals, but this 
cannot he bad unless we come face to 
face and talk out these great problems. 
Now as never before is the time to help 



No 



C&rptrvter St Morchous*, 

PRINTERS, 

i, Cook Place, Amherst, Ma»» 



Candy 



Sodm Parlor 



BECKM AIM'S 

Candies and Ice Cream 



Morthmmaton, 



MaaaaohuoottB 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Wednesday, November ^23, 1921. 




TV. jjggjggWi Collegian, Wedpesdav : November 13, lffl. 



S. S. HYDE 

9 IMeasant Htreet (ui> one nluht\ 

Oculists' Prescriptions Filled 

Broken Lenses Accurately Replaced 

Big Ben Alarm Clocks 

AND OTHER RELIABLE MAKES 

Fully (iuaranteed 



PRIVATE DANCING LESSONS 

MABRLLE LOVEJOY MILLS 

Individual Dancing a Specialty 

Mills Studio, Hume 456-K, P- O. Block 



For fourteen year* the Open Forum 
has IMM iii-oinpliKhmp this. Tli0M are 

lloW three hundred Forums in the 
(Jetted Ststes to give people ft chance 
tot open discussion of issues of the day. 
Their aim is to gftl an earnest crowd be- 
hind t lie leaders of the country. 

There is a tine opportunity for an Open 
Forum here today, so if you will ask 
polnt.bl.nk questions or raise argu- 
ments I shall conduct one now." 

There then followed a series of qiies- 
llOM which Mr. Coleman answered with 
great ability and precision. 
* \ftei the Op#B Forum the President 
„, ,,„, Senate read a few notices and 
\»seinbly was dismissed. 



TWO-YEAR CLOSES MEDIOCRE 
FOOTBALL SEASON 



GREAT PRICE REDUCTIONS 

Men's Half Soles Sewed $, -*j| 

Mei.'MK.odyearKul.l.-'i II.-.-Ik '* 

Men's Whole Neolln MM and fiOOdfOMT 

KnMier Heels « 

Men's Whole Leather Soles Se«.d and 

<;,„,<lyear Kuld.ei Heels .... **■ 

All Work Oumrmntmmd I 

High-grade Line of Mens Shoes 

for Sftle at Low Prices. 

J. GINSBURG 

19 Plea.ant Strstt. On your way M town. 



SOPHOMORES WIN 

SIX MAN ROPE PULL 



TTij?Mam JEWELRY STORE 

n Matn Street. 



Arohertt. Haft. 



-TKY— 

C. H. GOULD 

for first class 
Watch, Clock and Jewelry Repairing 

Kl Pleasant St., Amherst. Mass. 



Fine Groceries 

CANDIES AMD FRUIT* 



MASON A. DICKINSON, Proprietor 



Advantage of Eight Inches Goes to 
the Half Dozen from '24. 
With the players in the big football 
•ftlSfl getting; ready for Ibi second half, 
,| U . ever interesting Soph-Freshman 
Bomblaatton staged a vaudeville skit in 
tbe form »l a six-man rope-pull. 

The new rope, which was purchased 

by the Freshman, as is the custom, was 
Itrfttebed out at the bang of the pistol 
as the LI men threw themselves to the 

irround an«» "d«| ••"• 

The Freshmen seemed to have the 
advantage soon and took in some eight 
inches of rope, but ihe Sophs had ac- 
quired 16 inches on I he first jump, and 
Ike final result after two minutes of 
pallia! was eight inches in favor of '24. 
The winning class swooped down on 
the rope ami carried away large pieces 
Of it to adorn Sophomore walls. Some 
of the, Freshmen, evidently not know- 
ing the custom that the winning class 
,-laimsthe rope, took pieces, but were 
qolckly taUftbl tbat "to the victor be- 
longs the spoils". 

Tb« Sophomore team was Holway, 
anchor: Whitman, Nicoll, (iarretson, 
Pierce, and Davis. 

The Freshmen were represented by 
KatTo, anchor; Nolle. Seaver, Ward, 
White and MeHerve. 




HOCKEY 



Northampton MaM 

60L0STEIN BROS. AMUSEMENT CO. 

Where the Nest 

PHOTO-PLAY 

iS • • • 

Are shown. 

Program ch.a.«d daily e"«Pt M.nd.y 

sad Tuesday. 

KRKD'K 1*. BKI.MONT. Manager. 

mrs. prudenciTp. cassin 

SELECT CATERING 

at Reasonable I'riees. 

Mormmlm a Sumclmlty 

II so. Prospect St.. Amherst. Mass. 

Tml. BOB-M 



['he first meeting of the candidates 
for the hockey squad was held last 
Thursday afternoon la Flint Laboratory. 

Twenty candidates presented them- 
selves for the squad, and eight candi- 
dates for tbe managerial staff. Coach 
Mansell spoke ot the importance of con- 
dition in hockey and of keening up in 
studies. Holmes gave the men an idea 
Of the possibilities ahead of the team 
,his season. Captain Collins concluded 
the speaking by describing the pleas- 
ure, and tbe fascination of hockey. 

Friday ami Monday the hockey men 
were called upon for their iirst practices, 
which consisted of shooting goals. 
AfterTbanksgiving, however, with the 
release of football men, hockey practice 
will begin in earnest. It is hoped tbat 
at leaat tO candidates will present them- 
selves for the real outdoor work. 



Last Two Games Prove Stumbling 
Blocks. Captain to be Elected. 

With the defeat by Lowell Textile 
Saturday. Nov. 18, the Two-Year Kleven 
has terminated a season which, though 
not as successful as previous ones, 
was as good as could be expected 
witli the material Oft hand. Coach K. 
M. (irayson, started out tbe sea«,n 
with practically an entire new team, 
having only three men as a nucleous 
for this year's team. Around this 
triplet. Captain Hetlerly, tackle, Gerre- 
m onty,end, and Haymond, center and 
fullback, a new team had lobe formed 
,o play the games listed on the sched- 
ule, which included such teams as Con- 
necticut Aggie seconds, Y. M. 0. A. 
seconds and I^well Textile Varsity. 

The management was in a peculiar 
position. The team was not strong 
enough to play college teams, and yet 
it was too strong for the high schools 
The first game of tbe season was played 
with M. A. C. second team, and resulted 
i„ a victory for tbe Short Course men, 
a touchdown and a drop kick being the 
winning factors. Then the team journey- 
ed to Ludlow where they were defeated 
by the powerful outfit from Stevens 
Memorial Institute by a score of 14-7. 
The following Friday, Hie Eleven came 
hack and plowed through the Worcester 
North High aggregation for three 
touchdowns on Alumni Field, holding 
the visitors scoreless. In a hot con- 
tested game with theC. A.C. seconds 
at Storrs, the Nutmegs, getting the 
"breaks," nosed out Captain Betterly's 
team by one touchdown, tbe final score 

being 14-1. The la8t ,wo ,ean18 n,aved ' 
namely, Springfield seconds, and Ix>well 
lech were superior to the (iraysonites 
i„ all departments of the game, and 
were really not in the same class with 
•my two-year team. Consequently, the 
team lost by scores of 31-0 and 35-0 re- 
spectively. 

Next season should tind abetter Iwo- 
year team on tbe field as only four reg- 
ulars will be lost by graduation. The 
letter men have not been announced as 
jet, and a captain for next season's 
eleven will be elected at the banquet, 
which will be held the Tuesday follow- 
ing Thanksgiving Day. 



MANY OF ALUMNI STAY 

FOR WEEKEND 

Many of our Alumni came back to 
see the last and best game of the 1981 
football season. Among those who 
were here and stayed over were: 
"Phil" Armstrong '21. 
"Chick" Mallon '21. 
"Art" McCarthy '1». 
"Doc" Williams '». 
"Goo" Grayson '20. 
Starr King '21. 
"Dolly" Dole '15. 
"Bucky" Davis ft. 
E. J. Morton '1» 
K. S.Clark, Jr. '14. 
"Bill" Harris '17. 
G. C. Hubbard »9. 
H. R. Bond '1!». 
U. Sledman '2t>. 
Stiles '17. 
A. W. Dodge '12. 
"Al" Spaubiing '17. 
"Bill" Glavin ft, 
W. S. Beauregard '20. 
Elwin Cotton '1*. 
Faber '19. 
Helen Millard '20. 
Susan Smith '20. 
"Nat" Ames ex-'23. 
"Bob" Home '21. 
"Fred" Zercher ft. 
Geo. Edman ft. 



orchestra 



menorah 



The orchestra had their picture taken 
in a new fashion last Sunday in Stock- 
bridge Hall. Only a few of our jazz 
hounds were present owing ta the lack 
„f dress suits, but those who came made 
a record of ten (10) minutes in getting 
into them. Draping themselves grace- 
fully about the piano, six poses weie 
taken in playing position. The best 
one of the group will be exhibited a la 
Wbi.eman" on all the placards an- 
nouncing the concerts 

The program consists of one or two 
marches and popular selections ren- 
dered in the regular program and any 
number of dance pieces for dancing af- 
ter the concert is over. There will also 
be a few specialties which have been 
worked up as part of the regular pro- 

gram. . 

The first concerts are as follows: lie- 

cemberHat Hatfield; and December 
16atlladley. 

DR. BENJAMIN ADDRESSES 

POULTRY LOVERS 



North End Lunch 

120 Pleasant Street. 

Our food is right — 
Our prices reasonable 

TRY US OUT 

w. bTdrury 



Director Sidney B. Haskell, after rep- 
resenting the Experiment Station at the 
annual convention of the Association of 
Land Grant Colleges held November 8- 
lti in New Orleans, also represented the 
Station at the annual meeting of the 
American Society of Agronomy, held 
the same week at the same place; and 
at the annual meeting of the Associa- 
tion for tbe Advancement of Agricultu- 
ral Science. ^^^^^^^^^^___ 

They broke two drum heads Satur- 
day. 



The Menorah Society held its third 
meeting of the season last Sunday 
morning in Memorial Hall. Mr. G. 
Taube was elected corresponding secre- 
tary of the organization. Alumnus Mr. 
Baker '21, president of the Menorah last 
year, and Mr. Sandow '23 were the 
speakers. 

In his short talk to the members Mr. 
Baker showed the need of a Menorah 
society for Jewish students in tbe col- 
lege "The Jewish college student is 
isolated. He is not in touch with the 
Jewish life," the speaker saul. The 
Jewish student has great responsibil- 
ities to the community of which he is 
apart. He has a responsibility as a 
jew to himself and to Judiasm, Tbe 
Menorah is the living medium for the 
perpetuation of the Jew at the college. 

Mr. Sandow followed with an inter- 
esting talk on "False Messiahs in Jew- 
ish History". 



Dr. Benjamin spoke to those inter- 
ested in poultry last Friday afternoon 
in Stockbridge Hal. on "Marketing of 
Poultry and Poultry Products." 

Dr Benjamin is on a year's sabbati- 
cal leave from Cornell, and is with Au- 
genblick and Co. of New York, Whole- 
sale Receivers of Poultry Products. 

He spoke especially on the newer 
phrase of packing and shipping poultry 
products, and on the co-operative sys- 
tem of distribution now being used in 
some parts of the country. 



The Eighth Annual Conference of 
agronomists will be held on Dec. 8 and 
10 Programs have already been ar- 
ranged. Members of the Agronomy 
department will participate. 



Ifosfoa fferald, free. X* 1931:- Tbe 

explosion of a steam milk-testing ma- 
chine injured two men yesterday at the 
milk depot of J.M.HagerASon,lnc 
432 Mystic avenue, Somerville. Both 
are in the Somerville hospital suffering 
from cuts and bruises about the bead, 
hands, arms and face. They are : Clay- 
ton Hager '15, 30, dairy expert^ d 37 
Jacques street. Somerville, and Walter 
Coleman, 35. his assistant, of 3 Wesley 
park, Somerville. Parts of the machine 
flew in all directions, wrecking the 
laboratory". 



NEW COLLEGE STORE 

While you are home, boost the college. Our Watch Fobs, College Jewelry and 

Suit Case Seals will do the trick. 



A NEW COURSE IN 



5. Special lectures by practical nur- 



serymen, covering such topics as adver- 
NURSERY PRACTICEj li8ing a|U j „ e lling, nomenclature, certi- 



fication, special crops, etc. 



Ten Weeks Men to Find Valuable 
Course in Offered Their Curriculum. 



WORLD FELLOWSHIP GROUP 



Announcement is made by Director 
of Short Courses, John Phelan, that a 
new 10-weeeks course for men engaged 
in nursery work will be instituted at 
the college as part of the regular winter 
school, to he held this year from Jan. 
'2 to March 10. This course, which goes 
under the name of "Nursery Practice," 
is provided at the request of tbe New 
England Nurserymen's Association, and 
also has the support and co-operation 
of tbe Massachusetts Nurserymen's 

Association. 

The number of students is limited the 
Iirst year to 25, because of inadequate 
facilities. It hi expected that all appli- 
cants will have had considerable ex- 
perience in nursery work. The same 
rules and privileges which govern the 
10 weeks students apply la this case. 
Professor Waugh is the college repre- 
sentative of the committee which has 
charge of this course. Other members of 
the committee are: Mr. Kichard Wyman 
and Mr. Theodore F. Borst, Framing- 
ham; Mr. W. E. Campbell, New Haven, 
Conn.; and Mr. Harlan P. Kelsey, 

Salem. 
The work scheduled for the coming 

year is as follows: 

1. Horticultural Botany; the Identi- 
tication of plants, their correct names, 
the science of nomenclature, etc., by 
Assistant Prof. C. U. Thompsen. 

2. Soils and fertilizers, covering the 
origin of soils, Boil types, soil moiBture, 
tillage, organic matter, humus, fertiliz- 
ers, home mixing, etc., by C. U. Thayer. 

3. Propagation and nursery practice ; 
Heeding, cutting, grafting, layering, 
seed beds, transplanting, pruning, 
growing on, diggiug, paoking, etc. 

4. Landscape construction ;how land- 
scape plaus are made and carried out- 
including grading, planting, road mak- 
ing, etc., by Assistant Professor Roland 
W. Rogers, under direction of Professor 
F. A. Waugh. 



Last Wednesday evening the World 
Fellowship Group had an interesting 
meeting, ihe subject being "India, the 
Modem". 

The meeting this week will take the 
form of a parly of 20 or 30 who will go 
to Sunderland to hear Count Tolstoi 
speak on 'Russia. Fast. Present, and 
Future". Several of the faculty have 
kindly offered to take some of (hose in- 
terested up to Sunderland by machine. 
Tbts is a very good opportunity to bear 
this eminent Russian, the son of the 
great writer. 

Tbe next meeting of the group will 
be held Wednesday evening, Nov. 30, at 
7-00 I'. M., in the Memorial Building, 
with "Modern India" as the discussion 
topic. 



KINGSLEY'S 

SODAS SUNDAES CANDIES 

Luncheonette 



SHINE AS-U-GO 

Ueiiieiiiber 

The College Shoe Shine Parlor 

fur your 
Hat Renovating. Shos Dyeing. Shot Shining 

At M Amity St.. by Am. Kx. Offlce. 



140 Main Street, Northampton, Mass. 



AMHERST BOOK STORE 

Note Books Fountain Pens 



High Grade 

COLLEGE FOOTWEAR 



-Al- 



Economy Prices 



C. F. DYER 



DEPARTMENT NOTES 

Bulletin No. 202 issued by the 1a- 
periment Station from the department 
of botany is by William L Doran, now 
assistant professor of botany at the 
New Hampshire State College and assis- 
tant botanist al New Hampshire Kx 
periment Station. This bulletin em- 
bodies the' thesis presented by Mr, 
Doran in 1017 for the degree of Master 
of Science. ft is entitled "Rust of 
Antirrhiniutn (snapdragon)". 



-After Every Meal" , 

WRIGLEYS 



E. M. 

The Shoeman. 

Main St., Amherst 

"BIDE-A-WEE" 

Creamed Chicken and Waffles Our Specialty 

And otliei g<»>il things to est. 

MRS. L. M STEBBINS 

Middle Street. (Tel. 416 W) Hsdley. Mass. 



Bulletin No. 203 issued by tbe Kx- 
periment Station is by G. H. Chap- 
man and P. J. Anderson. It is a pre 
liminary report and investigation on 
Tobacco Wildfire, and treats with the 
description of the symptoms of the 
disease, its causes and reports of inves- 
tigations on control. 



A partition has just been built in the 
large soil laboratory in the basement of 
Stockbridge Hall in order to divide the 
laboratory into two smaller ones. 
Large classes this fall necessitate this 
division. 




COLLEGIAN DIRECTORY 



Associate Alumni, 

Memorial Building, 

M. A. C. Athletic Association, 

Non Athletic Association, 

The College Senate, 

Baseball Association, 

Football Association, 

Track Association, 

The Collegian, 

Hockey Association, * 

Basketball \ssociation, 

Roister Doisters, 

The Aggie Squib, 

Musical Clubs, 



Telephone 

Richard Mellen, Ass't Sec. 175 J 



TEN 

FOR 

FIVE CENTS 

B130 

The flavor Lasts! 



Nash Block 
AMHERST SHOE REPAIRING CO. 

Your Shoes Repaired 
WHILE YOU WAIT 

s 

H 
E 
SHEPARD 
A 
R 
D 

Furnishings, Shoes 






Richerd Mellen, Manager 
C S. Hicks, General Mgr., 
F. P. Rand, Manager 

A. W. Smith, President 
F. E. Buckley, Manager 
William H. Peck, Manager 
Richard Newell, Manager 

B. F. Jackson, Editor 
F. S. Tucker, Manager 
S. L. Freeman, Manager 
Gustav Lindskog, Manager 

C. R. Vinten, Editor 
J. G. Lowery, Manager 



Nineteen Hundred Twenty-two Index, H. W. Spring, Manager 
Nineteen Hundred Twenty-three Index, O. E. Folsom, Manager 

y. m c a K - w - Mood y President 



"75 J 

403-M 

136 R 

8377 

170 

8325 
8316 

8326 K 

8377 

8325 

53° 

833° 
170 

280 

83U 

8325 



=HARDWARE= 

Come to us for 

Fireplace Goods, Coat and Tronser Hangers 

Ever Ready Flash Lights and Paint 

Clothes and Shoe Brushes 

Anything in Hardware and Cooking Utensils 

Always glad to sec you. 



THE MUTUAL PLUMBING & HEATING CO. 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Wednesday, November 13, 1921. 



SUITS THAT GIVE SATISFACTION 

A wide ranee oi Ready-mades to select from, at $30.00 and up-also a choice selection 
of Woolerfor tailor-made suits. You can find no better values than we are offering at 
the present time. SOUTHWICK BROTHERS & GAULT 



DRESSED POULTRY SHOW 

Continued from page 1 

•II kinds were displayed", and all inelh- 
ods of packing and shipping were illus- 
trated. Boys and girls' clubs, commer- 
cial men, and agricultural schools all 
had exhibits, in addition u» those of 
the various college departments, includ- 
ing the faculty. A very large and a 
very small bird were given away to the 
fortunate ones nearest guessing their 
correct weights A large roaster was 
givento each man making a touchdown 
against Tufts. l>r. llenjaniin, formerly 
with Cornell university and now with 
Augentblick of New Jersey, acted as 
judge, and also awarded prizes and gave 
demonstrations. The poultry depart- 
ment here is launching a campaign to 
encourage better market poultry and 
eggs, the campaign being launched 
with this show. Many visitors, at- 
tracted by the big grid clash, attended 
the show, and were interested in the 
excellent displays. 

Prizes were awarded as follows;— 

Senior judging contest— 1st, Acheson : 
2d, K. A. Lyons; 3d, J. T. I'erry. 

Koaslers-lst, 11. S. Davis; 2d, E. 
A. Lyoue; 3d. U. S. Davis; 4th, J. T. 
1'erry. 

Honed chickens— Sat, II. 8. Davis; 2d, 
K. M Acheson; 3d, Carl Wiklund. 

High total-H. S. Davis, K. M. Ache- 

BOU. 

Vocational judging — 1st. C. I. fla»> 
detteand William Walsh; 2d, H. Wil- 
son. 

Uighest total, vocational— 1st, J. J. 
Karl; 2d, L, (irauman and Daisy. 

Vocational poultry prizes -tiaudette, 
one 4th ;. I. J. Karl, two 1st; Stillwell, 
one 2d ami one 3d: lirauiuan, one 2d 
and one 4th; Kodways, one 3d; Beyea, 
one 1st ; Bardwell, one 2d ; Warner, one 
4th. 

Commercial poultry— Won by F. L. 
Sedgwick of Lenoxdale; U. Morse of 
Amherst, 2d, and II. Wilson of Amherst, 
3d. 

Agricultural schools— Smith agricul- 
tural: Lester Premier, 1st; H. Zuzgo, 
2d ; Stenes, 3d ; Slatterley, 4th. 

Faculty W\ K. Kyan, 1st, 2d and 3d ; 
Locker, Id. 

Commercial eggs— K. F. Wood of West 
Bridgewater, 1st; W. Hurrlapp of Am- 
herst, 2d. 

I 'nit course eggs— Mendoza, one 1st, 
2d, and 3d; Hurley, one 3d; Fdwards, 
one 3d; Clamon, one 1st; Hurley, one 

2d. 

Ducks— Weber Brothers of Wrentham, 
1st; Raymond of Amherst, 2d. 

Boys' and (Jirls' clubs — Irving John- 
son of Iladley, grand sweepstakes, win- 
ning fryer and roaster contest. 

Fowls— John Marsh, 1st; broilers, M. 
Warner of Greenfield, 1st. 



BIOGRAPHIES OF THE TEAM 

Continued from pas* 1 



Dr. V. S. Began, assistant professor 
of entomology has reseigned his po- 
sition at the college to take effect at 
the end of the present term, having ac- 
cepted a position at the College of 
Agriculture at the State University of 
Montana in Bozeman. Montana. 



team he won a place as first string end 
last season, but injuries forced him out 
of the game. "Ach" has played I good 
game this year and has done very well 
on the defense. 

Clark, Clarence F., '22, quarterback . 
— He prepared for college at Amherst 
High School, and entered Aggie with 
no football experience. Because of nu- 
merous injuries "Stub" has not been 
able to play regularly. Uis steady 
playing and good headwork have put 
much life in the team. He went to the 
inlirmary a week ago Sun. lay night 
with a slight case of scarlet fever, and 
will be routined there until Christmas, 
(iniyson, Hayniond H., '23, right half- 
back a position to which he was 
shifted from right end at the beginning 
of the season. He played football at 
Millonl High School before entering 
M. A. C, and made the varsity his 
Sophomore year. His playing has 
showed prominently through the seas- 
on. He is a lighter, hard worker, and 
is good both in the backfleld and in the 

line. 

Beal, James A., "23, left halfback. 
—He came to Aggie from Abington 
High School. Although playing his 
first varsity game three weeks ago, he 
has developed under Coach (lore's tute- 
lage into an excellent backtield man. 
A point worthy of mention is that 
"Jim"' after being tackled always falls 
with his head towards the opponents 

goal. 

Mohor, Robert deS., '23, left tackle. 
-He prepared for college at Newton 
High School. He has played on the 
varsity in every game both this year 
and last, and has been a stalwart de- 
fense man. His work has been of high 
grade during both years, and he pos- 
sesses great strength as a lineman. 

Marshman, Wilbur H., '23, right end. 
-Prepared for college at .Springfield 
High School, but never played football 
until be came to Aggie. "Willie" uas 
played some of the time in the back- 
tield, but his best work is at end, where 
he is especially useful in aerial work. 

Sargent, Richmond H., '23, quarter- 
back.— Football experience at Thornton 
Academy prepared him for the varsity, 
on which he has played two years. He 
played right halfback last season, but 
this year most of his time has beeu 
spent in piloting the team. His speed 
and open field running are his strongest 

points. 

Salmon, Kenneth A., '24, right guard. 
—He entered Aggie from Need bam 
High School, and has been the only 
Sophomore to make the varsity team. 
He is a strong guard and has played a 
tine, steady game, \long with Alger, 
berates as one of the best guards in 
Aggie football. 

Alger, Mason W., '23, left guard- 
Prepared for college at West Bridge- 
water High School. In spite of the fact 
that he had no football experience be- 
fore entering Aggie, Coach Core rates 
him as good a guard as has played 
Aggie football for some time. He and 
Cotton have made a good pair on the 
offense, and little ground has been 
gained through their positions. 
Mudgett, Veruou D., '23, substitute 



guard. -Prepared for college at Lan- 
caster High School. "Husky" has 
played in almost every game this year, 



Bent, Leslie I)., '22, substitute half- 
back.- He prepared at Medfield High 
School. In spite of injuries received in 



and his size has been a valuable asset the early part of the season, he has 
in giving strength to the line, lie has proved himself to be a fas. man and 
developed into a good utility lineman, much credit is due him for his l.ara 
playing equally well at either guard or [ work in aiding the backs 
tackle. 



; we tins season anu nas nan mmi ,,,„,,,„ ui«», 

. . . i ;. r center.— He entered from ( roshy mgn 

rtuni.y to go .nto almost every b.g «•«•*• "_, ,. „ 



Nowers, Donald C, '23, substitute 
guard. -Coming to Aggie from dishing 
Academy, "Doe" has developed into a 
good guard, with plenty of weight to 
hold up his position. He has come 
along well this season and has had an 
oppo 
game. 

Tuiney, Malcolm K., '23, substitute 
end and halfback. — He is a former Deer- 
tield Academy star. "Kd" has had a 
chance to play in most of the games 
this season, and has shown himself to 
be a steady hardworking player. He 
punts well and hits the line hard. 

Hardy, Sherman K.. 23, substitute 
center. — He prepared at Littleton High 
School. Although having had no prev- 
ious football experience he plays a good 
game. 

These four men have been first string 
subs this fall, having worked up from 
the ranks. They are patient, conscient- 
ious, hard workers. 



Field, Richard K.. '22, substi- 
tute tackle. — He entered from Arms 
Academy. 

Leland, James F.. '22, substitute 
guard.— He entered from Franiingham 
High School. 

Parker, Oceffge B., '22, substitute 



School, Waterbury, Conn. 

Miss Julietta Kahn, representing the 
Intercollegiate Meimrah Association 
viBited M. A.C. last Wednesday after- 
noon and evening and talked over 
plans for the c lining year with the 
Menorah executive committee. 



'20.— "Cy" Tirrell announces a 

daughter born Nov. 17. "Cy" is an 

instructor in Animal Husbandry at 
New Hampseire State. 

The Seniors have finished up their 
field work in soils and are now taking 
up laboratory study of soils examined 
in the field. 





200% Profit 

The equ.valcnt of a bushel of corn, worth from 30 to 
40 cents when fed to nood cows will produce about three 
pounds of btittrr worth from $1.00 to $1 50 at leaM 
200% clear profit, as the manure, skim-milk and call pay 
for the cost of care and housing. 

How can you make money easier? There never was 
a time when the production of butter-fat was more profit- 
able, with cheap feed and high prices for butter-fat. 

A De Laval Separator enables you to yet the most 
profit from your cream it skims cleaner, turns easier 
and lasts longer than any other. 

De Laval Prices Reduced 

Take advantage of the 1922 reduced prices, available 

now, which put De Laval Sepa- 
rators on practically their pre- 
war basis. You may be paying 
for a De Laval and not getting 
it by using a cream waster. 

See your De Laval agent or 
write ns for full information. 

The De Laval Separator Co. 

NEW YORK CHICAGO 

165 Broad war 29 E. Madison Si. 

SAN FRANCISCO 
61 Beale Street 

Sooner or later you will use a 

De Laval 






Vol. XXXII. 



MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 

Amherst, Mass., Wednesday, December 7, mi. 



No. 9 



GLEE CLUB MEN CHOSEN 
FOR THE BOSTON TOUR 

Twenty Two Men in List for Holiday 
Concert Trip. 



SOCIAL UNION PROGRAM 
| ANNOUNCED BY MANAGER 

Fisk Singers Give Unusually Interest- 
ing First Concert Before 
Large Audience. 



M 



A. C. PUCES SECOND 

IN RFD CROSS DRIVE 



Amherst is Twenty Per Cent Ahead of 

Aggie While Third Place is Ten 

Per Cent Below M. A. C. 



Severn! BOMMtl Lave been arranged 
lor the boston I rip.. I the Mnsir.il clubs. 
The lirnt one takes place .... the Wed- 
,,...,day alter Christmas, an. I is followed 
bj three o'hers M| 1*4 "eM three 
Blgtrtl. C.ncerts have been arranged 
in Salem, Newbury port , and l'eabndy. 
The s.'l.edule of these concerts will Ml 
am..,. meed later. The regular Beaton 
concert will he held in the Hotel llruns- 
wick on either Wednesday or Friday 

nights. 
The following members o( the (.lee 

( lab will make the trip: 

nits I I I. no us. 
Sprint;, Kldredge, W. c. Frost , Steven- 
son, Armstrong, Nowers. 

HKIOND TKNOUS. 

J, I,. Williams, Uussell. Sears, 
Uiehards, M. <i. Murray. 

KIJIST HA8HKS. 

Vinten. llolinan. Kennedv, I.oring, 
Made, Not cross. 

sk.com> BAM 

Bennett, Wiiittier, Cotton. Keith, 
Sandow. 

INFORMAL DANCE THIS SAT- 
URDAY ON CAMPUS 



The Fisk I'niversily .luhilee Singers 
from Nashville. Ten.. , gave an enter- 
tainment last Friday evening in llowker 
Auditorium under the auspices of the 
facial r.'io... A prolan. containing 
many varied ami appropriate selections 
allowed the sinners I he ureal est oppor- 
tunity for the i-xpiesMoii of I lie negroes 

eoairibntlon to the world of poetry and 

mt.sie. 

The presentation of "My < »ld Ken- 
tucky Home" by fctr. Myers. t<> the 
humming accompaniment ol t lie oi heis. 
was one of the etTedive pieces of the 
Waning. The explanations of the 

meaning* of the various songs, as de 
lertbed by Mr. Myers, lent added signif- 
icance to I he spirit of the songs. The 
skillful manner in which I he Older Of 
the selections was arranged, will, the 
slower, more melodious songs mingled 
e.p.allv with tie faster, harmonious 
.•hauls, casi I spell upon the an.Uence. 
Humorous qnlrki and incomplete har- 
monic co. .elusions so characteristic ..i 

the old nemo melodies added to the at- 
tractiveness ot ihe eoaga. 

The climax of the evening's enlei- 
tainment was reached when Mr. My n 
gave two recitations; the first, a hum... 
oris poem I.y the c.dore.l poet, Dunl.ar, 
Continued on page 8 



When the curtain dropped on the 
Fifth Annual Bed CfOM Roll Call on 

We.lnes.lay. Nov. 66, Kenneth UoOOJ 

'», general chairman of Ihe campaign 
at M. A. <'.. ■eoonneed thai 511 ewm- 
1,,.,-s ot ihe college had been enrolled. 

or 112% of the entires!. i. lent body. Tbl» 
is a very good flgare in itself, although 
no! as high as was a! BlBl hoped lor. 
Moreover, it placed the college see.. mi 
| B ,| lt . ,.,,1. .petition among New Finland 

Collegee. The student* from Ihe other 

Bad of ll>e town won lirst place I.y a 

wide margin, Ibaa aeearlag the large 

Ue.l Cross l.auner which was offered fol 

the hlghaai pataaataga. The B»»l 
standing was as folloera: 

tnrollineiit. HoIim. rihe.s 



Ainhelst. BW 

M A.C, **~< 

Worcester Teeh.,488 
D owdal a, '■"• ,i 

Norwich Iniv., HI 

I'niv. ot Maine. 144»» 

Mass. Inst. Teeh..:UK<l 

liltts. '•"' : ' 

S. U. State. BOB 

Lowell Textile 866 

Mi.lillel.urv. 

K. |. Slate, 

Clark. 

Dart moil I h. 



Memorial Building Hall is the Place 
From 7-30 to 11-00. 
Saturday nigh! t lie informal commit- 
tee is to run the first of ■ series ..t 
dances in the Memorial Bolldlng, A 
college , rebeetrn will furnish the music 

and dancing will he in order from 7-30 
until 11-mi o'clock. The prices tor ad- 
mission are: BlngU ladies IB cents, 
single gentlemen B6 cents, couples 7o 

cents. 

The .lance is to lie the first of a series 
inslituted so that the men and women 
of the college may come together so- 
cially in some way or other each week 
en.l. During the winierterni they will 
1„. ma after the l.askethall games it 
is hoped thai a large number of stu- 
dents, faculty, stenographers and then 
Meade will take advantage of the new 
so.ials. 

GRADUATE CLUB 

The (ira.luale Cluh is planning to 
hol.l its next meeting soon and expects 
to Obtain a speakerot exceptional inter- 
est for the occasion. The lull organiza- 
tion of the cluh is as follows: Presi- 
dent. Mr. French; vice-president, Mr. 
l'oiter: secretary-treasurer. Miss (iar- 
vey; chairman Social Committee. Mr. 
Rogers; chairman. Prograaa Committee, 
Mr. Avery. Faculty Committee, Dr. 
Marshall, Dr. Chaml-crlaiu. and Dr. 
Cramplou. 



•J4t> 

178 

111 

3086 



466 
111 

•^.-»ti 

in 

611 

U>7f» 

•j7<; 
•fil 

T.\ 

r.tf 
71 

:'.»! 

Sgfl 



n 

8B 
M 

61 
a:, 
M 
M 
•.u 
:m» 
66 
%\ 
IB 

1H 
11 



INTERFRATERNITY CUP FOR 
SCHOLARSHIP IS AWARDED 

ft. T. V. in First Place with an Av- 
erage PerCent. of Nearly 79. 

The interfraternity scholarship cup 
went, this year, into Ihe hands of the 
Q T V. Fraternity, although there was 
a range of only a little over three points 
between the lirst and last places The 
,.„,, was hel.l last year by the Alpha 
Qamma Rbo Fraternity, which held 
second place in the list this year. The 
, n a,ks were made «.ut at the regiatrar a 
othec and the average fol each Iraiern- 
i, v calculated. These marks repre- 
sented the grades attained bj the at a- 
deolt |a the different fraternities ave. 
>ged together and are for the school 
year of 1660411. The highest izii.de at- 
tained bv the leading fraternity was 
,wo per cent, lower than attained by 
the highest of the previous rear, ihe 
averages for the various tiatemities an 
as tollows: 
(}. T. V 

Alpha (ianinia Rbo, 
Kappa Sigma. 
Lambda Chi Alpha. 
Theta Chi, 
Alpha Sigma Phi, 
Phi Sigma Kappa. 
Kappa (iainina Phi, 
Sigma Phi Kpsilou, 



The campaign here el college was 
,.,„.,•„..! .,„ b] classes, and inci.L ntallv 
,| 1P re was keen rivalry among the 
,.,asses tor the highest percentage en- 
rollmeBt. Fach class had a class ,-ap- 
tain win. .livi.led his class into groups, 
each of which was canvassed personally 
l, y a special solicitor for that gtoap. It 
was thought that by thla aaaaae more 

in ,erest c.ul.l be aroused in thecam- 
,„•„,„. tnoren.en conhl he rea.he.l than 

loaay other way, and ihe greateat num- 

Coiitinuecl on psge 3 



COMMENCEMENT COMMITTEE 
ELECTED IN SENIOR MEETING 



Class Meeting After Last Thursday's 
Assembly. 



78.M 
78.61 

77.47 
17.66 

Tti.'.tx 
76.70 

"ii.»')7 
76.60 



The Senior class held B short class 
meetlag la Boerhei Auditorium after 

Assembly las. Thurs.lay for the purpose 
,,t electing the Commencement Com- 

mittaa. Thai ooaamUtea baa fall ebarge 
of Commencement exereieea aaxl -Inne 

and is to meet soon for the purpose of 
electing a chairman and to begin the 
work of arranging programs. 

The committee is: 
John N. Lewandowski of Kasthampton 

Albert W.Smith of Fasthampton. 

llobart W. Spring of Hraintrec. 

George B. Thompson, Jr. of Lenox. 

rredertek V. Waugh of Amherst. 



TEN GAMES ALREADY 
LISTED FOR BASKETBALL 

Management Hindered by Decision of 

Stevens and St. Lawrence to 

Drop New England Trips. 

I wry casual special. >i at the Drill 

Hall any afternoon ihii week will he 

rewarded l»J watching the snappiest 
basketball ..ractice he has -vei seen. 

1 use competition fol bertha on the 

litsl train i- recalling IB I vim and 

sped seldom attained at ihe start "i Ihe 

season. Kxpelience.l l.askethall plav 
, n who pulled Aggie through last 

seal s season Willi slid, excellenl le- 

Ba |t t< Hud themselves bard pushed by 
a group of aspiring BOM b-tier men 

After the hist eal made in the tqaad 

last week end. there are 17 men leli 

from which t.. pick the varellj iqaad 

i;ii!hiisiasm,.lei.rnii.iaii..ii. and alhlet •■<■ 
ability eoppl] the iundamentals ol I 
championship team. Ihe prCMnl kggfo 
basketball tqaad possess,- thu 
qatalfoa. v wiaalag team is the oaly 

Continued on p»«« 2 

NOILO AliClL ALijN:NIjS 

RETURNS FROM EUROPE 

Prof. White '06, Returna te Cornell 

After Three Months Study 

Abroad. 

Prof. F. A. White, M. A. 0.*66 ol the 

Department Of Floriculture, of Cornell 

miversiiy. arrived home froai i three 

months- Furopea-. trip •-.. Nov. 16. 

Seven Weeks welc spelll ill Study at 

Kew Garden* ami la making a ton 
U | .on. menial lloiicult uial interests in 

| .1 in.l v.c.nily. i'rof. While also 

visited many of t he large palace gardens 
a„. I private garden! in F.ngland. In 

Paiis he visile. 1 the Boaerie de I. Hay 

,lo- r.-se gardens at the Bagatelle and 

the gardens of Ft) xeniboiirg l'ala. •■ 

Tuileries Sardeaa, v*araalllM and the 

large seed lin ..--I Villi... 1 1 h A Andreaiix. 
In Lyons the linn of lVrnei-l>u.h. r and 
Sons was visited This inn, has origina- 
ted many of the American rariettea el 

n.s.s and now have a large number ot 

promising seodltnge. The nareeriei 

\i ..iiiiioi ami Beraalx, alao rote breed- 

,.,,. were visited. Orleans is the ecu 
ter of the inns. 1 1 leetloa of Frame and 
Where many of the largeef establish- 
ments in Furope are. F Tin bat and 

Co.- Barbfer A Co., and Lavaeaeeeai 

wcie visited. In ltelgium I'lof. White 
visited the nursery .enler at lihei.t. 
also a large coinmcrcial establishment 

in Bragea and the Botanic Oardeaa i a 

Uriissels. In Holland he spent some 
lime in the Mower growing section at 
Aslmeer near Amsterdam, also lathe 
bulb growing section of Haarlem. I.isse, 

Baaaeehetm, Letdea ami The Hague. 

l'rotessot White has had interesting 
notes of his trip each week in the 
tlorieultural trade paper. 






The Massachusetts Collegian, Wednesday, December *7, 1921. 



BASKETBALL 

Continued from page 1 



CLINTON A. JACKSON 

OF SPRINGFIELD SPEAKS 



possible mult, tad t»ie New England 
championship docs not s, ''' m aM ''"' 
possible honor to nam. 

The schedule will include 16 names. 
Amonti some of the strongest opponents 
are Marvanl. M. I. T., Conn. Aggie, and 
AmherM. The date for the Amherst 
contest has not heen delinilely decided 
upon. Worcester will not appear on 
i he schedule. The Stevens and St. 
Lawrence teams are not permitted to 
make a New England trip at all this 
year which accounts for their failure to 
be listed. 

The schedule to date in as follows: 
Saturday, Jan. 7-M. I. T. At Home. 
Friday, Jan. 18 -Trinity. At Home. 
Saturday , Jan. 14 -Conn. Aggie. At 

Stons, Conn. 
Saturday. Jan. 21 Tufts. At Medfoid 
Wednesday, Jan. 2-V Harvard. At CSSV 

l>riilt;e. 
Thursday, Jan. 88— M. I. T. At Cam- 
bridge. 
Saturday, Keb. 4-Tufts. At Home. 
Saturday, Fel>. 11 Conn. affgte. At 

Home. 
Wednesday, Feb. 15- W es 1 e y a n. At 

Home. 
Thursday. Feh. 2:5 -Vermont. At Home. 



Old Deerfield Fertilizers 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Wednesday, December 7, 1921. 



F. P. RAND IN FRIDAY CHAPEL 

Last Friday morning in chapel Mr. 
Kami spoke to the students on the 
recent liiterfTaternity Conference held 
in New York. The Conference meets 
every year, and each Iraternity paying 
dues sends three deleuates. Discuss- 
ions and resolutions result from 
speeehehes by prominent men from all 
the country. The purpose of the con- 
ference is to promote harmony among 
fraternities. The Conference is in favor 
of an open rashlag season with no 
delinile restrictions. It is also in favor 
of fraternity extension. It urges a 
greater spirit of co-operation aiming 
the fraternities ami their representa- 
tives in the local interfraternity con- 
ferences. 



NEW COURSES 

The following new courses are to he 
offered in the winter term: 

Agricultural Kconomics KG. For Sen- 
iors. Seminar in agricultural prices. 
Two to three credits. See Department. 

Animal Hushandry Bl. Required of 
seniors majoring and Animal Hushand- 
ry. One hour scheduled Tuesday. Ut-1.">. 
Uoom 217. See Heads of Departments. 

I'hysies 2*5 will have a thin! section of 
lectures, Monday, Wednesday and Fri- 
day at lt-15, in 1'hysics Lab. 11. 

Junior-Senior election cards are due 
in the Schedule Boon not later than 
Saturday BOM, Dec 10. 

DANCE IN MEMORIAL BUILDING 

The Co-eds of the class of 1MB inau- 
raled last Saturday evening in the Me- 
morial Building a new stunt— a get-to- 
gether dance for the Freshman Class. 
The hoys of the class were invited bj 
note, and about forty eonples attended. 
Music for dancing was lurnislred by 
"Huddy" Frost's orchestra, and there 
were also a few games played. Punch 
and cookies were served before the 
dame was "ver at eleven o'clock. The 
chaperons were Mrs. Skinner, Miss Ham- 
lin and Miss White. 



Assembly Speaker Gives the Whys 

and Wherefores of Chambers 

of Commerce. 

The speaker in the Assembly of Dee- 

ember 1. was Clinton A. Jackson, a 

graduate of the Michigan Agricultural 

College tad " member of IbeSpringlield 

Chamber of Ooramere . His loptowaa 

•What is ami Why is a Chamber of 

Commerce." 

[a brief his speech was as follows: 

"Students of the Massachusetts Agricul- 
tural College. I am a graduate of an M. 
A. C. also, but of Michigan and not 
Massachusetts. 1 am here to tell you a 
little about the duties of a Chamber of 
Commerce. Art hnr Murray, thirty-two 
jean old aad a BUM who has risen 
high in the automobile industry, says 

•our grandfather! have pawed on to 
our lathers a heritage which has hen 
dlaeipatad and New Kugland must re- 
claim that heritage If her children are 
U> prosper.' This is in industry. We 
are encroached npon by the other sec- 
tions of the country. They are taking 
„ur industries and thus lowering our 
standard as a leading manufad tiring 
slate. We need an understanding ol 
how to entertain the trend of Agrieul- 
,ure in future years. New England 
baSSS TO! million acres of unused land. 
Industry in Massachusetts faces the 
handicap of transportation. 

•'There is an unresponse of Industiy 

ami Commerce to Agriculture through 

ignorance, and they have a duty to it. 
New F.ngland ; s a workshop and ex 
ehaages her products with the west for 

l product*. We are, however, in 

competition with western farms. The 
Chamber of Commerce stands behind 
the credit of foreigners so that they 
may help us to advance in industry. 

"A Chamber of Commerce is an oppor- 
tunity for the best brains of a commu- 
nity to gal together and pull together. 
There are til of them in Massachusetts 
with a membership of 30,000 men of 
careful judgement. Ily helping us they 
help save New England industry and 
eommerce. There is also a Junioi 
Chamber of Commerce in Springfield. 
deslgaed to interest theyoting to follow 
the problems..! the stale or community. 
Besides paying our taxes we must give 
our services." 

After a few notices had been read by 
Smith, president of the Senate, the 
student body was dismissed. 



"Reasonable in dollars and sense.' 
A. W. HIGGINS, INC., South Deerfield. Ma»* 




CHRISTMAS GREETINGS 

Don't forget to buy that Gift before you leave. 

He will appreciate a good tie, muffler or pair 

of sox or gloves. 

Our stock is exceptionally good. 



F. ML THOMPSON & SON 

Hart Schaffner & Marx Clothes 



257 Main Street THE PARK COMPANY, Inc. Nortaipton, Mass. 



An optical sh<ij> which measures up to the 
btshMt standard of modern service, V on ! 
run rely on our skill and fOM taste in all 
optical matters. " 



Our Art D.-pamnent is Hlledwitli ,t»h-t«""» 
■ultable for the decoration <>f frat nouses, 
or for birthday and weddiwc gifts. Greeting- 

cards for particular people. 



Deuel's Drug Store 



TOIL 



Shaving SticKs and Creams 



ARTICLES 

Razors and Razor Blades 



VICTOR RECORDS 



Kodaks and Supplies 



Fountain Pens 



DOZEN MEN APPLY FOR 

SIX DEBATING POSITIONS 



« 



hoe Store 

SPECIAL 



The Freshman candidates for the 
debating team to represent their class 
arH CmMBO, Uatal, Goldstein, COTWttt, 

War<l and Tauhe. Back has had high 
school experience la debating. 



Professor Prince Engaged to Coach 

M. A. C. Varsity Debating Team. 

Debating sit Aggie hi at last eomiag 

back into its own, and Manager Krasker 

tias arranged a iriaagalat meet with 

Bbodc Island and Connecticut, Aggie 
for next term. To provide an incentive, 
the Non-athletics Hoard has decided to 
award one credit for every debate par- 
ticipated in. The valuable services of 
Professor l'rince have been secured, 
and he will coach the team.. 

In former years. Aggie has turned 
«, ut some of the best collegiate teams. 
The return of interest in debating 

among the nadkMtgraduate bodj maybe 

shown in tlie number of candidates 
that have applied for the six available 
places. Among those that have applied 
are the following : 

Martin - 2o Sandow '88, Lai '88, Nor- 

cn.ss "t-\, Damans SB, Brodoriek '23, 

Tanner If, Krysian "22, Tanner '22, and 
Krasker '22. 



Saddle Strap Oxfords . . . $5.98 

iHE NEW M. TXSONG BOOK 

At the Treasurers 0ffice-$1.00 

LEARN TO SING ALL THE AGGIE SONGS 



When Vou Are Down Town 



DROP IN 



The Candy Kitchen 



— FOR — 



Lunch, Candy, Ice Cream and Smokes 

COLLEGE CANDY KITCHEN 

"The Home of Sweets" 



Concerning an Appropriate Christmas Gift! 

What could be better than a Banner, a Pillow Top or a Table Runner? We have a complete 
line of Banners and Pillow Tops of exceptional quality and at very reasonable prices. 



AGGIE INN By the Campus Entrance. 



HOCKEYMEN HOLDING PRAC- 
TICE EACH AFTERNOON 



REPORT OF THE INTERFRA- 
TERNITY CONFERENCE. 



FreBbmen Have Over a Dozen Can- 
didates Out for the Team. 



AMERICAN EDUCATION 

WEEK DECEMBER 5 



asaoag tha men reporting regularly 
,,„■ Bockej practice, Collins, Lyooa aad 

Gordon an- veteran "variety player*. 

The Bopbomorea bare aeotout aotne 
excellent materiel. Golderoltn, Tew> 
hill. bamb, Chase, an. I Lorieg en out 
i,,r i in' defease ami offeaea positions, 

SOd nriinnerand K. i 1 1 ►« » n i n«- an- mil fol 

goal lender. Cetioo, Kroeck end Ba- 
ker ere eleo out lor goal. 

I'hc old reliable standby! "i lasi year, 
HThllaker, Cotton, Bodedos end Bardj 
irill stake strong bids lor Ibelr posi- 
tions. 

Manager Tucker baaeomeverj tooA 
uaiiM-s arranged, and gamea with Bar- 
vard, Yale, Dnrtmootfc end Ambersl 
;1I( . prsotlcslly sssnrod. Tbe rink lias 

ill-en put in B I eondltton, eleetrlc 

llgbti an- to be Installed for nlgbl nrae- 
Hee, end bleaenera will be set up. 

The Frsebmen ere swafklngonl with 

i lie 'Varsity ami art- out Iwicca Wft-U. 

I'hey will eonttnae this until Christmas. 
Ilea ..in ere: Crosby, rx-Arlleglon 
Ktsr.Gntld, Bntoblns, Lovell, Maceulay, 
UeGeotncb, IMeree, Bbeldon, Bprsgan, 
Banford, Taylor, White end Ward. 



At Hit- lasi masting of tbe Confersnoe 
on Dee. let, IflSl, the follo«la« m 
Href were voted upon : 

Inviiatioii cards be uiv.'ti Freshmen 
:,t luerobly Dse. B, t«» be oolleotsd at 
\smhi1.Iv Dee. la, 

Kaih fraternity i>«' permitted no more 
than two datea with soy one Freshmen, 
Balurda) efternoon being eoneldered 
one date, and Batordaj evsnlng another 
dale. "Date" was defined as as sve< 
ning party after eli p. a., = i Batordaj 
■fternoon party t«. be over bj six r a., 

,.r a Mimiay alu-i ihm.ii party t « ► 1 .«- uvt-i 

by six p. m. 

The Secretary will have printed and 
deatribnted t.» tin- fraternities tbsia- 
vitatioii cards t .*• t * »i *• Dee. tth, These 
cauls must be retarned <•» the fieern- 
taryby Wednesday erasing Dee. 7th, 

The following commlftee was sp- 
polnted lo srraags aa lalerfraternity 
relsj schedule: Hallelt, Gordon, aad 

Polaom. 

Tin' sentiment <>i lbs fraterntUt 
desired on a p.»«>l and bowling aeries 
to be atarted aa s<..»n as tbe alleys and 
tallies are Installed in the Memorial 
Building. 



COSMOPOLITAN CLUB 

ORGANIZED AT M. A. C. 



First President is C. H. Lowe of China. 
Dr. Itano Gives Address. Consti- 
tution to be Drawn up. 
The foreign students ol the college 

held n meeting in I be Memorial build- 
ing last Thursday evening lo organise a 
Cosmopolitan Club. This is lo be a 
chapter of an Internatioaal club which 
is represented la all the lame universi- 
ties of t he world. 
Dr. itano pave ■ short address in 

which he explained t he pin pose of the 

organisation. 

Tha following officers were elected: 
President, C. II. I-owe of china; vice- 
president, Eunice Austin of Bngland; 

secretary, I'lcin Chaml I.al of India; 

treasurer, Danitaa Arangelovltch <>f 

Berbla. 

A committee was appointed to draw 
up a constitution which is to he re- 
ported at the nexi meeting. 



LECTURE ON ABERDEEN- 
ANGUS BY MR. BURNHAM 

Last Wednesday eveniny. at 7 .W, in 

Bowker Andltoriana.ao Illustrated lee- 

lure was given on "'Tha Improvement 

and Possibilities of the Aberdeea-An- 

t-us In New Kimland." 
The speaker was Mr. P. W. Barnbnm 

,,i the Black stock Perm, Greenfield, 
sad secretary aad treasurer of the Ab- 
erdeen- A ngua Bleeder's Assn. 

The lecture was illustrated with two 
Mils of motion pictures, the lirsl show- 
jug the raising Of the cattle on the open 
ratlge In the Southwest, and the SSX 

olid ahowing local farms. 

Mr. Burnham eompared the three 
common heel breeda, and showed, by 
using an actual personally conducted 
cxpci iinenl covering W days as an ex- 
ample, thai the Aberdeen- Angus is the 
most profitable when quick returns are 

desired. 



Tbla Monday BSomlng IB Chapel, 
Dean Lewis brought to the attention ol 

the aludenta lh« fact thai thai was 

American Education Week. 

The purpose of tbbl olisei \ aiice of 

American Education Week Is to bring 
to the attention of Iba public tha seed 
of teaching and fostering irua Ameri- 
oaatsm la the aohoobi of the United 
States, 

The \merican Legtos le cooperating 
wiih the National Education associa- 
tion in this work and some ol their i<- 
oluttona are, in brief, as follows: 

1. That all teacher* in America, 

ebaagc teaebera aad profeaaon es 
eepted, shall be American eitlssns. 

•i. Thai no om- shall be permitted to 

teach in any school in America who lias 

lees than a high school education, plus 
two yeara ol other training. 
;;. That the Bagllefa languaga be 

made the hasir laagUSgS for instriiciion 
in all schools. 

These are the most important resolu- 
tions, although there are others ol 
equally good purpose 

The committee la ebarga ol tbla work 

bopSS lO Bud an>weis to BOOM Of the iin- 

portaat civic problems, knowledge of 
„ur government, and better and uai* 
reraal use ,,t the Bagliah langnage. 

Dean Lewis emphasised the fact that 
wc as members ol a collage, a higher 
instiiiition of learning, should think 

seriously on these oiicsti. ms, ami try '•• 
realise and perhaps help in the need of 

improvement In t beea eoadillona. 




Service I 

Wluit you want when you 
want it. 

The Lest ol «• very t hi nii collcga men 

cear. sbmepori mu foods and luggage. 

Nail orders lilted 

RrxiKus Pbst Company 
Broadway Broadway 

at 18th si. "Four at 34th St. 

( oiivenient 

Broadway I ornere M Fifth Ave. 

at Warren "' 4lnt St. 

NEW TOBK CITY 



TWO YEAR BASKETBALL 

SQUAD HARD AT WORK 



COLLEGIAN COMPETITION 

The standing »f the compel itois for 
lbs Cni.i.KoiAii to date is as follows: 

l.l>I lolllM. |il,l'AIHMKM 

IBM 

Kennedy. Ift.l 

Darling, '•' .1 

Read, 7 h 

White, 6.8 

If (25 

< 'orwin, 1 1 s 

Taube, 10.0 

Batai, f*- s 

BtTSIMl ss DBPAK1 M I N I 
108S 

Blade, 15.8 

bimpsoa, 11 s 



RED CROSS DRIVE 

Continued from page 1 



her of Bubacriptlona secured. 'I t 
expeetatlona were realized. The class 
osptnina were: Luck "88, Bennett '88, 
Day '84, B, Cook '86, Ritchie 8-yr. '88, 

BwanSOnS-yr. 'S.\. and Daisy, Specials. 
And the tinal percent l.y elassea 
'84 78%; '88 71%; 8-yr. '88 88* ; '88 

—64%; "'25 M : Specials S vr. 

■>\\ 48%, 
Although working under the difficui- 

lies ol a late beginning and a lack ol 

supplies, II. A. 0. OH the whole did 

remarkably well. Aguie is by a cans 

a rich man's college, but ehe baa dem- 
onstrated once again that she is always 
ready to giva lilier.illy to a wort by cause. 
! Mr.Lotch.lheNew England divisioiiinan- 

sger of the Bed Croaa.baa extended bta 

thanks lo the inenthers ol M.A.C. in 
hearty appreciation ol the way in 
which they aided in this Led Croag Loll 
Call. 



Capt. Rosa and Parsons to Form 
Nucleus of Team. 

Although Capt. Loss and I'aisoiis ale 
the only letter men on the twoyeal I'US- 

kef ball aqasd ibia rear, Coach Oraj 
teds confident that ha can form a for- 
midable quintet from the U or aaora 
men who have already reported foi 
practice. A mora or leaadiflicnll sched- 
ule has been arranged for lbs team. 
Manage! K et tl o t o a s a n oMnc aalhal tha 

moat important gaasea on the schedule 
;lll with Union Freshmen. Willistou 
kcademy, Cuabing Academy and (lark 
School. • , Kn>." has chosen tempora- 
rily the following for the tiisl s.|.iad: 
Loss, Larsons. Adair, l.reene, llaskins, 

c.iiier, Wilson, Lieive, s.iout. Baker, 
ciufT, Donnelon, Barniclc and DalTia. 



You can save from 

$3.00 to $5.00 a pair 

— on — 

Young Men's 
College Footwear 

by baying at 
FLEMING'S, Northampton 



the: home: 

of Aggie Men 



IN 



SPRINGFIELD 



IS 



Hotel Worthy 

Drop in for a meal Of OVCT 
ni";ht. 

TARIFF REASONABLE 






SOCIAL HYGENE LECTURES 
Doctor seeley of Bnfiagfleld Collcga 
Kara Iba Brat ol hia lecturea on social 
byglenetotbe freabmenof both the two 

and tour year courses last Wednesday 
Dlgbt in Bowker Auditorium iinined 

lately after capper, h aecond lectura 

was uiven Thursday night, and the 

Otberi will lie uiven very soon. 

Doctor B e a l a y la awdoubtedly tha 

beat lecturer of ln« kind obtainable, 
and la rery much lik.-.i i.v all iris and- 

1 1 n cea. 
The fresimien are recrcilred to attend 

these lecturea, OUt any Other men who 

wish to at, are welcome. 



Main and Worthington Streets 

Giva «« m trial 



THE 
DRAPER HOTEL 

Northampton, Mass. 

The Leader for College Banquets 



Wm. M. Kimball, Prop. 



T^^Massachusett^^ 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Wednesday, December 7, 1921. 



THE RWSSACIUJSETTS C0LLE61AN 

Published every Wednesday by the 
Students of the Massachusett* Ag- 
ricultural College. 



BOABD OF KD1TOKS. 



K(lltor-tn-<hl«f 

Manaiftiilf Editor 



BEI.1HNO K. JACKHON It 

BOBAM W. HiMUN.i <n 

Abbociatk Kimtokh. 

I l IHKIt II. AK«IN*»T<»S .'H Ahhl ...... „ 

sss. «. .«■ • •;,;;;;: ; : 

sswsrs ■ - « > ; 

Htanikv W. BMMUn "« 

IllUSO W. Si AI'K *» 

S()l ,,M,.S ( ..111 N t* 

KlISUA K. ltMH«. .In-. "W 

BUSINESS DltPARTMKNT. 

-__- ..»•, Business Manager 

iVJ^ M £ei - Adv.r,U,n B Manager 
££"* Ko,..o« » Circulation Manager 

HOI.DKS WimTAKKK IS 
( , IKK..KI. I.. HFIKI'N --'I 
ROBKWr K. S1KKHE--M 



| B g how ignorant most ol us an-. Four 
vt .a.s in college should n..t »e»U '<»»' 
yenrenparl from tbC living, breathing 
r „■„,.,, Slates. II should MM 1""" 

y enn ol Intimate, thougbtfu] ooataci 

w ilh our national problems. 

This is purely curriculum malt, r, and 

one whi.h must beetudtedby the Aaaer- 

i( . a n Colleges it our education is to Ik- a 
competent means of turninti out ••think- 
|D8 cili/.ens." 



CAMPUS CALENDAR 



rt-'.to r 



Subscription $2.00 per year. Single 
oopiea.lt> cents. Make all order, paya- 
ble to The Massachuaetts Collegian. 

In case of change of address, sub- 
.oribers will please notify the business 
manager as aoon as possible. 

Entered a. .erondolaaa matter at t..« Amherst 
P „.t Office. Averted for matllng at spec la 

of October. .917 an..,", i.e.. A-.gu.t 20. U1». 



A Worthwhile Thing. 
[tea] "cultural" otginlnatlun* at 

M A C. an- rather scarce, ami one 

which does g I wort »ur*ly deeerro* 

,„„.,..,„,,;,. ula.ions. This is. he third 

yoa. that the Junior Quintal has been 
working together, rehearsing weekly. 
and it has developed Into a musical 
;,,,,„,, ,l.at any campua mlgbl be proud 

to claim. TblsQolntet bai bad a motto, 
•■No jius, •■ and has worked unlet ly lot 
batter musical expression. Their work 

al ti.cSen.i-Centennial last June, at the 
opening of the .Jones Library, and at 
other like occasions, has been ol the 

blghant order. The Collegia H thanks 

, he men tor what they have done and 
wishes them a highly successful future. 



:$-4*> p 



H-:5ti p 



7-tH) p. 



8-IHi P 



A Purely Curriculum Matter. 
\t i he recent Nat (ona) Con vocation of 

diversities ami College* ow Inter- 
national Halation, at Chicago, the fol- 
lowing resolution was passed: 

••Unsolved that this convocation, 
aroused by 'be consideration of the 
„,,..„ problem* now under discussion at 
Washington, calls the attention of col- 
lagaasd university ntlicers and students 
to" he necessity of providing more fully 
,han do present courses of instruction 
|a \n.erican educational institutions 
for an intelligent understanding 0* the 
problems ol national and international 
life TO thi end that presents defect s 
in these matters he corrected, it is 
nr ged that courses of instruct. on be 
provided which shall acquaint studenls 
iaaehoOW and colleges with the fun- 
damental necessity of social co-opera- 
tion and the disastrous consequences of 
the lack of International harmony and 

[, seems to DC a lamentable f;ict in 
Xmerican education. Iron, the bottom 

roogol the ladder to the top, from p«- 
nary eehool through college, that the 

student is blind to what gone OH In the 
w ,,rldabo..t him. F.ven national and 
Mate matters are mere shadows la his 
)|liml H« known all about Fatty Ar- 
buekle, little ahotit Japanese diplo- 
macy: all about captain-elect Jordan ol 
Yale, little about the policies of the 
British Km |iire. 

Ignorance Of world problems can not 
he held against the student alone. It 
j,, he fault of the system which does 

Bot require the poneeestco of aucb know- 
ledge through required course*. Amer- 

i,. a n history and .-ivies in high schools 
C aa not provide s.itlicient basis for an 

aaderetandtng ol the issues lacing 

\„,erica and the world today. hvery 
-OOag man in American educational 
institutions should hi following, step 

bj B tep, under eonapetaol guidance, the 
DlMrmaraenl Conference now ben.g 

held at Washiiigioti. 

I,,,. College man, eapecially, is eup- 
peeed to be "op" on current affair* a* 

well a* those alia .- Ol ancient (ireece 

onto- Middle .gee, n«d ll issurpris- 



World Agriculture. 
•[•)„. fall number of ITerU) .h//"""'"'' 
appeared on I he can. pus last week, and 
contains much of in. eies. to followers of 

the profession. 

M. A. C. was liberally repw seated in 

the issue. President Buttarueld write* 

„„ "A Satisfying Counti.v 1-ite. " and I>r. 
McFall, Kxtension Professor of Agrieul- 
tural Kconomics, has a long article on 
••Uecent Developments in Agriculture 

and industry- Two of Prof. Baroea' 

photos ot thecan.i.usare used to decor- 
ate the n.aga/.ine. 

Th* "World rood Number" is tilled 
with worthwhile material, and the 
paper is surely proving to be a real con- 
tribution to rural literature. The next 
kaauewill be the '•Denmark Number." 



A Plea for the Dignity of Sunday 
Chapel. 



Sunday chapel at Aggie, with the 
simple dignity of its service, the good 
music and the splendid messages ot the 
•peaker* who come tons Hon. all parts 
,,f the country, is an instil ution of which 
most of us are proud. Some of those 
who attend it regularly may go because 
U l« required Of them, and others go 
becauaa thef Bud it more convenient or 
rttiinulating than attendance at their 
own churches. But many go because 
they want to share in a service of wor- 
ship and because they sincerely care for 
the service as a religious exercise. 

hast Sunday the first half of a tine 
organ prelude was drowned in a mur- 
mur of talk and laughter, while the 
thuffllBg of feet, I he needless clatter of 
I, and the scraping ol hymn-books 

destroyed much <>f the Irapreealreneoeol 

the singing and the responsive reading. 

Let us all try to be quieter, and to 

enter more deeply Into the spirit of 

Sunday chapel, that each of us ma\ 

better appreciate and enjoy coming to- 
gether for worship. 

Mr. Greene, former librarian of the 

M. A. 0, library, gave a short talk to 
the Freshmen last Wednesday morning 
in stockbridge Hall. "The library," 
the speaker s:,id. "is the largest and 

most democratic depart meal in this in- 
stitution." In closing Mr. Greene re- 
marked. "The library i* the largest and 
bent agricultural college library in the 

count iy. having about 70,000 volumes. 



Wk.i.nksh.w, Dm. 1. 

Annual Conference of Kxlen 
sion Workers. 

u. -Lecture, Dr- Beeley of 
Springfield, llowker Audi- 
torium. 

TlU'ltSUAY, DUO. I. 
Annual Conference of Kx- 
tension Workers. 

n^ Assembly, stockbridge 

Hall. Mr. C. W. l'ugsley, 
speaker. 

M.-hecture, Dr. Beeley »f 
Springfield, llowker Audi- 
torium. 

M ._Y. W. C. A. Meeting, Me- 
morial Building. 
7H() ,. „— Animal Husbandry Club. 
Bowker Auditorium. Speak- 
er: Mr. la- vet of the AyrtMre 

IHijest. 
U. QrchSnlm Uehearsal. Me- 
morial Building. 
Fimoay, DUO. ». 
Annual Conference of Kxlen- 
Hion Workers. 

Intercollegiate Fruit Judg- 
ing Contest, Toledo. Ohio. 

M.-C.lee Club Uehearsal. Me- 
morial Building. 
S\n t:t. w, DUO. 10. 
\ initial Confereueeol Kxten- 
sion Workers 
7-:',(» p. M. -Informal Dame. Memorial 
Building. 
Si Nl.AY, Due. ll. 
..,.K, v . M . -Chapel. Mr. Daniel A. Bol- 

ing, New York City. 
The following pictures will betaken at 
Mills' St udio In Amherst: 

11-00 A. M.-.S'/'"''' »"!» nl - 

1140 a. M.— Judew Hoard. 

140 P. M. -Non-Athletics Activities 
Board. 

Tl 1st. AY, Due. 14. 
4;m ,. M _ V at. C A. Meeting in 

Memorial Building. 
7-15 p. m. -Senate Meeting in Memor- 
ial Building. 
H .— Glee Club Uehearsal in Me- 
morial Building. 
Wki.sk.shav, I)k« . 14. 
a.— LeetUW, Dr. Seeley of 
Springfield, Bowker Audi- 
torium. 

Concert, Musical Clubs, Hat- 
field. 



TOWN HALL 



Thursday 



Mat. 3, Kve. 
6-45. 8-30 



Friday 



Mat. 3, K\e. 
6.45.8-30 



Saturday 



Mat. 3, Kve. 

6-45. 8-30 

Monday 



Mat. 3. Kw. 
6-45.8-30 



-I pgR-PRODUCTIOS l>AY 

A ll.iUlitV s|>e. -tacleof illirl- 
valleil grandeur, a dazzling 
pageant of royal pomp and 
magnificence is Decep- 
tion," '.» reels, tl.e master 
work of Europe*! greatest 
■creen artists, screened by 
the director of "Passion. 

Pathe Newt. Aewp'e Fables 

Katherine MacDonal* ln| 
"My Lady't Uteh Key." 
in. ... the celebrated novel of 
t V and A. M. Williamson. 
in which Katherine Ma< 
Donald opsaa deer to ro- 
mance and mystery, 

Scenic Sunihine Comedy 

Wanda Hawley. T. Roy 
Barne* and Walter Mier.. 
"A KUi in Time," from a 
■ton bl Ic-M'l Brown. M'»e 
fun than a harrel of monkeys 
and clean as a whistle all the 
way through. 

Newt. "Do or Die." Comedy 



Dorit May and Courtenay 
Foote in"The Bronze Bell. 
from Louts Joseph Vancea 

BlMl thrilling novel tinned 
to action on the screen. 

Review. Mermaid Comedy I 



8-00 1- 



Tenor and Mandolin Banjos 

S.xophone.. Drum; mlc , Rmhmmdlno 

DEAN'S MUSIC HOUSE 

<„r. Main a nd State Hts.. Springfield. 

Local Agent. 
Edward Landis. 11 Amity Street. Amherst. 



S-IK) V 



ri-:to P 



BAND 



Why go down town for a 

First-Glass Hair Cut or Shave? 

Patronize the 

College Barber Shop 

Memorial Building, M. A. C. 
H. J. DUWELL, Proprietor. 

The Amherst Tavern 

EUROPEAN and AMERICAN PLAN 

Appetizing, Wholesome Meals-Cooked 
under modern sanitary conditions. 

Private Dining Rooms for "Frats" 
or special parties. 

Bright, comfortable rooms, single or 

double, at reasonable rates for 

the season. 



Regular rehearsal Friday at 4-;10. 
Everybody out so as to have an excel- 
lent program to put a««> 88 al ,he ,,as " 
ketball -an.es which start immediately 
after Christmas vacation. 

WANTED 

A student for temporary labor in the 
Dairy Departeut. Work is open to any- 
one holding a temporary student labor 
card. Apply at Flint Laboratory. 

H. F. .llDKINB. 

Save your 



Courtesy. Oimmnllnmmm, Qumllty. Oumn- 
riry mnd Vmrlmty I* our motto. 

We cordially invite your patronage. 



Student Barber Shop 



YE 

OLD 

TIME 



HAIR 
CUT 
35c 



Christmas Vacation harry a. erysian 



for your friends. North College 

Come in and look over our 

GIFTS UNO GREETING CARDS 

^* /<♦ Al ♦- /C«ft AhiUl Men's IbberjrkJie*i Rubber Heel* 

HtBB (HUtiCr C^ttt S'llDt 1 Men 

,,vcr rost< MBee <»i' 11 " s>aeunss. 



A. MIENTKA 

Shoe Repmlring While U Wmlt 
>KW PBICBfl 



Men's Whole Soles. Kul.l.ei Heels , 
Men s Half Soles, Rubber Heels 



. $2.50 

. $2.00 

. $2.25 

,i HaFf Boles . . ... $1.50 

Work Guaranteed-AMHERST HOUSE 




\ 



CUSTODIANS OF QUALITY 

N eTery «o,«..mi..i<> (hero \h ».«*•?• one store, which hy Ihe lui&h and ..... I.a..»i...ii 

th«ru. Ur of Us inrrchmidiMN . « i.ich lo he roiiordrd as a Custodian of Quality. 1 hat b 

the ain. and a. hievenunt of this .lore. Our only ....est is quality, and no. t>ne ean hrihe mm 

to forget it. And the only reason why we present II1CKKY-FKKKMAN CLOTHES 

W4m%m this season is hr.ause th. re is none Letter. For the true economy of Quality, buy 

a IIICKKY-FREKMA1S SUIT J 



COMMUNICATION 



CAMPUS NOTES 



The two year men will start praclic 
ino the narlj Dart Ol next week wilh 

Willard K. Flench un eoacb. 



I'm Mass, (oi.i.koivs BditOH. 
Amherst , Mass. 

Dear Sir: 
Tl.e following item take., fro,., the Professor Banla indued the utility 

Amherst Record of Nov. loth maybe birds al the Commercial l'oi.l.r.vn.en s 

of interest to some of your students, con, est held al Amherst on November 

who are eon. e at lag foreign work in *»■ W. Hulottp * student ol poultry 

agneelture after graduating. I IhoUghl won eleven tirsts al the same con. est. 

that some of the student readers ol I he Lawrence S. Dickinson 10. head ol 

COI.LBOIAM would want lo know mole the (iroiinds deparl incut , has perfected 

about the splendid openings which now a new method of copstrueilon for cinder I 

await graduate students of charade! walks. An example of his work is lo 

amiability. We have many line DO- be seen al I he end ol t he cement walk 

sitions waiting for the right men in all just above the pond. 

lands where are schools of education hundaj afternoon Mrs. K.litb Smith, 

and missions of evangelism. We arc a s ,„.,.j a l student, entertained tl.e 

now combining the three department* Wllllinl students and their guesis in 

ami lind that the combination rep- Adams Hall. With a delightful account 

resent* excellent ellicieney. ,,| |,,., wu rk in a girls' school in India. 

Yours most sincerely. \| ls Smith taught there for n.arU live 

Ki:i:i>i'.i:n k A. I.kii«ii. yearn and expects to return there in 

An item of unusual interest lo Massa- about a year to lake charge of the 

chusells Agricultural college gradua- teaching of home economies. 



Edith Hamilton Parker 

Graduate Teacher of Dancing. 



Studio, MASONIC BLOCK, Northampton 



Have Your Next Suit Made to Order 

— AT — 

LABROVITZ 

THE LEADING TAILOR 
FRIDAY EVENING, Assembly ClaSS I Fine assortment of Woolens on hand 

Dopu.ar wilh M. A. C. Men j ^ ^^ J ^ ^ ^^^ 

to Rent 

Full Line or Once* Buppliks 



Private lessons by appoinlmeul. 

Tel. 761 Northampton 



ling students comes from I he Board of 
Foreign Missions of t he Melhodisl Kpis 



Th* Mel.orah Society held I hell bi- 
wcckl> meeting last Sunday noon in 



i . -i i. i i, •• *bb a ass iwsww • i nctnij "ivvuiit, .,».-. . ,, 

copal church, to (he etVecl that Maha- t |, t . Memorial Building. There is usually 



rajah of Btkanir. Nortbweal India, has 

Offered to his mission Bl.tHKl acres ol 
line farm land that is to be the site ol 



a speaker bin ibis meeting was without 

one. However, a lively d iscussi on con- 
cerning Jewish parochial schools was 
a demonstration farm and agricultural aeld. 

college to disseminate American melh- 



NOW ON SALE 

a big assort me bi of 

X'mas Novelties 

— from — 

The Pohlson Galleries" 

Beautiful Gifts at Low Prices 
G. EDWARD FISHER 



Cleaning, Pressing, Remodeling, Re- 
pairing and Dyeing promptly done. 

Sinotm Sulfa Proomod, reduced to BOo 
On Promolng Tlokotm «"« 

ll will pay you lo buy a ticket. 



it 



We ilo naett wik of *tl descriptions. 

ii Amity 8t. - LABROVITZ Pkeee :»J w 






iodsol agriculture among ibe Rajpul*. 
jso desirous is the Maharajah of obtain- 
[ing graduates wilh experience in tins 

line of work, that in addition to t In- 
land, he oilers lo put up all building* 

for the station and college according to 

modern specifications and pay all salar 

ies of the experts as well as other 

operating expenses of the institution. 

I'.esides ibis 1 he same hoard has secured 

in Chili an old Spanish. estate, p o en a* * 

ing many splendid buildings and a Had 
jot land that represents KKl.(MM) aero* 

Dr. Leitch of Wesley church la in Am- Old man Winter tried lo annihilate 
betel to co-operate with the Bosrd In the student body la one tell swoop 

securing suitable stu. lent graduates fol when he dropped a tree on the special 
these fields ol se, vice. Oaiu reluming from Boslon afterthe 

. i,^—— ■ — 'ihanksgiving recean. .lu^t the other 

JUST BITS si,lt ' "' • IHI, ' rs "" ''" "ffUnff" "woke 

will, a start to lind t hat over xo windows 
The challenge to a debate Iron, .be „,, ,, e u , i;|l ,,.„,,,,,.„ ,„, >kc . n |, v * tree 
rit-hmen lo the Sophomores which was 



John D. Willard, director of the if. 

A. C. Kxtension Service, has called the 

ninth annual eoaferenee ot county and 
■tnte ' KtensloH workers lo be held in 
Slockbridge Hall, Tuesday , Wednesday 
and Tbursdaj . December sixth, seventh 

ami eighth. United States Department 

ot Agriculiure and the Cuuly Kxten- 
sion Service will help the college at 

this conference for the promotion of 
exlension work lo agriculture aad home 

eoonomlcn. 

Accident to Special Train. 



THE NEW $3.00 GEM RAZOR 

si.oo 
HENRY ADAMS & CO. 

The Rexall Store 



SING lee: 

Main Street 

Quick Laundry 

Aggie Stationery 

with Class Numerals 
1922 TO 1925 



M. INOVICK 

Custom Tailor 



read in last Thursday's assembly is 
claimed by the Kr-eshmen l<» have been 
unauthorized. It is understood, how- 
ever, that the Freshmen have such a 
challenge under consideration, and it 
iwill be brought up al the next meeting 
•f the class. Therefore, the Sopho- 
mores will take no action upon this un- 
llicial challenge. 



which fell on the train as il went By. 
"No one was hurl except financially," 

as the conductor would say. 



Cleaning, Pressing, Repairing and Dyeing 

Neatly and promply done. 
Work called for and delivered. 

Save money by buying a Pressing Ticket. 
4 Suits Pressed for $2.25. 

Dress Suits for Hire. 



A. J. HASTINGS 

Newsdealer and Stationer 
Amherst - - Maa*. 



Full Line of 



POMOLOGY. 

The M. A. C. judging lean, will leave 
Wednesday afternoon for Toledo, Ohio, 
to lake pari in (he Intercollegiate Fruit 
Judging contest ot North America, held 

in connection with the American 1'oino- 

' When is the deer season ot)'.'" logical Society meeting. 

"The season for dears is on for the The team has not yet been ehoseu. 
rtaole college year:" j It seems doubtful whether the same 

team thai represented the college in 
Ibe Now England cooteet at New Con- 
With the opening of the deer season. ^ R H., will rep.esent M. A. C. at 

Ibe Dean's office has begun checking ' 

. , , loledo. 

ipthecuts remaining to the lovers ot ,„„„„ 

i, lite fruit judging contest between 

Il.e open. * , , 

„„,„ Syracuse University and the two year 

Next year's football manager was men promises to be an interesting one. 

uly initiated a* a member of tl.e alb- I. B. Stafford lit is coach of the Syracuse 

etic department on Monday of this University team. 

eek. His initiation was in the form i^^eaaaia***^"""— 

>l a practical joke even worse than the The newest advertising feature ... 

ne played upon ' Dick" Holden a few Amherst and vicinity. Who.an solve 
earsog... it? HOLflTBYCO. 



19 Pleasant St. 



Tel. 9-J 



COLLEGE JEWELRY 

Let us serve you. 

ARTHUR P. WOOD 

197 Main St., "Hamp." 



JACKSON & CUTLER 



— DKAI.KKS IN 



DRV AISID FANCY 
Trunks Bags 



DS 
Suit Cases 



C*rpe|ivtcr & Morchou**, 

PRINTERS, 

No 1, Cook Place. Amhernt, Mae* 



Omndy Shop **** ***** 

BECKM AIM'S 

Candies and Ice Cream 

Northmmpton. Mmmomohummttm 






The Massachusetts Collegian, .Wednesday, December 7, 1921. 



tw, M^rhusetts Collegian. Wertn^sdav^December 7, 1W1. 



S. S. HYDE 

( „,iloiiH> .»•»<! jeweler 

U l'leaiiant Street (up cue lliiiht . 

Oculists' Prescriptions Filled 

Broken Lenses Accurately Replaced 

Big Ben Alarm Clocks 

AND OTHER RELIABLE MAKES 

Fully (luaranteed 

J. K. MILLS, Photographer 

Class Group* 
4mat.ur Ornvmloplng and Printing 

Mill* Studio Phone 456-R 



GREAT PRICE REDUCTIONS 

Men's Half Sol.HSr«.'.l * l -*° 

M,,,'s «<M»d>eM HuI.Imi ll'-W *» 

Hm'l \\lM.leN.-,.linSol.-H:.i».K.."-<l>''i" 200 

Knlliei HMll . 

M) .,r.K Whole l.eather Sole,. S.-«r.l :■...! 
hoodywi Bnbbei lis** • • • ■ ''^ 
All Work Guarantood I 
High-grade Line of Mens Shoes 
for Sale at Low Prices. 

J. GINSBURG 

19 Pleasant Street. <>u v-n. way m> tomm. 



PROF. N. E. PHILLIPS TO 

INSTRUCT IN BEEKEEPING 



EXPERIMENT STATION 

SEMINAR REPORT 



THE M1LLETT JEWELRY STORE 



For the Bwl i'"" 1 ' sin( ' e 1<,,1H M;,ss ' 
Agricultural College is able to be of 
wrvle* to beeheenen «>> t«« Btat*. 
Prof. N. E. l'iiiiiips was receotlj ep- 
poloted to tbeicollege eta* a» instructor 
in Beekeeping. Professor Phillips be* 
written ■ new eorreepoadencej course i>» 
Beekeeping, wbleh li s thorough and 
.ysteinatic itndj lot ibi beftlnnefwUh 

bees. 

The new enurse considers the fuiula- 

mentals ..i beekeeping la W lesson*- 

Kacli leaeon contains ■ discussion l»y 

, t ,c Instructor, ■ readies assignment 
| D a standard text on beekeeping, and 
references In bulletins sent with the 
course. Question* are Included, to be 

answe.cl and returned to Professor 
PhlUipe for correction. 

I, ike all oilier correspondence courses, 
,l„. hl .w beekeeping course is open to 

enrollment for Massachusetts residents 

al ;,n> time (luring the winter term. 

The problems studied are: Rqalpsseat, 
spun- Ifanagemeet, Bwars* Control, 
Management lor the Production of 

Honey Crops, an.l B** Diseases an<l 
Kneinies. In so far as possible, the les- 
sons will follow the natural order of 
I he seasons. 

The enure* will ''"• , '< thp ■*•*■ of 

tlu.se who intend lo keep BOOS for 

llst . ,„ pollination in connection with 

the production nf oreharw, garden of 

field crops, »* well as iln.se who deelr* 
ic. produee hooey. 



Prof. Morse Conducts Meeting Dec. 6. 
The r*gulW weekly seminar was held 
at the West Experiment Station on 
Monday, Dec. li, with about 20 mem- 
bers..! the faculty in attendance. The 
meeting was in charge of Prof. F. W. 
Moraeof the Experiment Station, who 
reported his studies on lime absorption 



and acidity; OB comparative effects of 
sulfate an.l muriate of potash; and on 
Study Of availability of soil potash. 

Uy no means the least Interesting 
part of the meeting WSJ the discussion 
which followed Prof. Morses discourse, 
and which was entered into quite earn- 
estly by those fathered around the 
table Different views and theories 
along the same genera! moles w«w 
brought to liuht,an.ls..ineof the points 
brought on) by Prof. Morn* wereglree 
further consideration. 




32 Main Street. 



Amherit. Hat*. 



TEN-DAY SALE 

Men's Winter - weight Oxfords 

$7.SO Pair 

BEGINNING TUESDAY HORWNG, DIX 6 

Our entire lot of Men's Cordovan and Scotch 
Grain Oxiords-ends of lines former | 
selling prices, $14 to $20 

MX SIZES IN THE LOT, BUT NOT ALU SIZES IN 

EVERY STYLE 



— TKY— 

O. H. GOULD 

for first -class 

Watch, Clock and Jewelry Repairing 

tf Pleasant St., \mberst. Mass. 

GRANGE STORE 

Pine Groceries 
Candies and Fruits. 



MASON A. DICKINSON, Proprietor 



PLAZ.A 

KottaassetM • • Ma8B 

GOLDSTEIN BROS. AMUSEMENT CO. 

Where the Best 

PHOTO-PLAY 
FEATURES . . . 

Are shown. 

Program changed dailjf except Monday 

and Tuesday. 

KltKI.K r. IlKI.Mi.M. Manager. 



MRS. PRUDENCE P. CASSIN 

SELECT CATERING 
si gessoeaMe Prices. 
Informmlm a Snmelalty 

,.,.,, |.,„,,..MtM.. Amli.M~t.Ma,s 

Te/. SBB-M 



NOTICES 

The speaker for Sunday Chapel on 
Dec. 11. is to be Mr. Daniel A. Poling, 
of New York Cilv. 

At Assembly tomorrow. Dec 8, the 
student body will be addressed by Mr. 
C. W Pugtley, Assistant Secretary of 
the U. S. Depl. of Agriculture. 

Notice to Freshmen: — At Assembly 
M Dm, I, the Interfratemity Confer 
ence will gWeottl l<> the Freshmen all 
Invitations of the rartoO* Iraternitics of 

the Ooaference tor datn* derleg meh- 

| B g week the first part of next term. 
Pall Instruction will he uiven at 
tsaemblj loi filling theee .aids out. 
They arc to be handed in te the Con- 

reronee without fail al next week's 
Alsemlily, Dee. 15, in order lo be valid, 
and Will then be returned to the Fra- 
ternities. 



Boll 



Tel. 94-M 



Amherst 



X3 



WW 



W 



North End Lunch 

120 Pleasant Street. 

Our food ia right— 
Our prices reasonable 

TRY US OUT 

w. bTdrury 



Notice to So|.hsinores: — More compet- 
itors are needed at once for the Htrninj 

department of the ii'^4 Index. There is 

plenty of work to be done, and a fine 
chance to g*1 into an activity for any 
who have the least bit of talent along 
that line. See Friend or Arrlaglo* '23. 

The schedule for pictuies for the 1981 

/„,/,■/, to be taken at Mills' Studio, has 
heenchantie.l. Further notices will be 
uiven out in the Cm. i.m.i an and in 
Chapel. As there has been some little 
00 illusion thus far, it is essential that 
all who are concerned make especial 
note of their particular date*. 



RELAY NOTICE 



The Interfratemity Conference an- , 
Bounces that the relay season for next 
term will commence two weeks after 
the term begins. Freshmen pledges: 

are eligible to take part is ibis. Cap- 
tain Sullivan, of varsity relay, is an- j 
xious to know wlm is coming out. and 
to get a line on prospective varsity , 
material. 



The Pulsation Test 

Take out your watch and time the pulsations of a 
De Laval Milker. You will find that every un.t in the 
barn no matter if there are a dozen, » runn.no ,« 
exactly the same speed and as uniformly as the >ck 
of a clock This insures your cows be.ng m.lked in 
Ictly the same way from day to day or year to year 
and is one of the reasons why cows do so well with 
the De Laval Milker. , 

Try this test on any milker and you will understand 
iust one of many reasons why the De Lava is 1 he 
Better Way of Milking." Send for full tnformatton. 
Ttt*» De Laval Separator Company 

NEW YoS CHICAGO SAN FRANCISCO 

t4**V9« 29 E. MadUon Street 61 Be.le Straat 

Sooner or later you will use a 

De Laval 

Milker and Cream Separator 



NEW COLLEGE STORE 

Make your note books bring you tbe highest grades by having all the work typewritten. 
We carry a full stock of all the standard machines. Cash or terms. 



NEW YORK PREACHER 

GIVES EMPHATIC ADDRESS 



John Haynes Holmes Speaka to 
Students in Chapel, on "Ser- 
vice to Mankind." 



\ most Inspiring sermon was preach- 
ed by Hev. John Haynes Holmes of the 
Community church of New York City 
at Sunday Chapel. The subject of his 
sermon was "Service to Mankind." and 
for three quartern of an hour Kev. Mr. 
Holmes interested the students with 
his talk. The speaker admonished the 
students to beware of selfishness, which 
he said was the cardinal sin of man. 
The greatest object la a man's life 
should be to live that life for the well 
tare of mankind and thus be service- 
able to all i.e.. pies. 

Mr Holmes gave the following defini- 
tion, slating that a serviceable life is 
I lie transformation of the soul to God 
and to the welfare of all humanity. 
He also compared (he easy mode of 
living of the rich people, with all their 
wealth and luxuries, to that of a poor 
man whose life is always more service- 
able to tbe world. The people today, 
he said, are inclined to grab all the 
money that they can possibly lay their 
hands on, and then take a chance on 
what they may earn tomorrow. 

If we wish to make our life he of 
service to mankind at large we must 
discipline and sacrifice ourselves to 
such a life. We must take serious 
consideration of tbe serviceable life. 
Thee* is no possibility of reconciliation 
between the life of service and the life 
of pleasure and wealth. There can he 
no compromise! If we enter upon an 
idealistic life we must adhere to it to 
the end. 



FINALS ARE COMING SOON 

Last Monday ninruiuu in Chapel, act- 
ing Pre*td*nl Lewis gave the usual 
''before finals" wanting to the college. 
He emphasized tbe fact that these last 
few weeks count heavily on a students 
marks, and may determine whether he 
is allowed to take the final examination 
or not. The Freshman eJaM was espec- 
ially warned, not because of any lack 
of good marks, hut because lb** are 
about to go thfoagfa their lirst set of 
finals, and need a little encouragement. 
Dean Lewis urged those men who are 
having trouble lo go to upper classmen 
for help, as they are always wilting 
and glad to do this. 



CASTS NEARLY COMPLETED 

FOR AGGIE REVUE 



INDICATIONS POINT TO 

STRONG YEARLING QUINTET 



Eight Men at Present in Squad A 
With Eight others on Team B. 

From all appearances, the Freshmen 
are going to be represented by a fast 
l.asket-bal! team this fall. The ma- 
terial is exceptionally good. Sullivan, 
Fish and K. Jack, all Amherst men are 
experienced players, while Samuels, 
Hale and Cahill are fast ami clever. 
The following are the important games 
en the schedule: Hopkins, Deerfield 
academy, Wlllistoa Academy, Green- 
field High, Turners Falls High, Smith 
lliuh, and Sacred Heart High. 

Cacb Gore has worked hard with 
the boys during tbe last week, putting 
them through preliminary practice and 
having the first and second team scrim- 
mage. "Kid" has chosen the following 
temporarily for positions on team A: 
Hale, Cahill, Samuels, Simons, Gannon, 
Seaver, liilske and Sullivan. The fol- 
lowing are on team B: R. Cook, Harley, 
Whiltuni, Holhrook, Wilcox, Pelletier. 
Dean and Shumway. 

II. N'ylen of East Boston and H. Slade 
, of Chelsea are both competing for the 
managership of tbe team. 



KINGSLEY'S 



SODAS 



SUNDAES 



CANDIES 



Luncheonette 



140 Main Steel, Northampton, Mass. 



SHINE AS-U-GO 

lit'iiieiulier 

The College Shoe Shine Parlor 

for your 
Hal Renovating. Shoe Dyting. Shoe Shining 

At la Ainli> St., ii.\ Am Be. (Mice. 



AMHERST BOOK STORE 

Note Hooks Fountain Pens 



Senior Act to Consist of Three Fea 
ture Musical Numbers. 

in tbe "Aggie Kevue" which is to be 
staged in the auditorium of Siockbridge 
Hall Dee. 17th. tbe casts for the four 
acts were selected at respective meet- 
ings. 

The Senior cast includes: 

vYaugh 

Vinlen 

llolman 

Maguinn 

Swift 

Wood 

Murray 

Cotton 

The Junior cast includes: 

Norcross 

Sears 

It. I). Fuller 

Broderteh 

HI. 1 ridge 

Slade 

K. F. It. Martin 

Bennett 

Hie hards 

Arrington 

Wendell 

Keith 

ffhttttai 

N'owers 

Tbe Sophomore cast includes: 

McAffee 

Weatherwax 

Haskell 

J. L. Williams 

Dimock 

Miss Geiger 

Miss Smith 

The Fresh mae cast includes: 

Stone 

Waite 

Langenbacher 

Corwin 

Wilder * 



Tbe poles which have been placed 
j around the hockey rink are intended to 
support the lights for tbe evening prac- 
tices and late games of the hockey 
[team during the coming winter. 



NON-ATHLETIC BOARD NOTICE 

The Non-athletic Activities board has 
voted lo issue no further public an- 
nouncement of medal credits. Candi- 
dates may learn their standings, how- 
ever, by personal application to the 
general manager. Attention is called 
to the fact that the list of credits pub- 
lished recently in tbe Comkoian was 
neither inclusi ve nor up-to-date. 

Solomon Coben's gift of oratory and 
bis ability to dispute the referee s 
decisions places him in a likely position 
for the captaincy of South Colleges 
twilite eleven. 



C. F. DYER 



-After Every Meal" . 

WRIGLEYS 




High Grade 

COLLEGE FOOTWEAR 

— AT — 

Economy Prices 
E. M. BOLLES 

The Shoeman. 

Main St., Amherst 

"BIDE-A-WEE" 

Creamed Chicken and Waffles Our Specialty 

Anil otlit i uoo.l tlilli«ti to SOI. 

MRS. L. M STEBBINS 

Middle Htreet. (Tel. 4ffi- W) llaitlej. Mail. 

WEBSTER'S STUDIO 

Nash Block 
AMHERST SHOE REPAIhING CO. 









TEN 

FOR 

FIVE CENTS 

B130 

The Flavor Lasts! 



Vour Shoes Repaired 
WHILE YOU WAIT 

S 

H 
E 
SHEPARD 
A 
R 
D 

Furnishings, Shoes 



HARDWARE 



Come to us for- 



Fireplace Goods, Coat and Trouser Hangers 

Ever Ready Flash Lights and Paint 

Clothes and Shoe Brushes 

Anything in Hardware and Cooking Utensils 

Always glad to see you. 



TEE MUTUAL PLUMBING & BEATING CO. 






The Massachusetts Collegian, Wednesday, December 7, 192L 



F-OR ROUGH WINTER WEAR 

A pair of Corduroy Riding Breeches are just the thin, for comfort and senice Heavy Sweaters, Wool 
ClZs, Heavy Muffler,, and everything to insure your comfort agamst the cold. 

SOUTHWICK BROTHERS & GAULT 



SOCIAL UNION 

Continued from pag« 1 



W. A. BANGS OF SOMERVILLE 

IS TWO YEAR LEADER 



entitled "In the Morning;" »»»e second, 
a more serious poem by the same au- 
thor, "When My 'Lias Went In War," 
which was related with great dram- 
alism and emotion. 

In his introductory remarks to the 
various select ions, Mr. Myers attempted 
to outline the development of negro 
songs and to give some explanation of 
their existence. The quintet was com- 
posed of four men and one woman. 
They were, in their order from left to 
right as they appeared on the stage: 
Mr. James A. Myers. Mr. Alfred T. 
Clarke, Mrs. James A. Myers, Mr. Carl 
J. Balhour, Mr. Collins. 

The program which was given fol- 
lows: 

1. Steal Away to .J»»n» 

<;oml News the ('harlot's Coinin' 
Quintet 

2. My Ml' Kentucky Home 

Mr. Myers and others 
a. Kv'rybody Talkln' 'bout Heaven ain't <!oln 
There 
Lit' David Play on Your Haro 
(jiiintet 

4. Solo: The Two (irenadiers 

Mr. Collins 
Mrs. Myers, piano accompaniment 

5. You Hear the Ijiuibs a-callln'. oh Shepherd 

ko Feed My sheep 

Quintet 

INTERMISSION 

6. Ain't Gonna Study War no More 

Quintet 

Ol' Black .loe 

Mr. Collins. Mr. Myers and others 

7. Ltl* Bunch of Honeyness. A Lullaby 

I Want to be Ready to Walk in Jerusalem 
.lust Like John 

a. Kecitatlon. In the MornlnK 

Mr. Myers 
». Kecitatlon : When My 'Lias Went to War 

Mr. Myers 

Swinn Low Sweet Chariot 
Quintet 



Election Of Captain For Next Year 

Follows Banquet and Speeches 

At Draper Hall. 

Twelve members of the Two- Year foot- 
ball squad were awarded their letters 
at a banquet given to the members of 
the squad at Draper Hall last Wednes- 
day evening. The banquet was s ter- 
mination of a rather unsuccessful sea- 
son in the matter of victories for the 
team. Following the banquet an elec- 
tion was held. Walter A. Hangs of 
Somerville was elected captain for next 



year's eleven, bangs played quarter- 
back this past season and his good 
work was consistent throughout the en- 
tire season. Although handicapped 
with a broken rib he played through all 
the games. During his high school 
career he starred in the l.acklield for 
Somerville several seasons ago. 

Postprandial exercises were then in 
ord«r following the election of the 
captain. Curry Hicks was the princi- 
pal speaker of the evening, and he 
spoke of the difficulties encountered in 
athletics when the Two-Year course 
was lirst organized Coach "Kin" Cray- 
son, Captain Uetterly, Ceire. ity. 

and Captain-elect bangs were the 



speakers. In-as-much as there at. 
eight regular lirst siring men who will 
return to school next year, a sue- 
fill season is looked forward to. 

The men who were awarded theit 
letters are as follows : Boland. Mana- 
ger; Adams, baker bangs, Better!) 
Captain ; Callage! \ Ceiremoiity , Henrv 
Pierce, Oulhnse, Raymond, Stioiit. 
and Trull, Betterly, Raymond, ami 
(ierreinonty are the three reguh.i 
tirst suing men who will be lost to the 
team by graduation in June. 

There was no meeting of the Catholic 
club las' Wednesday on account ol other 
conflicting meetings. 




10 



This year, the Social Union entertain- 
ments will come on the first and third 
week-ends of the winter months, and 
the complete schedule follows: 
Dec. 2, Friday, o-30 P. m. -Fisk Univers 

ity Singers. 
Dec. 17, Saturday, MQ r\ m.— Aggie Re- 
vue (local talent). 
Jan. 7, Saturday, 6-30 p. m. — Ernest 
Gamble Concert Party. 

Jan. 20, Friday ,0-30 p. M.-CaptainCrant 

Williams, former detective on the 

New York Police Force. 
Feb. 3, Friday. 0-30 p. m.— Mr. Phidelah 

Rice, Dramatic Reader. 
Feb. 13, Saturday, 0-30 p. H. -Orpheus 

Male Quartet. 
Mar. 3, Friday, 6-30 p. m —Mr. Thomas 

A. Daly of the Philadelphia Retard 

—Poet and Journalist. 
Mar. 1», Sunday, 3-00 p. M. -Mr.Thoruas 

Wilfred, Lutist. 
Date pending, Sunday, 3-00 v. K.— Pro* 

Concert— Havens' Trio. 



TRACK ANNOUNCEMENT 

Candidates for the Varsity Relay 
Team will report to Coach Derby to 
pass in hour plans for the second term. 
No work will be done on the board 
track this term, but in order to plan for 
practice schedules the second term, 
these hour plans should be turned in 
at once. 




Hlttotf or Crook* Tube 



How Were X'Rays Discovered? 

SIR James Mackenzie Davidson visited Professor Roentgen to find 
out how he discovered the X-rays. 
Roentgen had covered a vacuum tube, callea a Hittort or Crookes 
tube, with Lbck paper so as to cut off all it. light. About foui > ards 
away was a rrcc of cardboard coated with a fluorescent compound. 
He turned on the current in the tube. The cardboard glowed brightly. 

Sir James asked him: "What did you think?*' 

-I didn't think, I investigated:* t: id Fcentgen. he wanted to 
know what made the cardboard g'ov, ( nly planned c Pe"™nts 
cou'-d give the answer. We all know the practical result. Thousands 
of lives are saved by surgeons who use the X-rays 

Later on, one cf the scientists in tie Research Laboratory of the 
General Electric Company became interested in a certain phenomenon 
sometimes observed in incandescent lair, s. Ot. ers had observed it 
but he. hie Roentgen, inveati G ated. The result was tie discovery 
of new laws governing electrical conduction in high vacuum. 

Another scientist in the same laboratory saw that on the basis of those 
new laws 1 - could kui'd a new tube for producing X-rays more effec- 
tively 1 w -s tJ e Coolidr e X-ray tube which marked tl e greatest 
advance in the X-ray art since the criminal discovery by Roentgen. 

Thus, scientific investigation cf a strange phenomenon led to the 
discovery of a new art. and scientific investiraticn of another strange 
phenomenon led to the greatest improvement m that art. 

It is for such reasons that the Research Laboratories cf the General 
EH' it Company are continually investigating, continually explcrinrj 
thci '-nown 1 . It is new knowledge that is sought. But practical 
results follow in an endless stream, and in many unexpected ways. 



Generalise ctri c 

Company 



General Office 






Schenec;a<ly, N. Y. 
iii* 






MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 



Vol. XXX11. 



Amherst, Mass., Wednesday, December 14, 1921. 



No. 10 



C. M. WOOD '22 FIRST agricultural leader 



IN JUDGING AT TOLEDO 

M. A. C. Team Leads AH Judgers at 
Intercollegiate Contest in Ohio. 

Tlie II, A. C. Fruit Judging Team re- 
lumed Sunday from the Went wilh an 
enviable reputation which they M WW l 
at the Intercollegiate Fruit Judging 
contest bald Dm. '.» le Toledo, Ohio. 

Besides winning lirst place at the MI- 
t«al nicn on the "Aggie" leain captured 
lirst, second, and third individual 
prizes. 

MA. C. won the right to represent 
New F.ngland at thiB contest due to the 
fact that the team won lirst place in the 
fruit judging contest among the New 
Kngland colleges recently at Concord, 
N. II. This year's showing of the team 
is a distinct improvement over last year, 
when M. A. C. won third place, with 
Herbert Leer "21, securing the second 
individual prize. 

The contest in Toledo was held in 
connection with the Farmers Imposi- 
tion, the American Pomological Society, 
and the Ohio State Fruit Show , the vai i- 
oiis Agricultural colleges of the United 
Mates and Canada being invited to 
compete. Several schools were lord d 
lo cancel their trips this year due to 
inability to secure fruit with which to 
eoaeh their teams. While the fruit dis- 
played at the show was very nice, it 
was by no means as nice as that dis- 
played at the New England Fruit Show. 
Following is the order in which the 
team was rated : 

C. M. Wood, M. A. ('.— tirst-!MlA% 
K. II. Warren, M. A. C— second-H*i% 
W. II. Peck, M. A. C — third— Ht).% 
Karl Pralher, Ohio— fourth— 774 



GIVES ASSEMBLY ADDRESS 



C. W. Pugsley, Assistant Secretary of 

Agriculture of the United States, 

Talks to M. A. 0. Students. 

The speaker in last Thnrsda.v '■ tl 
semhly. Dec. s. was Mr. C. W. Pugslev . 
aeelslanl ■eeretarf ol egrleulture ol the 

United States. His subject was. '"What 
is Agricultural ProgrOM and How is it 
Measured?" In leading up tO his sub- 
ject, his iniro.luctioii being of such a 
nature lhal it mentioned his Western 
home, he briefly told about the gi 

rapbj, soil conditions, and cost of land 

as I hey were yearn ago, and as it is to- 
day. 

He commenccl. " 'What is Agtl- 
cultural PlUgraaH and lb>vv is it M 
tired'.'' One man Mid, It tl measiued 
by ihe county agents in Ihe (Jutted 
States: another said it was the number 
of acres under cultivation: another said 
it was what the land produced. Sev 
, ral other men also gave iheir opinions 
Continued on page 3 



COUNTY AND STATE 

EXTENSION CONFERENCE 

Ninth Annual Gathering Held at M. 

A. C. on Four Days of 

Last Week. 



YALE AND ARMY LISTED 

ON HOCKEY SCHEDULE 



FOOTBALL BANQUET. 

The football banquet will probably be 
held January 7. The Varsity Alumni 
club and the iaeoeiate Alumni will bo* 
operate with the committee in charge. 
Definite announcements of the place 
and program will be made later. 



THE ANNUAL 

BOSTON ALUMNI CONCERT 

AND DANCE 

of the Massachusetts Agricultural 
College Musical Clubs 

will be held at the 
BRUNSWICK HOTEL 

Friday Evening, Dec. 30, 1921 

at 8 o'clock 



Help make the Alumni Concert the 
Best Ever. 

Informal. 



Open Dates to be Filled by Har- 
vard, M. I. T. and Others. 

The hockey team has been putting 
in some hard work the past week in 
preparation fof the lirst game of the 
season which, will be played Jan. 7. 

The men are all in good condition and 

bave been aide to bold two sessions on 
the ice. the lirst real scrimmage being 
held last Saturday afternoon on the 
pond. Lyons, Gordon, Tewhill, Nicoll. 

and Lamb went well he forward 

line, ami Collins. Hardy, and Goldsmil b 

were especially good on the defense. 
"Hubba" is the ,,< ' s, defense man In 

college and has an uncanny eye in 
shooting goals, while Lyons is the 
f u tes< man OH the ice. Six men arc 
living out for the position of goal- 
tender, bul as yet no selection has been 
made for the place which Phil Newell 
filled so well last year. 

Mgr. Tucket has arranged most of bis 

schedule, and besides the following 

game*, Harvard and M. I. T. will be 
played at the Uoston Arena. 
Jan. 7— Middlebury at M. A. < 

'• 1(1— Amherst at M V. I 

lj^_ providence College at M 

•' 14— Dartmouth ai M. A. C. 

•• t8 -Yal« el New Haven. 

" il — Open. 

" so— Bates at"M. A. C. 

" •>"— Open. 

.^—-Hamilton at M. A. C. 

l_\Vest Point at West Point 

4— Open. 

10— Amherst at Amherst. 
11— Open. 
14— Open. 

Id— Open. 

18— Open. 



The ninth annual conference .1 Coun- 
ty ami Stale I'.xlenliou Workers of 
Massachusetts, held at the College last 

week, Dee. 6, 7, and 8, was attended by 

between HO and SMI men and women, 
Ironi all parte Ot t be State. Agricultural, 
home demonstration, and boys' and 
girls' club agents, and extension spec- 
ialists, all contributed to make this a 
memorable and influential group of 
meel :ngs. 

The keynote of Ihe conference was 
sounded by Assistant Secretary of Agri- 
culture C. W. Pugsley, who discussed 
ihe subject of a unified community pro- 
gram. Mr. l'ugslev has charge of the 
eMension service in Washington. 
Under bis direction there is a reorgan- 
ization now faking place in the Dept. of 
Agriculture, which will give greater 
freedom Of administration to each state 
in Kxicnsion work. It is planned to 
nave all the agents in lot -ame county 
work under one single general program, 
and so show better co-operalion with 
one anol her. 

The conference was loiliinalc in secur- 
ing several prominent people toapeah 

lo I hem. people who ale recognized as 
authorities every where in their various 
lines of work. Among these may be 

mentioned aflefl Sarah Louise Arnold, 

Dean Kmei it us of Simmons College who 
spoke OH Ihe subject: The Farm Home 
the Common Problem Of the Three 
Lgente. Dr. Mary Swart/. Hose, of 
I,;,, hers College, Columbia I'niversity, 
uneol i he foremost nutrition experts of 
Continued on page 2 



R. H. GRAYSON CAPTAIN 
OF 1922 AGGIE ELEVEN 

Second Member of Milford Family 

Chosen to Lead M. A. C. 

Football Men. 



Last Thursday, at a meeting of the 
"M" men Uaymond Henry ("Dame") 
Qraytoa 'M was ebon— captain of next 
year's football team. The tliaysou fam- 
ily has previously made its mark in 
Aggie football with Knmry (irayson the 
Captain Of the 1I*H» eleven and Forrest 
(irayson end on I be 1»H> team. 

"Dame" has been active in many 
lines since he came to Aggie, having 
captained his Freshman football team 
and played class basketball and base- 
ball. He is not only an athlete, how- 
over, as he has just been elected lo the 
Junior Prom Commiltee. 

For two years (irayson has played a 
stellar game el end, and during the last 
half Of this season he has played a 
steady, dependable k'ame »«- offensive 
right halfback, lie made his letter his 
Sophomore year, and the same season 
he was picked by t he Sp« it.gtiel.l Cnion 
for the All-New Kngland second team. 

"panic" twill from Milford High 
School where he played football before 
coming to Aggie. He is a member of 
ihe Alpha Sigma Fhi Fraternity. 

AGGIE ALUMNI GIVE 

TEAM LOYAL SUPPORT 



A. < 



Feb. 



POND MEDAL AWARDED 

TO J. N. LEWANDOWSKI '22 

Versatile Fullback Receives Aggie's 
Highest Football Honor. 

The Massachusetts Aggies paid their 
la<t lot. tball tribute to (heir great roll- 
back, Jobfl Lewandowski of Kastbamp- 
lon, last night, by awarding him the 
Allen Leon Pond Memorial Medal. 
This medal ll awarded annually for 
general excellence in football, and is 
presented during the Commencement 
exercises "lo that member whose work 
has been of the greatest credit to the 
college as well as of the. most value to 
the team." 

The fund from which to obtain the 
medal each year was raised by friends 
in memory Of Allan Leon Pond '20, cap- 
tain of the 1619 team, who died of 
pneumonia on the campus in the late 
winter of 1WM0, The committee of 
award hi com'poeod of the chairman of 
the Joint Athletic Committee, the gen- 
eral manager of athletics, and the head 
Continued on page 2 



Athletic Office Mentions Helpful- 
ness of Numerous Graduates In- 
terested in Their Team. 

The athletic efhee recently sent a 
letter to the alumni thanking them for 
their support of the football team this 
tsJl, It stressed the point that the 
Tufts comeback was largely due to the 
confidence and helpfullness of the 
alumni and that such support had given 
(he coaching staff an impetus to keep 
haul at woik with the team. 

The letter especially mentioned the 
large number of alumni who had spent 
anywhere from one afternoon to a week 
on Alumni Field with the team. Be- 
sides Holmes 'M and Long "21, mem- 
bers of the staff, they were: Dole '15, 
Danforth 'Id, (irayson '17, Magiimis TK, 
.lakeman "211, Casein '21, King '21, Lent 
"21, ami Mansell "21. 

Others who helped the team out in 
one way or another were: Lewis '05, 
Paul •05. Sehermerhorn '10, Holder) »i§, 

Lareen Ta, Little 'U, Habbard ea-'lt, 

Freeborn '14, Smith T4,Marsh 15, Hall 
HI, Harrocks'HI, Palmer '1«, Perry '16, 
Schlotterbeck 'lb, Day '17, Holden '17, 
Irving '17, Spaulding '17, Huntoon Tm, 
Russell TH, Grayson 1H, Faher '19, 
Parkhurst'19, Bunker "21, Poole '21, 
Brown '21 and Jones '21. It is such 
support as thlB that shows Aggie 
spirit. 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Wednesday, December 14, 1921. 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Wednesday, rtttnltr 14, 1921. 



WINTER FOOTBALL NOTES. 

ThiB year there is to be inaugurated 
a system of intensive winter work for 
football men. Some of the linemen 
have already begun practice on the shot 
put under the supervision of Coach 
Derby, and at the beginniugof next 
term classes will be started in wrestling 
and boxing. The latter will be in 
charge of Professor Mack, — former 
Pen u. State intercollegiate boxer. 

There will also be several football 
talks duriug the winter which will be 
of interest to all football men. "Aggie" 
alumni who have played on "Aggie" 
teams will be the speakers. 

A school is to be started for quarter- 
backs in which the fundimentals of 
quarterback play aud the quarterback's 
work will be stressed. It is hoped that 
this Bchool will result in some fine 
material for the pilot's position on 
next year's team. 

At all times there will be a football in 
the Athletic Office for use of candidates 
for the center's position. This will be 
used for practice in "passing back" and 
should bring accuracy and speed. 

The (irst week next March there will 
be a tournament and exhibition by foot- 
ball men who have entered the winter 
classes. The events will be a compe- 
titive shot-put, three wrestling bouts, 
and three boxing bouts. Admission 
will be charged and the proceeds will 
go for the Memorial Building. 

EIGHT MORE ALUMNI 

ON ADVISORY BOARD 



EXTENSION CONFERENCE 

Continued from page 1 



Old Deerfield Fertilizers 



the country was present on Wednesday 
and Thursday. She came to help the 
Home Demonstration Agents particu- 
larly, and told many of the newest ideas 
about nutrition. Mr. l'ugsley in bis 
address before the general session of the 
conference on Thursday, traced in an 
interesting manner the history of exten- 
sion service from the earliest instruct- 
ions at fair meetings, up through the 
present county agent system. 

A general good spirit prevailed among 
those who attended the conference, and 
their attention was not conlined wholly 
to their duties as extension workers. 
On Tuesday evening they gathered in 
Memorial Hall, where both young and 
old joined in a social time, including an 
informal dance and several stunts. 

Then, on Wednesday evening, the 
delegates attended in a body the supper 
at the First Congregational Church. 
For the evening's entertainment, J. B. 
Putnam 'U4, Paul Alger '«», and Miss 
Smith, the Franklin County Agents, 
demonstrated bow to bold a typical 
community meeting. 

Besides the general sessions held 
twice daily, at which all the delegates 
assembled to bear addresses and re- 
ports, there were also frequent section 
meetings. Here members of each of 
the three departments discussed their 
problems separately. 



"•Reasonable in dollars and sense." 
A. W. HIGGINS, INC., South Deerfield. Ma»« 



CHRISTMAS GREETINGS 

Don't forget to buy that Gift before you leave. 

He will appreciate a good tie, muffler or pair 

of sox or gloves. 

Our stock is exceptionally good. 



F. M. THOMPSON & SON 

Hart Schaffner & Marx Clothes 



Carptrvter & Morchoust, 

PRINTERS, 



POND MEDAL AWARDED 

Continued from page 1 



No. i, Cook Place, 



Amheret, Maaa 



Deuel's Drug Store 



Football Committee Complete for 
Next Fall Announced by 
Coach Gore. 
A recent announcement has been 
made by Coach "Kid" Gore naming 
the members of the 1922 Alumni Advis- 
ory Football Committee. The follow- 
ing alumni have been added this fall: 
SamCrossman '09of Melrose Highlands: 
"Bill" Hayden '13 of Boston; "Goo" 
Grayson '18 of Detroit, George Cotton 
'22, captain of this year's varsity, and 
John Lewaudowski '22 of Easthampton. 
New resident members are: John Ma- 
ginnis '18, "Chub" Long '21, and 
"Sunny" Mansell '21. 

All three Graysons are connected 

with "Aggie" football next year. "Em" 

and Forrest as advisory committee 

members, and "Ray" as captain. 
Alumni Advisory Football Committee 

for 1922: S. 8. Crossman '09, W. V. 

Hayden '13, S. A. Dole '16, G. D. 

Melican '15, G. B. Palmer '16, Forreit 

Grayson '18, B. F. Jakeman '20, S. M. 

King '21, H. W. Poole '21, G. A. Cotton 

'22, J.N. Lewandowski '22. 
Resident Members: E. E. Grayson '17, 

R. P. Holmes '18, J. J. Maginnis '18, A. 

H. Long '21 and E. J. Mansell '21. 

INFORMAL DANCE 



Last Saturday evening in the Mem- 
orial Building was staged the first of a 
series of dances to be given throughout 
the winter under the direction of the 
informal committee. The chaperones 
were; Professor and Mrs. Harrington, 
Mrs. White of the Abbey, and Professor 
and Mrs. MacLaughlin. Dancing took 
place from 7-30 until 11-00 p. h. with a 
■hort intermission in which the College 
Store in the basement of the building 
did a rushing business. Music was 
furnished by the College orchestra. 
About fifty couple attended and the 
proceeds were turned over to the trea- 
surer of the committee to be used in 
defraying the present deficit on the 
books. 



coach. The medal was won for the first 
time by Starr M. King '21, All-New 
England tackle last year. 

Lewandowski has been two years a 
star on the Aggie varsity, but his Jun- 
ior year he was kept out by injuries. 
He was the individual star on the team 
this season, and is one of the best 
punters that Aggie ever had; compar- 
ing well in this respect with Cobb '07 
and Palmer '16. Everywhere he went 
this year he outpunted his opponents, 
and in addition he was a place and drop 
kicker of BOBNI ability, sending the 
pigskin over the bar from 40 yards. 
"Lavvy" was the mainstay of the Aggie 
offensive, excelling in running, forward 
passing and kicking. He was 170 
pounds in weight, a fast, hard player, 
and always a bulwark of strength ou 
the defense. 

He played in every minute of every 
game this fall, and in spite of the fact 
that several teams, knowing his 
strength, hit him bard, he stood up 
very creditably under it all. Writers 
from many sections have considered 
him the best fullback in the smaller 
New England colleges this fall. 

Lewandowski is a member of the Col- 
lege Senate and the Senior honor so- 
ciety, Adelphia. He has had many 
class offices, played basketball for his 
class, and is a member of the Alpha 
Sigma Phi Fraternity. 



ARTICLES 



Shaving SticKs and Creams 



Razors and Razor Blades 



VICTOR RECORDS 



Kodaks and Supplies 



Fountain Pens 



Page's Shoe Store 

SPECIAL 

Saddle Strap Oxfords . . . $5.98 



THE NEW M. A. G. SONG 600K 

At the Treasurer's Office— $1.00 

LEARN TO SING ALL THE AGGIE SONGS 



FOOTBALL "M" AWARDS 

The following men will receive their 
"M's" in football this season : 

1»22— Capt. Cotton, Lewandowski, 
Freeman, Aeheson, Clark, Field, Packer, 
Collins, belaud, Beat. 

1923— Grayson .Sargent, Heal. Marsh- 
man, Mobor, Alger, Mudgett, Turaey. 

1924— Salmon. 

1922— Mgr. Peck. 

The following will receive the aMa 
in recognition of meritorious service: 
Conant, Chapin, Andrews, Nigro, and 
Krasker. 

The intercollegiate athletic board 
voted to give an aMa to worthy gradu- 
ating members of the Senior class who 
played on the second team. 



When Vou Are Down Town 



DROP IN 



The Candy Kitchen 



— FOR — 



Lunch, Candy, Ice Cream and Smokes 

COLLEGE CANDY KITCHEN 

"The Home of Sweets" 



Concerning an Appropriate Christmas Gift! 

What could be better than a Banner, a Pillow Top or a Table Runner? We have a complete 
line of Banners and Pillow Tops of exceptional quality and at very reasonable prices. 



AGGIE INN— By the Campus Entrance. 



FIRE IN COAT ROOM 

AT FERNALD HALL 



ASSEMBLY ADDRESS 

Continued from page 1 



Student Leaves Pipe in Pocket and 

His Carelesness Nearly Proves 

Disastrous. 

A lighted pipe left in the pocket of 
an overcoat is thought to have caused a 
destructive lire which took place in 
1 , iual.1 Hall last Thursday at 11-30 a. m. 
While the sophomore class in Military 
Ma|> making was wrestling with a knotty 
problem, Carpenter 24 saw smoke roll* 
ing out Of the coal-room. At once 
about ten amateur tiie-lighters were 
scuttling around with pails of water try- 
injr to find something to do. 

The tire was making good headway 
among the sheep-skin coats and the 
lank smoke soon tilled the basement. 
11 tit a dozen coats were carried into 
the hallway and drenched with water, 
while one unfortunate leather coat was 
taken outside. This last was damaged 
more than any of the others. After 
class there remained only a few shreds 
of the leather and a pile of ashes. 
Bome Of the Bbeep-BkinB were singed 
badly and a few coats had holes burned 
through the back. 

It is understood that none of the loss 
\sas covered by insurance. 

BOSTON TRIPS ARRANGED 

FOR MUSICAL CLUBS 



Selections Announced for Orchestra. 
During tbe past few weeks, the or- 
chestra under the direction of Coach 
Swift, has been perfecting I be pieces 
which are on the concert program. 
Practically everyone in the orchestra 
has been playing for various dances 
during the fall, and, as a result, the 
orchestra should be at its best when 
playing for the dances which follow the 
concerts. 

The following men will make the 
lloston trip: 
Piano— Wendell. 

Violins— Waugh,Sears,Norcross,Loring. 
it nor Banjos— Towne, Woodworth. 
Saxophone — Wood. 
Trombone — Kennedy. 
< larinet — Fuller. 
Cornet Aldrich. 
Drums — Kingston. 

The following concerts will be given 
during the Christmas vacation : 
Wednesday night, Dec. 28— Peabody, at 

the Peabody Woman's Club. 
Thursday night, Dec. 29— Newbury port, 

at the N'ewburyport High School. 
Friday afternoon, Dec. 30— Elizabeth 

Peabody Sentinel House, Boston. 
Friday night, Dec. 30— Brunswick Ho- 
tel, Boston,in the ballroom. Among 
the patrons of the concert are: Gov. 
Cox. Dr. and Mrs. Goldtbwait. 
Saturday night, Dec. 31— Salem. Pri- 
vate concert for members of the 
Now and Then" Club. 
The Newburyport concert was ar- 
ranged for the clubs by alumnus W. S. 
Little '09. 

night and Friday night, when the 
elttbi go to Hatfield and Hadley, the 
entire squad, with the exception of the 
Freshmen will make the trip. 

Dress suits will be worn at the Hadley 
concert, but not at the Hatfield concert. 



on the subject. The work itself is as 
interesting as any work that there is, 
when looked at from country, state, 
and county. To charge higher prices, 
and to maintain a high standard at the 
same time, is to set a low standard after 
a while. This is not an answer, and to 
maintain oil standard and those of the 
farms is not the answer. There are 
three points to the correct answer. See 
to it that (1) the farmers maintain a 
high standard of living; (2) Products 
sell at low prices to the consumers in 
the cities; (3) Soils are kept cultivated 
so that life can go on. Already the 
West is following this idea. Houses, 
roads, stock, femes, etc.. have rapidly 
increased during the past few years. 
However, the farmers are sutlering 
from the decline in products. Taxes 
have made a difference, which MAM 
that more food than can be raised on 
the farms must be raised in order to 
pay these taxes. There is a horrible 
thought in connection with this, thai 
excess food is being raised in the Mid- 
dle Central States and it cannot be 
bought by other states, due to transpor- 
tation and other factors. It is neces- 
sary that these things and the middle 
man's profit be taken care of immedi- 
ately. President Harding in one of his 
speeches mentioned this fact that peo- 
ple were suffering from want of food, 
that there was peenty of it, but there 
was no way in which to bring it to 
them. In the West, autos are idle be- 
cause tbe farmers are not able to pay 
for the gasolene. Again, people there 
are wearing the same clothes that they 
wore three years ago. 

"Tenantry is another serious prob- 
lem. There is not good living unilic 
farms. Fifty-four per cent of the farm- 
ers have moved to the city in five years. 
There is no better field to solve this 
problem than agricultural sociology. 
The more people on the farms with 
proper living possibilities the more will 
be produced and the better off our na- 
tion will be. Why not use tbe latest 
farm inventions? If this to done more 
men may be had for other positions. 
Things would be different if we gel peo- 
ple ou the farms under these conditions, 
because standards of living would be 
reduced. Labor, too, would be differ- 
ent if more people were on the farm, 
and the work was more evenly distrib- 
uted. People will not stay on the 
farms unless this is done. 

"I will now give you a few illustra- 
tions from ray own life, if you have n<> 
objections. My father was a farm, i 
I had ambition to judge -lock. One 
day we were passing by a pasture full 
of steer, and I asked my father to pick 
out the best steer. He did ; and then I 
asked him why it was tbe best. He 
never told the exact reason why it wa- 
tbe best, but said it va* simply because 
he knew it WU. Other illustrations of 
the same nature: garden and stock 
feed. Why was corn planted here, 
beans there, and clover somewhere 
each year; none of the three being 
planted in the same area in two con-''' 
utive years? He did not know why, 
and of course 1 lost my interest in 
farm life. My ambition was literally 



killed. The same is true with all chil- 
dren who want to know why £Ml works 
one way and Unit another. Their par- 
ents regard them as a nuisance, and so 
do not satisfy their curiosity. Thus 
the child knows no more than before 
and docs not care to know. I took up 
electrical engineering. 1 was looking 
for an easy course. I was told that an- 
imal husbandry was one of this 
type. 1 took it, and soon learned 
tbe very t hint's my father was 
not able to tell me. I went home and 
had a long talk with him about them. 
Whenever I went home for vacation 
alter that, we always had long talks 
together on what I learned in my agri- 
cultural courses. He was more inter 
M>ted than 1 was, because be never had 
even beard of such things before, 
and wanted to hear more at each 
talk. The more I talked with him 
the more 1 became interested, and as a 
result 1 have taken apiculture up for 
my life work. In closing 1 will MV, 
interest a fellow in agriculture when 
he is vonng, he will become interested, 
and will really learn some things, 
through his own interests, which will 
beneficial to everybody as well as to 
himself." 




INTER-CLASS BASKETBALL 

The schedule of the Intn.lass Has 
ketball seii.s has been announced by 
Manage! Freeman. The opening name 
of the season will be played on .Ian. I 
at 7.00 i». m. All games are to start at 
this lime except the Freshman-Sopho- 
more contest on Feb. 1M which will 
start at k (Mi p. M., to permit a maximum 
alien. lance. Should there be a tie for 

the [nterelam ehavnlonehlp, an extra 

game is scheduled for Wednesday, Feb. 
24. The champion team is rat her an 

Indeterminate thing at the present time. 

Owing to the fact that most of the 

classes have neither elected a ■anagOf 

nor called out candidates for their 

teams, and class basketball fans have 

not bad a chance to speculate. 

Friday Jan. n-Seniors vs." Sophs. 
Juniors vs. Freshman. 

Saturday, Jan. 14— Juniors vs. Bopha. 
Seniors vs. 2- Year. 

Friday, Jan. 20— Seniors vs. Juniors. 
Freshmen vs. 2-Year. 

Friday, Jan. 27— Juniors vs. 2-Years. 
Sophomores r«. Freshmen. 

Friday, Feb. 10— Seniors vs. Freshmen, 
.sophomores vs. 2-Years. 

Saturday, Feb. 18— Freshmen vs. Sopho- 
mores. 

Wednesday, Feb. 24— To play off tie for 
championship. 



We've something more than 
all-wool to crow over ! 

Prices surprisingly moderate ! 

Not in years have prices loomed 
so attractive for line quality. 

Winter suits, overcoats, hats, 
shoes, furnishings. 

The beat of everything college men wear. 
Nail orders filled 

Rogers Prkt Company 

Broadway Broadway 

at 13th St. "Four at 34th St. 

Convenient 

Broadway Corners" Fifth Are. 

at Warren al 41st 8t. 

NEW YORK CITY 



You can save from 

$3.00 to $5.00 a pair 



— on- 



Young 1 Men's 
College Footwear 

by buying at 

FLEMING'S, Northampton 

THE HOME 

of Aggie Men 

IN 

SPRINGFIELD 

IS 

Hotel Worthy 

Drop in for a meal or over 
night. 

TARIFF REASONABLE 



FORMAL GARDEN MODELS 
students in Landeoape Gardening 78 

have undertaken day modeling in con- 
nection with their work. This is an 
entirely new feature in the course, and 
so far has proven beneficial and prac- 
tical. It gives the students a definite 
idea as to how their plans will look 
when executed on a given area, and 
affords them opportunity to Bee where- 
irrectlon* or addition! are necessary. 
The Landscape hardening Depart- 
ment has put Ihem on exhibition in 
Wilder Hall and it is hoped that many 
will be interested in the display of 
formal gardens shown. 



Main and Worthington Streets 

Give a* a trial) 



DRAPER HOTEL 

Northampton, Mass. 

The Leader for College Banquets 



Wm. M. Kimball, Prop. 



*. 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Wednesday, December 14, 1921. 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Wednesday, December 14, 1921. 



THE MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIAN 



Published erery Wednesday by the 
Students of the Massachusetts Ag- 
ricultural College. 



BOARD OF EDITORS. 

Bsxdino r- Jackson '22 Editor-in-Chief 

Hobabt W. Bprino "22 ManSBlnif Editor 

Abbociate Editobb. 
LcthkkB.Arkinoton "28 Ass't Man's: Kditor 
Kbnmeth a. barkakd '22 CoaspetlrtoB Bdltoi 
JOHN M. Whittikk '28 Athletic Kditor 

Kcth M. W. -24 Kxrhanse Kditor 

Btani.by W. Bkomi.ky '22 

IUVlNli W. Hl.AKK 9J 

Solomon < oiikn "-'8 

Ei ism a k. Blub. •"<•• ' u 

Bubimebb Department. 
Charlks A. Buck '22 Business Manager 

Myron G. Murray '22 Advertising Manager 
Owin E. Folsom '28 Circulation Manager 

HOLDBN WHITTAKEK '23 

Curaoao i.. hsi i>kn "-*4 

KOHK.lt 1 K. STKKKK '24 



Subscription $2.00 per year. Single 
copies, 10 cents. Make all orders paya- 
ble to The Massachusetts Collegian. 

In case of change of address, sub- 
scribers will pleaBe notify the business 
manager as soon as possible. 



All Hail, the Apple Kings; 
The dean-cut victory of the Fruit 
Judging Team, la the National Prull 
Judging Contest, at Toledo, Ohio, last 
NN.'ck, deserves all the commendation 
and praite thai (be college ean glw. 
riic Aggie nien bring glory lo their 

State, their alma mater, ami themselves 

by this winning of tbeli BnM National 

Championship. 

The victory over last year's champion, 
Ohio, lakes an honor away from the 
Middle West back to the Bast, whence 
too many honors have been flying. '" ,lu ' 
past. It is a sectional victory, and one 

in which all Batters agrloultoral col- 
leges can rejoice. 

The Pomology Departaaeal has every 
reason to be proud that it has turned 
.ml men trained so well that they are 
able to go against the nation's beal eol« 

|«ge fruit jutlgers and come out victor- 
ious. Professor Sears and all those 
under him have in this achievment a 
certilicate of the Department's worth. 

Results like this must sliow our 
"Comeback to agriculture'" opponent! 

that we still stand with our feet in the 
furrow, that we are still "with the 
land," and that we are still laming out 
agriculturalists of the hest typo. 



Entered sssscond-clsss matter at the Amherst 
Post Offlce. Accepted for mailing at special 
rate of postage provided for in section 1108. Act 
of October. 1917 authorized August 20. 1S18. 



The Football Awards. 
The choice of varsity football captain 
and the award of the Pond Memorial 
Medal this year seem very appropriate 
and just. Both were given to men who 
have fought bard for Aggie on the grid- 
iron, and held up well the honor and 
prestige of this institution. 

Aggieathleticssurely owe much to the 
Grayson Brothers of Milford. Raymond 
is the second of them to be captain of 
varsity football, considered on the 
campus the highest peak that athletic- 
ability can attain. Emory (iravson was 
captain hack in 191«, while Forrest also 
did stellar work for 1919 team, and cap- 
tained the varsity quintet the following 
winter. Since 1913 these brothers have 
filled prominent places in the history of 
Maroon and White, and have gained 
v de repute as clean, sport-loving 

athletes. 

The Pond Medal goes to a man whose 
work has been of sterling worth all the 
fall. Lewandowski has impressed sport 
men all over New England as a player 
of unusual versatility and ability. Kid 
Gore called him a "three ply man," his 
running, toward passing, and kicking 
making him a constant menace to our 
opponents. 

Lewandowski was in every minute of 
every game. Opposing teams, knowing 
his ability, hurled themselves against 
him, but he stood up through it all. 
Those who saw Vermont can remember 
"Lavvy" stretched out "cold" time 
after time, only to struggle back lo his 
feet again, and soon be circling the ends 
for long ruus. 

We are sure that if "Ras" Pond could 
have himself chosen the man to receive 
his memorial, the selection would have 
been this big, quiet fullback, whose 
nerve and strength were the backbone 
of the Aggie's eleven all during the 
past season. 

Merry Christmas. 
Just to show howkindhearted we are, 
the Com.kgian wishes every one in col- 
lege an average of 90.7% in their finals, 
and all of our readers a roost delightful 
Christmas and New Year. 



The Red Cross Drive. 
The fact that Amherst and Aggie 
were first and second, respectively, in 
the college BedCrOM Drive speaks well 
for the altruistic spirit of these two in- 
stitutions, so many of whose students 
were benefited by the "Great White 
Mother." 



GOOD OR BAD PUBLICITY 

To i n k Coi.i.i «.i ^ : 

It is my understanding thai there are 
I hose who wish to give great publicity 
to what the vast majority consider a 
trivial matter; that of the enforced act- 
ions of a certain Freshman last Thurs- 
day afternoon This gentleman, doing 
fatigue duty, was ordered to throw his 
army hat down an embankment, to re- 
oover It, and to repeat the performance 

fer a number of times. The hat had 

previously been so treated by bin vol- 
untarily. However the whole farce lias 
been summed up and characterized as 
"a disgrace to the artii.v uniform, etc.'' 
1 and the military department but look 
upon the matter as "hard usage of the 
uniform" and not disgrace. 

Furthermore, in obtaining the views 

ill our military department, 1 was In- 
formed "that the indiscriminate wear- 
in- of the uniform or parts thereof is a 
much more serious matter and that 
Bfforta to abolish this practice would 
meet with the heartiest approval and 
cooperation of the department". But 
why make mountains out of mole hills. 

Gentlemen, why not discuss all sub- 
jects at issue with tbOM most inter- 
ested before endeavoring to enlist the 
aid of the American Legion, the Mil- 
itary Authorities, Bud the Print. 

Did Shakespeare have something to 
do with unwelcomed publicity F— 
"The evils that men do live after them 

(in print). The good is oft interred 

with their bones". 

A. W. Smith. 



Save your 

Christmas Vacation 

for your friends. 
Come in and look over our 

GIFTS AND GREETING CARDS 

Mm (Eutlrr'a (Sift fcljop 

Over Post < mice Opes Eton!— a 



A. P. STAEBNER 

Agent for 

Browning, King & Co. 

A national tailoring institution. 

SUITS and OVERCOATS MADE to MEASURE 

Bxeellent fabrics -Styles with an in- 
dividuality— Workmanship the best 

Satisfaction Guaranteed 

Let me show you styles and samples 
TEL. 1TO 



Tenor and Mandolin Banjos 

Saxophone*. Drum*, etc., Reheadlng 

DEAL'S MUSIC HOUSE 

Cor. Main and State Kts.. Sprinurfleld. 

Local A es» t. 
Edward Landit. 11 Amity Street. Amherst. 



COMMUNICATION 

Tim. M IM. Ooi i.ioi an KnnoK. 

Amherst, Mass. 
Dear Sir: 

What excuse can the upper classmen 
otter for the disgraceful scene which 
oecurred last Thursday after assembly 
on the campus - .' A man in the uniform 
of the United States Army was com- 
pelled to throw his cap down into the 
ravine ten times to satisfy the demands 
of a body of upper classmen. 

Do the students of M. A. C. realize 
thai the uniform that they wear is as 
sacred as the tlag which we all love 
and respect '.* Do they realize that 
there are thousands lying today in 
"Flsnder'l Welds," who fell defending 

that uniform .' 
The four year students shouted loud 

when the Short Course students turned 
the tables at the pond party, holding 
up the fact that the traditions of the 
college where being violated, etc. 
What about the traditions of those who 
never saw M. A. C? Those who died to 
make ftf. A. 0. possible.' 

I demand as a veteran, a son of a 
veteran, and a grandson of a veteran 
that the uniform, which my forefathers 
wore and which 1 was proud to wear, 
be respected. 

Sincerely Yours, 
Edward f. Si i.i.ivax, 
31 No. Proepecl St.. Amherst. 



THE CHEMICAL LABORATORY 

The tire in the coat-room at Kernahl 
Hall reminds us of the serious conse- 
quences which might accompany such 

;i conflagration la the Chemical labora- 
tory. Many coats are left on the first 
Boor at the bottom of the stairs and all 
the coat-hooks are in close proximity to 
stairways. With freshmen working on 
the third story and a fire in the ooatroom 
we might expect to see a list of dead 
and injured as well as a large property 

lose. 

The cheru. lab. has long been known 
to be a fire trap. There is but one fire- 
escape and but one stairway. Almost 
all the classes are on the second and 
third floors. Since the stairways would 
be the first things lo bum because of 
the draft it would be well nigh Imposs- 
ible for a large class to get out in time, 
for the building would go up like 
match-wood. 

The chemistry building is more likely 
to be subjected to fire than any other 
on account of the inflammable chemi- 
cals it contains. Doesn't it seem as 
though it was time for a fire-proof chem- 
istry laboratory'.' 



For Your 

Flashlights 

Interiors 

College Scenes 

Arrange with expert through 

ELISHA BLISS '24 



The Amherst Tavern 

EUROPEAN and AMERICAN PLAN 

Appetizing, Wholesome Meals— Cooked 
under modern sanitary conditions. 



99 



Private Dining Rooms for "Frats 
or special parties. 



Bright, comfortable rooms, single or 

double, at reasonable rates for 

the season. 

Court cay, Cleanllneaa, Quality. Quan- 
tity and Variety Im our motto. 

We cordially invite your patronage. 



While we are perfectly willing to 
"'play fair'" and print the above, we do 
not believe that any irreverence to the 
uniform was intended. However, we 
must admit that the performance 
savored a bit of the ''kiddish", and that 
perhaps a more suitable sort of punish- 
ment could have been found. 



Many people are always ready to 
criticise the errors of others, but never 
seem to have the opportunity to show 
their own ability. 



HOUSE DANCE. 

Last Saturday the Alpha (iamma Kho 
House held the second house dance of 
the season. The chaperone was Mrs. 
Cameron of Mt. Holyoke College. Six- 
teen couples attended and danced dur- 
ing the afternoon from three until quar- 
ter of nine when the dancing ceased. 
Most of the couples finishing their sue- 
eessful party at the Informal in the 
Memorial Building. Music was fur- 
nished by Woodworth'i orchestra. 

INTER-FRATERNITY NOTICE 

The Inter-fraternity conference wishes 
to announce that the rules torbidding 
fraternity discussions between Fresh- 
men and upper classmen are In force 
until Monday, dan. 2. This means 
also that no upper classmen should 
entertain the Freshmen at their homes 
over the holidays. 



Student Barber Shop 



YE 
OLD 

TIME 



HAIR 
CUT 
35c 



HARRY A. ERYSIAN 

North College 
A. MIENTKA 

Shoo Repairing While U Walt 

nkw rajcm 

Men's Whole Soles, ltubbei Heels . . . $2.50 
Men's Half Bole*, Rubber Heels . . . $2.00 
Men's HuWmt Soles. Rubber Heels . . $2.25 

Men's Hal* Boise $1.50 

Work Guaranteed-AMHERST H0U8E 




KNOX HAT8-THE FINK AKT OF IMPARTING DISTINCTION 

STYLE is one thin*; ** mtjlem* 9 mrm another. " Styles" crop out in urent 
profusion every yenr and die off as rapidly. They aehieve oddity with- 
out distinction; popularity, lint not the stamp of ifcood taste. We have 
Just received seven dozen KNOX HATS. This is the time to discard that 
felt which was creased in the outre fashion of last year. 




KNOX: 

M.W >UJi*.. 



NEW YORK AND STEVENS 

ON FOOTBALL SCHEDULE 



ANNUAL AGGIE REVUE 

THIS SATURDAY EVENING 



Manager Announces Eight of Nine 
Dates For Next Year's Varsity 

Eleven. 
The following tentative football 

tobedale is announced by Manager John 

M. VVhittier '2'.\ ami (ieneral Manager 

Curry S. Hicks: 

Sept. tO— Ne« York Aggie, at home. 

ltd. 7— Conn. Aggie's at Slorrs. 

Oct. 14— Worcester Tech at home. 

Oet. 'il Amherst at home. 

Oet. M -New Hampshire at home. 

Nov. 4— Hates at home. 

Nov. 11— Stevens at Hohokcn. 

Nov. 18— Tufts at Mcdford. 

Nov. 16— Pending. 

There will he five home names, and 

taken all i" all the schedule will be one 
of the hest arranged for some lime. 

The lirsl name of the year will be 
played at home with New York Aggie'l 
who are newcomers on tie schedule. 
The team will play Conn, at Storrs for 
the tirst time in history, and from the 
fact that Conn, has scheduled Tufts and 
the University of Maine ahead of the 
M. A. C. name, it is evident that they 
are more than ever intent on winning 

the name. 

of paiamount interest to all Aggie 
men is the announcement thai Amherst 
will agall appear on the schedule. We 
are lo meet Amherst on Alumni field for 
the first time in history, and as far as 
is known it will he the first time Am- 
herst and Aggie have ever met in foot- 
hall on our campus. 

Both New York Aggie* and Stevens 
are newcomers on the schedule and 
the latter at Hoboken will be the first 
time in years that an Aggie team has 
appeared in New York City. 

The annual game with Tufts will be 
played next year at Medford. and so 
i he schedule will afford both Boston 
and New York an opportunity t" ON 
the team in action. 



ONLY SIX MEN RESPOND IN 

ANSWER TO RELAY CALL. 



Four ClaBses, Faculty and Short 
Course have Prepared Enter- 
tainment for all. 
\e\i Baturdaj evening el 7 p. a. the 

■eeoad annual "Agglt Kcmic'" will be 
presented under i he anspieea tH the 

Bolster Deleters. Laetyear*a perform- 

ance was in the nal ureol an experiment 
and p roved to he such | lo c c es a that it 
\mis decided lo al.olish ihe mediocre 
Student Vaudevilles in its favor. The 
faculty, Short eoiilses, and each ol the 
four year classes are leading Ihelr aid 
in producing six acta Of music and 
drama of varied and interesting nature. 

Owing to the sudden lllnessof Mrs. 
w B. Prions the production of "Sham" 

by the faculty east is hanging in the 

balance of aaeertnlnty. Mrs. Prince la 
one of the leading characters and her 

ftbeeaea would cause the cancellation 
Ol IhS net. However, the faculty prom- 
ises thai in any case they will be repre- 
sented by a worthwhile production. 

The Juniors and Seniors will both 

present Musical sketches of diversified 

Character. The Bopfa res will pie- 
sent the lively farce "The Public Wor- 
rier". The two short course classes 
will give IbeBogMsh comedy "Motor- 
log" in wbtefa they will featuie a new 
type ol assembly ear. The freshman 
act remains a mystery, and while they 
refuse to stale what ii is. ihey promise 
■Ometbiag Of interest. 

The "Aggie Bovue" la a review in 
mora than Ihe ordinary sense, in thai il 
gives ihe Bolster Dotatera aa oppor- 
tunity to look over the talent of I lie 
college ia aaticlpattea of Iba need of 
material for (he IToin and ( oinmence- 
inent shows. 



Coach Derby's call for Lelav candi- 
dates has brougbi forth only lis men to 

date. TIhsc are Sullivan. MacCready, 

aoheeon, Nelson, Isaac, ami Beat. 

More men are wanled to compele fol 
position! on the learn. Sullivan and 
MacCready are last years stars. 
One BOeel has been scheduled with 

New Hampshire state on Feb. 4. 



\ farmer is one whose work is funda- 
mental ; who has lit lie, bill who is com- 
pletely contented. 



TOWN HALL 



INDEX PICTURES 

Next Sunday, (DSC. lH),lhe following 
groups will be taken at Mills' Studio: 
(.lee (lub at 10-80. 

( trcbeetrar al 11-00. 

Junior Prom (11MB) (om mince at ill.".. 
N.ph-senioi Hop (last year's) Com- 
mittee al il B0. 

All dales announced in previous 
numbers of the UolXBfllAl are hereby 

canceled. 

Delia Phi (iamma held a meeting lasl 

Monday al 7 ..•.lock to dlscosa plana for 
changing the form of the organisation 

I,, a elose.l society Of else lo make il an 
I orary society. Miss Skinner, Mrs. 

Hicks, and Mi-* Jefforsoa, i rary 

members, ware present. Definite aettoa 

was postponed until next term. 



Thursday 

Hat. 3. gve. 
6-45. 8-30 

SPECIAL! 



FIRST COLLEGIAN BANQUET 

HELD IN DRAPER HALL 



NOW ON SALE 

\ big saaoff meai of 

X'mas Novelties 

— from — 

"The Pohlson Galleries 

Beautiful Gifts at Low Prices 
G. EDWARD FISHER 



Friday 

M;.t. 3, gve. 
6-45.8-30 

Saturday 



Mat, 3, Eve. 
6-45. 8-30 



Monday 



M;it. 3, gve. 
6-45.8-30 



w in. Vaughn Moody's might! 
drama from t in- sii.ue sup- 
com, "The Faith Healer." 
H reels, witli ;i CMl iiiilii.tlnu 

Milton Sill* m.i Ann Forreit. 
Produced l . > (loo. Melford, 
win. produced "Behind Ihe 

I im. i. Ihe S.ii \\ ulf" an. I 

"The sheik." 

Pathe Newt. Aesop's Fables 

Bebe Daniels in "One Wild 
Week." Don't miss dashing 
Hebe I Mnleli In uiol h.-i " pep 
i>> " role. 

Scenic. Clyde Cook Comedy 

Ethel Clayton, Clyde Fill- 
more, Theodore Roberts and 
Walter Hiers In "Sham." A 
limousine life on ■ trollej est 
Income) A luxury picture that 
pierces through society into 

life. 

News. "Deer Die." Comedy 

Elliott Dexter. Rath Renick 
and Mary Alden in "The 
WitchinK Hour." from the 
ptovj i>\ aOBftttas Thomas 
<in.' of the greatest stage sac 
. - ever played In a merl 

.•a. now Sissllng over tbS 

screen I The stage phii t m ned 
thousands ..w;.\ . The pictuia 
i> leiaeilalila 

Review. Christie Comedy 



?) 



i esse in and see the most complete— 

Safety Razor Hade 

it takes <;wiette Wadi 

HENRY ADAMS & CO. 

The Kexall Store 



Have Your Next Suit Made to Order 



VI 



COLLEGIAN COMPETITION 

Hie standing of the competitor* for 

the ( oi.i.koian to date is as follows: 

KDITOUIAI. IIKPAIMMKNT 

1024 



Kennedy, 

Read, 

Darling, 

White, 

Waugb, 

Corwio, 

Tauha, 

Batal, 



1986 



21.1 
12.1 
10.7 

g.«J 

1:1.1 

11.7 

9.8 



Waugh is a new man who started in 
work with the last issue and brings the 
number of Sophomore competitors ap 
to five men. 

Owing to the poor response of the 
Freshman class tfiis fall il has become 
necessary to hold a special competition 
next term for Freshmen in both edito- 
rial and business departments More 
announcements will be made later. 

A football field is a gridiron; a base- 
ball field is a diamond ; a tennis ground 
la a court: but what, pray tell, is that 
area of land of uncertain dimensions 
which is known as a tag football field ? 



Interesting Discussions Keep Men 
at Table for Three Hours. 

Last Friday evening the inetnl.eis of 
the Coi.i.ko.an board held sbanquel 
in the private dining room of Draper 
Hall. The editoi-in-chU'f was the toast 
master for the evening. F. P. Hand 
and EiOUla Lyons were guests. 

Fart of the occasion was devoted to 

■peaches b? Mr. Lyons, Mr. Land, Jack- 
Bon, Spring, Laniard, Luck and other 
members. Different staff members gave 
criticismsof other college publications. 
A committee of three was appointed 

t„ diseusa with Mr. Band aa to the advis- 
ability of reimbursing members of the 
board. The committee is H. W. spring. 
chairman. C. A. Luck, I. W. Slade and 



M. INJOVICK 

Custom Tailor 



LABROVI 

THE LEADING TAILOR 
Fine assortment nf Woolens ou hand 



Cleaning, Pressing, Repairing and Dyeing 

Neatly and promply done. 

Work called for and delivered. 

Save money by buying a Pressing Ticket. 

4 Suits Pressed for $2.25. 

Dress Suits for Hire. 



Full Dress Suits and Tuxedos 
to Rent 

Full Line of Dress Supplies 

Cleaning, Pressing, Remodeling, Re- 
pairing and Dyeing promptly done. 

Single Sulfa Praaaad, reduced to 60c 
On Preamlng Ticket* ... 50c 

It will pay you to buy a ticket. 



19 Pleasant St. 



Tel. 9-J 



L. F. Jackson ex-olli.io. 



CORRECTION 

Attenltion is called to an error in ihe 
Dec. 7th issue of the Coi.i.koian. Mr. 
Daisy collected for the Led Cioea sub- 
scription for the Vocational Loiiltry 
Class and turned in a 100% ■nbscription. 
The Coi.i.i man printed that he */M 

! collecting for specials and gives then. 

! credit with only 60% Mr. Daisy was 
requested to collect from the Poultry 
Class only and knows nothing about the 

I Specials. 



Wc OS expert work Sf all (lesrrli.tioiis. 
II Amity Ht.- LABROVITZ PfeSSM M/-W 



SING LEE 

Main Street 

Quick Laundry 



KSOINI & CUTLER 

DKAI.KKS IN 

DRY AND FANCY GOODS 
Trunks Bags Suit Cases 



Candy Shoo 



Soda Parlor 



BECKM AISTS 

Candies and Ice Cream 



Northampton. 



Maaaaohuamtta 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Wednesday, December '14, 1921. 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Wednesday, December 14, 1*31. 



S. S. HYDE 

Optluliu) «fc«cl jeweler 
9 Pleasant Street (ui>one flight'. 

Oculists' Prescriptions Filled 

Broken Lenses Accurately Replaced 

Big Ben Alarm Clocks 
AND OTHER RELIABLE MAKES 

Fully (Juaranteed 



PRIVATE DANCING LESSONS 

MABELLE LOVEJOY MILLS 

Individual Dancing a Specialty 

Mills Studio, Phone 466-U, P. O. Block 



GREAT PRICE REDUCTIONS 

Men's Hall Sole* Sewed $1.50 

Mm'! <; Iiewr Bnbnei " ,,,ls 50 

Hra'i Whole Neoltn Sole* and <■ >>*' ;,, „ ftn 

Rabbei Heeta /,w " 

Men'i Whole Leather Boloi Bewe4 ••"«' 

aoodreer Robber Heek • • • • *•*" 

All Work Ouarantmod I 

High-grade Line of Men's Shoes 

for Sale at Low Prices. 

J. GINSBURG 

19 Pleasant Street, on row way up town. 



TWELVE GAMES ON TWO- 

YEAR QUINTET SCHEDULE 

Coach Grayson Looks to Successful 
Season Despite Lack of Veterans. 

The twO-ytM basketball squad 
it gradually rounding n>i<> form. The 
candidates bave been navlng practice 
every afternoon for the past three 
weeks and Coach "Kin" Grayson is an- 
liotpatlog a successful season. 'Ihere 
are only two letter men hark from last 
year's team, but Coach Grayson be- 
lieve* thai as the season advances he 
will be able to choose three more cap- 
able men to bum a quintet. 

[lie schedule is as follows: 
Jan 1— Amherst 11. S. at M. A. <'. 

11 IMiirv II. B. at North Adams 
lx-Sacied lit ait U.S. al liolyoke 
28— W'ilbraliam Acad, at M. A. C. 
i_\VJllisIon Acad., Kaslhampton 
li—Wurcesici North EUgh,M. A . C. 

18— (larkc school, Northampton 

■'.-> -Cusblng Acad., Ashburnbani 
28 — MontpL'lieiil>.(iiame pending) 

i Saered Head H. B. ■! M. A < 
g -Wilbrabam aead., Wilbrnbam 

10 I'nion Freshmen at M. A . C. 

Barnes with Deerfield aeademy, 

Northampton Btgh School, :>nd Monson 
Academy are also pending. 



Feb 



Mar. 



JUNIOR PROM ELECTIONS 

The Junior class held an importaut 
meeting Thursday, Dec. 8 after the 
assembly hour. The main business 
was to elect a Junior Prom Committee. 
Twelve men were nominated from the 
tloor and the following elected: O. E. 
Folsom of Uoslindale, W. II. Marshman 
,,f Bprlngfleld, B. W. Eldredue of Win- 
chester, K. H. Sargent of Buxton, Me., 
J. S. Hale of South Glastonbury, Conn., 
1'. B. Dowden of Sandwich and It. U. 
Grayson of Mi If old. 

ANIMAL HUSBANDRY. 

Last Wednesday evening in liowker 
Auditorium, Mr. I.ovet, Associate Edi- 
tor of (lie Ai/rshiir Journal spoke to 
the animal husbandry Club on "The 
Pnre-B»d Live -Stock Industry." He 
| A td special stress on Ayrshire qualities 
and their remarkable adaptibility to ex- 
isting conditions. 

He said that while the Ayrshires have 
not been a popular breed in this coun- 
try up to the present time, they are fast 
becoming on* of the reeognieed breeds 
in both economic and breeding aspects. 



HILLS PRIZE, BOTANY. 

The annual competition for the Bill's 
Prize in Botany, results in the award of 
the first prize of twenty-live dollars to 
Miss Danltaa Arangelovitch ; second 
prize of tifteeu dollars to Samuel H. 
White. Mr. Thomas Varnum and Mr. 
Harold II. Suepard received Honorable 

Mention. 

Professors C. H. Thompson, A. K. 
Harrison and A. V. Osnnin acted as 
judges. 



VOCATIONAL POULTRY 

CERTIFICATES 

The following men have completed 
the year'B course in Vocational Poultry 
and will receive their certificates next 
week: Brennen, lgo, MacMUlan. Wil- 
son, Talbot, Bobb, Cupard, Morse, Mc- 
Kenna, Gaudette, Moore. Many of 
these men have already obtained posi- 
tions which they will till immediately. 

Garretson n 24, is a promising candi- 
date for Kid Gore's lttM tag football 
team. 



THE MILLETT JEWELRY STORE 

^»u^^-rH.^:^^m:^K 

Fin* Wntch Repairing, also Broken Leases 

Replaced Prouiutly. 



32 Main Street. 



Amherst. Moss. 



— TRY— 

C. H. GOULD 

for lirstclass 
Watch, Clock and Jewelry Repairing 

13 Pleasant St., Amherst, Mass. 



Fine Groceries 
Candies and Fruits 



MASON A. DICKINSON, Proprietor 



Aggie Stationery 

with Class Numerals 

1922 TO 1.925 



A. J. HASTINGS 





Diamond Corn 
Gluten Meal 

The King of Corn Feeds 



Newsdealer and Stationer 



Amherst 



Mass. 



MRS. PRUDENCE P. CASSIN 

SELECT CATERING 

at Reasonable l'i i< < >. 
Informal* a Specialty 

U So. Pr osp ect **t.. Amherst, Mass. 

Tel. B&B-M 



North End Lunch 

120 Pleasant Street. 

Our food is right — 
Our prices reasonable 

T RY US OU T 

w. bTdrury 




DIAMOND Corn Gluten Meal is an- 
other one of our great products 
from corn. It is highly concen- 
trated corn protein with a minimum of 
fibre and is used extensively by the care- 
ful feeder with fine results. 

The protein in Diamond Corn Gluten 
Meal costs proportionately less than any 
other feed and, when properly mixed, 
makes a very low priced, highly produc- 
tive ration. It is guaranteed 40% protein 
and invariably runs higher. 

The Massachusetts Agricultural Ex- 
periment Station endorses Corn Gluten 
Meal by stating that, on the basis of its 
composition and digestibility, it has 10% 
greater feeding value than Cotton Seed 
Meal. 

Corn Products Refining Co. 

New York Chicago 



i MMJNOS Ntl 



WUltHI 

■fin unnxuj IJ3 

\'"m MAXIMUM «* 

L*?m GLUTEI* XE'j; 

'''KI.KFD&. 
.omtts.«» Tt *j 

.*t NO r 



NEW COLLEGE STORE 

Is your Fountain Pen going to withstand the strain of final week ? 
All the standard makes on sale at the College Store. 



FINAL EXAMINATION SCHEDULE 

December 20-23, 1021. 

Tuesday, Dkcemrkk 20. 

7-50—9-50 A. M. 

Animal Huso., 60 102 
Dairying, 77 F. I.. M 
Poultry, 50 12 
Floriculture. 53 F. 11. C 
Landscape, 75 VV. H. A 
Chemistry, 51 C. L. V 
Physics, 75 P. L. 
K.coiiomics Soc.,51 F. H. I 
Agric. Educ, 51 317 
/oology, 25 E. B. D 

C. H. A 

10-00—12-00 m. 

KncUaa.M no 

English, 60 F. H. F 
Spanish, 60 F. H. H 
Military, 60 M. B. D 
Military, 75 M. B. 11 
Chemistry, 1 C. L. 1 
Chemistry, 4 C. H. A 

1-00—3-00 i». m. 

Dairying, 50 F. L. M 
Poultry, 77 12 
Kural Engin.,75 102 
< hemiitry, 80 C. L. V 
Mathematics, 76 M. B. B 
Vet. Science, 61 V. L. B 
Economics, 75 C. U. A 

Agric. Econ., 77 C. H. C 

Agric. Educ, 91 317 

Chemistry, 25 C. L. I 

3-10—6-10 p. M. 

Agric. Econ., 50 C. H. B 
Agric. Educ, 60 114 
Agronomy, 50 102 
Entomology, 53 E. B. K 
Hist, and Govt., 64 F. H. F 
Agric. Educ, 76 317 
Mathematics, 75 M. B. D 
Poultry, 76 312 
Veg. Garden, 75 F. H. D 
English, 1 

Patterson, C. H. A 

Prince, E. B. D 

Rand, 111 

Bogholt, 110 

Wednesday, December 21. 
7-50-9-50 A. M. 

An. Huso., 76 102 
Agric. Econ., 79 C. H. B 
Physics, 25 C. H. A 

10-00— 12-00 M. 

Pomology, 77 W. H. A 
Veg. Garden., 51 F. H. D 
Botany, 62, C. H. B 
Entomology, 64 E. B. K 
Spanish, 75 F. H. H 
Rural Soc, 50 W. H. B 
Rural Soc, 76 W. H. B 
Rural Home Life, 60 F. H. C 
Algebra, Moore, C. H. A 

Machmer, M. B. B 

Porter, E. B. D 
1-00—3-00 p. m. 

Forestry, 50 F. H. H 
Pomology. 75 W. H. A 
Entomology, 76 E. B. K 
Microbiology, 50 M 
Zoology, 50 E. B. G 
English, 25 C. H. A 

3-10—5-10 p. M. 

Farm Management, 76 102 
French, 75 F. H. F 
R. H.L.,76, F. H. C 
Zoology, 53 E.B. G 
French 1 and 4 

Mackimmie, F. H. F 

Thissell, F. H. E 



(ierinan 1 and 4, C. B. A 
C. L. I 

TiiiKKDAv, Dwuma 22. 

7-50—9-50 A. m. 

Floriculture. 50 F. U. C 
Forestry, 75 F. II. II 
Hurt. Manuf.,75 F. L. M 
Pomology, 50 F. 11. I 
Tactics, 1 ('. II. A 
E. B. I) 
Microbiology, 1 M 

10-00— 12-00 m. 

Agronomy, 75 114 
Farm Manag.,75 102 
Poultry, U 111 
Landscape. 50 W. II. A 
Landscape, 80 W. II. B 
Rural Engin. 25 12 
R. II. L., SB Adams House 
1-00-3-00 i\ M 

Botany, 5M C. II. B 
Chemistry, 76 C. L. V 
Microbiology, HI M 
Horlicult., 50 F. H. f 
Botany, N C. B. A 
E. B. D 
Agriculture, 1 114, 12 

102, F. L. M 

HO— 6-1Q p. m- 

Veg. Gard.,50 F. II. D 
Entomology, BO E. B. K 
Mathematics, 50 M. 11. B 
Microbiology. *2 M 
Zoology, 75 E. B. G 
Agric. Educ. 80 317 
French 25 and 28 F. U. R 

FltlDAY, Det'EMHEIi 23. 
7-50—0-50 A. m. 

Vet. Science, 78 V. L B 
Rur. Journ. 50 111. 
Tactics 25 C. II. A; E. 11. D 
Microbiology, 25 M 

10-00—12-00 m. 

Botany, 50 C. H. A 
Physics Lab., 25 E. B. D 

1-00— 3-00 r. M. 
Drawing, 25 W. H. 
An. Uusb.,25 114. 

Any examination not scheduled must 
be arranged by appointment with the 
instructor in charge. 

When more than one room is indi- 
cated instructors will please posl 
notice of divisions to be assigned Met 

room. 

In case of conflict for students hav- 
ing repeal or make-up courses, the 
lower class subject must take the pre- 
cedence. 

Y. W. C. A. 

The Y. W. C. A. gave a Christmas 
pantonine based on "The Birds Christ- 
mas Carol," in the Adams House Tues- 
day evening at 7 o'clock. Miss (iri/zle, 
instructor in sewing, directed the per- 
formance. She read the story, while 
the members of the cast acted it out 
silently. 

Last Thursday afternoon after Assem- 
bly, the first tryout was held for choos- 
ing three students who will represent 
the college as speakers at the annual 
banquet of the Union Agricultural So- 
ciety meeting which will take place in 
Ford Hall, Boston, January 18. The 
eight selected by the judges were 
Krasker 1 22, Fitzpatrick, '22, Abele 23. 
Sandow"23, Loring '24, Miss Smith 24, 
Staebner '24, and Ward '25. 



KINGSLEY'S 



SODAS 



SUNDAES 



CANDIES 



Luncheonette 



SHINE AS-U-GO 
leiemnei 

The College Shoe Shine Parlor 

for your 
Hat Renovating. Shoe Dyeing. Shoe Shining 

At II Amity St., I» Am. K.\. Olliee. 



140 Main Slreel, Northampton, Mass. 



AMHERST BOOK STORE 



Note Books Fountain Pent 



High Grade 

COLLEGE FOOTWEAR 



— AT- 



Economy Prices 






C. F. DYER 



M. 



The Shoeman. 
Main St., Amherst 



»» 



"BIDE-A-WEE 

Creamed Chicken and Waffles Our Specialty 

And other good things to est. 

MRS. L. M STEBBINS 

Middle Htreet. (Tel. 416-W) lladlej. Mass. 



-After Every Meal" 



WRIGLEYS ™ sTEn studi ° 




TEN 

FOR 

FIVE CENTS 

B130 

The Flavor Lasts! 



Nash Block 
AMHERST SHOE REPAIRING CO. 

Your Shoes Repaired 

WHILE YOU WAIT 



S 
H 
E 
SHEPARD 
A 

R 
D 

Furnishings, Shoes 



=HARDWARE= 

Come to us for 

Fireplace Goods, Coat and Tronser Hangers 

Ever Ready Flash Lights and Paint 

Clothes and Shoe Brushes 

Anything in Hardware and Cooking Utensils 

Always glad to see you. 



THE MOTOAL PLUMBING & HEATING CO. 




The M^chusetts Collegian, Wednesday, December 14, 1911. 



YOUR CHRISTMAS SHOPPING 

Don, for g et you, friends at home-a neat tie, some clever socks-or any number of tHin g s u>e Have u»U 
make your friends happier. Stop in before you leave for home. ^ mmm _ mtmmm - r^ At JIT 

SOUTHWICK BROTHERS & GAULT 



WHAT MATTER IS MADE OF 



Molecules, Atoms, and Electrons in 

Relation to Our Every Day 

Problems. 



Hy iMt. \V. K. Will ini IT. 
Director Ijcsciircn l.ahrwatory 
Cenerul Elei-tric Co 
Those who are Inquiring tatO t tiin^is 
are always disturbing the comfort of 
our old ideas. The scientist, who is in 
truth, what the amateur is in sport, 
tries to learn what makes everything 
ami how the work is done. He is daily 
learning more, so that former views are 
constantly improved. At present a 
new picture of slutY is being painted. 
A new hook should l>e written, "The 
Element! of the Elements." 

Like our old atom, impossible of par- 
tition, we now have its indivisible sub- 
division, the electron, but fortunately 
for simplicity, instead of 70 or 80, as 
with the atoms, we have but two of the 
new units— the positive ami the nega- 
tive electron. The myriads of compli- 
cations which correspond to all the dif- 
ferences in matter about us, must re- 
side in the arrangements or combina- 
tions of these two simple components. 
The thiiiRS which have forced this 
new chemistry and physics upon us are 
fairly familiar. The interconnection 
may not be evident. Such names as 
electrons and atomic structure do not 
convey to the mind inherent relation- 
ship with radio, radium and X-rays. 
But a proper view of matter as it is now 
understood can most readily be pic- 
tured by getting the connection among 
some such group of present-day sub- 
jects. 

We are now forced to look at all 
matter as composed of identical, small, 
electrical charges, which determine the 
character or nature of chemical ele- 
ments and compounds by the numbers 
and arrangements in space. Under 
this plan, an atom— the ultimate parti- 
cle substance -becomes more like a 
solar system than like a solid. The 
volume of the atomic space is mainly 
unoccupied, but through it the forces 
act which are attributable to electric 

charges within. 

Becquerel, who found that a certain 
uranium ore emitted an invisible ray 
capable of passing through black paper 
and still affecting a photographic plate, 
was partly responsible for our new 
views. Soon afterward, the Curies dis- 
covered radium, and this was shown 
later to be a naturally decomposing 
atom. Several other decaying elements 
were also found among the heavier 
ores. During this process of decompo- 
sition small electrical qnnntitlei were 
continually discharged. 

Similar discharges had already been 
found in other lields, but were not un- 
derstood. For example, when the fila- 
ment of a lamp is heated in a high 
vacuum, negative electrical charges are 
emitted and current thus crosses the 
empty space. This had early been no- 
ticed by Edison. It was not until after 
the discovery of radium that the true 
nature of these "electrons" was under- 
stood. 

When these little units of negative 
electricity now within a wire, they con- 



stitute the electric current. When, by 
b lgh temperature, they are emitted 

from a metal, they are called thermions. 

When they pass through gas with sut- 
li.ient velocity, their impacts decmn- 
pose molecules, and the greatly aug- 
mented How of th.5 resulting charged 
particles produces the common electric 
arc. When they flow through a vacu- 
ous space, under the influence of a blgfa 
electric force, they are called cathode 
rays. When their motion is stopped by 
impact in the surface of a solid, the 
sudden change of motion starts an 
electro-magnetic wave, which we call 
an X-ray (just about as a drum heat 
sets up a sound wave in air), and when 
they surge up and down a wireless 




antennae they produce the, long wire- 
less waves through space. 

This being known, it is easier for us 
to imagine how ordinary visible light 
may be due lo similar changes in mo- 
tion of these electric charges, because 
light waves are only long X-rays, or 
very short wireless waves, and all three 
are propagated through space at the 
same speed. 

When constituent electrons are ar- 
ranged in the groups called atoms, all 
properties seem determined merely by 
geography, 01 orientation. Apparent- 
ly such old established things as 
chemical activity ami valency are due 
to the number ol t hose electrons which 
occupy the outer surface of the groups. 
The shooting electrons of the cathode 
rav, stopped b\ the platinum or tungs- 
ten target, produce the X-rays, which 
by reflection in crystallized matter, 



disclose its atomic arrangements and 
thus lead to hetter understanding ol 
many physical properties. 

because electrons may he driven out 
Of a metal by heat and carried through 
space hy an electric force, it has been 
possible to develop all the various wire- 
receiving, amplifying and oscillat 
ing, devices now in common use. lhey 
are all based on motion and control ol 
electrons. , 

Since decomposing elements eiiut el- 
ectrons, since heat drives them from 
filaments, since gases and air yield then. 
on inpact in arcs, since ■ tat J call) 
charged bodies carry them and lose 
them (as a car gains or loses passengers! 
it is logical that all electric current- 
are Attributed to their motion, ell static 
eharges to differences in concentration 
and all matter to balanced combination- 
of them. 




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CAMEL. 

Into this ONE BRAND, we put the utmost quality. 
Nothing is too good for Camels. They are as good as it s 
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Camel QUALITY is always maintained at the same high, 
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flavor of choicest tobaccos — and entire freedom from 
cigaretty aftertaste. 

And remember this! Camels come in one size package 
onlv— 20 cigarettes— just the right size to make the greatest 
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can get Camel Quality at so moderate a price. 

Here's another. We put no useless 
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Such things do not improve the smoke 
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amel 



R. J. REYNOLDS TOBACCO CO., Wintton-Salem. N. C. 






• 



MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 



Vol. XXXII. 



Amherst, Mass., Wednesday, January 11, 1922. 



No. 11 



SIXTY FOUR PER CENT 
OF FRESHMEN PLEDGE 

Ninety-three First Year Men Put Pins 
On in Monday Chapel. 

I The first second term making seaeoa 
lield at Aggie, at least for some time, 
closed Sonde* algal at *i ■•. m. altera 

.olid week of intensive rushing. The 
results of the pledging •» Monday 

morning Chapel sbowrd that a total of 

M Freshmen had plowed fraternii ies. 
making ■ ,,,,il1 percentage of o4' , of 
the Freshmen class enrollment at 
present. The list hy Fraternities is as 
follows: 

], 1*1 <»K Fkksiiman PLBMM 
January t>. 1 1*2*2. 
Q. T. V. 
Barnes, Adrian Douglas So. Weymouth 
Cnmnno, Joanna eroeelaad 

(iadshy, J. Herhert, '24 North Adams 
tfoaradtaa, Gnrneed K. Brldgnwatei 
Panose, J. Gilbert Melrose Highlands 

I utile. Vernon B. Warren 

Kappa Sigma. 



PREXY'S SECOND LETTER 

ARRIVES FROM CHINA 



Cahlll, Carl M. 
Kldredge, Stnatt 

Fish. Donald 
('uteitnan. Carl E. F. 
Haeiissler, (iilbert J. 
Keith, Lewis H. 

Langeebeeaer, Robert F. 

Weehawken, N. J 



Newbury port 

\\ inchesici 

Amherst 

Springfield 

Springfield 

Bridgewater 



Falmouth, Me 

Fast Boston 

Cliflondale 

Chelsea 

Heading 

Amherst 

(hat ham 

Abington 

Stow 



Melrose 

Auburn 

Berlin 

Mansfield 

Springfield 



Lnnt, Samuel W. 
Svlen, John H. 
Mieldon. Herbert ('. 
Made, Wesley L. 
staniford, Duncan M. 
Sullivan. Donald <'. 

lay lor, Milton W. 
White, Karl M. 
Kuwell, Winston '24 

Alpha Gamma Rho. 
Currier, Leland L Marblehead 

Fuller, Henry K. 

Love, Andrew W. 

Unss, Donald K. 

s-heridan, Irwin S. 

Woodbury. Samuel I, 

Phi Sigma Kappa. 

ChtM, Gilbert E. Greenwich 

Cleaves, Leighton G. Gardner 
Continued on par* 1 

INFORMAL SATURDAY 

There will be an informal in the Me- 
morial Building immediately after the 

j Dartmouth hockey game on Saturday, 
refreshments will be served down stairs 
and dancing will take place on the sec- 

toed floor. One orchestra will furnish 

| the music. Tickets will be $3.75 until 
Thursday, and thereafter $4.00. It is 
estimated that 60 couples will attend. 
The chaperons at Smith will be Miss 
Lawman, Dickinson House, and Miss 
l'aimalee, Tyler House. Girls should 
call on Friday. At Mount Holyoke 
Miss Cameron of the Faculty House will 

jehaperone. She will receive girls oo 

I Thursday. 



Head of College Mentions the Feeling 
in China Toward Washington. 

The following letter was received by 
the Coi i i «ian just before the winter 
recess : 
Tiik Mass. Coi.i.mii an Kimtok. 

On the last mail front .loine I received 
ii iv Inst news of the result of the Am- 
herst Kama. Sorry of course about the 
score fl.nl pleased that the old tradition 
of hard lighting and clean playing was 
maintained to the full. Perhaps next 
fall 1 can exert some influence toward a 
more favorable score! 

Since 1 wrote my former note, telling 
aboiii my trip to Sappoio. .Japan. 1 have 
been in lOof the IK provinces of China: 
have travelled nearly 50(H) miles by rail- 
way and steamer. Including a 700 mile 
voyage down the great Tongteaa rleer, 

;i (lav under the "old flag*' ll Manila 
and another .lay in the meat British 
port ol Hong Kong. The Commission 
|, as practically completed its inspec- 
tions, and is now settled down here to 
, ,„•,.. tv sieadv iM'xidii.L' on its re 

port. 

1 have not seen all the Chinese grad- 
uates of at. A.c.but UangofOeoame 
to Peking to greet us, and later we saw 
him and his family and home in 
Tientsin For some years after return- 
| B g to China he was in government agri- 
enltaral service and was 1 believe for a 
,j,„e vine minister of agriculture and 
,. (llimlt .,vc. He is now a prosperous 
,val estate dealer but has a small far... 
near the city which he showed us with 

much pride. 

Continued on p»r« 8 



VARSITY FOOTBALL TEAM TO PLAY MICHIGAN 

AGGIE NEXT FALL AT EAST LANSING, MICHIGAN 

Game will be First Intersection^ Game in History of M. A. C. Team 
will Also Appear in Hoboken, N. J. 



FAST AGGIE QUINTET 

OUTCLASSES M. I. T. FIVE 



Fast Work of Tumey with Clever 
Passwork and Footwork by En- 
tire Team. Score 22 9. 



MUSICAL CLUBS SCORE 

SUCCESSES IN BOSTON 



Private Concerts Given for Three 
Evenings and Saturday Afternoon. 
The Musical Clubs, mi their annual 
Christmas trip, appeared on the con- 
cert stage at Peabody, Boston and 
Salem this year, scoring a success in 
each city. A wide variety of songs, a 
varied program of specialties, and an 
abundance of enthusiasm contributed 
Itneij to the success. Much credit 
must be given lo Coach Worthley and 
Leaders Vinten and Waugh for the 
work they have done in rounding the 
clubs into shape for tbjs trip. 

The first concert was given at Pea- 
body on Wednesday, Dec 28, under the 
auspices of the Peabody Woman's Club. 
On Friday, Dec. 30, the clubs played at 
the Brunswick Hotel in Boston, and it 
was there that the concerts reached the 
high point of excellency. Saturday 
afternoon was given over to a concert at 
the Peabody Sentinel House in the West 
End of Boston, and in the evening a 
concert in Salem terminated the ex- 
cursion. 

Continued on P»I« B 



with a enure el t*tta« Harm d 

White basketball team successfully 
opened the season against M. I T. Sat- 
urday afternoon in I he Drill Hall. 
The game was played before a large 
crowd of enthusiastic Aggie barters. 
Tech was no match for Kid ('ores fast 
aggregation, finding it very difficult to 
break through the Aggie defence. The 
game was characterized by hard, clean- 
cut play, resulting in a battle from start 
10 finish. The Cambridge outlit bad 
several good chances to close I be gap 
between the scores, but each time their 
inability to tind the ring caused their 
tailure.' Had the Aggie passwork be... 
less ragged the final score might have 
shown still greater inequality. The ex- 
cllent Boot Wort and foul shoot ing ol Bd 
Taney was ■ feature of the game. Al- 
though playing his lirsl varsity game 
he led t he team in scoring. Marshinaii I 
clever BOOT work with three tallies was 
also noticeable. 

The first half started with a burst of 
speed which showed that the otliensive 
of Tech was not to be dealt with lightly. 

The Engleeore quickly dropped a counter 

in the basket in the lial few minutes 
of play. However, the home team re- 
taliated with two baskets in quirt sm- 
,ession and from then on Tech was 
never in the lead. The Aggie defence 
tightened perceptibly at thispoint with 
the entire s.piard on guard. In the re- 
maining minuies with some clever BOOT 
work and sensational shooting they 
pulled together and linishe.l the half on 
the long end of a II to 4 score, Barrows 
substituting for Smith just before the 

whistle blew. 

Continued on pafe 2 



The Mass. Aggie Football team will 
play the first intersect ioiial game 
in its history m xt fall, aecoining 
loan announcement made by Heneral 
Manager ot Uhleiics Curry 1. Hicks 
ami Manager John M Whiniei a short 
lime ago. The (MM is to be played 
with Michigan Aggie on College Field. 
Last Lansing. Mich., on Nov. -if.. The 
name nitb M V. Aggies has been can- 
celled, due to a decision ol I heir tacilly . 
Nevertheless, the schedule as it now 
stands consisls, as usual, ol eight 
sanies, and is undoubtedly IN best 
and most comprehensive ever ar- 
ranged for an Aggie eleven. 

The Michigan game has many im- 
portant features which make It cspe.-i 
ally interesting to both colleges. Not 
only will it be an interesting KKKI mile 

jaunt for oar team ani it will beanaet 

of M. A. C. M. M \.C. Not only are 
both teams representing an M.A.C., 
l,ut both are land grant colleges and 
both have the lines! athletir traditions, 
reaching far back into the past. The 
BMBOa the campus with whom we are 
all well eeqanlBted ami who are alumni 
of Michigan arc President Butte, lield, 
Treasurer Kenney. IM. Marshall of the 

Oradnate School, and Prof. Carrj B 

Hicks. The game will relcbiale (he 
homecoming of the Michigan alumni, 
a date tilled last season by Notre Dame. 
Michigan will meet three conference 
teams this coming season: Northwest- 
ern, Ini remltf n! Michigan, and Uni- 
Continued on p*f« 3 



GOOD RESULTS IN POM. 77 

APPLE PACKING CONTEST 



DR. WILLIAM S. REGAN 

RESIGNS FROM FACULTY 

Instructor in Entomology has been at 
M. A. C. Since 1912. Goes to 
Bozeman, Mont. 
It is with regret that we note the res- 
ignation of another member of the fac- 
ulty, one who has always been held in 
the highest esteem by the students and 
l, y a ll those with whom he has come in 
contact. The resignation of William S. 
Regan, Associate Professor of Entomol- 
ogy,went into effect the first of the year, 
Continued on page 6 



Three Seniors and One Graduate Stu- 
dent Carry off Honors. 

Peck, Warren, Barnard, all Seniors, 
and Miss Lli/.abeth Coleman, graduate 
student/carried olT the honors in the 
annual I'omology 77 packing contests. 

Miss Coleman scored first in the barrel 
and second in the eastern box contest, 
giving an unusual demonstration of 

skill and ability. 

Beck and Warren scored first and sec- 
ored respectively in the western box 
contest; Beck making the record time 
of 15 minutes. He also scored first in 
the eastern box with the remarkable 
time of nine minuies. 

Barnard came second in the barrel 
contest, a fraction of a point behind the 
winner. 

French pruning shears and swivel 
pruning saws are offered as prizes for 
the best work, and the winners have 
obtained articles of real value for their 
excellent performances. 




The Massachusetts Collegian, Wednesday, January 11, 1922. 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Wednesday, January 11, 1922^ 



M. 1. T. BASKETBALL GAME 

Continued from page 1 



FOOTBALL MEN HOLD 

LARGEST BANQUET EVER 



ROMS started the second half in Hike's 
place. The visitor* took the defensive 
at ihe beginning and l*« game became 
much slower. Neither team was ahle 
to score during this period, but with 
Smith hack in forward the play livened 
up. The Cainhii.k'ians began to fight 
hard, hut their determination was of no 
avail, for all hough they broke through 
the defence several times they were un- 
aide to score. The Aggies t»e» started 
their spurt. Marshman and Tuiney al- 
ternated ea.-h with a pair of double 
counters, carrying the ball down the 
Boor with some fast teamwork. 

Tech succeeded in coining back a 
minute later with some quick passim; 
and tilled the hoop for their tinal tally. 
COMB Core began to send substitutes on 
the tlooi as the uame drew to a close. 
Thompson, (irayson, Hale and Heal, all 
lirst siring subs had a chance to prove 
their merit. They held the visitors 
scoreless until just before the tinal 
whistle when the entire first team went 
in again. 

Hike played a creditable game on the 
defence, and Captain Gowdy showed his 
usual good form. Smith played a line 
game at forward, caning two baskets 
daring the fray. 

MASS. AUUIK. M ' '• T- 

smith, (Beal), If rg. Capt. Hubbard 

Tiuncy, (Thompson), rf 1«, Cook 

Marshman, (Thompson), c 

c, Coleman (Blood) 
(iowdy, ((apt.) lg rf, I.andis, (Davidson) 
Bike, ((irayson), rg H, Totion 

Score— Mass. Aggie 22, M. I. T. 9. 
(ioals iio.n tloor-Smith 2. Turney 6, 
Marshman I, blood. Davidson, Tonon. 
Goals from fouls— Turney 2, LandiB a. 



Old Deerfield Fertilizers 



FINAL PLANS MADE 

FOR INTER-CLASS DEBATE 



Freshmen Seem to Have Good Mate- 
rial with Experienced Men Out. 

Final arrangements for the debate 
between the Freshman and Sophomore 
classes have been practically completed 
since the Freshman class held its pre- 
liminary debate last Friday afternoon 
in Slockbridge Hall. The three men 
chosen to represent the Freshman class 
in the art of debating are orators of no 
mean ability. 

James J. Batal of Lawrence, a former 
president of the Lawrence High School 
Debating Society, was declared by the 
judges to have been the best speaker in 
this preliminary contest. He was also 
chosen class debating captain, and he 
will act in that capacity during the 
Freshman-Sophomore debate. 

Carl Gutennan, the second successful 
candidate, is a product of the Central 
High School of Springfield, where he 
learned the rudiments of debating. 
Gordon Ward is the third member of 
the Freshman team. Mr. Ward has 
won enviable reputation as an orator at 
the Englewood High School, New 
Jersey. All three men have taken 
active parts in interscholastic or inter- 
class debates. Kail Coiwin of Boston 
will act in the capacity of an alternate. 
The judges for the preliminary contest 
were Professors Band and Patterson of 
the faeulty. 

The Freshman debating team will en- 
deavor to avenge the defeat adminis- 
tered by the Sophomores in the rope 
pull. The debate, which will take 
place at some Weduesday Assembly, 
will undoubtedly be argued vehemently 
by the representatives of both classes. 
The exact date of the debate will be 
announced later. 



Freshmen Attend for FirBt Time, j 
Alumni Give Interesting Talks. 
The football team held its annual 
banquet at 7-80 last Saturday evening 
in Draper Hall. The Senior members 
of the team spoke of the past season. 
Members of the staff, alumni prominent 
in Aggie football, and members of the 
Freshman team also look part, making 
il the most sucessful banquet ever held. 
Starr King stressed the efficiency of 
the present coaching staff and asked 
all those present to support it. Cap- 
tain Cotton heartily thanked the men 
for their loyal support during the past 
season and gave a brief resume of the 
work of the team. Capt-elect Gsayson 
thanked the men for his election and 
asked for a whole-hearted support 
during the coming year. 
- George Melican '16 cautioned the 
earn to back up the coaching staff 
after their graduation. He told of the 
importance of the support by the 
alumni and Km. Grayson heartily 
seconded him. 

Prof. Curry S. Hicks spoke of the 
coming season and of the candidates 
from the present Freshman class. 
Andrews spoke for the aMa men. 
Louis Lyons '18 spoke of the Varsity 
Club, its origin last June and its work. 
Sullivan, captain of the 1925 Fresh- 
man team, gave an impromptu speech 
pledging the support of the Freshmen. 

Coach Kid Gore spoke of last season, 
and gave a brief glimpse into the fu- 
ture. He thanked the men for their 
support, and for the hard work tbey 
had done. He mentioned the fact that 
it was necessary to sacrifice many 
pleasures to attain success on the grid- 
iron. He recalled the exploits of Has 
Pond '20. in whose memory the Pond 
Memorial Medal Is auuually awarded. 
In this connection he spoke of the first 
two recipients of the medal: King '21 
and Lewandowski '22, praising the lat- 
ter for his fine work the past season. 

Freddy Waugh and Ray Viuten fur- 
nished music, and William Peck, man- 
ager of the 1921 team, acted as toast- 
master. 



^Reasonable in dollars and sense." 
A. W. HIGGINS, INC.. South Deerfiei-o. Mam. 



m m m P Ydll SIVE MONEY 

We are offering a reduction of 20 P* r cent from our re S ular P " CCS 

on Men's Suits and Overcoats, including those made by 

Hart Schaffner and Marx. 

Men's Fur Coats, Fur Lined Coats, Sheepskin Lined Coats and 

Leather Coats. 

If you are interested in any of these garments we will be very glad to 

show them to you. 



F. M. THOMPSON & SON 

Clothes for College Men for 35 Years. 



Carpervter & Morehouse, 

PRINTERS, 



No i, Cook Plac*, 



Amherst, Mui 



Deuel's Drug Store 

ARTICLES 

Shaving Sticks and Creams Razors and Razor Blades 

VICTOR RECORDS 



VARSITY FIVE HAS 

TWO GAMES THIS WEEK 



Kodaks and Supplies 



Fountain Pens 



Trinity and Connecticut to Oppose 

Aggie Speedsters. C. A. 0. 

has Fast Team. 



F»atce'» JSfcaoe Store 

SPECIAL 

Saddle Strap Oxfords . . . $5.98 



With a oleam cut victoiy to its credit, 
the Aggie basketball quintet will meet 
Trinity Friday night in the Drill Hall. 
This game promises to be a hard scrap 
as Trinity is in fine form, having suc- 
cessfully quelled Middlebury 41-17 and 
Lebanon Valley by a score of 28-21 in 
the only two games played thus far. 
Trinity will come to Amherst full of 
confidence in view of her two wins, a 
fact which will serve to make the game 
fast and aggressive. 

Saturday night the Maroon and White 
will appear at Storrs against a crack 
Conn. Aggie team. Connecticut has 
defeated Harvard, West Point and 
Brown to date, and suffered only one 
reverse at the hands of Wesleyan 19-20. 
Speed will be the watchword Saturday 
night, but with the team in first-class 
form Aggie may count on a victory. 

Harry Starr, president of the Harvard 
Menorah Society, will address the M. 
A. C. Menorah Society Sunday, January 
15. All students are invited to attend. 



THE NEW M. A. C. SONG BOOK 

At the Treasurer's Office— $1.00 

LEARN TO SING ALL THE AGGIE SONGS 



When 



Vou Are Down Town 



DROP IN 



The Candy Kitchen 






— FOR — 



Lunch, Candy, Ice Cream and Smokes 

COLLEGE CANDY KITCHEN 

"The Home of Sweets" 



AGGIE INN 



N ow is the time to buy your College and Fraternity Pennants and Pillow Tops. We have 

a complete line of Banners. Drop in and see them. 

IISIISJ By the Campus Entrance. 



AGGIE REVUE EVEN MORE 

SUCCESSFUL THAN IN 1920 



Freehman and Senior Acts Bring 
Applause. Faculty Good. 
The tinal Social Union event of the 
year, the 1»21 Aggie Hevue. was given 
at 7 o'clock Saturday evening. Dec )7, 
1081, ta liowker Auditorium under the 
auspices «>f the Uoister Doisters, and 
attain demonstrated the success of this 
plan of entertainment. 

The Sophomores had the opening 
numher, and presented very suc.ess- 
fully the farce "The Public Worrier." 
The lively action of the piece waB well 
carried by B. E. Weatherwax, who 
played Godfrey Giblets, the Worrier, 
and by Miss Geiger as the Maiden. 
Five other players took their parts very 
well, and furnished 20 minutes of com- 
plications and consequently of amuse- 
ment to the audience. 

The Juniors offering consisted of hu- 
morous and classical music •NVp- 
i line's Farmers," nine in number, were 
hold bad pirates with cabbages, carrots, 
and cutlasses as weaponB. They sang 
two songs from "Pinafore," and then 

'Davy Jones' lacker, Ihe Oyster," 

and the "Gold Marine." 

These numbers were alternated with 
Helections by the Junior quintet which 
BM Ucome very well known for its tine 
rendering of classical music. The qual- 
ity oi their work cannot be too highly 
praised, and their music was thoroughly 

enjoyed. 

The Faculty's act was a playlet, 
sham," a social satire. The plot 
hinged on the finding of a very self- 
possessed burglar by a home-returning 
n.uple. The thief succeeds in showing 
them how false their lives are, and 
what a sham their home and personali- 
ties really are. Harold W. Smart acted 
most excellently the part of the thief, 
and the acting of Professor Piince, Mrs. 
Thayer, and C. H. Davidson was very 
good. The whole act was epical of 
the fine acting and choice of play which 
the Faculty always gives. 

The class of 1925 entertained with an 
entirely new-to-us, at least, method of 
presenting an excellent and unique 
"take-off" on the Sophomores. They 
adopted the French form, and gave the 
whole act without scenery, without 
costumes, and without speaking a word. 
Three acts, of two scenes each, por- 
trayed a day in the life of a Soph, and 
included "Billy's" class in simple har- 
monic motion, a pond party, drill, and a 
little entertainment "over the moun- 
tain." The actors, who shall say in- 
appropriately ? were dressed as Pierrots, 
and the total stage setting consisted of 
four chairs. Not least of the perfor- 
mance was the ability of the no.se, and 
•oaidtaaken to supply some very ex- 
pressive sounds in the right places. An 
interlocutor gave the general idea of 
each act, and explained the few things 
that could not be interpreted without 
words. These latter were very few, 
however, as the actors were easily cap- 
able of making clear all the details that 
make a Sophomore what be is. The act 
will long be remembered as one of the 
best that has been given at Aggie in 
recent years. 
The dignified Seniors decended from 



their high pedestals long enough to 
black up and show what tbey could do 
in the way of orchestral "jazz," and to 
furnish no little amusement by demon- 
strating bow to "roll them." 

"Freddie" and "Bay" turned out 
some "original stulT", catchy little 
songs with banjo accompaniment. 
"The Agricultural BlueB," "O.v- 
Oy Setiora," "Educated, by Heck," 
and "Where does the Wind come 
from, before it starts to blow," 
were some of the original songs which 
drew signs of appreciation from the 
audience. The Agricultural Quartette, 
or the "Frisk University Quart," sang 
"liuund for Australia." and several 
others were accomplished after MaMM 
Cangrene, Hookworm, and Kczenia 
were aroused. Mr. Cotton, gave 
Pluto's song from the Aggie musical 
comedy, "Pluto's Daughter." In 
fact "a pleasant time was enjoyed by 
all," and the Seniors certainly suc- 
ceeded in their attempt to keep the 
crowd laughing. 

The Short Courses finished out the 
evening's entertainment with the 
Knglieh farce "Motoring," and suc- 
ceeded very well in showing us the true 
brand of English humor, which appeals 
to us as well as to those who originate 
it. N. P. Harrison as the owner of the 
broken car made the part very natural, 
and his son, taken by C. A. Carlson, 
was also very good. 

The Short Course orchestra furnished 
music betweeu the acts, and proved it- 
self to be "right there" when it comes 
to playing. The hall was very well 
filled, and while many of the Faculty 
were absent, Kid Core and his basket 
ball squad made things lively down in 
the front rows. 

The "Aggie Revue" has come to stay 
and 1921's presentation will undoubt- 
edly rank high among those which are 
lo come, and with the IfM Bevue. 



ERNEST GAMBLE CONCERT 
APPRECIATED BY STUDENTS 



M. A. C. TO PLAY MICHIGAN 

Continued from page 1 



versity of Indiana. 

The schedule as completed : 
Oct. 7-C. A. C. at Storrs, Conn. 

14— Worcester P. I. at M. A. C 

21— Amherst at M. A. C. 

2H— X. H. State at M. A. 0. 
Nov. 4— Bates at M. A. C. 

11— Stevens at Uoboken, X. J. 

18— Tufts at Medford 

H— Mich. A.C. at B. Lansing, Mich 



Mies Page and Miss Stadleman Com- 
petently Back Their Leader 
Mr. Gamble. 

The Ernest Gamble Concert Party, 
consisting of Mr. Ernest Gamble, basso 
rat.t ante, Miss Verna Page, violinist, 
and Miss Clara Stadleman, soprano, 
gave a recital Saturday evening in Bow- 
ker Auditorium. 

The concert was enjoyable anil un- 
usually interesting. The large pro- 
grammes wbicb were distributed, 
contained not only the order ol t he se- 
lections but a description and history 
of them as well. 

The noted trio have a wide reputa- 
tion, having given concerts all over the 
world. Mr. Gamble is himself an 
artist. It is perceptible that be has 
had long voice training for he sang la 
masterly style. Miss Stadleman, the 
soprano, thrilled the audience more 
than once with her remarkable singing. 
The facility with which she struck the 
extremely high notes, ami the manner 
in which she trilled was nothing short 
Of remarkable. Judging from the re- 
ception given her. Miss Page, the violin- 
ist, was most appreciated. Seemingly 
a young girl, her performance was 
worthy of praise. 

The programme was made unusually 
lOgg on acrotint of the many, necessary 
encores. The selections were: 

Waltz-'Var.iiena." 

Mimh Htailleman mil Mr. tiainble. 
Hondo eleiMiite. 
■;i' Koiiiani M kioik parole*. 

Miss Page. 
Invictiis. 
(a) Banjo Sonu. 
(bl Younu Mellaril. 

.Mi. (inmble 
MailSiene f.om l.ucla ill l.aiiinieriin.or. 

Mm Stailleman. 
1'reluile from " Trie Deluge." 

(a) Moto Peiiietoe, 
(I,) The I. out < Imrd 
HtM l'a«e aeeompanleil !>>' Mrs Watts. 
ti. I've Keen Koamlng. 
(a) Just You. 
(hi The I.llac Tree. 

Misa Stadleman 

7. Hco'.eh Lullaby 

(a) Nobody Knows the Trouble I'veHeen 

(b) old putehSong. 
Mi«s Tage. 

8. Romania from Tanhauser. 

(a) On The Koad t«. Mahdalay. 

(b) Irish Names. 
Mr. (Jainble. 




Do you believe in signs — dol- 
lar signs? 

Why not get lk the best" M 
well as "the most" for your 
money— Rogers Peet clothe*. 

Down-to-daU in pria and up- 
to-date in stifle. 

Hail orders filled 

Rokkks I'kkt Company 
Broadway Broadway 



at lHlh St. 



•'Four at 34th St. 

Convenient 

BlO«dway Corners" fifth Ave. 

at Warren »' 4,H < St - 

M.W YOKK CITY 



I, 



•.'. 



B. 



Have Your Next Suit Made to Order 

— AT — 

LABROVITZ 

THE LEADING TAILOR 
Fine assortment of Woolens on hand 

Full Dress Suits and Tuxedos 
to Rent 

FULL Ll**- OF ONUS 8UPPLIE* 

Cleaning, Pressing, Remodeling, Re- 
pairing and Dyeing promptly done. 

Single Suit* Pfmmmmd, reduced lo BOc 
On Preeelng Ticket* BOo 

It will pay you »p bttj a ticket. 

We do expeit wit* "i all dewrlirtfoiui 

11 Amity St. LABROVITZ. H.one M-W 



NOTICE 

In its last issue the Cou.ko- 
ian, in printing an article on alumni 
-tance of Aggie football, omitted 
the following men about whom Kid 
Gore said : "I cannot help but refer 
especially to the following who did 
a lot of real bard work for us: Cross- 
man -07, Hayden '18, Dole '15, Mel- 
ican IS, Murphy '1«, Grayson '17, 
Maginnis'18, Lalbrop '20. Ball '21. 
King '21. and Mansell 21. " We re- 
gret the omission and take this op- 
portunity to correct it. 



FRESHMAN HOCKEY 



SING LEE 



Main Street 



Quick Laundry 



A goodly number of Freshmen have 
answered the call for candidates for the 
10SS hockey team. Although ibey are 
for the most part green, Coach Mansell 
feels confident that he can turn out a 
fatl squad to represent the yearlings. 
A lew have already drawn suits and 
more uniforms will be issued soon. Eto 
games have been scheduled to date, but 
Manager Putnam expects to make out a 
good program if the team merits it. 
The following have already reported for 
work: Taylor, Lovell, Sprague, Guild, 
Macauley, MiCeoeh. Ward, Sheldon, 
( rutby, ( urrier, Peirce, Righter, White, 
Cannon. Hutchins, Staniford. Kldredge, 
and Tufts. It is felt that this aggrega- 1 
lion can give the Sophomore team which 
last year defeated 1923, a run for its 
money. 



A. MIENTKA 

Shorn Repelrlno While U Wmlt 

KKW run i - 



H 50 



Mei.K Whole Soles. Rubber Heel* . 

Men* Half Role . Kobbei Heeta • • • V-»» 
Men's Robber lk»lei Rubber Heels . ?*•£» 

Men's Half Holes .... • • • •'• 5W 

Wortt ftatrtatwir- * MHKHBT HOI M 



You can save from 

$3.00 to $5.00 a pair 



— on- 



Young Men's 
College Footwear 

by buying at 

FLEMINGS, Northampton 




The Massachusetts Collegian, Wednesday, January 11, 1922. 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Wednesday, January 11, 1922. 



THE MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIAN 



Published erery Wednesday by the 
Students of the Massachusetts Ag- 
ricultural Co liege. ^ 

BOARD OF EDITORS. 

laLMH r. Jackhos 'n BdUor In Chief 

Hobakt W. 8pk.no « Manning Mttnr 

Abbociatk Editokh. 
U ■■iiikiiB.ArbinhtJ.s'SS Ass't Ma.ru K<lit..r 

KKNNBTII A. BAKNAKI) '« < « . II. p.t it t« .1. KditOC 

John H. Wi.lTTlFR '28 Athletic Editor 

K, ... M. WOOD** Kx.lm.i."-K<Utor 

HTANI.KV W. Bkomi.KV "22 
IIIMN.i VV. Sl.AIK. "■ 

s... ohoii (oiiK.N tt 

Ki.ihiia k. Hum, .in • "m" 

BlIBINKSB DKPARTMKJJT. 

Cbari.e* A. Bitk -22 HiwlneM Manager 

Myron <i. Mikhav T2 A rlvertislnB Manager 

Owrn IC Folium '23 Circulation Manager 

Uoi.dk N Whittarkr V 

CI.IKKOHI' I-. Bri I>fN '24 
K.IIIK.Ki B. SrK.K.KK '24 



(.line, u'.ves the lowest class an exau- 
|«imt«d idea of their own importance, 
and makes them feel that on them, al- 
most alone, depends the fate of the col- 
lege. More IratciniticK at this time e:in 
only add to an already rather evil eon- 
iliiion. stir up more needless competi- 
tion, and necessitate more delicate sit- 
uations. 

Next year, a second tern, season, with 
M mere fraternities will probably he 
the "Lest bet" for (he situation as it 
now exists. 



Subscription $2.00 per year. Single 
copies, 10 cents. Make all orders paya- 
ble to The Massachusetts Collegian. 

In case of change of address, sub- 
scribers will please notify the business 
manager as soon as possible. 

Entered sssicond class matter at the Amherst 
Post Office. Accepted for mailing at special 
rate of pontage provided for in section MOS. Act 
of October. 1917 authorized August 20. 1918. 



Once More It's Over. 
Again we breath our annual siiih 
Si relief. The fraternity rushing 
season is over -those we didn't expect 
to join us have come across, those we 
though! were cotninu' across didn't join 
at all, those we SIMM were ours for sure 
went somewhere else, ttu.se- but, any- 
way, it's over, all over, for another 
whole hlessed year. 

There seems to he a general notion 
ill... ut the college that the new plan of 
second term rushing lias proved mote 
successful than the lirst term scheme. 
Several things have made for this. 

First, theoretically at least, the fra- 
ternities and the Freshmen have mu- 
tual opportunity to look each other 
■ ver. The yearlings could see the men 
they liked, finding where they be- 
longed, and !i*'t general information 
about the status of the fraternities. 
The Fraternities eoiild also keep an eye 
on the Freshmen, and select those they 
liked for future rushing. This system 
must in the long run prove more effi- 
cient than the hit or miss plan of the 

past. 

Moreover, second term rushing has 
interfered little with athletic activities, 
while the old plan harmed in no little 
degree the smoothness of the football 
season, the greatest of our athletic en- 
deavors, and nenerally hampered 
earn put affairs. 

Hut, granting a successful season, (tie 
rosblog this year revealed a fait « iter- 
SsUsg in view of agitations for more 
fraternities on the campus. Surely 
such can not be needed when existing 
groups fail to call a larger number to 
membership than they did. 

The rushing season here is altogether 
too much of a pelting party, a coddling 
match, a "Oh. what a nice little Fresh- 
man you are!" affair. The ideal con- 
dition would be one in which the Fresh- 
man would have to bid the fraternity, 
not the fraternity the Freshman. Such 
cannot be realized where students are 
so few. And there are now almost too 
many fraternities for the number of 
students. The scramble for men is so 
intense that it shatters Freshman disci- 



The Revue. 
If it is not loo late to say a kind word 
for a good thing, we should like to 60B< 
jjratulate those responsible for the re- 
cent Aggie Revue. Performances of SO 
high a calibre add much to the prestige 
Of both the college in ueneral ami its 
dramatics in particular, and should 
meet with encouragement and praise 
on every hand. 

COMMUNICATION 

The M. A. 0. football schedule for 
11)22 as a whole is very creditable and a 
lot of hard work will have to be done 
by the coaches and teams to come out 
on the long end of it. 

Freshmen, Short Course and Special 
Hiudenlsai M. A. 0. cannot participate 
is intercollegiate athletics. This is as 
it should be. The scholastic siandinu 
of the men In the I hree classes which 
are eligible to represent the college in 
athletic com pet ion must satisfy a rather 
strict board of faculty members. Con- 
sidering these facts, which make the 
actual number of men eligible to com- 
pete for positions on M. A. C. teams 
very few by comparison with many of 
their opponents, the schedule should 
be made up of teams from institutions 
which have and live up to similar 
regulations. 

When one considers the comparative 
weights of the Aggie players with the 
teams they met last fall, there is noth- 
ing to be discouraged over. In the 
game I saw, the men played hard fast 
football, and as a team had showed 
more football train'ng than any of the 
smaller college teams I have seen play 
for a long time. A great deal of credit 
is due these boys and their coaches. 

Let's all get behind these AgftM 
teams and coaches and help push I hem 
on to victory this fall ! 

S. S. CaOSSMAD '<»'•». 



CAMPUS CALENDAR 

Wi nsKsi.AY, Jan. 11. 

148 v. m.— Assembly. Speaker, Mr. 
James H. Marsh, Uoxbury. 

7-1)0 i\ m- Animal Husbandry Club 
Meeting, Room 114, Stock- 
bridge Hall. Speaker, Dr. 
W. W. Williams. Springfield, 

Thursday, Jan. 12. 

7-tHl p. M.-V. W. 0. A. Meeting, Me 
morial Building. 

8(H) p. m. -Orchestra Rehearsal. Me- 
morial Building. 
Fun. ay, Jan. 13. 

7-tK)p. M. — <ilee Club Rehearsal, Me- 
morial Building. 

7-:i0 i>. m.— Basketball Game, Trinity 
at M. A.C. 

Nam isi.ay, Jan. 14. 
Hockey, Dartmouth Si M. A. C. 
Basketball Game. Conneciicut Aggie at 

Storrs. 
Informal, Memorial Building. 
Sim. ay. Jan. 15. 

t)-lt) a. m. Sands? Chapel. 

Speaker. Dr. CharlesK. Brown, 

Vale I'liiversils. New Haven, 

Conn. 

Tikhi.ay, Jan. 17. 

4-;i() p. m. — V. M. C. A. Meeting in Me- 
morial Building. 

7-15 p. m. — SenaU Meeting in Memorial 
Building. 

7-00 p. M.— Glee Club Rehearsal in Me- 
morial Building. 

Wki.nksi. ay, Jan. 1H. 
Ml p. m. -Student Forum, Bowker 
Auditorium. 



OWN HALL 



Thursday 

Special 



Mat. 3, K\e 
6-45,8-30 



Friday 



Mat. 3, Kve. 
6-45. 8-30 



St I'KK -1'KOIM fCTIOH l>AY! 

William S. Hart ami Myrtle 
Stcadmani .."The Whittle." 

1 A new role for Hart, tliat of a 
factory foreman in a New 
KiiKlaml town. The tale of a 
Lilt man's riant for justice. 

Newt Aesop'* Fables 
Pollard Comedy 

Wanda Hawley and Walter 
Hiert In "Her Sturdy OaK." 

A breezy comedy of married 
life with officious in-law h, big 
bills, slim meals, iiuisinu bot- 
tlen. baby hutficles. trouble 
and fun. and an unexpected 
fortuneall mixed in together. 

Scenic reel 

I'-reel Al St. John Comedy 

Com tanceTalmedge i n Dan- 
SatlirdaY girous Business." A Jobs 

I Kiiierson and Anita I.oos pro- 
duitlon. Connie's peppiest 
picture. 

Path* Nowt. "The Tooner- 
vllle Trolley." .'rl. Comedy 

Clare Kimball Youns, Low- 
oil Sherman and William P. 
Carlton in "What No Man 
Knows," by Bads Cejwas 

Pathe Review 

f reel Christie Comedy 



Mat. 3, Kve. 
6-45. 8-30 

Monday 



Mat. 3. Kve. 
6-45,8-30 



Save Money -Buy During Our 

ANNUAL PRE-INVENTORY SALE 



'16. — Alfred Toplian has been sent to 
Brazil to buy eggs for K. M. Augenblick 
A Bros., to supply the London market. 
Miss Titlley T7.is employed by the 
same firm as a deinonostrator in pack- 
ing of eggs and dressed poultry. 



Real Bargains on 
QUALITY GOODS 

Sale Now Going On 



G. EDWARD FISHER 



TRACK NOTES 



CbompsoiTs Dmelp Calks 

^'oVmell^V^^eVri^lu^lir^ep; 

v t" t WUllanii. Sloni with the latest dance 

musie. played by the best danre orehes ra.. 

See you in our New (iiafrnmla Miow Kuoiu. M 

THOMPSON'S SHOP, Rear National Bank 

Campus and Dress Footwear 

QUALITY TRIK HOSIERY 

Reasonable Prices. 



A. .P STAEBNER 

Agent for 

Browning, King & Co. 

A national tailoring instilutiou. 

SUITS and OVERCOATS MADE to MEASURE 

Kxcellent fabrics- Styles with an in- 
dividuality— Workmanship the best 

Satisfaction Guaranteed 

Let me show you styles and samples 
TEL. 1TO 



New Men Showing Up Well. 
Winter track is progressing rapidly 
under the tuition of Coach Derby. Al- 
though the work this term has been 
composed of setting-up exercises, stag- 
ings, and jogginv. practices, the leading 
candidates for this year's relay team 
which is scheduled to compete with 
New Hampshire at the H. A. A. meet, 
Feb. 4. can almost be picked. Three 
veterans of last year's team, Captain 
Sullivan '22, L. S. Wood wort u '23 and 
I). E. MacCready '23 are sure of berths 
on this winter's quartet. Bent and 
Acheson are bofh making a strong bid 
for the fourth position. This is Ach- 
eson'stirst experience on aboard track, 
as he was kept out of track last year 
because of injuries. 

Other men who are showing enter- 
prise in track this winter are; A. W. 
Grieve '24, L, H. Fernald '24, C. O. 
Nelson '24, I*. C. Isaacs '24, G. A. Kemp 
'22, E. Tanner 23. E. N. Tisdale '23, 11. 
II. Woodworth '24. 

Three distance men are out in prepa- 
tion for Spring Track: It. B. Bates '23, 
H. D. Stevenson '24, K. S. Loring '24. 



THOMAS S. CHILDS 



IV0OBFOBATBD 

273-279 High St., 



Holyoke 



For Your 

Flashlights 

Interiors 

College Scenes 

Arrange with expert through 

ELISHA BLISS '24 



M. INOVICK 

Custom Tailor 



Cleaning, Pressing, Repairing and Dyeing 

Neatly and promply done. 
Work called for and delivered. 

Save money by buying a Pressing Ticket. 
4 Suits Pressed for $2.25. 

Dress Suits for Hire. 



19 Pleasant St. 



Tel. 9-J 



The Amherst Tavern 

EUROPEAN and AMERICAN PLAN 

Appetizing, Wholesome Meals— Cooked 
under modern sanitary conditions. 

Private Dining Rooms for "Frats" 
or special parties. 

Bright, comfortable rooms, single or 

double, at reasonable rates for 

the season. 

Court* my, Olmmnllnmmm, Quality. Qua* 
tlty and Varlmty la our motto. 

We cordially invite your patronage. 



IT IS IDLE TO WAIT FOB VOCE SHIP TO COME IN UNLESS YOU HAVE SENT ONE OUT! 
trMlEN placing ord,r* for our UK KEY-FRI EMAN SUITS for Sprint, the pattern. .and value, were so 
iV a tractive that we bought in larger (.(..title, than ever hefore. One shipment has »l'™ d * ^J**" 
oeived; also some of the renowned Van Ingen woolens. We can *et better service now fro... 
IIICKEY-FKEEMAN on custom orders than a ...onth hc.ee. Won't you n.ake an early selection, at Ine 
shop that's Moro fhan a To ^ ery _ 

A College Institution. 



DR. REGAN RESIGNS 

Continued from page 1 



:d though he had tended it last fall but 
iiiid charge of his classes until the 
Christmas vacation. Dr. Kenan leasts 
lo take a position as a professor of l-.n- 
luinology at the I'niversity of .Montana 

at Bosemae. 

Dr. Kegan received his device of 
Itachelor of Science from the Massachu- 
setts Agricultural College ia HW efter 
majorlag in Biology. During the jrsan 

frOBs 1908 to 1911 he held the position 

of Chief Deputy Slate Nursery Inspector 
,,! Massachusetts, liel ill ntnsj to M . A C. 
in 1012, he took graduate work in Knto- 
mology, here receivintr the degree of 
DOCtOr of Philosophy Id IMS. Since 
Ihen he has taught in the department 
M an instructor until VMH when he was 
„ liu le Associate Pre lessor, which he has 
,inee held. 

His (OSS is keenly tell b] the students 
with whom he has alwa>s been popu- 
lar, and by his many friends in the 
towa. He is a member of the Kappa 
Oigma f ratereltj and has been active 
In local club ami lodge work. 

\> yet. I here has been n IC secured 

lotake his place permanent ly. although 
p»rt of his work is being carried on 0J 
Harlan Woithley assistant in the Kx- 
peiiineni Station, and by Harrison 
liei/. graduate instructor, and other 
memberi ol 'be faculty. 



COLLEGIAN COMPETITION 

Owing to the pool response of the 
Freshman class to the call for camli 
dales for Col.l.K.OIAN competition last 
fall a special compel H ion will be held 
this term. This will apply to Fresh- 
men in both business and editorial de- 
part Stent! and will be governed by the 
same rules as the pievtOM compel ltion 
except that the minimum number of 
credits will be reduced tO 15. A BTOOd 

number of men is desired and each fra- 

lernilv is urged to send out at least one 

candidate. 

The standing ( I esodldstes at t he end 

ot t he lirst tern is as follows : 



BITSIHKSS 


HKI'AKIMI » 1 




IMS 






Slade. 






11 1 


(Mm peon , 






2tUi 


i i>i roBJ m 


. OKI 

n>24 


Al 


1 Ml-. NT 


Kennedy. 






2K.1 


Read. 






12 1 


Waugh, 






10.* 


Darling. 


V'l-- 




K>.7 


Betel, 






i:t.7 


Corwin. 






1S.8 


Taube. 






18.0 


tirrrwil'CI 




AC 


.C17MRI 



Our NEW STORE will 

Open SATURDAY, JAN. 14, 1922 

Come in and see our new stock of 

KUPPENHEIMER CLOTHES, STETSON HATS, NETTLET0N 

SHOES, MANHATTAN SHIRTS, KEISER CRAVATS 

and ARROW COLLARS 

We have a new and complete line of Stylish, Well-made Men's Outfittings 

CARL H, BOLTER 

correct— MEN'S OUTFITTERS -exclusive 

Amherst House Block, Amherst, Mass. 



FIRST HOCKEY GAME WITH 
DARTMOUTH ON SATURDAY 



Game with Amherst Postponed Owing 
to Poor Ice. 



The Aggie hockey team Is ready tor 
ils tirst game of the season ami will 
meet Dartmouth Saturday afternoon on 
i he M. A. C. rink. The experience 
gained from the numerous afternoon 
practices and the night sessions will 
belp the team greatly agaieei lbs ret- 
sras Dartmouth nextet. "Hubba" Col- 
lins will be the only man who ever 
started before la a game for m.a.c. 

but allot the men are doing well, and 
last getting in trim. Ilaskins is very 
good at center ice, and "Doc" (iordon, 
with his experience of laHt season, is 
going fast in left wing. 

Dartmouth has a veteran team, the 
best for many years, and their 2 win 
from Amherst would have been much 
greater but for the wonderful work of 
Plimpton, the Amherst goal. The Dart- 
mouth lineup will be: goal, Tobin of 
Neidlenger; left defense, l'erry (capt.) ; 
right defense, Foster; left wing. At- 
wood; right wing, Osborne; center, 

Hall. 

The Aggie tesui which would have 
laced Amherst on Tuesday, will line up 
>atnrday against Dartmouth with 
Kroeck al goal, left defence. Collins 
.apt.); right defense. Hardy: liirht 
wing.Tewhill; left wing, Gordon ; cen- 
ter, Ilaskins. Besides these men, 
Whitakerand Lamb will have a chance 
to work out at defence, and Goldsmith 
and Hodsdon will play a part of the 
game on the wings. 

The game with Amhersi, which was 
scheduled for Tuesday, was postponed, 
due to poor ice. 



Al I he saeeasbt) of -Ian. 4. Mr. Lewis 
ilodolisad diessed t best lldclll body oil the 
subject of China. All bough taking a \eiy 
general subject, the speaker made his 
talk interesting by telling not only 
about the conditions i n China, at pies 
ent, but also by giving many examples 

of tbe queer sbaraetei and customs of 

I he people. 

Mr. Ilodoiis was well acquainted with 

bis subject, for he has traveled exten- 
sively ihruiigh China and spent con 
siderable time I here. As an example to 
show that that republic, as yet in its 
infancy, is progressing under modem 
civilization's influence . he gave a word 
picture of a modem Chinese city of his 

acquaintance, which would compare 

favorably with an American cltj Of 
similar size. 

The speaker in completing his talk, 
urged on IBS students the necessity 
that this country give China a spiritual 

background, in helping her develop 

morally as well as commercially. 




0. E. F0LS0M ELECTED 

JUNIOR PROM CHAIRMAN 

Owen K. Folsoin Wof Aubumdale 

was elected chairman at the last meet 

I j„g of tbe Junior l'roin Committee. 

tasi year be wee assistant manager of 

the varsitv basketball team and is now 
a business manager of tbe 19S» Index 
and circulation manager of the Coi.- 
i.koian. Mr. Kolsom is a member of 
the Phi Sigma kappa Fraternity. 

Nothing definite as to the nature and 
date of the next prom has been decided 
„,,,,„. The committee will meet so.ne- 
M,„e the latter part of this week. More 
definite announcement will be made 
i„ the next issue of the Coi.i.kgian. 

\ legisla.or. it would seem, is one 
who promise, to do, who will do, but 
who never does it. 



The Pulsation Test 



Take out your watch and time the pulsations of a 
De Laval Milker. You will find that every unit in the 
barn, no matter if there are a dozen, is running at 
exactly the same speed and as uniformly as the tick 
of a clock. This insures your cows being milked in 
exactly the same way from day to day or year to year, 
and is one of the reasons why cows do so well with 
the De Laval Milker. 

Try this test on any milker and you will understand 
just one of many reasons why the De Laval is I he 
Better Way of Milking." Send for full information. 

The De Laval Separator Company 

NEW YORK CHICAGO SAN FRANCISCO 

Sooner or later you will use a 

De Laval 

Milker and Cream Separator 



JACKSON & CUTLER 

DKAI.EKS IN 

DRY AND FANCY GOODS 
Trunks Bags Suit Cases 



Dandy Shop 

BECKMAISTS 

Candies and Ice Cream 

Northampton, Mm " 



Parlor 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Wednesday, January 11. M2. 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Wednesday, January 11, 1922. 



S. S. HYDE 

Optlolnn «i»<« Jeweler 
9 Pleasant Street (up one flight'. 

Oculists' Prescriptions Filled 

Broken Lenses Accurately Replaced 

Big Ben Alarm Clocks 
AND OTHER RELIABLE MAKES 

Fully (iuaranteed 



J. K. MILLS, Photographer 

Class Group* 
Ammtmur Omvmloplng mnd Printing 

Hills Studio Ebon* 456-R 



GREAT PRICE REDUCTIONS 

Men's Half •s*ssiswed SI -** 

Mea'S G Iy.;u Kut.lM-r ll.-fls »« 

Men's Whole Neolin SoIch an<l <..">ilycar 

Kuhher Heels '•" 

HMl Whole Leather Soles Sewe.l ao.l 

(ioo.lyear Kul.l.er Heels . . • • *•'" 

All Work Oumrmntmmd I 

High-grade Line of Hen's Shoes 

for Sale at Low Prices. 

J. GINSBURG 

lO Pleaiant Street, I »n your way up town. 



THE MILLETT JEWELRY STORE 

Fine Watch Repairing, also lroken Leases 

Replaced Promntly. 
32 Main Street. Amheret. Mass. 



ALUMNI. 

Are you coming back lot tfcs Hid- 
Winter Alumni Day (hie yeai ".' ll li >" 
b« held Feb. 3-4. We would like to 
have you all hack with us ihil jm*. 
The program, us tentatively arrant-e.l, 
,. ;l lls for the following activities. 
,, w n,AV,FKn.a,A.M.-TalkshyAlumni 
in .lasses arranged by beads Of De- 
partments. 6-80 P. M.-Phid«l la 
Kuc dramatic reader-Social Union 
Entertainment, n-oo p. m. -Musical 
Clubs Concert. 
svn im.av, Fkh. 4,940 a. n.-Alumnl 
Meetings. »00p. m. Hockey Game 
if possible. MO i>. n.-Tnfts Ban- 
ketl.all Game. B-OO P, m. -Frater- 
nity Banqnate. 
<;et in touch with your fraternity Of 
Mr I. 8. Wood worth »SS, concerning ae- 
eowmodalloaa. Let's all get together 
here this year, meet the bunch, and re- 
new our old aciuainlan.es for two 
bappj days 

'13.- W. C. Porbueh, instructor In 
Agronomy »l the eollegs last year, is at 
Cornell UnWereUy, working for ■ Ph.D. 

He is majoring in Agronomy. 



MUSICAL CLUBS IN BOSTON 

Continued from page 1 

The North Station in Boston was the 
meeting-point on Wednesday afternoon, 
the clubs receiving a hearty welcome 
when they reached l'eabody. The 
members were paired off and enter- 
tained over night In private homes. 
The concert attracted much attention 
in the "Leather City," as shown by the 
large audience in the library ball. Ken- 
nedy and Frost were the star perform- 
ers of the occasion, in a little act of 
their own, entitled "Pity the Ivories." 
Although this was their firHt appear- 
ance with the clubs in the capacity of 
piano soloists, the playing surely made 
a hit, and several encores were neces- 
sary. The dance which lasted until 12 
was held in the K. of C. Hall. 

The Peabody concert surely put the 
clubs into top notch form for their next 
appearance in the Brunswick Hotel on 
Friday evening. As usual, the alumni, 
■indents and friends of the college sup- 
ported the musical organization by a 
large gathering, and an enthusiastic 



reception of the program. Over 100 
couples attended the dance following 
the coticert, which was a semi-formal 

affair. 

Waugb and Vinten,witb tbeir collec- 
tion of entirely original songs, created a 
great deal of attention whenever tbey 
appeared on the stage. The Glee Club 
drew a strong applause for each presen- 
tation of the "Ford bong." given as an 
encore just before the end ol the pro 
gram. The orchestra received many 
favorable comments on the quality of 
their lively dance music. The Junioi 
Quintet, the Quartet, and the Banjo 
Quartet received their share of praise. 
Manager Lowery collected hid band 
of traveling musicians Saturday at one 
o'clock in the North Station, and after 
a short walk through dark alleys, and 
narrow and dirty streets, the l'eabody 
Sentinel House, on the banks of the 
Charles, hove into sight. This house is 
the home of a charitable organization 
which helps the poor people of the dis 
trict. After a substantial dinner serve<l 
by college girls, a concert was given to 




—TRY— 

C. H. GOULD 

for Brat-elan 
Watch, Clock and Jewelry Repairing 

IS Pleasant St., Amherst, Mass. 



Fine Groceries 
Canoics and Fruits 



MASON A. DICKINSON, Proprietor 



Aggie Stationery 

with Class Numerals 
1322 TO 1925 



A. J. HASTINGS 

Newsdealer and Stationer 

Mass. 



Amherst 



MRS. PRUDENCE P. CASSIN 

SELECT CATERING 

at Reasonable Trices. 
Inform*!* m Specialty 

II So. Pi septet St.. Amherst. Mass 

Tml. SBB-M 



North End Lunch 

120 Pleasant Street. 



Our food is right — 
Our prices reasonable 

TRY US OUT 

w. bTdrury 



What Is a Vacuum Furnace? 

IN an ordinary furnace materials burn or combine with the oxygen 
of the air. Melt zinc, cadmium, or lead in an ordinary furnace and a 
scum of "dross" appears, an impurity formed by the oxygen. You see 
it in the lead pots that plumbers use. 

In a vacuum furnace, on the contrary, the air is pumped out so that 
the heated object cannot combine with oxygen. Therefore in the 
vacuum furnace impurities are not formed. 

Clearly, the chemical processes that take place in the two types are 
different, and the difference is important. Copper, for instance, if 
impure, loses in electrical conductivity. Vacuum-furnace copper is 
pure. 

So the vacuum furnace has opened up a whole new world of chem- 
ical investigation. The Research Laboratories of the General Electric 
Company have been exploring this new world solely to find out the 
possibilities under a new series of conditions. 

Yet there have followed practical results highly important to 
industry. The absence of oxidation, for instance, has enabled chen.ists 
to combine metals to form new alloys heretofore impossible. Inieed, 
t>e vacuum furnace has stimulated the study of metallurgical proc- 
esses and has become indispensable to chemists responsible for 
production of metals in quantities. 

And this is the result of scientific research. 

Discover new facts, add to the sum tot il of human knowledge, and 
sooner or later, in many unexpected ways, practical results will follow. 



General 

Com 



General Office 




Electric 

any 



Schenectady, N. Y. 

9S-4S4IIU 



NEW COLLEGE STORE 

START THE TERM RIGHT Keep your note books in an orderly fanner bj r using 
the proper index systems such as are on display at the NEW COLLhGh SlUKb 



an appreciative group of foreign born 
people mixed in with a theater-full of 
noisy youngsters. This program was in 
the nature of extension work carried on 
hy M. A. C. iu various parts of Massa- 
chusetts. 

The final concert of the trip came 
Saturday evening at the "Now and 
Then" Club in Salem. The occasion 
took the form of a New Year party, with 
all the accompanying noise aud revelry, 
much to the aunoyance of several of 
the Glee Club songsters. The large 
well-filled hall was gay with paper 
hats, and the orchestra catching the 
spirit of the evening supplied the best 
jazz. After a strenuous week the mu- 
sical club members were glad to admit 
that after all there is some truth in that 
phrase "In this college life there is 
rest, sweet rest." 
1. Kollin 1 Down to Rio, German 

(ilee Clnb. 
Yankee Doodle Come to Town U.M.Cohan 

Orchestra, 
A Little (lose Harmony. 

O'Hara and Others 

Quartette. 
H unitarian Dance No. 6. Brahms 

Junior Quintette. 



FRESHMEN PLEDGED 

Continued from page 1 



Arlington 

Uernardstoii 

Melrose Highlands 



Crosby, John S. 

(Hover, Walter C. 

Guild, Everett J. 

Uale, Laurence N. 

South Glastonbury, Conn. 

Nolle, Whitney K. Weston 

Peckham. Carlisle 11. 

Melrose Highlands 
Peirce, Veasey Dorchester 

Salmon, I. Chenery . Turners Falls 
Wilder, Frank II. V Sterling 

Theta Chi. 
(Hidden, Wallace N. B*»m 

Hntchins, Maurice C. Auhumdale 

Hyde, John W. L. s Amherst 

Knowles, George A. W> J Kverett 
Loud, Emery S. ~ ttockland 

Lambda Chi Alpha 



KINGSLEY'S 

SODAS SUNDAES CANDIES 

Luncheonette 



140 Main Street, Northampton, Mass. 



SHINE AS-U-GO 

Item I"'' 

The College Shoe Shine Parlor 

for yoar 
Hat Renovating. Shoe Dyeing. Shoe Shini n s 

At tit Ainll> St.. 1>V Am. K\. Olli. .-. 






•J. 



4 



ft, 



Strum mines. 

The Four Leatherheaun. 



Al .lolson 



6. Viking Song. Coleridg-e-Tavlor 

Olee Club, 
intermission. 

7, YooHoo, 

Orchestra. 

». Pity the Ivories. 
"Buddy" Frost and "Ducky" Kennedy. 

a. originalities— 
a Where does the wind come from, Freddie 
b The Agricultural Blues. Bar 

c Oy, Oy. Senora. Ilmir 

Freddie Waugh and Kay Vinten. 

10, Little Tommy. * iacy 

Olee Club. 

11. "Sons of Old Massachnsetts."Knigbt 

Combined Clubs. 



Erickson, Etnil L. 
Hanscomb, George W. 
Holbrook, Lester M. 
Kingston, Robert L. 
Lewis, Donald W. 
Meserve, George D. 
Oliver, Charles F., Jr. 
Seaver, Russell B. 
Templeton, Robert J. 
Partington, Clyde N. '23 



Littleton 
Boston 
New Bedford 
Boston 
Stow 
Hudson 
Brockton 
East Bridgewater 
Boston 
Medford 



AMHERST BOOK STORE 

Note Books Fountain Pens 



High Grade 

COLLEGE FOOTWEAR 



— AT — 



C. F. DYER 



Economy Prices 
E. M. BOLLES 

The Shoe mar.. 
Main St., Amherst 

"BIDE-A-WEE" 

Creamed Chicken and Waffles Our Specialty 

Ami SSnet good things to est. 

MRS. L. M STEBBINS 

Middle Street. (Tel. 416-W) lladley. Mass. 



v 



Kappa Gamma Phi. 
Craig, Kenneth R. Jamaica Plains 



South Uadley 

Hyannis 

North Weymouth 

Amherst 

Springfield 

Springfield 



A 



o-j 



1NTERFRATERNITY RELAY 

The interfraternity relay schedule 
begins next Monday, Jan. 16, when the 
first three races will be run off at 4-45. 
The fraternities of the campus have 
been divided into two groups of five 
and four each. The leagues are: (1) 
Kappa Sigma, Phi Sigma Kappa, 
Lambda Chi Alpha, Q. T. V., Alpha 
Gamma Rho; (2) Theta Chi, Sigma Phi 
Epsilon, Kappa Gamma Phi, Alpha 
Sigma Phi. 

Each fraternity will race only with 
those fraternities in its own group, 
until the group championship is de- 
cided, after which there will be a cham- 
pionship race between the leaders of 
each group. There will be no post- 
poned races. A copy of the rules will 
be placed in each fraternity house. All 
races called at 4-45 p. m. sharp. The 
schedule follows: 

Jan. 16-Kappa Sigma vs. Phi Sigma 

Kappa; Lambda Chi Alpha vs. Q. 

T. V.: Theta Chi vs. Sigma Phi 

Epsilon. 
Jan. 20— Kappa Gamma Phi vs. Alpha 

Sigma Phi; Q. T. V. vs. Alpha 

Gamma Rho; Phi Sigma Kappa vs. 

Lambda Chi Alpha. 
Jan. 23— Kappa Sigma vs. Lambda Chi 

Alpha; Phi Sigma Kappa vs. Q. T. 

V.; Theta Chi vs. Kappa Gamma 

Phi. 

Jan. 27— Sigma Phi Epsilon vs. Alpha 

Sigma Phi ; Lambda Chi Alpha vs. 

Alpha Gamma Rho; Kappa Sigma 

vs. Q. T. V. 
Jan. 30— Kappa Sigma vs. Alpha Gamma 

Rho; Theta Chi vs. Alpha Sigma 

Phi; Sigma Phi Epsilon vs. Kappa 

Gamma Phi. 
Feb. 3— Phi Sigma Kappa vs. Alpha 

Gamma Rho. 



Galbraitb, Leo 
Jonsberg, Henry F. 
Tufts, Robert W. 
Walsh, Philip B. 
Whit turn, Waller W 
Wilcox, Stanley L>. 

Sigma Phi Epsilon 
Bray, Ralph H. Ire* 

Cady, Harold A. 
Cook, Peter 
Flexe'r, Carl S. 
Gannon, William J. 
Uaworth, George G. 
Hurley. Everett U. 
Ingrabam, Edward F. 
Jack, Melvin C. 
Jack, Roland A. 
Kelso, George 
Kingsbury, AniosC. 
Needham, Basil A. 
Parker, Donald L. v 
Ross, Charles F. \ 
Strong, Homer B. 

Alpha Sigma Phi 
Aldrich, George S. 



-After Every Meal" . 

WRIGLEYS 



Worthington 
East Bridgewater 
Allentown, Pa. 
Arlington 
Dalton 
Northampton 
MUlli 
Amherst 
Amherst 
Reading 
Medfield 
Taunton 
North Adams 
Lee 
Dalton 




Nash Block 



AMHERST SHOE REWIRING CO. 



Your Shoes Repaired 

WHILE YOU WAIT 



Burt.Orin C, Jr. 
Cooke, Robert G. 
Lord, John F. 
Maboney, Walter F 
Perry, John 
Sazama, Robert F. 

Kappa Epsilon 

Duffy. Leo F. 
Elliot, James A. '24 
Marx, Herbert J. 
McGeoch, Charles R 
M jxon, David 
Stone, George L. 
Zwisler, Frederick F 

Delta Phi Alpha. 
Goldsteiu, Samuel 
Gordon, Solmon H. 
Samuels, Samuel B. 
Taube, Gustavo / 



Millville 

Easthampton 

Richmond 

Mel hue li 

Millville 

Walthara 

Northampton 



TEN 

FOR 

FIVE CENTS 

B130 

The Flavor Lasts! 



THE 
DRAPER HOTEL 

Northampton, Mass. 

The Leader for College Banquets 



Win. M. Kimball, Prop. 



Palmer 
Summit, N.J. 
Hoi yoke 
Providence, R. I. 
Holyoke 
Moutello 
Holyoke 



"\ 



Zinn, Arnolds. 



Brockton 

Boston 

Bronx, N. Y. 

New York City 

New York City 



=HARDWARE= 

Come to us for 

Fireplace Goods, Coat and Trouser Hangers 

Ever Ready Flash Lights and Paint 

Clothes and Shoe Brushes 

Anything in Hardware and Cooking Utensils 

Always glad to see you. 



'17 -Frank W. Mayo wishes that 
some Aggie men would drop in on him 
once in a while. He is principal of the 
Shelton High School. Sbelton is only 
fen miles out of New Haven and any 
one who finds himself down hat way 
will oe assured of a cordial welcome. 



THE MUTUAL PLUMBING & HEATING CO. 



The jhMtOgtjjg Collegian. Wednesday. Jaauary'TU.t92J. 



m 1* ANNUAL INVENTORY SALE IS ON 

™J™ ™ i™- to SAVE MONEY- Reductions of 20 to 50 percent on Ready- 
YOUR CHANCE IS HERE J° ^J™ Hose> Hats , Caps , ShirtS) Hose, Ties, Vests, etc. 
made Suits, Overcoats Sheepskins Uoii . ^ you cftgh 

Corduroy Riding Breeches, were $6.00, now n*.7i r p 

cnnTHWJCy BROTHERS <£ GAULT 



FRESHMEN OPEN SEASON 

WITH X 31-11 VICTORY 



LETTER FROM PRESIDENT 

Continued from page 1 



Hopkins Academy Loses Game in 
Which Samuels Scores Twenty 

One Points. 
The Freshman basketball t*-n n» 
banded Hopkins Academy the short 
end of a 81-11 score at the Drill Hall 
last Saturday after tbe varsity had 
trimmed M. I. T. The frosh showed 
more style at all times and did not give 
the Uadleyites a chance. Hopkins 
showed up best in the Brat quarter but 
fell down badly toward the close of the 
game. The stars for '25 were Samuels, 
Sullivan, and Hurley. 

Samuels came to Aggie from Bronx, 
New York. Sullivan is a local boy and 
was captain of the Amherst High 
hoopsters last year. Hurley hails from 
Northampton. Kigbter is from Alta- 
mont, N. Y., Uol brook comes from New 
Bedford, Simmons is from Kingston, 
Seaver from East Bridgewater and Hale 
from Glastonbury, Conn. 
The lineup: 

Mass. Auoib '25—81. 



Hsieh of 0» is in official life in PaMan 
ami gave us much of his tiine.helpinmis 
in many ways to meet otlicials as well 
as to see Peking. He evidently enjoys 
politics and has occupied several in- 
teresting positions. 

Jen of '00, I saw in Hong Kong for 
only a moment. He is general mana- 
ger of the Pacific Trading Co. and 1 
judge is building up an important ex- 
port business. 

Here in Shanghai I have had a good 
visit with D. Y. I/m "f 12, who is »•• 
K aged in forestry woik, with several 
side lines that keep him out of mischief. 



He is an alert promoter of things agri- 
cultural. 

Chun, with '13, is at Nanking Chris- 
tian University, also in forestry. Altai 
leaving M. A. C. he worked in Syracuse 
and Harvard, and has done much plant 
exploration work. All the men are 
doing well, and eager to hear from the 
College. 

There is more agricultural educa- 
tion being done by the Missions and 
less hy the Government than 1 had sup- 
posed was the case. The possibiPties 
of improving agriculture are really re- 
markable, and the opportunities for 
men who like that sort of thing are 
everywhere. Cornell has the jump on 
M. A. C. in sending men over here. 



Penn. State and Kansas also have men 

here. 

The Washington conference is being 
watched with eager interest by Chinese 
as well as foreigners. China's future 
depends in no small degree upon the 
conference, and every first class power 
will be affected decidedly by what hap- 
pened to and in China. It is a great 
privilege to be in the Far East during 
these momentous days. Nevertheless 
Ibere is noplace like home, especially 
when your home is on the Aggie 
campus! 

Sincerely. 

Kknyon L. Hi TTKIIK1KI.II. 



Shanghai, Dec. 10, H>21. 




Sullivan, If 
Righter, If 
Samuels, rf 
Holbrook, rf 
Simmons, c 
Hurley, lg 
Seaver, rg 
Hale, rg 



a. 
2 

7 


3 



12 



v. 


7 








HOPKINS ACADEMY— 11. 



Miloski, rg 
Cole, lg 
Garrows, lg 
Coffey, lg 
Pellissier, c 
Flaherty, c 
Wancyk, rf 
Kazara, If 
Moore, If 

Kef eree — Ball of M. A. 
minute periods. 







K. 





4 


21 






31 



P. 








o 





2 1 








1 


3 6 














2 


4 








— 


— — 


3 


6 11 


C. 


Time— 15 



SPEAKERS CHOSEN FOR 

FORD HALL MEETING 



Krasker, Sandow, and Ward Win 
Competition Before Judges. 

Abraham Krasker '22, Alexander San- 
dow '23, and Gordon Ward '25 were 
chosen to go to Boston to speak before 
a meeting of Agriculturists in Ford 
Hall on Wednesday, January 18, 1»22. 
These men were chosen from tbe eight 
who competed in the semi-finals last 
Monday. Prizes of 25, 15, and 10 dol- 
lars are offered by State Commissioner 
of Agriculture Gilbert. The subjects 
to be spoken upon are: 
Krasker:— "How are You Going to Keep 

Them Dowe on the Farm". 
Sandow:— 'The Extension Service". 
Ward:— "M. A. C. Freshman Courses 
in Agriculture". 
The judges for tbe semi-finals were: 
Professors Prince and Cance, and Mr. 

Bdgholt. 



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finest tobaccos are concentrated on this one cigarette— 
CAMEL. 

Into this ONE BRAND, we put the utmost quality. 
Nothing is too good for Camels. They are as good as it s 
possible to make a cigarette. 

Camel QUALITY is always maintained at the same high, 
exclusive standard. You can always depend on the same 
mellow-mild refreshing smoothness— the taste and rich 
flavor of choicest tobaccos — and entire freedom from 
cigaretty aftertaste. 

And remember this! Camels come in one size package 
onlv— 20 cigarettes— just the right size to make the greatest 
saving in production and packing. This saving goes 
straight into Camel Quality. That's one reason why you 
can get Camel Quality at so moderate a price. 

Here's another. We put no useless 
frills on the Camel package. No "extra 
wrappers!" Nothing just for show! 

Such things do not improve the smoke 
any more than premiums or coupons. And 
their added cost must go onto the price 
or come out of the quality. 

One thing, and only one, is responsible 
for Camels great and growing popularity 

—that is CAMEL QUALITY. 




-mat is v^-tt.m.E/j-» v w ■"•■"** •• ^^ 

amel 

R. J. REYNOLDS TOBACCO CO., Wln.ton-SaUm, N. C. 






MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 



Vol. XXXII. 



Amherst, Mass., Wednesday, JanuaryJL8, 1922. 



No. 12 



U(\m\ TPAM RFA1W TO TRINITY DEFEATED BY BIKE STOPS ALEXANDER 

H0 9E lit v .. r i rl TVCU SUPERIOR AGGIE PASSING BUT VARSITY IS DEFEATED 



TAKE ON YALE AND TECH 

Basketball Squad Looking Forward 

to Good Contest with Tufts 

on Saturday. 



Excellent Work of Smith, Tumey and 

Marshman Gives M. A. C. a 

28-18 Win. 



Captain Collins Riid his pockmaa 

,. „„ ,!,,.,, schedule fOI I Lis week a 

,,i game* which should teal tbalr 

: ,l„liiy to the utmost. (Mi We.lnes.lay , 
,l ;lll . 18, the team ROM I" *•« Baraa to 
lueel ('apt- 6rtoebm and his Vale aggre- 
gation, which snatched ■ 4-i victory 
from Princeton in ■ Maid foagbl gam* 
last isaturday. 

II,,. next day. Thursday, seesoiir men 
|„ ,1,,. liusioii Arena against llie last M. 
I I ,!«, which lias already trimmed 
1 ale 141 and Dalhotisie 3-1, and expects 
,,, mm the same trick with Aguie. Tba 
second gamaon th« bom rink will he 
played Saturday, .hi" It, with the 
Springfield Hockey Club, which has a 
much stronger team this >ear than last. 
Vggiegof some valuahle experience in 
berflnil game last Saturday, wilh Dart- 
mouth, and should he in prim* cotuli- 
tioi to >P ■ ■*!■ '» ; ' ,,le »« fc ««« 

three nexl names. 

The basketball team also fOM lo Boa 
ion this Saturday to hattle with Tolls 
al Bedford. Pxoapecte look good for 
tggie hy comparison of scores. The 
Med ford team has heendeated hy M. I. 
I Sfi-35, and has also won one game, 

[run Rhode bland. Bat on their home 
nmri ihey should prove formidable op- 
position for Captain Qowdj and his vet- 
eran five. 



Maroon and White Quintet Put Up a 

Good Fight After Their Victory 

of Friday. 



DR. CHARLES R. BROWN OF 
YALE IN CHAPEL SUNDAY 

Dean of Yale Divinity School Speaks 
on Service and Man's Worth. 



The Aggie hoopsters added another 

victory to tbalr reword '»y outplaying 

| be strong Trinity five on the college 
Hiirface Hi. lay night , 28-18. The game 
was featured hy the lightningdike pass- 
work and dogged defense ol hoi h teams. 
The speedy handling' of the hall and 
clean, hard playing ■»*• one id the 

must hit icily tesie.l frays seen on 

the Moor. The Maroon and White aggre- 
gntlon showe.l that a week of hard work 

.an brlai raggad paatworfc lo aaaf par- 

le.iioii. Kaeh team, realizing the 
siiciiglh of theii opponents' defense, 

triad long eaote t«>r teoriag and several 

skillful basket shooters on hoth teams 
scored from iniil-iloor. Aggie had the 
edge trom the opaalng whistle, bat at 
the beginning of ibneeeoad half Trin- 
Uj came very eloM to the lead hy 
bringing the score to lo-14. At this 
point Smith went hack on the lloor and 

\i.o,e climbed to a aaantortabbi lead. 
Tuiney aad his eye on the hasket from 
i hoi art,, auing fouls wilh the great- 
est accuracy. 

Continued on p»»« 2 



DR. CANCE IS AGAIN 

CALLED TO WASHINGTON 



The Maroon and White 1PJ9 M uiniei 
received its fust sethack Saturday night 
ai St. .us when the fast Conn. Aggie ag- 
gregation handed them atl-ll beating. 
The M. A. C. players were unable to 
get golagoa the large sized baakatba'l 

surface that their rivals had to oiler. 
Coach GOT* was forced lo change the 
style of detense. which put his team al 
a real disadvantage. Had it not been 
for the keen headw.-rk and excellent 
gaaidlaf al F.ddie Bike, who ,>la\e.l 
attains! Alexander, one of I onnecticut's 
hest scorers, (he team would have been 
beaten bye larger score. Kven on the 
dafaaae Hike scored more Moor baskets 
for the Hay Staters than did the for- 
wards The paaafag and team work of 
the Nulmens was superior in all re- 
spects during the came, hul Kid OoTe'l 
men have the greatest conli.lence in a 
,.,,„,, ,|.ie i.-talia'ioii in the return game 
on their own Hour. 

Conn. Aggie started the tirst half 
with some whirlwind play which took 
the M. A. C. quintet oil its feel, ptllag 
up 14 points in rapid succession. The 
Aggies came back with determination 
and did not stop until the score book 
Continued on page 5 



(iREEN TEAM GIVES 

AGGIE A 3-1 SETBACK 



Hockey Season Opens with Fast 

Game on Home Eink-Collina 

Scores for M. A. C. 

The It, A. C. hockey season opened 

Saturday when Aggl« was forced to 

a .;.l ,|efeat by Ihefast Darlmoiilh 

Mixtet. The game was close and well 

Jit. play becoming faster as the 

game programed, but penalties were 

annecaeaary on either side. After live 

minutes ot play Capt. "Habba" Collins 

,k the puck down the ice and caged 



Head of Economics Department to 

Participate in Conference on 

Agriculture. 

Dr. Alexander K. Cance has again 

Im called to Washington. This time 

he goes iu response to an invitation of 
Secretary of Auriciiluire Wallace to 
participate la tba Coafaraata o« Agrl- 
,.,ilture which President Uarding is as 
scolding on Jan. ». About 100 to 100 
men. representing all parts of the 
Cited States, are being invited. 

The announced purpose of the con- 
ference is the formation of an agricul- 
tural policy for both the present and 
the future. Such a policy and program 
have been advocated for some time by 
the agriculture leaders of thecountiy, 
notably Praaldaal BaltartaW, aot oaly 
as a guide to agricultural legislation 



RHODE ISLAND, CONN. 

AND M. A. C. IN DEBATE 



j shot trom mid-ice for the first as ^^.^^^^^Uure ope, 
W ore. The Aggie tea... did well on the but to the direct o ol ag 



defense but at no time could they start 

an oitensi\e which carried any punch. 

"Hubba" played his usiia' wonderful 

DC and time and again slipped 

.Ugh tba t.rceii team to pepper the 

tmoutb aoal with loagnbota. He 



ations. organi/.ation, education, re- 
search and extension work. 

The depression in agriculture, partic- 
ularly in the West and South, the in- 
sistence on favorable agricultural laga- 
,;,,„., |,e activities of the great farmers 



;(s eovt 



•red at all times by Hall an. I organizations, 



and the growing laflu- 



>rue but managed to gat away and 
w s,,nie spectacular work, llaskins 
Gordon both did good work, the 

i ai left wing carrying the puck up 

the let into the Dartmouth territory 

man] times llodsdon, playing his 

Hist game of varsity hockey, showed a 

Continued on page 2 



(nc e of the "agricultural bloc" 
Congress are forcing national attention 
to agricultural affairs. It Ml to he 
hoped that theconference may make 
some statesmanlike plans to restore ag- 
ricultural prosperity and bring about a 
normal balance between agricultural 
and other industries. 



March 16 Chosen as Date for Inter 
collegiate Contest. 

At a recent mewling in Boston our 
maaagnf met with representatives of 
Connecticut Amicultural College and 
Rhode Island State College, where a 
dabatiBf league was ore.aniy.cd. It is 
to be known as the II. 0, K. I. Debating 
UmgBl This is to be a permanent or- 
ganization whose purpose will be to 
carry a triangular debate every year. 
In entering this organization, the repre- 
sentative colleges are not barred fioin 
debating with other colleges. 

The debates this year are to take 
place on March 16. The schedule is as 

follows: 

C. A. C. vs. U. I. S. C. at Kingston, K. I. 
K. I. S. C. vs. M. A. C. at Amherst. 
M. A. C. vs. C. A. C. at Storrs, Conn. 

The subject of the debate this year 
is: Resolved, that the Philippines 
should be granted their independence 
within two years. All teams will de- 
bate the same subject al the same time, 
a8 is usual in an organized debating 

league. 

The Freshmen are eligible for the 
varsity debating team. All those stu- 
dents interested should see the 
manager, A. Krasker, in 14 South Col- 
lege, as soon as possible for further 
details. 



Dr. ChilHes U. Brow* Dean of the 
Vale Divinity Collage, N«w Haven, 
Conn., was l he speaker at last Sunday's 
chapel. The keynote of his interesting 
and instructive sermon was that aai 
vice is the nieasiiie ol a man's worth 
and thai in order lo prove his worth he 
must throw his whole life into Ihe el 
fort, <>ne must gift all he has in him 
to realize the highest goal of his ideals. 
Heaven is not a remote place of pearly 
gates and Cohteu harps but a iwl liv- 
ing part of our life hereon earih. Hux- 
ley once made Ihe statement that "It 
.luesn't lake much of a man to be a 
Christian but it takes all he has." Col- 
lege may be likened lo I be liel.l in I he 
parable of a man Mltlag all his posses- 
sions in order lo obtain I Ibid in which 
he had discovered a treasure of great 
value. Some go ihroagb eoltege spend- 
ing foolishly and publicly. These ma.v 

get throagh collage but they do aa 
wUboat obtaletaf tm laar taaMaattaa 

.d an education. 

The speaker intimated the need of 
true service in the business world. 
Boataam men demand service before 
prolit in inemhcisot (he med cal or min- 
isterial professions Should they nol 
also place service before prolit t Baal- 
oess should he a profession and lis 
ideals and ethics Ihe same. 

To attain a worthy and more reliable 
personality costs all one has, "Seek ye 
lirsl the Kingdom of Heaven and all 
Ibese things will he added unto you." 



WRESTLING IN VOGUE 

FOR FOOTBALL MEN 

Football men are pulling la some 
bard work this winter to keep in trim 
for next fall. Thirty of them are re- 
porting to Prof. Mack ev»ery Tuesday 
and Thursday afternoon al 4-00 i\ m. 
for instruction in wrestling. Prof, 
Mack was a member of the Penn. State 
wrestling team in his college days and 
knows the sport hy experience. 

It is expected that work of this kind 
will keep the men strong and alert as 
well as giving them quickness of 
thought and action. It should make a 
marked difference in the condition of 
the candidates who report for practice 
next spring. Instead of tlabby inns, le 
from a winter of loafing a squad of men 
hardened by labor and with qulakaaai 
of mind unimpaired will report to Coach 
"Kid" Core for the season's first 
grilling. ^^ 



MID-WINTER ALUMNI DAY 

February 3 and 4 
WILL YOU BE BACK? 






The Massachusetts Collegian, Wednesday, January 18, 1922. 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Wednesday, January 18, 1922. 



DARTMOUTH WINS 

Continued from page 1 



lot of promiM and Kioeck's work at 
Hoitl augurs well for l lie fin lire. .Jules 
is a new man at hockey, Mil lie stopped 
many long sholH, and the three foaJa 
slipped by him were from fairly close 
quarters. 



TRINITY GAME 

Continued from page 1 




The first half opened with Tumey 
■oorisg on two free tries. From the 
start the play was hard and fast. 
Marshinan and Smith succeeded in elud- 
ing tbetr opponent several times with 
successive tallies as a result. The 
Auijie guard* learned to respect the 
prowess ol Mills and Keating early hi 
the »ame and in spile of exceptional 

guarding could not prevent the pair 

from eeorioj live times. Coach GoT« sent 
in Harrows for Smith as the half was 

drawing toaoloee. The visitors scored 
immediately i.y evading the Aggie de- 
fence. Hike came bank with a surprise 
toe* through the boop. Trinity took 

the defensive at this point and IJ.»cr 
went in for Hike The home team 
started with passwoik in their own ter- 
ritory, the halt ending with Ayiiie in 

the lead 1<»!». 

Trinity started the second half with 

determination and before the Maroon 

and While team awoke the score was 
Hf-14. Ofl the return of .Smith and 
liike to the game, the M. A. C. men 

pulled together and came tbnmgh with 

some cyclonic llooiwork. Marshman 
succeeded in getting under the visitors' 
basket three times in the last few min- 
utes of play MOTing each ti 

To Mills went the honors of high 

point goiter for I be losers. 

M. A. 0. 



Old Deer-field Fertilizers 

"Reasonable in dollars and sense."" 
A. W. HIGGINS, INC., South Deerfield. Ma»s 



WF MN HUP YDU SAVE MONEY 



We are offering a reduction of gO per cent from our regular prices 

OD Men's Suits and Overcoats, including those made by 

Hart Schaffner and Marx. 

Men's Fur Coats, Fur Lined Coats, Sheepskin Lined Coats and 

Leather Coats. 

If you are interested in any of these garments we will be very glad to 

show them to you. 



F. M. THOMPSON & SON 

Clothes for College Men for 35 Years. 



Captain Coi.i.ins. 

Id the first period the puek regained 
in the center of the ice most of the 
time but in the second period Dart- 
mouth came back hard anil af:er five 
minutes of play tied the score. An- 
other point was gained toward the end 
of the period, and the fioal score was 
made by the tireen in the third period. 
Ilaskins very nearly scored for Atftfie 
in the last period hut when within a 
few feet of the goal he fell. 

The work of Hall, who played center 
ice for Dartmouth, was far above the 
ordinary. He seemed to be all over 
the rink, was in the wav of every ett.nt 
for an Angle goad, and scored one point 
for his learn, unassisted, by a dash 
down the ice. Let' defense Foster was 
a close second for Green honors, not to 
mention Tobin, who is rated as one of 
the best trials in college circles, and 
stopped many bard shots. Fresh men 
were sent into the game by both teams 
but neither scored thereby. 

The Aggie team looks yood on the 
ice, and after the loss of a little staye- 
frijjht. and the addition of a better of- 
fensive, the M. A. C sextet promises to 
be a etrong aggregation, 

Summary : 

I1AIMMOI Tit MASS. AtHilK 

Osborne, .Smith, rw rw, Lyons, Lamb 

Ball, W. Ferry, c 

c, Ilaskins. Qordon, Whitaker 

Atwood, Sheehy , lw 

lw, Gordon, Whitaker 

W. Ferry, I). Fen y. id 

rd, Ilodsdon, Lyons 

Foster, Id hi. Collins 

Tobin, n g, Kroeek 

Bonn by periods : 12 3 

Dartmouth, 1 1 1-3 

If. A. C, 1 0-1 

Goals : Osboi lie. Sheehy . Hall, Collins. 
Referee: Dowd of M. A. C. Goal um- 
pires: N'icliolson of Dart month and 
llilyard of M. A. C. Time : three 15 
minute periods. 



barrows. It 




ti 


it 


1) 


Smith, If 




4 





* 


luiney, if 




2 


tt 


11) 


Mai shm an, 


c 


4 





8 


Qowdy, lb 













liike, rb 




1 





2 


Itoser, lb 













Hale, rb 







It 









n 


t» 


2* 






THl.NITY. 










It. 


K. 


p. 


Mohnkern, 


rb 











Nordlund, 


lb 


1 





2 


Mills, c 




3 








Tanner, rf 




1 


4 


fi 


Keating. If 




1 





4 



C&rpfn'tcr & Morehouse, 

PRINTER, 

No i, Cook Place, Amherst, Maaa 



Deuel's Drug Store 



TOILET ARTICLES 



Shaving Sticks and Creams 



Razors and Razor Blades 



7 4 18 

Score at half time Aggies 10, Trinity 
i». Referee— Fink of Uolyoke. Time— 
90 minute periods. 



Kodaks and Supplies 



VICTOR RECORDS 

Fountain Pens 



INFORMAL DANCE 

The first Informal of the year was 
given in the Memorial Building last 
Saturday. Dancing started immed- 
iately after the Dartmouth hockey 
game and continued until 9-30. It was 
one ot the most successful, or belter, the 
most sttOSSSfal one ever given at Aggie. 
The dance was attended by 05 couples 
and a new idea was tried out, that 
of dancing as usual up stairs, but in- 
stead of eating at the Draper, as has 
been the custom at former dances, every- 
one ate cabaret style iu the lower hall. 
bias was the caterer for the occasion. 
Boh Woodworth's orchestra furnished 
the music. The chaperones were Mrs. 
Lawman and Miss I'ariualee of Smith, 
and Mrs Cameron and Mrs. BtaR of 
Mount Uolyoke. The dance was alM 
a treat for the Smith girls as a new 
plan was tried : that of allowing them 
U> stay aad dance until P-J0, instead of 
having io return home on the i» o'clock 
car as has been the custom at former 
dances. 



I^asje'ss Shoe Store 

SPECIAL 

Saddle Strap Oxfords . . . $5.98 

^theIew mju songTook 

At the Treasurer's Office— $1.00 

LEARN TO SING ALL THE AGGIE SONGS 



'17.— Mr. and Mrs. Richard L Ilolden 
of Poterboro, \. II announce the birth 
of their daughter Ituth Marjorie on 
Jan. 1. 



When You Are Down Town 



DROP IN 



The Candy Kitchen 



FOR- 



Lunch, Candy, Ice Cream and Smokes 



COLLEGE CANDY KITCHEN 

"The Home of Sweets" 



STOP' DROP INTO THE AGGIE INN 

on these cold, frosty mornings for a piping hot cup of coffee and an 

order of crullers. AGGIE INN-By the Campus Entrance^ 

1NTERCLASS BASKETBALL 



o„ Friday, Ja».<», Ifltt, the first later- 
, basketball gem* between (he 
Inninrs and Freshmen look place. The 
M ,,re was 1IW5-11, l«l- 10. T,ie 
, W as well play** and hard fought 
, shown by the score. Dickinson 
!llt . M f„r the Juniors, mid Kcrranti 
rortBi Freshmen. At Hie close of this 
, .ootber was played between the 
Senior* and Sophomores, which was a 
u;l |kawav for the Seniors, the score 
,„. IIlt r; 1U22-12, 1924-5. I.ewandowsk. 
„ 1( 1 Weber featured for the Seniors, 
while Gifford and F. liartlett played 
w ,.|| for the Sophomores. 
I In- scores: 

(iOAI.H KOUl.S POINT* 

1 5 7 

1 2 



9 

9 

1 I 



J-Yr. 
SI rout, c 
Cutler, rf 
llarnicle. If 
Nelson, lg 
(lnfl. m 

Totals, 

lii-22 
Randall, c 

Weber, ll 

Kokoski. it 




IDENTIFICATION OF 

THE UNIDENTIFIED 



RESULTS DETERMINE COSTS 



«...vi.s nu'i.s roiM- 
u 


2 tl 4 




tt 



II 



1926 

Tenanti, If 
i;. Cooke, rf 
barker, c 
B .lack, lg 
Mottridlan, r« 
Kelso, r«, if 



Totals 

1928 

tiger, if 
Sargent, rf 

Dickinson, c 
Hunter, If 
Minor, rg 
Wirth, rfi 



<iOAI.» 

o 


2 

9 




Hill. 

9 
9 
« 

9 
9 



Totals, 

L922 
Weber, If 

K<>koskl, rf 
Randall, 8 
Hooper, Ik 

Irwandowski, rg 



OOAI.S 

1 

1 
9 

2 



6 

FOULS 

4 

ti 
9 
9 
9 



11 

POINTS 
t) 

9 
19 

a 

ti 

9 
19 



POINTS 
tt 

2 
tl 
9 
4 



Totals, 

I-.I24 
i.itlord, if 
I' I'.artlett, If 

Sal n. c 

Whit man, rg 
Kt miner, lg 
Hayes, lg 

Totals, 



OOAI.S 

1 

o 

t) 


1 



nu'i.s 
Q 

I 


I) 


9 

I 



12 

POINTS 

2 
I 


9 




OB Thursday. Jan. 12, the second 
a.nes were played, the Juniors vs. 
Sophomores, and the Seniors vs. 2-yr. 
I be .Juniors won from the Sophomores 
be tune of 9 to 7. It was an ex- 
cellently played game, the floor work 
ol Alger, Sargent and Dickinson feat- 
urlng for the Juniors, while the play- 
.., Salmon and Weatherwax featured 
for i he Sophomores. 

In the Senior-2-Yr. game, the score 

was 2-Yr.-12, Seniors-11. Kokoski 

and Weber showed up well for the 

settlors; Cluff, Barnicle and Cutler 

ted for the 2-Yr. team. 

The scores: 

aOAM Fori-s points 

2 9 4 

1 9 2 

1 1 3 

9 9 

9 



l.ewandowski, rg 1 
Giles, In 9 

Totals. I 6 11 

The managers of the various learns 
ba\e been elected and are : 1822 N. A. 

McA.dle; IMS— "Connie" Worth; 19M 
-Alec Grieve; 1028 Herbert Nyl.-n; 
2-Yr.-Net(leton. 

MR. HARRY STARR OF HAR- 
VARD ADDRESSES MENORAH 

Phi Beta Kappa Man Gives In- 
structive talk to Apprecia- 
tive Audience. 

Harry Starr, of Harvard Law School 
aa d president of the Harvard Me. ...rah 
Society, was the speaker at the lasl 
.neeling of the M. A. < . Me..orah So- 
ciety, Sumlav, Jan. K>. in Memorial 
Hall. He received his A. H. degree at 
Harvard and during his four ye..;- tta] 
was a member of the debaliim council. 
[|e won the boylslot. I'ri/.e la public 

ipeaklw aad receive. I honorable men- 

tion for the liowdoin l'n/e it. essay 

w.itiim. N<»' <■»'> li:t - Ml - s,:,n (,is ' 

(inttuisl.ed hinisell as a foi.eful and 
.•onvincii.e speaker but has as well 
proven lO be a good student. lie is a 
member ot l'hi beta K»P|M Fralernily. 

Mr. Stair deal! * upon I he social 

problem of the Jew. He pointed out 

,!,,- fallacies ot Jewish orthodoxy Slid 
,i M . o.eate. fallacies ot J. wish reform. 

Be showed that Jewish orthodoxy cot.l.l 
not adapt itself lo modern eondltloneh) 
mediaeval methods and that Jewieh re- 
form could not adapt Iteell to modem 

eonditloaa bj Imliallog other religion.. 
In eloaleg the speaker remarked, 

- n ,e salvation of the Jew is to a-, it 

himself. He mu-i be egjrreeaive as he 
lia^ been in the |>ast. 



(iiven: The skeleton of a man, nn- 

earthed beneath the cellar of ■ henee 

in the Fast Side of New Yolk. The 
skull WM injured la three places on the 
back of the head, showint: that death 
bad been caused by violence. 

To Trove: Who was I be man, w ho was 
the aeaaala, and what was the ...olive 
ol t be cri me'.' 

Captain Qraol Williams, formerly ol 
the New Voik Police Department, no* 

retired, explains how he unravelled 
this myste.v as one of bis nun. .-rolls 

stories of hie Identification work when 
be was connected with the deteettve 

I, ranch ol this service. Many Other 

aquallj amaalng and aatoaUblng cases 
ot Identification are to be disclosed at 
bis lecture la Btockhrldge Hall this 

Friday al ti ltd P M. under the aoaplOM 

oi i be Social Union. 

n Bol the bent entertainment of the 
rear, certainly well to the lore--- II be- 

hooves everyone tO be present al Ibis 
led l. I'- 



ll isn't the Initial cost of a dairy sup- 
ply that determines its economy, bill 

rather the result* produced by iis con- 
tinued us.-. Many Dairymen have made 

what they thought was a saving by 
lower lirsl cost only lo later find that 
they have sacrili.c.l all and more to loss 
in quality and Ml vice. 

The dependable high quality and 

value ot the s.iv .. which always fol- 
lows I he use of 



MR. W. N. CRAIG ADDRESSES 
LANDSCAPE MEN 



w r * /ij iryni.tn *• _^^P 



io \. r tails to return profit! to the Dairy- 
man maay llmee In eseene of lu cost. 

'This quality service has gained for 
Wyandotte Dairyman'* (leaner and 
i leaneer aa aatabllebed plnee la the 

Dairy industry bceaii-e it is a guarantee 

of that sanitary protection which in- 
sures blah quality products that build 
permanent and Increasing, business). 
These results nre guaranteed ho yon 

also or the trial '-..sis you nothing. 

In. Han in 

. int.- 



1923 

\luer, rf 
Sargent, If 
Dickinson, c 

Minor, rg 
Wirth, lg 



Totals 4 

1924 GO A 1.8 

t.ilford.lf 

t . Bartlett, rf 

•salmon, c 1 

! herwax, rg 1 

Whitman, lg 

Hill.lg 9 

Totals, 2 



1 

FOUI.S 



8 

o 
t) 
ti 


3 



9 

POINTS 

9 
3 
2 
2 





TWO-YEARS "FARMER'S BALL" 
■The Freshman Two-yeai gave ■ "Fnr- 

mer's ball" to their Beoloi Class last 

Friday evening n. the Memorial Balld- 
| Da There were about 90 eouples | 

eB l aad ths faculty e/hoattended acre 

Prof, and Mrs. l'helan, Prof, aad Mi- 
French and Miss Skinner. 

The dancer* were dreased In Fan..'-. ■ 

eostun.es for the most part, and some ! 
„f , be costumes were cM-eedinglv rievel 

and original. 

The Two-year ot.l.pstn. furnished Ibe 

mu.icand the feature of the evening 
was a saxophone duet by '•JohMJ 
4dam* aad "Charley" Wheeler. They 
wirn encored again and again and .be 
dancing stopped white the gaceU »•« 

ttM ,ed, although fee. and .boulder* 
might have been shaking in time With 

the music. 

Punch wns served ihrough the even- 

iugiintil 19-30 when the dame USI 
over. 



Horticultural Classes Fpend Profit 
able Hour with Experienced 
Speaker. 
H r u - \ « Iralg, snperinlendeiil ol 
the Faulkner Pams ol llooklinc. < - 

nented to nome to the eollogeon Tue* 
day.Jaa. 10, for i rerj brief visit ol 
several hours, ai the Invitation ol the 

L Is. ape and Florici.l. ure Dep«*. Tht 

loforaial lalh which be gave to* group 

ol about To students In F.ench Hall was 

certainly appreciated, dcepits the 

l,i, rlty "I hi^ slay. 

The subject which Mr. Craig spohe 
UIl v «a "private Bstate Maaagement. 

H» B Adva.iiages and t tppoil mill ies.' - 
II, made out a very Strong case for ibl" 

brunch e4 hortlcultutal work, and .-..- 
eouraged lbs meg tocondderlt serious- 
ly before entering other breaches. 
' an Englishman by birth, Mr. Craig 

baa been in i his co.ini ry lor many yean, 

am | bai worked Up Iron, the bottom. 
II,. is now one of the leaders in privale 

eetate Interesi and aciviiy ihecouniry 
,,v.r. being ex-president of Ibe Na- 

lioIia i Association of Hardeners, and 
Secretary oi the Boston 8srden«rs' and 
Florists 1 t lub. 




Order from four supply 

lloll-i . 

I. .-leans .lean. 



in svsrj 
paessae 

The J. B. Ford <'o.. bole slsnufacl arera, 

Wv a.idoiie. Mich. 



Have Your Next Suit Made to Order 



\ i 



LABROVI 

THE LEADING TAILOR 
Fine assortment of Woolens -»n hand 

Full Dress Suits and Tuxedos 
to Rent 

Full l_i*e of Ores.* ^urplics. 

Cleaning, Pressing, Remodeling, Re- 
pairing and Dyeing promptly done. 

Sinai* Suit* Prmmmmd, r»ducmd to BOc 
On Prmmmlno Ticket* oOc 

It will pa) yon io bn| ■ ticket. 



We de-expert swrli ot M Sfsertptiens. 
HA.i.ll>St. LABROVITZ PbeO*B»sy 



FRESHMEN SCHEDULE 

'The schedule for the lre~hman bas- 
ketball 'Team ha- beet, made up and is 
its follows : 

Jan. si, Turners Falls Fflgb, home. 

j.,.1,. 1. Amherst Blejh, home. 

4. Sacred Heart Hii;h. home. 
16, Deerlield Academy, home. 
t:>, Smith Academy of Hailield. 
home. -• 

Mai. -h 1, Williston Academy, bono-. 
The I -re-bn ii-ti i.ave already played 

Hopkins Academy and t.reenliebl Blffh 
and have come oil in good shape. 

-,., _(„-on;e \. Peeh wa* married on 
Dee. 1 to Miss Lillian M. Howard of 
Barre. The ooupk will live on Winter 
Street, barre. 



A. MIENTHA 

Shorn Repairing While U Walt 

mav rici' n 

Men's Win. I.- Soles. liiiM.ei ll.-.ls . . $2.50 

Men s Half Hole Rubbei H*eh • • • V-»® 
Men'i Rubbei K«»le« Rubbei Heelt • \*'ii 

Men'i Hun soi.s .... . ■ *i.»« 

W..rk<.iuoi...oe,l- AMHKRfrr HOt'WK 



You can save from 

$3.00 to $5.00 a pair 



— on- 



Young: Men's 
College Footwear 

by buying at 

FLEMING'S, Northampton 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Wednesday, January 18, 1922. 



THE HUSSAChTSETTS COLLEGIAN 



Published erery Wednesday by the 
Students of the Massachusetts Ag- 
ricultural College. 

BOARD OF KDITORS. 



Bti.niNO K. Jackson '22 Kdttor In-Chief 

Hobakt W. Hi-kino "n Managing Kdttor 

A8SOCIATK KniTOKB. 

1,1 ihf.k B AKHiNinoN ft Asst Sfan'g Kdttor 
Kknnbtm a. kaknako 'ti < Dsapettttoa Editor 
John M. Wuittirk "2H Athletic Kdltor 

Rl ill M. Wo..|.".M ■swtaBfS Kdltor 

Htam.RV W. Hkomi.ky '22 
lltMMi W Si.ai k "SB 

Sol.oMoN » OHKN '2H 

Ki.ihiia K. Hi.ihs. .Ik- '24 



Business Department. 

Cbari.uk a. Bkk '22 Businew Manager 

Myron <;. Mihkav '22 Advertising Manager 
Owen K. Kolsom '23 Circulation Manager 

HOI.DKN WnlTTAKKR '28 

Cumsn i.. BFi.ofN '24 

KollKKI K. SlKKKK '24 



Subscription $2.00 per year. Single 
eopies, 10 cents. Make all orders paya- 
ble to The Massachusetts Collegian. 

Id case of change of address, sub- 
scribers will pleaBe notify the business 
manager as soon as possible. 

Entered as 8»cond-clas» matter at the Amherst 
Post Office. Accepted for mailing at special 
rate of postage provided for In section 110.1. Act 
of October, 1917 authorized August 20. 1*18. 



Concerning Athletic Capitalization. 
The Dartmouth, undergraduate paper 
at Hanover, recently took a most inler- 
estinu position in regard to the "capi- 
talization of athletic ability." It holds 
that no harm, but on the contrary, much 
Hood, would l»e done by allowing ath- 
letes to participate for pay in sum- 
mer sports, and not forcing Ihem into 
the ineligible class because of such 
professionalism. 

This viewpoint rather jars a set ol con- 
ventionalities pretty well established 
in amateur circles, ami also mir (irmly 
Used ideas about the purity of college 
athletics. However, a glance at the 
new stand is convincing and must com- 
mand attention ami respect. 

The two chief arguments Bgalaet pro- 
fessionalism are questioned. First ; * is 
customary to charge that " professional- 
ism among college athletes puts a pre- 
mium on competition for money, and 
takes away all thrill from a game con- 
ducted purely on an amateur basis.'* 
Can Ibis lie true? Are the college ath- 
letes ot to-day so narrowminded, so 
blind to the purpose of college training 
that they could conform to such a 
thing'.' The best answer 10 the "sub- 
traction of thrills'' idea is that college 
sports have never been more enthus- 
iastically participated than induring the 
past few years, and yet, to quote the 
Dartmouth, "the rule (against profess- 
ionalism) has become almost as well 
known for its breach as for its observ- 
ance." 

Again, argues the "ant t," profession- 
alism may till our colleges with a crowd 
ol misfits, excellent physically but of a 
distinctly minus calibre scholaslically. 
Be] s the Dartmouth, "Are not the schol- 
astic requirements in most rases high 
enough to nullify thechancesof a man's 
staying in the undergraduate body who 
had no other recommendation than an 
unusually huge amount of athletic ac- 
tivity f To say that professional athletes, 
otherwise unlit ted for college, could 
remain very long in I present day 
institution is to charge the faculty 
cither with lax requirements at with a 
wilful disregard of duty." 



It seems to us I hat these modern ideas 
are very well founded. With requiie- 
inents unchanged, permission lo play 
for money could not fill the colleges 
willi "low-brows." The fact that some 
institutions have seen fit In make a 
"pass at any price" curriculum to suit 
youthful athletes chosen by the careful 
selection of veteran scouts, and to give 
these youths a B. A. (bachelor ol ath- 
letics), after four years of lough work 
on the varsities, has nothing to do with 
the mailer. No such condition can ex- 
ist in ft genuine scholastic institution. 

The average college student does not 
toil at his life work during vacation. 
He picks no what he can get, usually at 
some avocaiion. Take for an example 
an Aggie undergraduate. He wails on 
table, works on (he highways, sells 
maps, does anything and everything to 
earn the necessary cash to purchase 
books at $2.00 per volume or board at 
*7.00aweek. Only a few lucky ones 
strike something actually pertaining to 
their "major" here. 

The non-athlete, points out our con- 
temporary, has the advantage in the 
chase for the dollars. If a journalist, 
he can work for a paper, if a musician 
he can tind a position in a hotel or sum- 
mer resort, and earn I Id J sums without 
danger of losing prestige in his alma 
mater because of professionalism. 

The athlete is cut off from many cam 
pus tasks by long practises, and the 
non-athlele again has I he advantage. 
Moreover, "melons" are often out for 
Senior members of college newspaper 
staffs, dramatic organizations. etc. 
Athletes are never so fortunately re- 
warded, at least not openly. It is a 
shame that, in order to get some needed 
recompense for clean sport the athlete 
must make himself a petty criminal, 
and leave the way open for personal 
enemies to oust him from honors later, 
even as when Thorpe, still a popular 
American hero, was ousted a few years 

ago. 

It is titling that this matter should 
be brought before the colleges and the 
public in this new way. Itighl or 
wrong, it should be thrashed out again, 
in the light of these new ideas ami cir- 
cumstances. 

We should like to agree with Ihnt- 
moitth, that. "Allowing undergraduate 
athletes to earn part of their college 
expenses by playing during the sum- 
mer months would recognize a right 
that should he theirs and would do 
away with a rule thai has become al- 
most as well known for its breach as 
for its observance." 



"Oh!" indefinite, whcre-the-diice-is- 
tbat-if-il-isn'l-Ainhersl sort of an expla- 
nation. 

To illustrate again, the Boston Olobi 
recently contained three articles about 
this college, all of which spoke of Ain- 
mherst Agricultural College in their 
heads. 

Now we have nothing al all against 
Amherst College. It is a line place 'o go 
to and all that. But we're not there 
There's I he big point. 

Individuality is the main thing. 
Without il a man or an Institution I" 
lost. We have been battling (of years 
to put Mass. Aggie on the map, to sep- 
arate it from each and every other thing 
in the minds of the public, to make it 
donote something more than the place 
where they produce milk to feed Am- 
herst College. Thank heavens, we are 
succeeding and now hear these foreign 
applications less and less. 

However, we musl aim at a complete 
success. Kvery man must lake his 
alma maler with him wherever be goes. 
correct misinformation al every oppor- 
tunity. If anyone says "Going to Am- 
herst? Fine place!" say ye to thai 
man, "No sir. going lo Mass. Aggie. 
Also fine place!" Capt. tiowdy had the 
right idea, when he told I lie basket- 
ball referee, in a recent game upon his 
saying "Amherst' ball." "Mass. Aggie, 
please!" 

This is no trivial matter. It involves 
the very life of the college. No one 
knows how much we have lost because 
people have not realized our not meat, 
it is true, importance, book al the 
tbein bab, a monument to such ignor- 
ance and misinformation. 

Henieuiber individuality counts, bet's 
propagate Mass. Aggie. 



TOWN HALL 



Thursday 

Sl'l.i I AL 



M;.t.3, K\e. 
6-45.8-30 



Friday 



Mat. 3, Kve. 
6-45,8-30 



Saturday 



Mat. 3, Kve. 
6-45,8-30 

Monday 

No Advance 
in I'rli es. 

Mat. 3, Kve. 
6-45.8-30 



SI TK|{ -1'KOIU (HON day: 

Prisrilla Dean and Herbert 
Rawlincon in "The Con- 
flict," 7 reels. Her greatest 
picture, tlie biggest thriller 
on tlie screen. 
News Comedy 

Aesop't Fables 

Maurice Tournear** "The 
Bait," with Hope Hampton, 
is ■ photoplay of Parts and 
New York. Adapted from 
Siilne.v Toler'S staire play. 
Tli.-Tiiicr l.lly." 

Scenic rMl 
i n it Butter Keaton Comedy 

Katherine MacDonald.Wet- 
ley Barry ami great cast in 
•Stranger than Fiction." 
v death Ihrhl In Um clouds I 

I aiiL'lit in a miilair parachute 
lesp! A thrilling rescue from 

a burning plane. 

Pathe News 

■i- t Clyde CooK Comedy 

Harry Carey ami Betty Rots 
Clark In "The fox." The 

first Western sapcr-prodnr 

tii \ei made. See 1000 

horsemen In s meat battle 
with outlaws on the scorching 

Mcij.i\ !• I )e>i'i I 

Pathe Review 
.'reel Mermaid Comedy 



An Age-Old Controversy 

Amherst vs. Mass. Aggie. 

It is an unfortunate thing to be lo- 
cated in the town with another older and 
well established college. It is a terrific 
handicap to be under to be obliged to 
iterate and iterate the fact that the 
Massachusetts Agricultural College is 
an individual and not a part of Am- 
herst College, or a vocational school, or 
a Utile sometbing-or-ot her oonnected in 
some mysterions way with an experi- 
ment station and the Legislature. 

How often do we meet thissiluatioti ? : 
"Hello. Bill 1 I>o you happen to know 
John Qutncy ?" 

'"No. Never heard of him." 
"Why, he's a Senior at your college." 
"I don't think so. I know all the 
class. Are you sure you have the right 
place'.'" 

"Yes, he's been at Amherst four 
years." 

"But I am not al Amherst, I'm at 
Mass. Aggie." 



Arena Parties. 

We understand with some pleasure 
that the general subject of Arena Part- 
ies is to be brought up for discussion in 
ibis afternoon's Forum. The fact ihat 
the pros and cons concerning their ef- 
fectiveness has been t borough ly gone 
over unofficially around the campus 
makes it necessary to bring the matter 
to a head. 

We are too prone to give up old tra- 
ditions on the spur of the moment. 
The Arena Party is an old tradition. 
On the other hand, when a tool has be- 
come dull or unlit for use, it must either 
be sharpened or cast aside. The quest- 
ion is, has the Arena Party become act- 
ually useless, or is il simply dull. In 
eithei case, judging from results as 
shown in the Freshmen class, il is not 
at present doing its job. 



Why go down town for a 

First-Glass Hair Gut or Shave? 

Patronize the 

College Barber Shop 

Memorial Building, M. A. C. 

H. J. DUWELL, Proprietor. 



Save Money - Buy During Our 

ANNUAL PRE INVENTORY SALE 



Real Bargains on 
QUALITY GOODS 

Sale Now Going On ! 



FRIDAY NIGHT DANCE 

A plan was suggested at the close of 
the last term that dances be given in 
tlie Memorial Building every weekend 
or every other weekend. One was 
given and proved so successful that the 
Informal Committee is giving another 
on this Friday evening. Jan. 20, from 
.7 30 until 11-00 i\ M. It is to be run on 
the same plan as the first one was, 
namely : it will be open to the students, 
faculty, and employees of the college. 
and their friends. 



G. EDWARD FISHER 



A. .P STAEBNER 

Agent for 

Browning, King & Co. 

A national tailoring institution. 

SUITS and OVERCOATS MADE to MEASURE 

Kxcellent fabrics - .styles with an in- 
dividuality— Workmanship the best 

Satisfaction Guaranteed 

bet me show you styles and samples 
TEL. 1TO 



The Amherst Tavern 

EUROPEAN and AMERICAN PLAN 

Appetizing, Wholesome Meals— Cooked 
under modern sanitary conditions. 



I be on sale at the door and prf |e jj— RoQm fa « Frats < 

per- ! " 



are 75 cents a couple or ">0 cents a pe 
son. The orchestra will be Woodworth, 
Wood, Parker, and Dunbar. 



MID-WINTER ALUMNI DAY 
February 3 and 4 » 

WILL YOU BE BACK? 



or special parties. 

Bright, comfortable rooms, single <> 

double, at reasonable rates for 

the season. 

Courtcmy. Cleanllne**, Quality. Quan- 
tity and Variety la our> motto. 

We cordially invite your patronage. 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Wednesday, January 18, 1922. 




JUST A LITTLE BETTER 



{ In the quality of the woolen*. 
In the character of the dewiiiiiN. 



"S 



| In the ori&inulity of the model** 

i In the workmanship and the finiNh. 

1ST a little lieHer Hum the next lies! clothes thai the s,....c n.omy will hiiy ! TLaae. is the IfWI •«■ 
of the HICKEY-FREEMAN story. They are the best clothes matfe in Aimricn today . 



ADDRESS ON THE LIFE 



IN THE FAR EAST 



limn R- 



Mirsh Interests Student 
Body. 
Contiauinii the subject ol "China 

Hboui which Mr. Ilodolls spoke I week 

before, Mr. .lames ft. Marsh of Boxburj 

s „,ke on th« "Significance ol Chinese 

ligation" in last Wednesdays 

-., -uibly. Hesterted out bj quoting from 
rge Bernard si. aw ihat ■ traveler's 

ulory became interesting only when he 
He added thai, it thU «:^ tee 

... his talk would be oalatereetiag. 

Mr. Marsh stated thai the Chinese 
,,„.,. is a «OOd sbeial experiment bfl 
, ;lllM . its civilization went so hum un- 
interrupted, li baa been the same :.(hmi 
n wi.iie the exterior ot the China- 
man may differ from that ol the Anieri- 

con we muel remember thai fundamen- 
tally he is I he same, lie baa the same 

emotion* although be may i sprcea 
ihem in a different manner. We must 

,. Chinese civilization as an BStab- 

,.,i or der of thing* because of Iti 

long stand in history. 

China give* na an Idea ol the future. 

|',\ noting the milestones of i I s ci vili/.a- 
, ion we may predict the future state of 
The main factor which has 
Impeded the Chinee* If reckless breed- 
ing. Tbel« are so many people thai 
everyone Banal eoatlnuallj think ot his 

work and there can be no research men 

Idealiatt. toother facto, which 

BAt hindered them is ancestor worship. 
In China W* lind live million people all 
try l 0g 1( , obtain food. Thus we .an 
ia] thai while other nations may seek 
[or ethical advance CblM must seek for 

^es. rood and shelter an their 

• •illy de-ires. 

The Chines- ate the best governed 

I pie of the world. If the authority 

,,! the law is removed they do not si an 

b riot* as characterised the Boston 

police strike, but i hey go about peace- 
ablj and do not interfere with each 

otbei 

The Chinese are limited in theabil- 

•,, develop an aesthetic sense. 

Hole are no parks and museums in 

China, However, the Chinaman so le- 

. | his intellect that the lack oi 

»uch advantages doea not seriously ef- 
fect him. 
In bumming up, Mr. Marsh enipha- 
. i the facta that : 

I. If it were not for ancestor worship 
< bineefl would have outdone the 
ol Pericles. 

Had it not been for occidental in- 

on China would never have changed. 

I be Study Ot Chinese civilization 
S re* us a glimpse of the future. 

t W e should strive to do the great- 

g 1 lor the largest number. 

Each man should have the op port - 
;. of developing his own intellect. 

Mr. Marsh then closed by relating 

rial humorous anecdotes descriptive 
( hint -■ . Ft 



1NTERFRATERN1TY RELAY 

The lirst of I he inlerli aternity relay 
race- were run off M scheduled la-t 

Monday afternoon. LambdaChl Alpha 

scored fast lime lor the afternoon niak- 
ino (be rounds iii 8.14 8-6. Competi- 
tion was Hot vet V keel, ill most of t he 
races probably due lo the fad that the 
embryo athletes were not In the mosl 
perfect condition. The races lol low in 
Ihe older in which tin \ were inn ! 



■ -Ill > 1 1 . M A K \PP A 

Woodworth. B 

Bartletl 
Qarreteoa 

Piet. 



KAll'V MOM A. 
Staebner 
Slade. W. 
While 
( ihill 



Won by Phi Sigma Kappa. Time 

a.lfl i r>. 



collegian competition Edith Hamilton Parker 

Collegian competition has taken an Graduate Teacher of Dancing. 

added impetus Ibis lerni with live n.-vv 

candidates from the freshman alaaa. studio, masonic im.uck. Northampton 

Ward. Sheridan. Slanniford and llauess- 
ler have signified their intentions of 
trying OUt for lha editorial board and 
Nylen for the business depait incut 

Thl* bring* the total number up to 
Mven candidate* for tha editorial board 

and three for the business department 

In the sophomore section Kennedy. 
Waujih. P. sid and Darling are furnish 
i ti li lively competition. 

The special competition l"i Itesliinen 

began with this Ineue hut it is not yet 

too lata for more men lo try OUt. Any 

.me Iniereated should hand in his name 

at once. 



I \MI1U V < HI VI I'll A. «,» I • v . 

Kemp Tunic 

Feinahl Parsons 

l'etianli Kennedy 

Lortng Itilski 

Won by l.amda Chi Alpha. Time— 



44 



IITIilPL" 



FRIDAY EVENING, Assembly Class 

Popular with II. A. C. Men 
Private lessons hy appoint inent . 

Tel. 761 Northampton 

Campus and Dress Footwear 



QUALITY TRIK HOSIERY 

Reasonable Prio 



sin MA PHI l.rsllo.v 

Bra) 

Alexander 

Giles 

Glfford 



NIK I \ < III. 

Roberts 

Rhodes 
Il'inork 

Delicti 



The Old Famous Reliable Way of 
Earning College Expenses. 



THOMAS S. CHILDS 



I M i IH POBATK 

8TO-87B High St.. 



Ilolyoke 



Won by gtgaaa Phi Kpsilon. Time— 
l.P'ii •"> 



NEW ENROLLMENT 
The college enrollment for this term 

shows the entrance of four new men in- 
to the regular courses. H. L. Norwood, 

a transfer from the University of Maine. 

has entered the class of 1WJ4 : Philip 
Bouncy, a transfer from Norwich has 
entered the Freshman class: My N. 

smith and H. V. <>'< onnoi have entered 

as special students. 



SOME VACATION EARNINGS, 

1921 

|, J) *1HIW.(HI 

( \\ 14PI. VI 

H \{ IS60.00 

j \ DNO.00 

Students rooking for summer peat* 

lions, write ihe New York Olhce. 

1 19 Nassau SI. 



M. NOVICK 

Custom Tailor 



C. A. C. GAME 

Continued from page 1 



showed 9 tallica to their credit. 

In the second half the M. A. C. Sfftl 

gation started out strong, but Conn, re- 
sumed ihe speedy tactics ,,t the early 

part of the game and scored heavily to 

the end. dropping the lasl double 

counter through tha ring as the final 

whistle blew. 
The score: 

Mass. A '...its 



Hike, rb 
Hale, rb 
Gowdy, lb 

Marshmaii. <• 
Poser, c 
Tumey, rf 
Smith. H 
Harrows, li 



National Map Company 

Chicago Indianapolis New York 



Cleaning, Pressing, Repairing and Dyeing 

Neatly and promply done. 
Work called for and delueied. 

Save money by buying a Pressing Ticket. 
4 Suits Pressed for $2.25. 

Dress Suits for Hire. 



19 Plensant St. 



let. 9 J 



It. 


1 . 


f 


2 


11 


i 


II 





(i 





II 





tl 


II 


tl 





tl 


I) 


1 


5 


7 


1 


ii 


1 





ti 


u 



Come in and see ..in new lot of stylish, easy fitting 

Nettleton Shoes 

All the latest styles. Including the 

VIKING GRAIN OXFORDS 

Pleasing to the eye and a pleasure to wear. Also a complete assortment ol 

Rubbers and Overshoes 



CARL. H. BOLTER 

correct-MEN'S OUTFITTER exclusive 



Amherst House Bloeh 



Amheisi. M.i-s 



( ,,w 



Alexander, If 

Makopski. rf 
Habcock. if 
Slull, e 

Putnam, lb 

Lord, rb 



N \\ . ( . A. held an Informal 

.i . ' Pride] evening, In the 

is Dormitory, In order to welcome 

■ii weeks women students dames, 

popping, and songs were enjoyed 



,i.ii 

ii. 
(i 
B 
u 
4 
• i 


11 



i . 

7 
t» 
(i 
u 
ti 
li 



18 



p. 

7 
fi 
I) 

H 

111 

I) 



JACKSON & CUTLER 

— DSALKBg is 

DRV AIMD FANCY GOODS 
Trunks Bags Suit Cases 



! I 



Score at half time— Conn, 
Mass. Aggie* '■' Before* 
Time— 20 mteuta periods. 



7 :n 

aggie* W, 
Brenoan. 



Candy Shoo 

BECKM ANTS 

Candies and Ice Cream 

Northampton, Mt 



Sods Parlor 



tttt 




I 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Wednesday, January 18, 1922. 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Wednesday, January 18, 1922. 



S. S. HYDE 

Optlolain i»«i«i ja»^*re*ie»* 

\> Pleasant Street (lipoM RaffeS*. 

Oculists' Prescriptions Filled - 

Broken Lenses Accurately Replaced 

Big Ben Alarm Clocks 
AND OTHER RELIABLE MAKES 

Fully liiiiiranteed 



SOPHOMORE PERSONNEL 

CHOSEN FOR CLASS DEBATE 
The debate between the Freshman 

ami Sophomore classes will lake place 

in Bowker auditorium Wednesday, Feb. 

1. The snl.jeel ill the debate is: Ue- 

iolred,Thai the areseat disciplinary re- 
latione between tb« Freshman ami 
Sophomore classes are detrimental t<> 

college spirit . The suhjeci is very | 
I, road in its scope ami one which will 

undoubtedly be <-i ireal interest to the* 
■tudenl body, although it is not deli- 



PRIVATE DANCING LESSONS 

MABKLI.K LOVE JOY MILLS 

Individual Dancing a Specialty 

MUls Studio, Phone iM-B, P« O. Block 



ALL RIGHT, GO TO IT 

We have never had perhaps, such a 
stretch of line abating weaiher as we 
have had durum the past two weeks. 

it leemi ioo bad that we. who ba»e out 

skates lore, should lose the opportu- 
nity to use them. To BUggeSt ll,i " ' m ' 

Freshmen get together '" eleau the 

pond for everyl>od\'s enjoyment, would 

be easing too much. The man. rot 

ridding tl'e pond of snow would lake 
I he entire class not more than an hour 
or so. Sinned. 

A Fkksiiman. 



GREAT PRICE REDUCTIONS 

Mi-i.-s'll.ilf S.ilrsScwe.l **- 50 

M,.,r, i>r..r Rabeei Heent • ' 50 

Mra'a w hot* Keoltn ftoleaaed aoodyoar 

Kui i.ii Heeta i,vv 

Mm - Whoto beatfeet Solaa Sewo*" ae4 

i.ooil\c;ii KuM.ci IttcK .... *•*» 

Mil Work Guaranteed I 

High-grade Line of Men's Shoes 

for Sale at Low Prices. 

J. GINSBURG 

19 Pleasant Street. 0» roe* «•! ■» town. I 



niiei.. decided, yet it is expected thai 
three menabereof the faculty will act 
as judges. Baeb speaker will he al- 
lowed live minutes for liis main speech. 
There will be oaly >"ie rebuttal and 
thai of live minutes duration. 

The personnel of the Sophomore learn 
is BOW complete. Alfred K Staehner 
Of W'illimantie, Conn., has heen chosen 
as class captain of the Sophomore 
learn. His oilier two colleagues are 

Richard ttlfotd ol Westpori ami Baenell 

Hovel "I Newtonville. 



CAMPUS NOTES 



THE MILLETT JEWELRY STORE 

Fin* Wotcli Repairing BkM Broken Leoae. 

Kejilaced I'roii'OtU . 



32 Main Street. 



Amherst. Hats. 



— TKY— 

O. H. GOULD 

fot Bret-claaa 
Watch, Clock and Jewelry Repairing 

18 Pleasant St.. \mhci-t. Ma— 

GRANGE STORE 

Fine Groceries 
Candies *no Fruits 

MASON A. DICKINSON, Proprietor 

Aggie Stationery 

with Class Numerals 
1922 TO 1925 



GLEE CLUB AND ORCHESTRA 

Every man lias now had a vacation 
from the Boston trip, and as eonceris 
are coming in I he near future, it is 
necessary lor each one to"lii.d himself" 

again. The Boaton trip went ofl excel- 
lently and the eonceris which are to 
oomeiunel glee the audiences aegood 

an impression. The liist delinite eon- 
eert is to he given at Deerlield Academy 
on the Blghl of Keh. i»>. ami there will 

probably be one over alumni weekend. 
Everybody out Tuesday evening, Jan. 

•24. at K (HI, in the Memorial Building, 

tor a rehearaaJ. Tl rebeetra has bad 

the same rest, and more so: so every 

,.,ne o«i Tburadal light at Ml v. m. 



The Sophomore hockey lean- will be 
formed very soon and confidently ex- 
pects to trim the Freshman learn. The 

elaeaol n»24 last year defeated ibe real 

19*8 team, ami most of the men who 
played then are available this year. 

Miss Helen Brsgdoe, geaeral aeere- 
,arv of the V. w.t . \. at Mi. Uolyoke 
College, waa the speaker at a meeting 

of the V. W. C. A. in Ahaiuail Adams 
Bull, last Sunday. She spoke Interest- 

togly of *' What Membership le the V. 

\V. < . A. Means.'' 

Tlie Freeh man girls gava a alehjb 

party, last evening, al whicli 17 couples 
were present. Starting ean> in the 
BVenlngtbe partj went lO Sunderland. 

where they stopped lor refresbmenta 

and a jolly social hour in the chap. I. 
Mr. and Mrs. Thayer were chapemnes. 



\ ■lelgblng parly to Shuteshury was 
held, 'Tuesday evening, by Sophomore. 
Junior, and Senior co-eds and their 
gueete. Mi. ami Mrs. Wort hley and Mr. 
and Mrs. French were ^nesls. Coffee 
and dongbOUtfl were served l.y the u'irls 

upon arriving ai Bbuleabury, and dane- 

|Ug was enjoyed for an hour in the town 
hall. 

rjndei the eaaploea of the Y at. <'• a. 
a forum <>n religion* subjects is to he 
hold each Tuesday evening this term 

from 640 to 7-80. In the Memorial 
Building. Ml Ward, a man of Wide 
training and experience with students, 
is to lead. There will he liberal oppor- 
tunity for discussion, an. I the meetings 
promise la be rerj Interesting. Tuples 

f,,r this month are as follows: Jan. 17, 

••Who is God*" Jan. So, "Evolution 

and I'hrislianily." .Ian. :tl , " Who was 
Jesus'.'" 



An sssembly is composed <d legisla- 
tors who, with good inleniions. baVC 

gathered to transact business In a most 
efficient manner, hut whose Individual 
timidity preveata lee sspresetoa <d 

I heir views. 



SING L.EIE 

Main Street 

Quick Laundry 



OPPORTUNITY 



There If an excellent opening for a 
technically trained agricultural grad- 
uate of some practical experience on 
the Banster Farm, at Angolia in Ubille, 

South America. The farm lias :i(HM) 

Korea and entail of teachers connected 

with Ihe Schools. 'There are 800 stu- 
dents. Practical farming along modern 
lines la the aim of the college. For 
farther Information inquire of F. A. 

I.i.-tch. !» College Avenue. 



A. J. HASTINGS 

Newsdealer and Stationer 

Amherst - - ■ Mass. 



MRS. PRUDENCE P. CASSIN 

SELECT CATERING 

.it Bmoonabto l'i fc <-• 
Informal* a Specialty 

Ivan pro o pe t s*t. *> mtuT-! . m.i.-s 

Tml. 88B-M 

North End Lunch 

120 Pleasant Street. 

Our food is right — 
Our prices reasonable 

TRY US OUT 

W. B.~DRURY 



R. 0. T. C. 
The complete roster of the Cadet oiti- 
Bajrj ,,i the B. O. T. C. at Ibis college 
has been recently announced by Sfajoi 
Sebayder. altogether there are 11 
commissioned cadel officers and 4* non- 
commissioned ol'tieers. The roster of 
the commissioned cadet officers is as 
follows: Captains. B. H. lleekwith '22, 

Wellealey Hills. F. A. Gilbert '22, Bran- 
don, Vi.. H. K. Wentsch '22. Soul hhury, 
Conn., lieutenants.E. A.I'iekup'22, Uol- 
yoke, F. K. Williams '88, Sunderland, 
\V. E. Paddock '88, Worcester, B. F. 
Martin '88, Amherst, K. <i. Jolmsoii '88, 
Mattapan, J. B. Faoeuf '88, West War- 
ren. It. I). Fuller '2:;. Woburn, It. B. 
llalleti '88, Rockland, B. K. Hardy '88, 
I.itileion.and N.l). llilyard '2:i. Detroit, 
Mich. Beeidea tbeee appointments there 
are 21 sergeants and 27 corporals. 

Mis. Marion White, matron at the 
'Ahhie." has heen confined in I lie In- 



firm arv I' 
dilion wa 



the peal week. Her cou- 
ncil that Dr. Haskell has 
Ordered her to take an extended vaca- 
tion. She la going lo the home of her 
roil-in. Mrs. Del'or.i, who lives in llalti- 
uiore, Md. She hopes to he able to 
return befotl the end of the school 
year. 



The Pulsation Test 

Take out your watch and time the pulsations of a 
De Laval Milker. You will find that every unit in the 
barn, no matter if there are a dozen, .s running at 
exactly the same speed and as uniformly as the icfc 
of a clock This insures your cows betng milked in 
exactly the same way from day to day or year to year 
and is one of the reasons why cows do so well with 
the De Laval Milker. 

Try this test on any milker and you will understand 
just one of many reasons why the De Lava is 1 he 
Better Way of Milking." Send for full information. 
The De Laval Separator Company 

NEV/YORK CHICAGO SAN FRANt 1SCO 

!S iBrCadwar 29 E M.dUon S.reel 61 Be,l, Straot 

Sooner or later you will use a 

De Laval 

Milker and Cream Separator 



Supplies NEW COLLEGE STORE 

Ice Cream Run for the Student Body 

Confectionery by Students 



Sodas 
Crackers 
Note Books 



ALUMNI 



FLORICULTURE CLUB NOTES 




>;>. -Dr. Joel K. Qoldthwall "<>w 
bead of the department ol bygelnc and 

physical education al Smith College, 

bia been appointed brigadiei ajeneral in 
ihe liedioal BeeerreOorpa td Ibe Halted 

gtatea Army. Dr. toddihwait served 
M ;, colonel in the World War. ami ffM 

on General Perahlng'e ntal at the gen- 
eral liea<l«|uarlers of Ihe A. 1.. F. in 
| ranee, lie did especially Important 
work inconneciion wit h traininK camps 
and putting tha men in I lie best poe- 
siide conditions for thelf physical ex- 
aminations. He will continue this 

vork.aaetatlag the aurgeoa geaetalol 

i lie army with fuiure traialng camps 
deelgaed l<> make and preserve Ihe 
highest standard of physical efliciiiic\ 
for men in everyday life. 

11.— Mr. and Mrs. ('•■ B. Caboutelej 
Konounoa the birth <»i ■ s ""i i{ |, « ,,r 
Burton, on Jan. 1. 

'14.— Raymond k. Nate la engaged in 
the fruit growing beelaeaa with the 
Keiitueky orchard Company, hftdora, 

k.v- 

lti. -Frank K. Haskell, a oaptain in 
the United Slates Army, hi stationed at 
(amp Bennlng, Columbua, <ia. 

•IT,— Word has been received of the 
narriage, oa Dee.tt, of Warren Whii- 

COHib to Mis- Neva Owens at Dickinson . 

Whitcomh la engaged Ingoreru- 
in. nt antomoleglea] service in the great 
appla regloa of Vakima. Waah. lie 

has lo'.ri the poetUoa for two years, and 
all ,p,,rts indicate that be is (ioiiij,' 

rj weil there. 

l'.i. -Morton H. (asssidy, an entoinol- 
ogblt, is temporarily loeated at (Jroton, 
\. V.. B.F.D. 11. 

jn— Jack Carleton, Pete Casein It, 
and .lack Coombs fj are employed in 
cilrua orchards al Fort 1'ierce, Fla. 
Address, R. F. I). No. I, BOX SO. They 
made the trip from Westliuld hy auto 
in Hi days. 

.'u.-Harold S. Harrington Rives bis 
new address as City Y.M. C. A. Athens. 
tia. He is connected with the Horti- 
cultural division of the University of 
i ieorgla. 

jo.- Harry Hall is teaching chemis- 
try in the Uroekton Hiuli School. He 
ilea assisting with the track work. 

-'(>. -Warren Clapp is starting a Btor- 
. jural Manufacture Plant in Baal 
Braintree. 

jn— William A. Luce is locatetl at 
Wcnatcbee, Wash., where be is carry - 
01 an investigation of soils in Cbe- 
laa County for the United Stales De- 
partment of Agriculture. 

JO.— U. F. Jakeinan.located in Provi- 
B. 1.. is a salesman for the 
Wrlgbl Ziegler Company. 

21.— "Phil" Uobinson is back on the 
ta taking graduate work in l.and- 
i ( tardea I ng, 



The Floiienlinre Dep ailment was re- 
eeatl] preneatedwlth a miniature green- 
house built bj ihe a. t. stem ns Um- 
ber Company of Boatoa. The model is 

to he used especially for study in 
courses in greenhouse construction, 
beating, and fumigation. The model 
is about two hy four feet and is perfect 
in c\ery detail. 



KINGSLEY'S 



SODAS SUNDAES 



CANDIES 



SHINE AS-U-GO 

itrmi'iiilii'i 

The College Shoe Shine Parlor 

for \<>m 
Hal Itnovatintf. Shoo Dytlng.Shoo Shtnin« 

At la Amity St . lo Am. 1^ Oatoo. 



Luncheonette 



llie regulai meeting of the Floricult- 
ure Club was held on Tuesday evening. 

Jan. io, In French Ball, with a small 

crowd on hand to help devour Ihe 
doughnuts and cocoa which weiesetu-d. 
Tbfl main interest of the meeting cen- 
tered about Mr. 11. V. Lawrence, who 
was asked to speak on short notice, lie 

discussed i imeretal floriculture iii 

general, Dill chiefly from the a-sllielic 
Standpoint. "Commercial floriculture 
is, from the human side of the question, 
■a most essential industry, " be said, 
"despite the country's ruling to the 
contrary during Ibe war." Mr. Law- 
rence is leaching in the new nursery 
course ibis year, which is being held 
tor the Ten Weeks students. He has 
a commercial florist and garden bus- 
iness in Falmouth. 



140 Main Street, Northampton, Mass. 

AMHERST BOOK STORE 

Note Books Fountain Pena 



SQUIB 



Hie first SftffO to he published undet 
V.n-Athletic Board will bt issued 

: ii ..! meat month. II la called ; 

Futuristic Number" and we hope 

ill be the best ever. In order to 

be rest of the numbers as good, 

s Up to the student body to coti- 

tte. Any originalities or jokes ,.t 

"i nature are always welcome. t 



On .Dm. 14, Tuesdav evening, the 
next meeting of the club will be held 
at which officers will he elected. There 
will also be ■ speaker secured by the 
Veg. GbaCdealBf members of the club. 
Ii \oti haven't been attending these 
meetings, ami are Interested In Flori 

culture or Veg. Sardealag, doa't mtai 

iliis chance lo start in with the next 
meeting-. Help have some good, plea- 
sant and profitable social times. 

GIFTS TO LIBRARY 

The college library has been the re- 
cipient of seveial substantial gilts of 
late. Several hundred volumes on 
botaaj and horticulture from (ieorge C. 
Woolson '71. Of Tryon, Polk County, 
N. C. besides a valuable collection of 
about l^tH) manuscripts from eminent 
bolanists and other scientists are among 

l,.>e. C. F. W. Felt '80 presented a 
., the .Inn noil 0/ W« Association of 

the Suytaeertafl Seeiettea, volumes l-W, 
ISHl-l'.ilo, and Clinton King '07, of 
9prlDgfleld,gave two volumes on the life 
of the late Justin B. Morrill, in addition 

toa large number of old college pub- 
lications. 

D. C. Bowse '83, of Newburg, N. 'i ., 
presented the library with a collection 
of books from bis own library as a me- 
morial to his nephew. D. O. N. Kdes '18. 

„ lied in France while in the service 

„l his country. Thecollection is largely- 
historical, containing some of the older 
books on agriculture and veterinary 

science. 

V year ago (ieorge A. Parker 16, of 

Hartford. Conn., presented his collec- 
lion of college photographs showing 
early campus views, original faculty, 
and'studen.s of the first decade. I bene 
have been bound and a case provided 
lot their preservation. 



C. F. DYER 



-fitter Every Meal" . 

WRIGLEYS 



High Grade 

COLLEGE FOOTWEAR 

— A I — 

Economy Prices 
E. M. 

The Shoeman. 

Main St., Amherst 

"BIDE-A-WEE" 

Creamed Chicken and Waffles Our Specialty 

And other gooil thing-* to eat. 

MRS. L. M STEBBINS 

Miasm Htreet. (Tel. 41B-W1 Hadle». Maa». 




Nash Block 

AMHERST SHOE REPAIRING CO. 

Your Shoes Repaired 

WHILE YOU WAIT 



DRAPER HOTEL 

Northampton, Mass. 

TE N The Leader for College Banquets 
FOR 

FIVE CENTS 

Bi3o Wm. M. Kimball, Prop. 

The Flavor lasts! 1 



MME. LOUISE HOMER 

Mme. Louise Homer will appear in 
( .„ lu . (n ., role at .bdin M. Greene Hall. 
Northampton, .Ian. 25. Tickets all re- 
s,,ved. Write lo Music Hall, care of 
V issar Endowment Fund. 



=HARDWARE= 

Come to us for 

Fireplace Goods, Coat and Trouser Hangers 

Ever Ready Flash Lights and Paint 

Clothes and Shoe Brushes 

Anything in Hardware and Cooking Utensils 

Always glad to see you. 



THE MUTUAL PL0MBIN6 & HEATING CO. 



s 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Wednesday, January 18, 1922. 



OUR ANNUAL INVENTORY SALE /S O/V 



YOUR CHANCE IS HERE TO SAVE MONEY- Reductions of 20 to 50 percent on Ready- 
made Suits, Overcoats, Sheepskins, Golf Hose, Hats, Caps, Shirts, Hose Ties, Vests, etc. 
Corduroy Riding Breeches, were $6.00, now $4.75. Prompt action will save you cash. 

SOUTHWICK BROTHERS <& GAULT 



TWO YEAR WINS FIRST 

OF ITS FIFTEEN GAMES 



DR. J 



K. SHAW'S WORK 

ON CERTIFICATION 



Amherst High Defeated 19-9 in First 

Game by Capt. Ross Men. 

Coach (Jrayson's Two-year basketball 
team not a good start when they de- 
limited (he Amherst High School live in 
iis lirsl (MM, l'.»-'.l. The play was fasi. 

although the scoring was not bigb, duo, 

no doubt, to (lie tact lhal hoth teams 
were playing a defensive gam*. Ob 
the offense, however, theTwo-year team 
far surpassed their rivals, the shooting 
of (iieene being the notable feature of 
lhal depailment of the game. The ab- 
seiu e i.l Parsons, last year's center who 
lias lieen out of tile gMM this year 
because of an inleeteil knee, was no- 
ticeable in the Two-year team. It is 
hoped that lie will DO b«ok for Tues- 
days name. Kiel. ut was the only high 
sehool |dayer who managed to score 
either from the tloor or from fouls. 

TWO-VKAIl. AMIIKKSI IIKill SI IIOOI.. 

(ireene, if lg, Fleury, Mitchell 

Boob, Copt., If rg, Dowd, Floury 

Strom, Cutler, c c, Mitehell 

Doeaelon.fg '«, K e"y 

Adair If. If, Flehut 

Score— Two-year 1S», Amherst High 
School 0. duals from tloor— (ireene 4, 
BOM 2, Cutler, Flehut. Hoals from 
fouls -ltoss 5, Flebut 7. Time— Two 90 
minute periods, lieferee— Ball. Timer 
— A i hi I 

Manager Nettleton has prepared a 
schedule including U games with Con- 
necticut Valley high school teams. 
The schedule follows: 
.Ian. 17. Sacred Heart Btgh, llolyoke. 
21, Deertield Academy, Ueerlield. 
M, Wilhraham Academy, home. 
Fob, 1. Williston Academy F.ast- 
hamplon. 
:!, Arms Academy, Shelbiirne 

Falls. 
4, Deerlield Academy, home. 

10, Smith Academy, borne. 

11, Worcester North High School, 

home. 

18, Clarke School, Northampton. 

•>:,. CUBbing Academy, Ash burn - 
ham. 

28, Smith Academy. Hatfield. 
March 4. Sacred Heart Blgfa School, 
home. 
8. Wilhraham Academy, Wilhra- 
ham. 

111. I'nion College Freshmen, 
home. 



Experiment Station Doctor Leader of 
Work in Nursery Certification. 

Nursery Certification, on outgrowth 

of the research in leaf characters by Dr. 
,1. K.Shaw of the Horticultural divis- 
ion ot the Experiment station, has been 

undertaken by the Massachusetts Fruit 
dowers' XcsiM-iulioii this fall. More 
than 8000 trees have been examined In 
the nursery. 
The Buraorj men, Dr. Shew reports, 

were as anxious as the growers to elim- 
inate misnamed slock. This falls cer- 



tilicalion was only a beginning. It WUB 
the lirsl application of Dr. Shaw's 
studies mi I he Identification Oi 11001 by 

their leaf characters to the commereln! 
fruit growere. 
Tremendoufl poBBlbilltlea are seen in 

this fruit stock ceil ilicat ion work by 
the Horticultural division of the col- 
lege K ornery men are eager to clear 
up their nursery propagation stock, and 
growers are impatient to eliminate tha 

sale ot misnamed trees. 

The varieties certified BO far have 

been: Delicious, Wegener, Northern 
Spy, Bed Astrakhan, Yellow Transpar- 
ent, Bhode island Greening*, Macin- 
tosh, Baldwin, Wealthy, Oldenburg, 

(iravcstein and Williams. 



NEW COURSE IN ECONOMICS. 

A new course called Agricultuia 

1'rices is to be given by i he Department 
of Agricultural Boonomioa daring thi 

winter term. This COUIM will inclu.l. 

tbe general Iheorj of prleea, tbefeotort 
underlying the recent movements ol 
pri.es ot agricultural prod note and an 

intensive study of the prices of son., 
representative piodncis. 

The course may be taken for althei 

two or three erodlta, and the lima will 

be arranged. 
So far aa le known tbla oollege is the 

second in the country to otter a course 

in this subject. The other la the Bin 
neeota Agricultural College. 



RIFLE NOTES 

The U. O. T. C. men, especially the 
Sophomores, are now competing for the 
ladoot title team. The members will 
be determined by those having the 
bigheal total score. All four positions- 
prone, sitting, kneeling, and standing- 
are used. 

The Military Department lias plans 
for an outdoor team in the spring term, 
when the weather will permit shooting 
on the range; and a pistol team is also 
planned. 

lii. —Ralph c. Eaten was married on 
Dec. 3 to Miss K. A. Holland at Atlanta, 
Ga. Mr. Kstes is working for the Fed- 
eral Board of Vocational Education iu 
that city. 




Diamond Corn 
Gluten Meal 





D— IAMOND Corn Gluten Meal is an- 
other one of our great products 
from corn. It is highly concen- 
trated corn protein with a minimum of 
fibre and is used extensively by the care- 
ful feeder with fine results. 

The protein in Diamond Corn Gluten 
Meal costs proportionately less than any 
other feed and, when properly mixed, 
makes a very low priced, highly produc- 
tive ration. It is guaranteed 40% protein 
and invariably runs higher. 

The Massachusetts Agricultural Ex- 
periment Station endorses Corn Gluten 
Meal by stating that, on the basis of its 
composition and digestibility, it has 10% 
greater feeding value than Cotton Seed 
Meal. 

Cofn Products Refining Co. 

New York Chicago 

Also Manufacturers of Buffalo Corn Gluten Feed. 



flOO POUNDS Nt-t-J 



mm, 

IUIHI 



I^WtHI 



8IKIMUM 
!""» MAXIMUM »*J 

ffOft* GLUTEN ME*'- 
^HOHOO* 9 






MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 



Vol. XXXII. 



Amherst, Mass., Wednesday, January 2f>, 1*>22. 



No. 13 



HONORS ARE PAID TO 
SERGEANT A. V. PETIT 

Buried from the College with Full 
Military Honors. 



The bodf of Sergeant A- Victor Petit, 
ufter lying >» ■*•** in "'•' Memorial 
Building for I went. v four hours, was 
burled Saturday morning with full mil- 
itary honors. 

The body arrived in Amherst Thurs- 
day, and on Friday morning was taken 
i,, the Memorial RoOBB by a guard of 
titty ex-service men. The body was 
taken from the cassion into the Memo- 
vial BOOBB where a guard was im- 
mediately mounted whieh continued 
throughout the night and until nine 
o'clock Sal unlay morning. Flowers 
„,.,,. heaped about the casket whieh 
was covered with Hie flag, and wreaths 
ami hou<|uelB testified to tbe esteem in 
which Petit's name was held. Various 
campus organizations, friends, nrgani- 
/aiions which served in France,- Am- 
bers! College. M. A. C.-all were rep- 
rctBBled by their offerings of flowers. 

A; aloe ..'clock Saturday morning, in 
the milts! of a .mid snowstorm, Petti 
left the Annie campus for tbe last time. 
MOorted as a man wen gave bis life de- 
M1%M to I.e. A band from llolyoke, 
obtained by the Legion, led tbe >IU(M 
■lOD, and was followed by the American 
Legion post, tbe Veterans of foreign 
Wars, Ttoop A of tbe \\. O. T. C , four 
representatives ol the Salvation Army 
,,l llolyoke, and tbe tiring squad, Bight 
in number. The eassion. bearing the 
body, ..,..1 its guard of honor, came next, 
ami was followed by the relatives in 
■ limed oars, his fraternity brothers in 
- gaa l'hi F.psilon, and Troops U and <J 
ami the Freshman troops, in uniform. 

The body wan takes toBeiate Bridget's 
(lunch, where a requiem mass was 
rani by Bee. John O'alalley. The en- 
tire escort and many townspeople com- 
pletely filled tbe church ami listened 
Continued on page 7 



VARSITY WINS 1-0 AGGIE SEXTET SWEEPS YALE BULLDOG FROM 

FROM JEFFERYMEN j TS FEET IN SENSATIONAL 3-2 VICTORY 

Brilliant Playing of Collins, Lyons, and Gordon Baffles Yale Defense. 
Bell Excels for Home Team, with Timely Goal Tending. 



In Aggie's Fastest Contest, Collins, 

Gordon, and Plimpton Play 

Stellar Game. 



Yesterday afternoon the hockey nam 
played three 10 minute periods ol last, 
skillful hockey against Amherst which 

resulted le a l-Oeletory for the Maroon 

and While. Do." (.union in a "fol- 
low-up" shot behind Lamb, scored toe 

only goal Of the gamfl in the second 
period. The ice was in perfect con- 
dition and a large crowd was present 

from hoth college*. 

Collie* and Gordon played exception- 
ally well while Kroeck s goal work was 
the best of the year. Plimpton at Am- 
herst's goal savc.l the purple and white 
from a more disast mus defeat . 

Tbe Aral period wee ebaraeteriaed i>> 

the line work of Collins and I'limploii. 

Hard play followed Gordon's aoore la 

the second period and in I he final period 
the offensive work ..l the M . A. C men 
wa- 0*lj slopped by Plimpton's ureal 
work. A delayed Amherst spurt was 
snipped by Kroeck just bciole ' lie 
whistle blew. 
The lineup: 
A Mil hits T . M.A.i. 

Sylvester, lw lw, Gordon 

Hunter, rw rw, Lyons 

Davidson, c c, llaski-.s 

Allison, id Id.Colllne 

Worcester, rd rd, Bodedoa 

Plimpton.- c, Kroeck 

summary: Goal Dmplrea Bainea ret 

Amherst and llilvar.l for M. A. C; ref- 
eree- Lombard of Springfield. Time -J. 
KB. and 141 m. period. Shots stopped 

— Kroeck id, Plimpton 60. Substitu- 
tions- Lamb for llaskins. Til us for 
Sylvester, LaWBOO lot I'itus. 

JUNIOR PROM PROCEEDINGS 

Owinu to the lateness of Faster this 



TRIO OF AGGIE ORATORS 

SUCCESSFUL AT BOSTON 



Saudow Awarded First Prize at Ford 
Hall. 



POULTRY JUDGERS TO 

GO TO NEW YORK 

The Poultry J Bulging team will go to 
N.w York on January M and 27 to take 
part in the lodging at the Madison 
Square Gardes Poulty Show. The team 
will consist of Perry. Lyons '22. and 
Davis '22, and will be accompanied by 
Professor Bant a. 

In past years at A. C. has scored 
high in these contests, and has earned 
I reputation in poultry judging at the 
show, so that possibilities for carrying 
off first place tbis year seem very good. 



MID-WINTER ALUMNI DAY 
February 3 and 4 

WILL YOU BE BACK? 



year the Prom Committee Is experfen< 
illlF considerable diiii-niiy Id Betting a 
definite date for the Junior Promenade. 
[, Mama advisable 10 have the IM-.m 
batweentbe Hoeeof Lent and tbe be- 
ginning of the baseball season, so that 
everyone who wishes can attend. A 
tentative date has been set and will be 
announced next week, if negotiations 

DOWgoittg on between lh< mm. .tee 

a „d Smith and Ht. llolyoke Colleges 
turn out favorably. 

The committee has been hard at 
W0 rk and has ROB* a great way toward 
what promises to be one of the be*l 

proBMlnyeara. Attractive tavorebaee 

already been ordered and offefB fol mu- 

8i , are cominun. last. Elaborate plans 
have been laid and prelims will go OB 
sale as soon as the date is lixed. 

The Prom Committee has been sub- 
divided as follows: Tickets. Folsom and 
Sargent: decorations. Marshman and 

Hale; music, Dowdeo and Grayeon, 
menu, Eldredge. 



Alexander Saudow 'W of l'il l-tield. 
won lirsl pri/.e in the speakim: coiilest 

held at the Union Agricultural ban- 

quel, h.rd Hall, Host Jan. 1*. IMS, 

In connection with the Fourth Annual 
Meeting of tbe HaaaaebuBSHa Agricul- 
tural organizations. He spoke on ' I 
tension Seivice." coinpetini; with (Jol- 
don Ward '2.">. who won second prize 
and Mirabam Krask.r 2:1. w In. received 
,| m ,| p| ;1 cc The prizes were gM 

and 51ti respectively. Waids subject 
was -Whal M. A. < . is doing for me." 

ami Breaker apoke on •What at. 4.C. 

has done fol me." 

Samlow. after sketching the bisioiv 
of the ex'ensioii seivice as an ulllulowlh 

ol the agricultural college of tbeetate, 
pointed out tbe three anderlylng prin- 

Ciplea of the service namely : 

1. To make the eniire siale the class 

mom of the college, 

2. To assist only tboee communities 

that voluntarily elect extension pro- 
jects, and 

:; To train I he best farmers and 
homemakeis to be the teachers ol their 
object lessons. 

Alter describing ibe system of the 

service, be concluded by making a idea 

for the eo-operaiion of the farmers, 
lhal they nl ilize I he services ol the Kx- 
leusioa service and atso gtrc H 'heir 
help when possible in older lo raise the 
auricultnre of tbe fjalted s,; "« - '- "' ■ 
bigber plene ot, development. 

Ward spoke pi incipally on t he Fresh- 
ma Muses In agriculture gleeu at Ibe 

College. In the disCUSStng them he 
Continued on p»ge 4 



Ifusallag the I dog on his own 

mounds is no job. but that is 

w hat the Aggie | 'earn did last 

We.lnesdav nlgbt wl thev beat Yale 
:i 2 at New Haven. The gaSM was hard 
loUgbl tbroUgbOUt, With lb* result that 
it , tbe end of the third period both 
teams weie pretty well used up. Coach 
Mansells icain came through with tbe 
gOudB and showed just whal brand of 

hockey they are capable of playing. 

I he nam leal ned B bit from their defeat 

by Dartmouth tbe week before, and 

showed an offensive that had Vale bat- 
tled from siait to Belch. 

"Hubb*" was cverybeic on I he ice 
and scored iwo goah b.r AgglB within 
the lirsl 10 minutes of play. A New 
Haven paper ilesci ibed " II ubba's" work 
as [olk>WS: "lb- brilliant work of Col- 
lins, i he Halting captata who playe left 

defence, was ion much for the KHh. 
This > . . 1 1 1 1 v. man is about the best 
hockey player thai has appeared iu Ibe 
arena ibis season and it is little wonder 

that the Baj Staters have seen excel 

lent teams with men like him on the 

aqoad." 

ibe game started of! with a rush that 

took the blue l..v suipiise.and in less 
than four minutes later •|lubba" had 

reglsUred tbe tirst goal, followed 
s ,x minutes b] anolher. Vale 

also scored in ibis period wl 

speideu. aided by soinw line pasaing, 
drove one past Kroeck. In the second 
period ••Sharky" Lyons registered the 
only goal when he pushed in the puck 
■iterUordoa bad shot and Ike puck had 
rebounded. Speiden made tbe final 
goal of the name when he, after five 
minutes ot play in the third pelted, 
tucked in a 20-lootcr lhal Jules could 

not see. 

Continued on page 2 



AGGIE LOSES SLOW GAME 

TO TUFTS QUINTET, 32-18 

Repeated Fouling Features Play of 
Both Sides. 

The Tufts Jumbos trod mercilessl.s 
OU IBB Aggie basketball quintet last 

Saturday elgfct el Hedford, emerging 

victorious on the lon» end of a H2 to 19 
leore. The game as B whole was ex- 
ceptionally slow, with a large number 

of fouls Interrupting the play etfre- 

, )U( .,„ intervals. AgglB tried lo keep 

l„ the running the first half, meeting 

arilfc tolerable success as the narrow 

margin ofM at the end of the period 

Continued on page 2 



CAPT. GRANT WILLIAMS 

ON IDENTIFICATION 

Finger-print Demonstration and Ster- 
eoptican Lecture. 
(apt. ©rani Williams, former detec- 
tive of the Now Vork police force, made 

tppearanec at Biockbridgc Hall, Fri- 
day evening, like all policemen, with- 
out introduction. His interesting talk 
on Identification gave the audience 

something to ponder over. Through 
actual demonstration and illustration 
he tried lo convey to tbe audience bow 
the most mysterious cases of the uni- 
dentified were solved. 

The linger print was the first thing to 
be considered. For purposes of demon- 
stration, Mr. Williams asked for volun- 
Continued on page 3 






The Massachusetts Collegian, Wednesday, January 25, 1922. 



YALE DEFEATED 

Continued from page 1 



"Doc" Qordoa played >■■ hard llu ' k !tH 

evening for lie palled Yale's youl-lender 
out of the cage on two occasions only to 
have the rolling puck miss the sage by 
inches. 

Time and again the Aggie ottense 
btokt tblD*gh the defense of the Hlues 
only to have their shois mined aside by 
Bell. The work of Kioeck was excep- 
tionally good? many of liis stops draw- 
ing a big applause Iron the crowd. 
Muzzling the Bull Dog: 

YAI.K. M ' A " ' • 

Buld-.e c, Uaskins 

Shiran, Iw I w, Gordon 

Chislio'.in, rw rw, Lyons 

( .is.om, Id W.OollIOi 

Spesiden, rd i«l, Hoclsdon 

Hell, g *"> Kroeck 

Substitutions— Murray foi Cliisholin, 
Chisholm for Murray, Wliitaker for 
Lyons, Lyons lor Wliitaker, Farnswoiib 
for Shiras, Shiras for Farnsworth, Hods- 
don for Lamb, Lamb for Hodsdon. 
First Period. 

Collins- M. A. C. * :M 

Collins -M. A. 0. 10:21 

Spei<len Vale 1 * 2:,MS 

Second Period. 

Lyons- M. A. C. '■ i:04 

k Third Period. 

Speiden— Yale 4:,,r * 

Keferee— Mckimion. Timer -tjueal. 

"The Mass. Tech. team was a hum- 
mer, underrated by Yale that's a cinch, 
and last niuht the Affgtes Horn the Lay 
Mate showed some ureal slutT by beat- 
ing the 'Klis.'"— New Haven 1'aper. 

"Those boys can play hockey, make 
no mistake about that.' -New Haven 

Paper. 

•'Hubha" barely missed a back- 
hander in the last minute of play, after 
he had drawn out Hell. 

Hockey is getting more and more pop- 
ular at Yale, nearly 2000 people watch- 
ing Wednesday's game. 

The AggieM.I.T. game was originally 
slated for later in the week. With a 
good rest the Aggie team could have 
shown much hetter hockey. 

"They sure know how to raise hockey 
players down Arlington way." 

The following letter reveals the feel- 
ing of our alumni about this game: 

TO TUB COLI-KOIAN ! 

The showing that Aggie put Dp 
against Yale last night in New Haven 
was wonderful. I was fortunate enough 
to be able to see the game, and 1 was 
surprised at the way the boys outclassed 
Yale; and Y'ale has no slouch of a team 
this year. 

As you know. Y'ale had defeated 
Pennsylvania and 1'iinceton within a 
week, and was all set to trim M. A. C. 
Sport writers here in New Haven are 
calling "Hub"Collins the fastest skater 
seen in New Haven this winter, and 
that is not barring any of the big col- 
lege teams. 

Y'ours very sincerely, 

i. (;. Qtmra "21. 



turned the tide in their favor, and en- 
abled iiu-m to pile up a big wore. 

When midway down the tloor the 
striped-jeise\ visitors .lid not attempt 
to go further, but contented themselves 
with long tries at their upponeiits' eage. 
The bright spot of the game was the 
spurt Hurinu tbc second half, when 
Smith and Hike were hustled back late 
1 the game, tWO of A.ggle'1 second period 

baskets being secured at this li , 

The Hill-men continued to score, since 
the guards were repeatedly unable to 
slow up bounds, who was by fai the 
luckiest scorer on the floor. 



Old Deerfield Fertilizers 

"Reasonable m dollars and sense,** 
A. W. HIGGINS, INC., South Deerfield. Mass 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Wedne sday, January 25, 1922. 



['! IIS 

Mahoney, If 
Kvans. if 
Hounds, Rogers 
Hopkins, lg 
Klleman, rg 



MASS. AOOIK 

rg. Hike 

!g, Qowdy 

c. Marshman 
rf.Tumey 

It, Smith 



Snore— TnfU :»2, M. A. C. 10. Goals 

from BOOT- Mahoney 1, Evans 2, Rounds 

.-., Rogers, Harsh men, Tomey, Smith 8. 

Goals 011 free tries-Kvans 12, Tuiney 

t). Referee— SwafBeld. Time -20 m. 
halves, 

INTERCLASS BASKETBALL 

The Two-Year class team met its tirst 
defeat last Friday evening, Jan. 20. at 
the hands of the fast Freshmen quintet 
by A 12-0 score. The game was well 

played by both the 1MB team end tbs 

Two-Year men, who throughout the 
game threatened to score. Clongh had 
11 chances to score for goals, besides 
foul shots, and yet was unable to make 
a count. Fenanti scored six of the 
total yearling's scores, while Fish 
scored a goal ami barker scored two. 
The scores : 

1MB "• "• '"; 

Fenanti, if 1 ** (i 

<;uuiion,lf l » ° ° 

Barber, e • ° 4 

Fish. \n l • " 2 

Mouiadian. lg 

Kelso, lg 



gj m m\ r yaii save money 

We are offering a reduction of 20 P er cent (roni our re 8 ular » >rices 

on Men's Suits and Overcoats, including those made by 

Hart Schaffner and Marx. 

Men's Fur Coats, Fur Lined Coats, Sheepskin Lined Coats and 

Leather Coats. 

If you are interested in any of these garments we will b« very glad to 

show them to you. 



F. M. THOMPSON & SON 



Clothes for College Men for 35 Years. 



C&rpervter & Morehouse, 
PRINTERSi 



No i, Cook Place, 



Amherst, Mase 



Deuel's Drug Store 



TOIL 



Shaving SticKs and Creams 



ARTICLES 

Razors and Razor Blades 



4 4 12 













Totals, 
t\vo-yi:w: 
Barnlcle, If 

Fierce, rf 
Gar ford, c 
Clough, rg 
liaker, lg 

Totals, 

Following this the Seniors beat the 
Juniors in an inter-class game to the 
tune of 25-11. Although the game was 
well played, the Juniors were put to I 
disadvantage when two of their best 
men were put out of the game in t he 
second half, Alger and Wirth being 
pulled for personal fouls. Weber and 
Randall played well, for the Seniors. 
while Dickinson scored seven out of 
the nine points scored for the Juniors. 

The scores: 
v.m »• ''• **• 

Weber, rf * 7 • 

Kokoski, If 1 » > 

Handall,c » 10 

Clark, rg 1 ° 2 

Hooper, lg l ° 2 



VICTOR RECORDS 



Kodaks and Supplies 



Fountain Pens 



J£ 



hoe Store 

SPECIAL 



Saddle Strap Oxfords . . . $5.98 

IhE NEW M.A.C. S0N6 BOOK 

At the Treasurer's Office— $1.00 

LEARN TO SING ALL THE AGGIE SONGS 



BASKETBALL AT TUFTS 

Continued from page 1 



indicates, but in the second halt was 
totally eclipsed by the phenomenal 
basket shooting of Rounds, and the 
faultless foul tossing of Evans. The 
work of these two men was the out- 
standing feature of the game. 

Both teams displayed a rather poor 
brand of passing, the Tufts aggregation 
pulling together in the second period 
with a better grade of teamwork, which 



Totals, 

1988 

Sargent, rf 
Alger. If 
Dickinson, <• 
Wirth. rg 
Giles, lg 



9 7 M 

2 4 



t) 7 7 

Q 





Totals, * 7 H 

The standing of classes follows: 

Tkam 8, I*. Won Lost P. C. 

1922 I I 1.000 

1922 I 2 1 .«* 

Two-Year 2 1 1 • r,on 

1928 3 1 1 - ;m 

1924 2 2 .000 



When You Are Down Town 



DROP IN 



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Have you lost any Fountain Pens yet ? We have a fine assortment 
of Pens and Pencils. Moore, Crocker, Conklin Pens and Pencils. 

/Vfflfff^lF" INN fi y tne Campus Entrance. 



CAPTAIN GRANT WILLIAMS 

Continued from page 1 



HOCKEY SEPTET SLATED FOR 
THREE SPEEDY CONTESTS 



leers from the audioes, Having on 
lbs stags i" persona, he look the Bngsr 
priatsol each, laballmi them win. the 
Initials of the person, lie Instructed 
i,,. group thai erhea l,e u '" "" * ! ** e 

,,, v mi of Ihein Blight maks an im- 

itnn Of his linirer, ami upon rciurn- 

i,,. would identity ins person, The 

... being made, Mr. Williams returned 

.,,„! without dslaf identified the person. 

ii,. explained thai altar one becomes 
acquainted with the loops and whorls. 
urease and capillar] ridges oi the fin- 
print, it is an easy matter to arahe 
a ti ideal location. 

[*be detective not only traces a crimi- 
nal and solves B clime l.ul aels in 

mother tunction, thai being to return 
runawaj boys and uirls to their homes. 
i;> relating two Interesting stories of s 

young !>«>>■ and girl, Mr. Williams 

showed why 78% of the boys and litis 

leave home, 

The last pari of the lecture was de- 
vested to slides on •'The Identification 

,,l the unideiitilied." Mow persons 

were traced by their keys, watehee, 

mndrj marks, lillinys in leelh.and eye 

glasses, was demonstrated i>y the lee 
turer. Probahly the aioal interesting 
, ,,i Identiflcntios was the ease oi 
"Dominies" a skeleton of ■ man who 
bad been buried for two yean, was en- 
esrtbed and "iven over i<> the detect I v< 
tor solutton, With plaateriiai . Mr. 
Williams restored the face of ihs skele- 
, and made it BO litelike I hat I friend 

on seeing It, shouted, "That's Domi- 
nic*. " and fainted. 



Squad is in a Fine Condition for a 
Hard Week. 



Three fast games are In store for the 

hockey team this week. On Thursday 
the team plays BatUS on the If. A. C 
rink al S-86 P. St. Hales has had some 

good games ti>i* year, defeating Bow- 

doin and oilier Maine teams. Thej 

bave a fairly good learn, judging from 
what little Information we bavs ea 

them. Ofl Friday the leani plays Cor- 
nell al Ithaca. Cornell has a heavy 
team and has won all games played 

this season. They defeated Ambers! 

4-0. rhls should prove a very fast 

game. <>n Saturday the team meets 

Hamilion at Clinton, N. V. Hamilton 
has a well rounded, smooth Working 
learn. They defeated Amhersl 1-1, am! 
the dope at the other end of the town 

was thai Hamilton had Beilgfatly better 

learn than Cornell. 

The Aggts team isinA-l condition 

ami a clean slate is expected this week. 
Yale reported our team as the best 
which has played al New Haven this 
year. The forward line ranks wit h t he 

best on any college tenas this season, 
while Captain Uolllae and Hodadon 

make a defease thai is hard to pOSS. 

Kioeck. ai the goal, ; s doing saeeption- 

allv well. Al! in all. I his season's cluh 

Lggfc bai 

oil the i' 



MR. OWEN LOVEJOY, SPEAKER iDCCMITC DETERMINE COSTS 
AT SUNDAY CHAPEL. nttULId UCICnmiHC UUOIO 

it isn't the initial cost of a dairy sup- 
ply that determines iis economy, hut 

rather the results produced by its con- 
tinued use. Many Dairymen have made 
what they thought was a saving by 
lower lirst cost only to later Bad thai 
they Imve sacrificed all and more to loss 
ill quality and service. 

The dependants lout" quality and 

value ol the serv.ee which always fol- 
lows I lie use ol 



BASKETBALL QUINTET 

DUE FOR A COMEBACK 



Two Fast Games Assured at Boston. 
Tbe Varsity quintet pinyes two faat 

unt-oMowa names Ibis week, bul 

Igh there has been a slump in the 

two aaines. the old liulnin^ 

is there and we look toward i" a clean 

- re Ibis week. On Wednesday the 
B plays Harvard at Cambri ige. 
Harvard has won live sanies this seaSOB 
Sod lost four. They were defeated by 
tkiBuectient Aggie 8 >'8 0, bwl won from 
M. I. T. ;Jl-^7. The name should be last 
and close. On Thursday the team plays 

M. I. T. at Cambridge, since suffering 

sal at lbs bands of the M. A.C team 
\ in the season, they have played 
two games ami lost two. 

The aggie team sutlers from tin- loss 
■it Tumey who is in the infirmary due to 
an injury received in his kuee during 
tbe Tufts game. Probably either Bar- 
rows or Uoser will take his place. Bar- 
rows is l sophomore who has shown up 
well this seaeott, and Uoser will be re- 
mbered as the premier foul-shooter 
•I last season's team. Maishman has 
• atiy recovered from bis injuries re- 
ed in football and is fast getting 
ich into shape. On t tie whole, the 
i^ine; has improved and some good 
I ms ean be looked forward to. 



FRESHMEN DEFEATED BY 

DEERFIELD SEXTET 2-1 

The Freshmen were forced to take 
the small end of a 2-1 score in their 
firs! hockey game "I the season last 
Wednesday w i 1 1) Deerfield Academy. 

The gams showed both teams some- 

whai green but with tine possibilities. 

The Freshmen started oit strong :>" (l 
eaged the puck early in the liisi period. 

McOeoeh. the !a-t yearling left defense 
man, < allied the puek the whole length 
of 'he rink and shot the goal from a 

difficult angle. Tbe second period was 

.seoreless and (he puck remained in the 
Center Of tbe link practically all Hie 
time. In the third period, however, 
the Deerfield boyi, BTgWl on b\ their 
COach, Kine -21. came back with a rush 
and dropped the puck into the goal 
twice in quick succession. Adams was 

do- star of Hie Deerfield sextet. 

The score : 



A forceful address of unusual interest 
was delivered at Sunday Chapel, .Ian 
T>, by Mr. Owen Hovejoy of New York, 
chairman of the National Child Labor 

Committee, 
'The problem of the youthful child 

laborer is nearly solved," be said, "but 

great problems eoueerning America's 

Children slill face us. The children of 
the rural sections particularly need OUT 
attention." 

•'ll is an American characteristic to 
wan until a situation b e co mes intoler- 
able; I hen WO love to jump bravely in,' 
and attempt to clean ii up. Why can- 
not we learn to foresee evils in our na- 
tional life in lime lo remedy theni.' 

''Our rural population le steadily de- 
clining. Former prosperous farming 
regions are now cultivated by Ignoranl 
lenanl farmers. The present rate of 
decline Of the rural population, lo- 
Melbei with I he steady increase of 

tenancy, means thai uuleas we take 
>t,-ps to prevent it, in twenty-five years 

American cities will be even i e over- 
crowded, while the farm population 
will be largely of nomadic tenants." 
"Our key lo Hie situation lies with 

this generation of country children, 
They need attention la three directions: 
bealtb, freedom, and education. Once 
ire warned country people against the 

utihealihfuliiess ol the city, but BOW 
„.. ...i] ,.j, v people of the nnsanitarv 
conditions of the country. The health 
ol I oral children MUSI be looked out 
lor. 

"Education is even more neglected. 
in some sections Illiteracy in a grave 
problem. No American child should 
grow up without learning to read and 

write, yet in the South many children 
do not no to school at all. H we ale 

going to keep a sturdy Intelligent farm 

population in America we must provide 
KOod school log for every country child." 






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This quality service has gained for 

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Cleanaer an established place in the 

Dairy industry because it is a guarantee 

of that sanitary protection which in- 
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These results are guaranteed to you 

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Burnett, Loorois, lw 

lw, Guild, Sheldon, Sprague 

Adams, rd M. McGeocb 

dakes. Id rd.Huteblus 

Corning, g g, While, Pel rce 

Time three 10 minute periods. Bef- 

,.,,.,. -Dowd of M. A. C. Ooal umpires 

— Doneiley of Deerfield and Prosi of M. 
\. c Coals -McGeocb, Burnett, Bcott. 



'1*. - C. U. Pbipps lias left the Geneva 
Bxepriment .Station, New Nork stale, to 
'ake up work in Entomology at the 

Missouri state Fruit Experiment sta- 
tion. Mountain Odove, Mo. 



MID-WINTER ALUMNI DAY 
February 3 and 4 

WILL YOU BE BACK? 



COLLEGIAN COMPETITION 

The Standing of the competitors of 
Till. M \s- M III -I us Coi.I.i.oi \N up to 
date is as follows: 

I |,l TOIilAI. IIKI-AUIMKNI. 

1084. 

Kennedy •8.1 

Waueh **•' 

Bead w - 9 

Darling 10 - 7 

IPJ5. 

Taube 17H 

Corwin ld»° 

Dalai 1H7 

Oliver l«8 

lirsl.NKSS 1.KI-AKI MINI. 

I98f, 
Blade -'>■* 

Simpson »v.U 

Lewis 80 

Oliver in the editorial department 
ami Lewis in the business department 
arc oew candidates this term. Nylen 
and T utile have also signified their In- 
tentions of entering the business com- 
petition, while Btanntford, Keith and 
Parsons are entering the editorial com- 
petition with this issue. 

•fO, V. <'. Williams is now winter 
course Instructor in Animal Husbandry. 
Ile has been teaching for a year at Del- 
aware College. 



LABROVI 

THE LEADING TAILOR 
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Full Dress Suits and Tuxedos 
to Rent 

Full Line of Ores* Supplies 

Cleaning, Pressing, Remodeling, Re- 
pairing and Dyeing promptly done. 

Single Suit* Prmmmmd, reduced to BOo 
On Rre*»ina Ticket* BOc 

It will pay you to buy a ticket. 



We do expert work of all description*. 
1 1 A mrty UL- LABROVITZ I'hone 302 W 



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Shoe RopmMng While U Well 

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Hen's Waste Boles, Bobber Heels . . ■ $2.50 
Men's Half Bole». Rnbbet 'Heele . . • |2.00 
Men's Robber Boles. Bobber Heeli . . |Z.« 

Men's Half Soles »'-50 

Work (iuaranteed-AMHKKHT HOU8K 



You can save from 

$3.00 to $5.00 a pair 



— on- 



Young Men's 
College Footwear 

by buying at 

FeLeEMINO'S, Northampton 






The Massachusetts Collegian, Wednesday, January 25, 1922. 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Wednesday, January 25, 1922. 



TBE MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIAN 

Published erery WedaeedaVJ by the 
StudentH of the Mahha.lniHetts Ag- 
ricultural College. 

BOARD OK BDITOBS. 



peclalty i.\ beginners, and ;"' sttempl 
made to treat our aeweal Inatltutlon 

with care, in onler lhat if may ai leasl 
last 1 1 i 1 1 i 1 spring. 



CAMPUS CALENDAR 



MUM K. JeSUSS* -2-2 K.l.tnrln rhlef 

hobaki w. 81-k.n.i <n mamm Mtmr 
Abbociatk. Burrow. 

,,,n, f ,i.B.AKK,M:inv'V« \*'\ l»BB'« Mtt»1 
Kenneth A. BAMAKO W «■ MtloB Wlt«r 

joHM-Wmrnn 1 * atMstkMttoi 

ROTH M. W ••' Bseha»«e Boltoi 

STANI.KY W. MOW KV '•« 

Ins in.. W Si \i i 

S>>< OHO* < "HI N "-' :; 

Ei.ihiia I Bl IBB. .!« •■ '*» 



3 10 r. 



7 (Ml I 



NlTBINKSB DKPAKTMKNT. 
CHABI.K* A. B..K '2-2 BM l M WMWBW 

MTK..N <i. 1VHU1 II Advcrtmi.ur Ma.iaa.cr 
Owen K FOtSOB « < Ir.uUtl.... MuMW 

Hol.l>KN Will 11 AKF.U '2H 
O.IKH.KI. L. I*KI DTK -t 
ROBSBT K. HTKKKF. "*« 



»;:'.( i p. 



Subscription |2.(K) per year. Single 
copies, 10 cents. Make all order* paya- 
ble to The Massachusetts Collegian. 

In caBe of change of address •»•>!. 
•oribers will please notify the bosioese 
manager as soon as possible. 

Entered Mlicond <•!»•» matter at the Amherst 
Pott Office. Accepted for inailins at special 
rate of pontage provided for in section 110.1. Act 
of October. 1917 authorized August '20. 1918. 



Tim 
N-IMI 



The Arena Party ProbUm. 
Shall the Arena Tally b« perpelu- 
aieil in this lnslilulion ? Ahlelphia 
Hiirely louche. I upon asul.jecl which is 
in need of discussion when il brought 
this .|iies(ion l.efore the assemhly. 
Probably no student foiuiu ill years has 
Called forth s.. much disriissii.ii troin 
all classes in the auditorium. 

One ITOap of spenkot- earnestly 
condeinned the practice of aubjsgatlog 
Freshmen by means ..I an evening in 
the sawdust rin». They argued that il 
was childish and apt 10 (fire a had 
name to the BollegS. lint, alter all. 
were these men expressing the real 
sentiment of the student body.' liven 
red -blooded fellow usually likes spoil 
and fun when it is at the I KpCBSC oi 
someone else. What is an arena party 
but an attempt to have a line Innocent 
■BOH with a Freshman .' No doubt the 
yearlinu needs the treatment- a fad 
which is actually at the base of the 
whole affair. The Arena Party does 
not have as iis purpose physical injury, 
but simply and solely the •humiliation 

of the ralebreaker. H seeks U> bring 
him to the realisation tbat he cannot 

have things his own way if he is a true 

Ayu'ie man. 

some outsiders naturally hate tbe 

impression that personal injuries are 
likely to result to the participant in the 
arena. Such is n.>t the eaae. As the 
President of the Senate explained •"The 

expectation and lack of knowledge©! 

what Incoming is the worst part of the 

affair. 11 Too much street- it being laid 
on the Importance of the event, for only 

one arena party is held I jreai and 
some years have passed wit h none at 
all. As has been said ot the insiiiiiili- 
cant poodle. "His bark tot woree than 
his bite - " so it is with the arena party, 
"its notoriety is worse than its harm . 



\Vi i.visi.w. .Ian 25. 
M. -Assembly. Speaker. I'ro- 
laaaor Many P Ward. Inioii 

Theological Benilnary, New 
York City. 
M.— Animal Husbandry Hub 
Meeting, Koom 114. Stock* 
bridge Hall. Speaker. Mr. 
('. I,. ISIacknian. Springfield. 

Basketball, Harvard at Cam- 

bridge. 

Tmurbuai . .1 »«. M. 

Hockey, Kales at M. A. C. 

Banketbal), M. 1. T a< Cam- 

bridge. 
vi. Stereoptlcon Lectors for 

short Course girls. Microbi- 
ology Building. 

M _y. \V. C. A. steeting, Me- 
morial Building. 

vi. -Orchestra RebeaiBSl, Me- 
morial Building. 
Pkiiiat, .Jan. 27. 
Hookey, Cornell University 

at Ithaca. \. V. 

tilce club Concert, Mortb- 
bamplon. B. P. O. E. 

Dance, Ten Weeks Students 
at Memorial Building. 
s v 1 1 ni>\\ . .Ian IB, 
Hockey. Hamilton at Clinton, 
N. V. 

si \n \\ . .1 vn IB, 
9-10 a. m. Sunday Chapel. Speaker, 
In. Prederich Lynch, The 

i Inistian Wolk. New Voik 

City. 

Ti kuiai . Jam. SI. 

i, I,..- club Bebeareal In Me- 
morial Building. 

u.— Basketball Game. Boston 
University ai M . A . c. 
Wkdmshav. Fi:is. 1. 

U.— Assembly, Debate 

tvveen I he Freshmen 
Sophomores Subject 
salved, Thai tbe present dis- 
ciplinary relations between 
the Freshman and Sophomore 

classes are detrimental to 

college spirit . 

Hockey. Wesi I'oini at West 

Point. 



7-:iti p 



:( 4". P 



LETTERS AND MEDALS 

AWARDED TO 32 MEN 

The annual presentation of Ms look 
place in Chapel Monday morning, when 

letters were presented to 20 football 
men as well as a Mas to live men. AI 
the names were read by Act ing-Presi- , 
dent Lewis the men stepped onto the I 

platform and were glvea the certificates | 

as well as a hearty hand-shake from 

aetlng-Deau Meekmer. To those men 

who bad not received them previously, 

\i -waters were presented also. Pol- 
lowing the athletic awards gold and 
Stiver medals weie presented to eight 
men for non-athletic activities. 

Those le receive the II were: Cotton 
'», Collins '», Freeman "22, Marshinaii 
»J8, Heal '2:1. Mohor '98, Mudgett 2:5. 

Alger 'SS, Srayeoa *%t, salmon '24, 
Turoey '88, Leland '22. Packer '22. Bent 
»M, Field '», clark '22. Sargent '2:i. 

Acheson '22. I.e wandowski '22 and 

I'eck '22. 

Those who received the AMA were: 
Andrews '22, Chapin '22. Coiianl '22, 

Ifigro '22. and Krasker '22. 

(,,,l.l medals were awarded to the fol 
lowing Seniors: 

C \. Duck, Husiness Managei of tbe 

( (1 1. 1. 1.O I AN. 

15. F. Jackson, Kdiloi-in-chiet of P»22 

/„,/'•/ and C01.1.1.1.I AN. 
.).(.. Lowery, Manager of the Musical 

Clubs. 

H w. spring. Husiness Manager ol IBM 
Index and Managing Editor ol Ike 

( t.l.l.l OIAN. 

( . It. Vinten, header ol (ilee Club. 
f, V. WaUgb, Leader of Orchestra. 

Also two silver medals were awarded : 
K. A. Harnard "22. Assistant K.liioiot 

(OI.I.KI.IAN. 

U. F. Martin '22. Leading part in "School 

[or Scandal" and "Jobs Epps." 

Acting-Piesident Lewis also spoke of 
the honorable mention due three men 
wii.. represented this college in Ford 
Hall at Boston last week when they ad- 
dressed a meeting there, speaking on 
agricultural subjects. The three men 
were krasker '», Sandow «, and 
Ward '25. 



TOWN HALL 



Thursday 



Mat. 3, Eve. 
6-45.8-30 



SPPKK-PKOmCTION l»AY! 

Win. D.-Mille's prodiution of 
Sir .Ihh. Itarrie's fainoun play. 
"What Every Womaa 



Bnswii nltlii s~* — MA ''"n' 
Includlns Loi 
Conrad Nagel 



_jple.._ 
Including Lots WiUoB and 



Friday 



Mat 3, Eve. 
6-45. 8-30 



Saturday 

Mat. 3, BVS. 
6-45. 8-30 

Monday 



Mai. 3. BVS. 
6-45.8-30 



Newt . Comedy 
Aesop's Fables 

,!as Oliver Curwood's "God's 
Country and the Law," with 
Gladys Leslie. A viuon.iiH 

st..i\ of red 1.1 led adven- 
ture stated in that BTSBt out- 
door i.layttrouiid-tlie Nortli 

Woods 

Scenic reel 
.reel At St. John Comedy 

Alice Brady ami Geo. Faw- 
cett in "Mush Money," by 

Samuel Merwin. A powerful 

drama of life on Fifth Ave. 

and of Mfea few blocks away. 

News reel 

Harold Lloyd i.,"FromMaBd 
to Mouth," -'reel Comedy 

Wallace Reid. Asnes Ayres 
and Theodore Roberts in 
"Too Much Speed." A story 

of love ami racing cars, and a 

dare-devil driver who piove.l 

a fast worker in both. 

Pathe Review 

i reel Christie Comedy 



Why go down town for a 

First-Glass Hair Gut or Shave? 

Patronize the 

College Barber Shop 

Memorial Building, M. A. C. 

H. J. DUWELL, Proprietor. 



be- 
am! 
Ke- 



Save Money -Buy During Our 

ANNUAL PREINVENTORY SALE 



Real Bargains on 
QUALITY GOODS 

Sale Now Going On ! 



G. EDWARD FISHER 



ORATORS AT BOSTON 

Continued from page 1 



"Save the Surface and You Save All." 
It has been brought to OUI attention 
that the bowling alleys in Menu. rial 
Hall are heiny. used a bit too harshly 
hy Home who insist in "lobbing" the 

halls and dentine, Ike surface «.r the 
alley. More care should be taken, es- 



pointedoet what they made him See 

and understand In agriculture tbat be 

had never seen bet.. re. and refuted the 

prevalent Impression that little agricul- 
ture was being laugbt at Ike college. 

Krasker opened his talk with a lew 
Introductory remarks, slatine some ..I 

bis experience* ol his lirst day on tbe 

farm. He lirsi told why he became In- 
terested in farming and secondly, why 

bis interest in agriculture has been re- 1 

tsined. In dosing be disproved the 

theory held by some that a college ed- 
ucation educates one away from the 
farm, providing 8 Student enters the 
college with farming in view. 

It was a distinct innovation for the 

students frooo the college to address 

agriculturists at tbell annual banquet. 

Pormerlly ike assemblage was addressed 
by members ol tbe faculty. Tbe gen« 

eialiinpiessii.il made by I he student's 
representatives was s.. good that it is 

certain the custom will be continued. 



SENIOR CLASS NOMINATIONS 

The last meeting of the .Senior Class 

eras held Tuesday avealag, January 17, 
in the auditorium of Memorial Hall. 

Owing 10 the small number present it 
was decided that the class act as a nom- 
inating body only, and have the final 
elections take place by ballot at assem- 
bly on February 2T>. The cheers elected 
are to hold office until next spriagwben 
permane.il class officers will be chosen. 
The nominations were as follows: 

President:— A. W. Smith, J.N. Lew- 
andowski. ('. H. (b.wdy. .1. Kroeck. and 
t;. 11. Thompson, Jr. 

Vice-president:—?. V. Waugk, <■. A. 
Cotton, C. t. Clark, C, U. Vinten, and 
H. I,. Collins. 

Treasurer:— J. Kroeck, H. 8. Moeely, 

P. M. Keed. A. S. Higgles, B. i. Field 

(lass Captain:— C. H. Roser, F. K. 

Hooper. M J. Mordock, H. M. Acheson, 
ami J. T. Sullivan. 

Sergesntst-Arms:— i. F. Leland, <i. 
A Cotton. S L. Freeman, G. B. Packer, 

and 11. L, Collins. 

By a unanimous vote Miss H- W. 

H order was elected class secretary, and 

i B. F. Jackson the permanent class his- 

: torian. 

If, the same man be elected for 

[twoyffiees, he shall hold the higher, 

and the candidate having the next 

1 highest count lor the lower office shall 

' receive that election. 



A. .P STAEBNER 

Agent tor 

Browning, King & Co. 

A national tailoring institution. 

SUITS and OVERCOATS MADE to MEASURE 

Excellent fabrics-Styles with an in- 
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TEL. 1TO 



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We cordially invite your patronage. 




"WINTER COMBS TO Ulll.K THE VAR1BD YEAH" 

February an.l March are lh«> snownml-lriow ...»..< h«. .». WALSH bmwi ugh •»• 

(untlile «„r..u'.,ls which Uvv V out ovcm. thv .nosl pcnrlrntiiift wind a.ul allow you to 
frolic in defiance ol Old Boreaa. Don't overlook our MtuKinaw ShlrUI 



\RENA PARTIES CAUSE 



SPIRITED DISCUSSION 



VARSITY HOCKEY WEAKENS AT 
M. I.T. IN FINAL PERIOD 



The Assembly na Thursday was in 
charge ol Adelpbia, President Csrlyle Fail to Keep Speedy Engineers From 



6-0 win. 
The Aggie bockej sestet lined up 
agaiitBl M. 1. T. In tbe Boston Anna lasi 



Oowdy presiding. In ordei tbat tbe 
|-,e>liinen migbi become familiar with 
„,nie ..I the oollege songs wbicb are nut 

M well known about tbe campus Tbi|r(|d B| u , ;illll ,,„ lwo ,„.,,, >lU 

Hank" asked "Bay" Vinten,.. leads f ., rl u ,. p!jl y ed lbe Engineers. In tbe 

(awsoags "Boost Old Ags e, Jollj ,,,,,,, M ., >i(lll l,^,.,,., ,,„. Haroon and 

Students," end "When Twilight Sbad ^^ w( . ;|ki . m . (1 ;illll v ,,, u l:m Bpi 



First Period. 
No score. 
Second Period, 
lech. I Duveinet, 

Tech. -' ^ HbUI . 

Third Period. 
Tech, 8 Halion, 

Tech. i Dal Ion, 



;!:U7 
0:1« 



.J'.i 
7:81 



„«a Deepen" were the numbers be 

UBOSC to sins-. "Dick" Wendell ac.oui- 
psnied on the piano. 

I he Honor Constitution was brought 
,„.,„„. the student body by Kennetb „ ol|Ill work by cjeptaln Sickle at gosl I 

Moody. The assembly seemed sat islied ,., , , ,, ,,, 



;ii to ii acorn before tbe Hnsl whistle 

I blew 

Vicale showed some Que bockej 

in the lirst \w< periods and Old) excep. 



lech..-. Ilayden. 14:W 

Tech, 6 Ma.N.ii 14:41 

geore reefa 8. Penalties Rec ' 

period. Taylor, irlppleg I minutes? 
i hit a period. Da) ton, holding sink. I 
minute; afacNeil, tripping, 8 minutes. 

bet.i..- Don Sands and Monte I..- 

Pebre. Time Three 15 minute periods. 



aa no discussion was nil. led. 

The Deal mallei before the nieeliim 
*SS the discussion ot arena parlies. 
Arguments were ei\eii both l<-r and 
gainst t In in. Anion- lln.-e who spoke 

in favor of tbem were: Hooper. Noyes, 

Sly rick, Weaiherwax. and " M" Smith. 
Those wbowere ag«insi ibem Included: 
Llodqulst, Kre.l (..ok. Duff) an.i others. 
The points made la favor itl them were 

Ihal I hey take I he conceit mil ..! I he 
I'reslilnen. lhal they pul StHUC spiril 
ml,, ihe college life, lhal they do no- 
body any harm and some ol u> aome 
KOOd, and that they help to make men 
OUt ot boys. The suggestion was made 

iiuii it tbsj were s« good why not have 

tin. re of them. This wmi loud applause 
from tbe Sophomore sections. Tbe op- 
position offered the arguments that 
they iniuilate the victims, that ibey arc 
childish and unbecoming to college 
men. and that ibej advertise tbe col- 
lege in the Wrong buhl. Ilele a sti- 
ll. Il was made to lind a substitute 

foi them, preferabl) tbstol making the 
offenders work. At the end of the hour 

no decision was reached, s.. I hat the 
discUBStOfl may be continued at a later 
dale. 



MR. WATTS ADDRESSES 

MEETING OF BUSINESS MEN 



Secretary to President Gives Interest- 
ing Talk to Gathering in Cam- 
bridge. 



Mr. Ralph .1. Walts. Secret a r\ to 

the President <>f this college gave ■ 

most interesting talk to the Association 
..I Business Officers of New England 
Kiiucational Institutions at their go- 
nna! meeting which was held iii ihe 
Walker Memorial Building of M.I.T.. 
Dec, 88. The subject nf his talk dealt 
exclusively with the intricate problems 
il "Cost Accounting for Colleges." 

by a careful and systemstic research 
Mr. Walts showed that ••Industrial cost 

accounting rep r e s ents one of the nota- 
ble developments of modern business. 

DuriiiK the past decade, and more par- 
ticularly during the past live years an 
enormous volume of business has been 
performed on a basis whereby ii has 
a essential that manufactures and 
contractors should have an exact knowl- 
..' ni their costs of operation 11 they 
• i" realise lbe maximum of profit." 

During the course of his talk. Mr. Walls 

showed thai a college today la prscti- 

csll) run on the same basis as lhat of 

i business corporation, being its ureal 
object, not oi creating wealth, but of 

giving the best possible education to 

its students. 



for Tech prevented ibem from scoring. 
The Tech cage was peppered with shots 
from Captain Collins, Lyons and tior- 

doii but Nickle was equal 10 lbe occa- 
sion and oiih once did lbe puck uet b) 
1 1 i 1 1 1 . This was a >boi b\ Lyons which i 
lbe referee did uol allow on account ol 

,,||s ,le pla) ■ ' aplain Collins was I he 

outstanding sisfol lbegame,tbe faatest 

iiioii on Ihe ice, liandliiie Ihe puck 

cleverly and with su accurate eye for 
the Tech rage, Borers! "t his numer 
oos Hashes down tbe Ice were thwarted 
only through flue stops by Sickle On 
tbe defense "Hubba" also was s gresi 
■tumbling bb.ck to the opposing for- 
wards. Lyons snd Gordon were others 
wh.. stood out prominently In ihe 
\euies - play, i-'oi M l T Duveruet, 
MacNcil and Dalton were the most no- 
table performers, lbe latter scoring 

lb tee goals. 

The lirsi period started oil fast and 
was fslrlj even throughout, though lbe 
x^mj,... were uutsknting their opponeuts 

and Sickle wee .ailed «.i lo more 

work than Kroeck 

The second period saw some lasl and 

furious bockej . with M. A. C. on lbe 
aggressive and tbe puck In their oppo- 
nent's territory lbe greatei pari oi tbe 
time. Tech bowevei scored twice in 
this session. Both tallies followed long 
shots from center Ice which rebounded 
directly In front oi tbe cage and lech 
men were there to brush them lo. Tbe 
Aggies tried desperately to even up 

matters and Collies, Lyons snd don 

kepi tbe home team defense on the 
jump; but Vckle invariably warded off 
the puck, with the exception ol Lyons 1 

shol which did not count. 

It was the third period which w;is 

disastrous for at. A. C. The Ag 
were played out and showed the effects 

Of the two previous periods and the 

hard game the night before. The En- 
gineers, "ii tbe contrary, sh iwted at 

their best and exhibited more speed and 

team play than earlier in the game. 
They kepi Hie Maroon ami While on lbe 

defensive and found little trouble In 
scoring, driving the rubber Into the net 
four times before the period clo 

one ot these cai Ilrectly from a face- 

H in front of the cage following a pretty 

piece of lean. WOTs bj Daliot. and Mac 

Neil, ami the other two came as the n - 

suits Of individual ellortsoii the pait Of 
t he same two pla\ei- 

Tbe line-up ; 



SIDELIGHTS ON THE GAME 

\ considerable number ol A| 

Alumni were present, smong them being 
< apt. Jerry McCarthy snd Harold Poole 
oi last year's team, \e-ie apparently 

had more rooters than tbe home team. 

The Aggies looked like winners in the 
lirst period and got a rousing welcome 

when they came on the ice for I be sec 

olid session. 



For Your 

Flashlights 

Interiors 

College Scenes 

Arrange with expert through 
ELISHA BLISS '24 

Campus and Dress Footwear 

QUALITY TRIK HOSIERY 

Reasonable Prices. 



THOMAS S. CHILDS 

I M olil-oi; v I l I. 

278 878 Hi^h Bt. Uolyoke 



ALUMNI 

i:». il. II. Archibald la coacbina. a 

WlUUing basketball team in Undue 

water, where bela tbe principal ol ihe 
high school. 

•jl. "Micky" Gssklll is now working 
toi the Draper Corporation in Hopedale, 

acting as .ash accountant. He enjoys 

his wolk. as well as his ( oi 1.1 «.i \s 

which he receives regularly, 

Chompson's Cimclp Calks 

If mam "Oil 1". I.e:u some lent ItvS. (Bappl 

rlance i n . .-..me In and listen t....in i .i.iu.ov 

H»t, n's..« Li. tin the utmost la Record 

Sel \ Ice, COfltC '" 

THOMPSON'S SHOP, Rear National Bank 



M. NOVICK 

Custom Tailor 



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Neat ly and prompt] done. 
Work called for and delivered. 

Save money by buying a Pressing Ticket. 

4 Suits Pressed for $2.25. 

Dress Suits for Hire. 



19 Pleasant St. 



Tel. 9 J 



WHITE OXFORD CLOTH SHIRTS 

in several different styles and in all sizes. 

Neat, Good Looking and Serviceable 



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correct MENS OUTFITTER exclusive 

Amherst House Hlock. 



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DKAI.KHS IN 

DRY AND FANCY GOODS 
Trunks Bags Suit Cases 



1 1.< ii. 

Taylor, Iw rw, Lyoue,Slcoll,Lamb 
Dalton, Wilbur, c c,Haekloe, Whltakei 

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Hayden, rw '" ■ 

MacNeil. Dalion. hi rd,Hodsdoo,LyoBH 

,. , ,. i hi. Collins 

|)n\elliet .lil 

Nickle. R 



Candy Shop 



Soda Pmrlor 



BEICKM A N'S 

Candies and Ice Cream 



Northampton, 



Maaaachuaalta 



\ 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Wednesday, January 25, 1922. 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Wednesday, January ^5^1922. 



S. S. HYDE 

t I'leasant Street (up one tlluiit . 

Oculists' Prescriptions Filled 

Broken Lenses Accurately Replaced 

Big Ben Alarm Clocks 
AND OTHER RELIABLE MAKES 

Kully (iiiaranteed 



1NTKRFRATERN1TY RELAY 
'llic second set ol Interfrateratty relay 

races which was scheduled tc save been 

run last Friday, bttl which was post- 
,,,,,,,.,1 beOIOM "I tl'f services being 
l, ( .],l |o the Men. .-rial Building, was run 
off Monday, .Ian. SB. Aa tblssel the 

s ,h ( du]. e date behind, II baa been 

advanced one dale. I'"*- '" lbs Bold, 

(be rac-s on Mun. lay wen- not vei\ fast. 

Tbe order of i be raei s : 



PRIVATE DANCING LESSONS 

MABELLK LOVHJOY MILLS 

Individual Dancing a Specialty 

Mills Studio, Phone 450 1;, P. O. Block 



»j. r. v. 

Darling, 
Barnard, 

kennc.h . 

Bllake, 

Won l.y <„> T. V 



AI.IMI A (.A MM A KHO. 

Slevensoii. 

Witt, 

Nelson. 

Bats*, 

Time 8.808 10. 



GREAT PRICE REDUCTIONS 

Men'alllalt Sol— Sewed *'•*• 

Men's <.on.l>e;u ■ Kulilifi Heels ■ - 50 

Meos Wliole Neolin Soles ;.l.<l<.oo.l>ear 

Rabbet Heels '' 

Men's Whole l.eall.c. Hotel Scwe.l **& 

Hoodyesi Bubbsr H««h • • • • '• 3W 
All Work Guaranteed ! 

High-grade Line of Men's Shoes 
for Sale at Low Prices. 

J. GINSBURG 

19 Pleasant Street, on row way ap towm. 



ALPHA SIC. MA PHI. KAl'IX <■ VMM A PHI. 

Biggin, Joaaburg, 

I.eland. BUtee, 

Bayea, Craig, 

Lswandowski. Wbltlum. 

Won l.y Alpha Sigma Phi. Tint* S 84. 

nu mum \ K vi-e \. l.AMl:i.A .III At. en \. 
pierce. Kemp, 

Nolle. I'ernal.l. 

I, unci son. Steele. 

Wood won b. luring. 

Won by I'lii Sigma Kappa Time i. \~ 



FRESHMAN BASKETBALL TEAM 
ADDS TWO MORE VICTORIES 

Defeats Greenfield 18 12 

The Freshman basketball team de- 
feated Greenfield Blgh by a score of IK 
tolSal Hi'- Drill Hall on Saturday,. Ian. 

14, following tbsrsrsttj bocksygame 

W it I, Dai nth. The Fresbmaa team 

■bowed ili'ii superiority in every de- 
partment of t lie «ame, and l.y Being th* 
live man defense, they practically had 

i be Greenfield boys al lhali merey. 

Samuels was the individual star of 

lbs game, scoring 10 of t tie Frsabmen'a 
points. He completely bnffied hi* ep- 
ponsata when t he ball was in his 
poaaeeatoa. Sullivan and Hurley also 
played well. The Greenfield lean. 

scored elgbl ol ibeirlS potnti by fouls, 

and noi until the las! minute and a 

quarter, when tbej eagsd two field 
counters, were they luceaasfnl In scor- 
ing by bask st a. 

The lineup : 

\i v>~. v..'. II -■"'■ I s 



MUSICAL CLUBS 



THE MILLETT JEWELRY STORE 

Fine Watch Repairing. also Broken Lente« 
Replaced Pron«otl> 



32 Hal a Street. 



Arohtrit. Haas. 



— TKY— 

O. H. GOULD 

for Bret-claaa 

Watch, Clock and Jewelry Repairing 

18 Pleaaanl Bt., Amherst, Haas. 



GRANGE STORE 

Fine (jroceries 
Candies aimo Fruit* 

MASON A. DICKINSON, Proprietor 

Aggie Stationery 

with Class Numerals 
1922 TO 1925 



The rehearsal laal nlghl was tbe Bral 
aines the Boston Ttrlp. The rlub was 
m encellesl condition after theli long 
vacation, and should render the Fiks al 

Northampton an excellent program BSXl 
Friday night, Jan. ll. Besides ibis 
concert, there are ntbsra in ths near 

Inline a> follows : 

p eU 8 Alumni Day Concerts in Bow- 
ser \udiloiium. 
Pen, in Concert al Deerflsld Acadsroy. 

r'eli. 1 » t'on.eiiat A m heisi Town Hall. 

Other dates are being arrangsd, 
h„i are undecided as yet. Kserybodj 

i„ i he clubs will make I he Mips. 

There will be aa Orehsstra rehearsal 
tomorrow night, J»a. 80, al 8-00 p. n„ 

l„ ( „,ie! to i-rush up on ihe regular 

pieces and also to learn new ones lor 

tbe coming concerts. This rehearsal la 
important!!! 



Sullivan, II 
Samuels, rl 
Simons, c 

Beavst, rg 
Cabtll, rg 

II urlev. Ik 



is. r. r. 

I u ti 

a i ut 

I) 

1 (» -> 

II I) 

(I 



Totals, 1 ' « 

..Kill \ I III I. 111.11 I'- 
ll. I . p. 
O'Hara.lg " ° " 

Me./, lg » ° " 

Vlckery.rg " ° ° 

Andrews, rg ° ° ° 

Ftc.rick. C 118 

Thompson, II ti 7 7 

Lynch, Ig I ° ■ 

Partenbsimer, ri " ° " 



star of (he game, esglng six baskets 
for a total of 19 poinis. The manner in 
which Samuels handled ihe ball com- 
pfetslj bewildered bis opponents, while 
on the offensive he was a player to be 
watched. Simmons played aa except- 
ionally good name, at center, and with 

Beaver and Hurlej m guards tbe op- 

poneBta seemed unable to break 
tbrongb the Aggie defenst . 
With tbe exception of Ihesahsiltatss, 

who entered Ihe uanif la Ita last stages. 

ev.ry kggle player managed to cage at 

|,..,sl ull e basket. The game was the 

.leanest played t bus far, for onl.v live 
fools were called on both teams dur- 

inti the ci, lire game. 

The lineup: 

mass. a. ...ii l'> B. 

u. r. P. 

Samuels, rf •* 

Holbrook.rf n ° ■ 

Sullivan. II (i ° Vi 

Cablll, If ° ■ D 

Simmons, e ,{ " ■ 

Barley, lg - ° ) 

Sea v el. rg 1. — — 

U\ 1 88 

n i;\i BJ i All s in. .11 SCHOOL B 

Kells, rf " « ' 

It. Parks, If I ° l 

La pi ne, C X ° 8 

Karwell. k <» " U 

Campbell, Ig ° ■ ° 

\\. Parka, rg ° ° ° 

Temper.., " ° ° 



8 1 5 

Itcteice- (.rayson ol M. A. <'. iinie 
16 minute periods. 



SQUIB 



A. J. HASTINGS 

Newsdealer and Stationer 

Amherst - - * Mat "* 

MRS. PRUDENCE P. CASSIN 

SELECT CATERING 

at geaaoaabla Prices. 
Informal* a Specialty 

li So. Prospect St.. Anili.'i-l. MaM 

Tel. see-M 



North End Lunch 

120 Pleasant Street. 

Our food IS right — 
Our prices reasonable 

TRY US OUT 

W. B.1)RURY 



The loiulb Usiie ol Ihe -S-iilib"' WlH 

i„. | | lt . /■,,,. . Gazette Xumber. Prob- 
ably many ol the itndenl body have 
been in Barber shops and similar liter- 
ary institnlions where Ihe above t.a> 
h«en freely exhibited. The "Squtb" 
al present feels Its Inability to handle 
such B subject in full wilhoiil the aid of 
additional experts, who mav be battel 
informed. I o-opeiat ion is uecessaiv to 
make ibis issue I be biggest, beat, and 
peppiest of the year and the Hoard 

teels it will be accomplished. The 

third ISSUS is now at the printers and 
will be ready for distribution in about 
iwo weeks. 

BOSTON ALUMNI GET 

AGRICULTURAL BLUES. 

The Boston Alumni are holding a 
meeting tonight, one ef tbe weighty 
subjects to be presented before the 
august body is tbe ever intereatlng anb- 

ject: •"Where Does The Wind Come 
From'.'" Th« leaders in this discussion 

will be " Freddie" and "Kay" of the 

well known Aggie Musical Clubs, it 

is not expected thai the subject will be 
entire!] pettled at this nteeting, but 

verv important steps towards iis solu- 
tion will DC taken. The Alumni re- 

qaested that representatives from the 
musical clubs be aset down to furnish 
entertainment lot the meeting. ' ll( 

leaders of our clubs wire honoiablv 
elected to till this obligation. 



Totals. 1 * W 
Befsree Ball <>t M. A.C. TI Two 

16 minute peiiods. 
Turnes' Falls' Turned Down. 33-5 
The Freshman team annexed Ita third 

eonsecntlve victory lasl Saturday after- 
noon,. Ian. 81 la Ihe Drill Hall when it 
administered a 88 to •". pnnlahmenl to 
the qnlntel from Turners Falls IHuh 
School. Both teams displayed much 

••pep" at ihe beginning of tbe game, 

but Ibis spirit ol enthusiasm soon 

abated on the pan ol the hioh school 

hoys when ihe Flesh men tlcvv into t heir 

Hide. 
"Red" Sullivan was the individual 



ANIMAL HUSBANDRY NOTES 

There will be an Annual Husbandry 

club meeting tonight, Jan. SB, at 1-80 

P. M.inStockbridtiellallr The speaker 

„f the evening will beC. D. Blaekmaa 
of the New England Hdaiela-Frlealaa 

\ssociation. Kveryone is welcome. 
Tome and bring voiir friends. 

The following list '-I speakeis have 

been secured for the coming asset logs 

of the term : 

Peb. 8— 6. B. Morrison, superintend- 
ent of Brookvale Kami, will give an 
Illustrated talk on "The Hereford la 
New England." 

Id.. 88— Prof. <■• C, White ot tbe 
Connecticut Agricultural College, wil1 
lecture on "Dairying In New England. 

March 8— Dr. W. \V. Williams. D. V. 
||. of Bprlngfield.wlll glss an illustrated 
lecture on "'Contagloua Abortion in 
Cattle." 



SALESMANSHIP IS THE FOUNDATION OF BUSINESS 

This is true Of all classes of commerce. Almost anyone can 
lnak e an article, but it takes a salesman to get its full value la 

ihe open market. Baleamaaahlp should be studied by all college 

,„en contemplating B business career. 

N\M\l'CO offers a thorough course la practical as well BS 
theoretical salesmanship, and in addition, an opportunity to pay 
all college expenses. We uuaraniee you s.yjr, lor the summer 
vacation" Last year B large number of our students received 
over 81000, 

We have room fox a tew more ...en for our "1088" organisa- 
tion and it vol. are anxious to receive a training ol this nature, 
kin.llv con.niunicale with our New York Ollice, lilt Nassau Street. 

THE NATIONAL MAP COMPANY 



SEW YORK 



INDIANAPOLIS 



CHICAGO 



NEW COLLEGE STORE 

CONVENIENCE SERVICE ASSORTMENT 

Try our Eskimo Pies — Something New 



SERGEANT PETIT BURIED 

Continued from page 1 

reverently to tbe impressive service. 

The escort was again forme. 1. and the 
body taken to Plainville c-meiery for 

burial. Tbe tag which draped the oof- 

tin was presented to Miss ( online Pe.it, 

Sergeant Petlt'a sister, by captain 

<r<- ( r, who was in theSOtfa infantry 

vvilh 1'eiit. The markers for I be grave 
WON presented by W.S. : Smith, Com- 
mander of the American Legion Peal ol 

Amherst, and by C. K. Johnson, Com- 
mander of tbe Amherst Post of Veter- 
ans oi Foreign Wars. Mrs. Patterson, 

State Chaplain of ths American Legion 

Auxiliary, presented a l.oii.|iiet. Then 
with the services at the grave: thesa 
lute ironi the liriny squad, and the 
notes of "Taps", Victor Petit was buried. 
Ser»eant Fetit typified for H. A. C. 
What the Unknown Soldier who was 

buried at Arlington typified for the na- 
tion. W'e honored not only him. but 
also those other men who died, and to 
whom our Memorial Building la a last- 

Ing dedication. 

We will keep fait ii with them who 
lie asleep". 



TWO-YEAR QUINTET 

BOWS TO MISFORTUNE 



Sergeant Petii enlisted September 8, 
1917, sad was a aaesaber of Company 11. 

•jo; li Infantry, :Sd division. He sailed 
i,,i France April 81, 1»1H, and foUghl at 

Chateau-Thierry, st. Hiatal, Verdun, 
and In the Argonne. He was wounded 
Augnst 10, 1018, and again la the Ar- 
gonns Forest on October «.», H'l*- H« 
died of pneumonia January 8, huh. at 

P.ase Hospital No. 8, Savenay, France. 
Petlt'a home Was in Amherst, and he 
wasai the time of enlistment a member 
..f (he class of 1916, M. A.C lie leaves 
a mother, Mrs. A. X. Petit, and two sis- 
icrs. Mrs. Alice Dean ol New Vork. and 
MissCorinne l'etit who is employed in 

the Extension Depart meal of the Col- 
lege. 
The Guard of Honor, composed of 
ma of the Veterans of Foreign Wars. 
was as follows: <'• B. Llard, D. S. C, 

CreixdeOuerre; Henry Knight, D. s 
i .: Paul Rhodes. Croix de Cuerre: C. 
t.audette, H. A. Dunbar, H. Dickinson. 

H. Norrtngton, W. Walsh. Knlgbl and 

t.an.lette were in IVtit's company. 

Hie tiring squad was led by Mr. War- 
ren..! Amherst, and was compo s e d of 
Ley ion men. 

sergeant Warren who is stationed at 
ihe It. O. T. C. unit at M. A. C. had 
lull charge of ihe arrangements. 



Games Lost to Deerfield and Sacred 
Heart High School. 
Last Wednesday evening. Jan. 90, the 

Two-year quintal was beaten by tbe 

tast aggregation lioin ihe Sacred llciri 
High School at llolyoke to tbe I line oi 
11 to Kb 

After the Brai live minutes ol play. 

Parsons. Ihe Short Course pivot man. 
was injured and had to leave the game. 
This was a serious loss In tbe lean.. 

Shortly alter Qreen, the left forward 

foi the visitors, was also removed as a 
resell "I receiving a blow on the head. 
The Sacred Hear! team proved to be a 

annppj leans, and although tbe Aggie 

quintet, crippled as ii was, did its best. 
the home learn was VI points abend 

when the whistle blew. Sacred Heart 

is coming here in I he near tut lire, and 
the (iraysoniies w ill have a chance lo 
turn tables. 
The lineup : 

m. \. i . 

Rom leapt .). it 
Qreen, it 

Parsons, e 

Cutlet 
m real 

Adair, rg 
Donuellan, lg 
Wilson 



KINGSLEY'S 

SODAS SUNDAES CANDIES 

Luncheonette 



shine: as-u-go 

Ke.l.e.nliel 

The College Shoe Shine Parlor 

ll.l Sell. 

lUt RenovatinR. Shoe Dyeing. Shoe Shtnini 

Al U \ mi, N >t . l>\ An. fcl. iMIiec. 



140 Main Street, Northampton, Mass. 



High Grade 

COLLEGE FOOTWEAR 



AT 



AMHERST BOOK STORE 

Note l>o»ka Fountain Pens 



a, ii. ii. ■ 

II. Vogt 

Mov niban 
If. Roberta 

0, Kane 

Burks 

rg, Sullivan (.apt.) 

lg. Klicndici.si 

Kane 



Score S. II. H. S. 88, M. A. C. 10. 



C. F. DYER 



A A 

x&es rsnsM ksh3 

WMGLEYS 

Newest 
Creation 



Not fully recovered from a rather dis- 
astrous game with Basted Heart, the 

Two-year basketball leam journeyed to 

Deerlield on Friday evening and WON 
given the short end of a 89-18 BOOM by 

theanperior Deerrleld Academy qulntel 
Beodgmaa waa the star for ths bo 

lean.. Shooting iu 10 foul shois, and 
garnering two more points lor the 
Academy by a nice shot from lbs BOOT. 

(,ie,M. played well for the shoit Course, 

making one two-p..i titer and putting In 

six on tree tries. Adair did well on 

i he de f e nse . 

The lineup: 
M. A. C. 

Wilson. K..S-. rl 

Qreen, II 
Parsons, a 

Adair, rg 
Donuellan, lg 



Economy Prices 
E. M. BOLLES 

The Shoeman. 

Main St., Amherst 

"BIDE-A-WEE" 

Creamed Chicken and Wattles Our Specialty 

Ami oiln-i u'oo.l tliuitfH to eat. 

MRS. L. M STEBBINS 

Mtcl.lle Street. (Tel. 4lf. -W) lla«lley. SfaSS. 

WEBSTER'S STUDIO 

Nash Block 
AMHERST SHOE REPMING CO. 

Your Shoes Repaired 

W II ILK YOU WAIT 







THE 



i.ki i;i ii in v< v i>i vi \ 

lg, Uoliinson 

rg, McKay 

c, Atkinson, Kimball 

If, Snodgrass 

rl, Van Pstsrailge 



Score- Deerlield 88, M. A. C. 18. 



Is it indeed BOt singular that the 
name of the man whom we have so 
lately honored, is so inerasably in- 
scribed in the motto on the (ireat 
•seal ol Massachusetts, "Knse petit 
plaeidam sub libertate quletem"? 
And the cause for which he died is 
essentially analogous to the mean- 
ing ol tbe inscription. "By the sword 
she seeks permanent peace under 
liberty". 



Peppermint fla- 
vored chewing gum 
with Peppermin 
Sugar Coating. 

Sugar jacket 
"melts in your 
mouth," leaving 
the deliciously 
flavored gum 
center to aid 
digestion, 
brighten teeth 
and soothe 
mouth and throat 



Great 
Treat! 



Northampton. Mass. 

The Leader for College Banquets 



Wm. M. Kimball, Prop. 



^32 



hardware: 



sing lee: 

Main Street 

Quick Laundry 



FRESHMAN CLASS MEETING 

At a recent meeting of the freshman 

Class, which was held in Bowksr Au- 

.ntoiium. Utlbert F. case of Greenwich 

was elected to represeiil the rresh.na.i 
(lass in the Sludeui Honor Council. 
Philip Wash. Freshman Cheer-lea. br 
presented the following elaSS yell: 

l-»-2-.-i— Rabl Babl '80. 

Massaehusetls '08 Tea...: Team! Team! 
This was unanimously adopted as the 

daasyell, Wesley L, Binds ol Cbslsea, 
was elected as manager ol the Presh- 

man basketball team. 

TWO YEAR ORCHESTRA 

For the past few weeks the Two Year 
Orehsstra, under the leadership of 

Hesse, have been holding weekly re- 
heiir8il , s . The orchestra has been 
working mostly on dance music, but 



Come to us for 



Fireplace Goods, Coat and Trouser Hangers 

Ever Ready Flash Lights and Paint 

Clothes and Shoe Brushes 

Anything in Hardware and Cooking Utensils 

Always glad to see you. 



THE MUTUAL PLUMBING & HEATING CO. 






The Massachusetts Collegian, Wednesday, January 25, 1922. 



FULL OF VALUE 



l i„,„«. *tnnd the test of wear, appearance and satisfaction— and today 

us insure you in suit sat,sfact,on. SOUTHWICK BROTHERS £ GAULT 



. - , - •-.': -;■. vr:;::.. ;;:/*c:;:r :,:::;';; "zzrx v: STiiM sssr * 

»u... u.< i u>»™ ■"'■ i ;:,t;':;^, 1 ;':;;» ;,.» r,i..In,- £i , M«.d 1 »..«.ii >»»*. > » ■■ 



Mglll o|ii lilt ic selections 

The opportunltj 

Year stinU'iils for membeishi p in (he 

orchestra. All applicants are requested 

U) report to manager Allen \V. F.dmin- 

si.t. Regular rebersale an- bold even 

Tuesday afternoon (nun 4:5(1 to WW 

P. m. in Memorial Building. 



yean 



EUROPEAN AGRICUL- 
TURAL CONDITIONS 

Dki vci ursr ni' Co\ivii.i:> k. 

The pasl year was the driest Euro- 
pean agriculture lias known foraeen- 
tary or more, says a cable from Alfred 
p. D.Minis in London t<> tbe Department 
of Commerce. Batmoll moisture is still 

low in (ieiniany, Frame, nnitliern Italy . 
ami England. Sowings ol winter grain 

wnv retarded bj drynaeaof soil and on- 
•eaaonable cold In November. There is 
■ started falling nfl of sowinga la Aus- 
tria, Rumania, northern Italy, anil 
Prance. Tbe shortage may noaatblj be 
otTsct in the latter eoantrj by spring 
needing, Acreage of other countries li 
fully maintained <>■• Increased, wiih fav- 
orable growing conditions throughout 
Deeember. Intensive efforts being made 
to Increase food production, particu- 
lar!! in Belgium, Germany, Denmark, 
Poland, ami CaecboeloTahia, Indicate 
that Europe is fuel pulling up t© pre- 
war production. A striking revival of 
llu- Danish porb>prodaets Industry 
meaas sharpened competition with sim- 
ilar American products In British mar- 
kets. Government control ol foodatunTa 
is impending in Romania. There la an 
embargo on grain exports from Hungary 

and Jugoslavia. Bread subsidies are 

to i>e I'm down in Austria after Jan. 8. 
Rising prices in countries of Inflated 

currency follow the suspension of bread 
subaidiea, lending in turn to restrict 
consumption and stimulate production. 
Europe is returning to prewar produc- 
tion taster than to prewar consumption. 
Import demands are limited by reduced 
consumption and sheer Inability to 
finance requlremenla abroad. Require- 
ments in Italy, Austria, and Germany, 
and in a lesser degree in Belgium, 
Prance, and Greece, will become acute 

with the exhaustion of home supplies 
in the spring. The question ol finance 
will largely determine the source of un- 
posted supplies. The pressure ol I tie 
new Argentine crop is also a determina- 
tive influence. The demand for Amer- 
ican grain, especially loeentral Europe, 

will tend to slacken unless extraordin- 
ary credit facilities are afforded Import- 
ing countries by the United States. 



particular care, considering the appli 

••r;" : ,t r ,, : , .:r,;r '"^r ;; rf:,:;::.'-;" .>-,.;;:;: r^-, ;----««-, 

;;:;;;:;:; w ;:;:;;;r , u,,;::,a,e!y' , ; 1 a,: , tw 1 ; „,, ,,;,,, ,,, ,,,,, ,,, „,,>,,, 3—^ • *-*£ 

CT^g^a^ r;^: ::;:::,,:;:;:. :;:;':; :::':; s= « 2 - — — 

i^dpc son iheworhlngoftbl. rangemen,, a. they will not ba,a 

^periment. H 1. entirely possi.de. «o wait nntl. September io begin ibelr 

,;,,„„. Urge* courses arc already divid- business training. Tins plan was SUg- 

Z into scions, and it may prow a. geeted b, a number of sueb men, who 
eonvenienttostartaome section, in Sep- felt that under eaiattng business con- 



it, from tbe UnUeralijf ol California, Hi 

each from Vale and l.eland Stanford 
and smaller groups from each of 108 

other colleges and universities allovei 
i be country. " 



BUSINESS COURSE AT HARVARD 

In order to give men who finish their 
College course in the middle of the 

academic year a chance to begin their 

business training at once, the Harvard 

Buaiaees S«hool will adopt experimen- 
tally thia year a new policy of admitt- 
ing a limited group ofcarefullj selected 
college graduatee on .Ian. R, Dean 

Wallace B. Donhani announced re- 
cently . 

The program <>l work for men enter- 
ing in January will be so adjusted that 
they will he able to complete the regu- 
lar course for the degree of Master of 

Business Administration in the usual 
time of two years, graduating in .Janu- 
ary MM, 




nmUHHUII II llll l ll l lll l Hllll l lllHIISIIIiillll T 



Jt took 



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to develop 

CAMEL QUALITY 

We worked on Camels for years before we put them 
on the market. Years of testing— blending— experi- 
menting with the world's choicest tobaccos. 

And now, EVERY DAY, all our skill, manufactur- 
ing experience and lifelong knowledge of fine tobaccos 
are concentrated on making Camel the best cigarette 
that can be produced. 

There's nothing else like Camel QUALITY. And 
there's nothing else like Camels wonderful smoothness, 
fine tobacco flavor and FREEDOM FROM CIGA- 
RETTY AFTERTASTE. 

That's why Camel popularity is growing faster than 

ever. 

A better cigarette cannot be made. 

We put the utmost quality into 
THIS ONE BRAND. 








3!!lll!!!iilll!lllllM 



amel 



R. J REYNOLDS T HCCO CO., Wi»tio«-S»l««, H. C. 

iiiiiiiii.;;mnniniiiri\umnl! 






MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 



Vol. XXXII. 



Amherst, Mass., Wednesday, February I, 1922. 



No. 14 



M. I. T. NOSES OUT 

VARSITY BY TWO POINTS 



FORMER MEMBER OF 



I MID-WINTER ALUMNI DAY TO 



PARLIAMENT IN AMHERST HAVE AN ACTIVE PROGRAM 



Harvard Also Wins from Basketball 
Team on Boston Trip. 

In what proved to be one of the most 
tuning and fastest games «»f the sea- 
.,.n to date the M. A. 0. basketball 
learn suffered I reverse by the M. 1. T. 
.juinlel, 20- 1M, laal 1'husday ev» ning in 
Walker gymnasium. Although headed 
in Hie lirst period by a seven point mar- 
gin, the Aggie live launched an attack 
at the second whistle which brought 
i la- score to a tie 1H-1H just before the 
linish of the game, when a long shot 
I t , ,m mid-lloor by Davidson gave the 
Engineers their two point victory. A 
significant characteristic of the playing 
v\as the excellent defensive of. both 
teams, which caused Tech lo shoot 
troui the center of the floor over the live 
man defense of the west state live, a 
practice well adapted to the high roof 
.,1 tlie nyiniiasium. Smith's playing 
(TBI a feature of the game, his accuracy 
eaabliog bin to cage four baskets from 
the Boo* and seven Iroin (befoul line. 
I iiinev. (lie hi»h scoier in moBl of the 
uames earlier in the season, was kept 
<iuiet by a bad knee so that only one 
tree throw fell to his lot. Marshman 
eaast through, as on the night before, 
wild a double counter to bis credit. 

In spite of the uumerous technical 
foals throughout the game, the play 
«;iv not appreciably slackened, the 
leavers winning only after a hard 

stnitiyle. 

Continued on page 2 



KID GORE 13 JOINS 

RANKS OF BENEDICTS 



T. Whitwell Wilson Addresses Stu- 
dents in Sunday Morning Chapel. 

At tbe chapel exercises on Sunday 
morning, January W, a very interesting 
and instructive sermon was delivered 
by T. Wliitweil vVils.ni. a disl int>uislietl 
Bagllab author, journalist and lecturer, 
and a fornei menilier of t l»e Urili-.li 
Parliament. The speaker scheduled 
for tbe date, Dr. Frederick Lynch. 
MgagSMl la The Christian Work. New 
York City, was unable lo be present 
but sent as a substitute the speaker 
Of the occasion. The keynote of Mr. 
Wilson's talk was the value of faith. 
Of tbe virtues that make for the 
UieatiiesB of a man, faith, panicularly 
faith of salvation, is paramount. The 
speaker cited instances of ureal men 
in whom this was characi.ristic. 
Among them were Viscount Hryce 
and Theodore Roosevelt. Hoosevelt 
had faith in the future and was con- 
lideut in the progress of humanity. 
In contrast to these, the speaker used 
Bernard Shaw and H. <i. Wells as 
illustrations, whose writings slioweu 
lack of faith in the future. 

(ireat men have high ideals and put 
them into practice. This was the 
characteristic >f those great men men 
tinned. Mr. Wilson brought his ser- 
mon to a close with the illustration 
from his text, "The sword of the Spirit, 
which is the word of fjod". Ht 
stated that the Hible was the greatesi 
source of inspiration, and the best 
basis for faith that was known to him. 
He appealed for a greater confidence 
and trust in the Hook and application 
of its ideals. 



HOCKEY TEAM TRIMS BATES 
BUT LOSES IN NEW YORK 



AthleticCoach Wedded to JanePollard 

'22 at North Adams. 

A marriage of unusual interest to the 

Massachusetts Agricultural College is 

that of Harold Martin Gore 'll <>» 

Qutoey, Mass., to Jane Isabel Pollard 

22 of North Adams, Mass.. on Friday, 

Jan. 27. The ceremony took place at 

the home of the bride. 

Mrs. Core is the daughter of Mr. and 
Mrs. Frederick Pollard of North Adams. 
She entered M. A. C. in 1917 as a special 
Miidenl.and in 15)18 was a loyal mem- 
ber of the class of '22. She graduated 
term, and is now doing graduate 
work at the college. 

'Kid'' Core, as he is known about 
the college campus, entered M. A. C. 
wilh the class of 1JU3. During his 
Freshman year he entertained tbe up- 
perclassmen many times by being the 
Continued on page 6 



PETIT 



MID-WINTER ALUMNI DAY 
February 3 and 4 

WILL YOU BE BACK? 



He Seeks. 
Hint aliutit OS the blossomed spray. 

\viii« li has the louder call. 
Woodland, meadow or-far-awa>- 

gbadowy waterfall? 
Youth, with life "Ike B map outspread. 

Where will you tiud the noon? 
Seeklne. eager. unwearied-Dead? 

Finished the search so soon? 
-He that lo»eth lux life"- What then? 

Honor beneath the sod? 
Mucher .|uesting and wider ken 
i nithe fair hills of Ood. 

A. L. Coon I I i ■ 
This verse was suggested by this clip- 
ping from tbe CoLtaoiAS i 

Is it indeed not singular that the 
name of the man whom we have so 
lately honored, is so -erasably in- 
scribed in the motlo on the (ireat Baal 
of Massachusetts. "Ense pettf pla-idam 
sub liberate quietem" t And the cause 
for which he died is essentially anal- 
ogous to the meaning of tbe inscription, 
"By the sword she seeks permanent 
peace under liberty". 

'21— Fred Howard is teaching history 
and mechanical drawing in the Essex 
County Agrieuhural School. 



Nearly 150 Alumni to Return to the 
Campus. 

Agglt alumni will auain have the op- 
portunity lo meet together and renew 
acquaintances wilh the old Dollego; the 
occasion balBf Mid-Winter Alumni Day 
on Feb. :t and ». Friday and Saturday ol 
lata week. These two days protitis. I i 
l.e full ol action and IntorMl for alumni 
and students alike, with conceits and 
names, and then Iralernily Initiation 

i»aiM|iieis the alisaai U> ■ porfael day. 

Indications point to a laigfl number ol 
alumni back for the event, between 1(1(1 
and lull at least. 

Several have signified I he'll intentions 
ol coming back early Friday to speak lo 
classes along the general line ol work 
in which they are engaged. Dy laic 
Friday afternoon all who are coining 
should have arrived in Amhersl, for the 

actual program ttartawlta tba Social 

1'nion entertainment OB Friday at 8 M 
in Slockbridge Hall. 

Mr. I'hidelah Itice. a dramatic reader 
from the I,eland Powers Bcbool "I Ora- 
toiy in t.oMon, mi. i iuioisii pari ol lu« 
entertainment. He will give "The 
(Ireat Adventure,'" I play by Arnold 
Bennett. Mr. Hice lias given readings 
here twice betme, and has plea-ed his 
audiences very much al both limes. As 
the second pari of the evening's 
"double-header.'" llu- Musical ( lubs. 
beaded by "Uay" Vinten and' Freddie" 
Waugh. art) scbediiled (<> perform . As 
many students and most alumni have 
not beard the clubs this year, t be con- 
cert should prove a special deal. 

At 10-CH1 on .Saturday morning the 
alumni will meet in Memorial Hall. 
Allhoiighl this is, in name, a business 
ineeeting, it is bound to be an Inter- 
esting one, and one which no alumnus 
Continued on page 8 



Scores Three Times in Fast Game with 
Hamilton but is Outclassed Com- 
pletely by Cornell. 

M. A. ('. opened the lirst of the week- 
end i luce game scries last Thursday af- 
tcrnoon bj defeating Bates 2 in a fast 

aasna aa lbs M. A, •'■ rink. 

WTIt bin a minute after the. game 
opened, a Mash of good feain-work and 

passing resulted In iba tirsi score, which 

was caged by Lyons A few minutes 
later, Hales narrowly missed a goal 
wb.n in a hoi M(immage, the Aggie 
net being overturned in (be melee. The 
rani <>l ibe parted was fast and exciting, 
ncithci team scoring in spile of many 

llie-.. 

The second period opened with an en- 
joy able act of shinny . and Aggie, nol 
tO be outdone, enleied the wood-chop- 
pi lig contest w il h I he result thai team 
work was forgolieii and many opportu- 
nities to score were passed up. When 
the players were m..i backing at the 
pud Uiev were taking a spill on the 
lea, i be sin lace being exceptionally 
hard and fast. 

Both learns were out for goals in the 

third ptriod, Bales dying lo even the 

count at any cost, and Aggie trying to 

looraase tba score. The puck had 

Continued on page 2 



RELAY TEAM TO OPPOSE 

NEW HAMPSHIRE 



Fast Team to Compete at Boston Ath- 
letic Association Meet. 

The Varsity Relay Team will run 
against New Hampshire State in the 
Boston Arena on Saturday evening, at 
the Boston Athletic Association (.anus. 

While the team has not been definite- 
ly chosen, Coach Derby will send live 
men, and these will probably he chosen 
from the following members of the 

squad : 

l;. Wood worth '2 4, Mact ready 1(8 

I.. Woodworlh "23, Isaac U4 

Fernald '24 Bent '22 

Kemp '22 Captain Sullivan '22 

Acheson '22. 

Of these. Captain Sold van. L. S, 
Wood WOrt b, and MacCready are veter- 
ans, having been on tbe team which 
easily defeated New Hampshire last 

year. 

Continued on psge S 



ROISTER DOISTERS GIVE 

SUM TO MEMORIAL BUILDING 

Banquet and Business Meeting Held 
in Draper Hall Saturday. 

The M. A. 0. Koislor Doisters held a 
pleasant baii«)U«-t last Saturday at noon 
in the banejvef room at Draper Hall, 
which later in the day took the nature 
of a business meeting. The Prom show 
was discussed, (bis to be the comedy 
' ( larenee by Clarence Buddinglon 
Kelland. Mr. Rand, faculty manager, 
and the otlicers of, the society expressed 
themselves as being in favor of taking 
the play on the road two or three times 
befmc presentation al Prom lime. Tbe 
date Ml fot From is not until the spring 
lerin. mi that ample time is available in 
which to prepare I he play. 

The girls who will take part are as 
follows: Misses Ituth Hurder '22, Elea- 
nor Baleman '2:',, Vera Smith '24. Marion 
.Slack '24. Aimee (Jeiger '24. These 
assignments are subject to change. 
There is lo be a tryoiit for five men who 
will take part, on Wednesday evening 
at li o'clock in Memorial Building. 



PLEDGE 

Charles K. Lyman 18 of Connecticut 
has pledged Q. T. V. Mr. Lyman is 
at present travelling extensively in 
Europe and when beard from was in 
Florence. Italy. 






2 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Wednesday, February 1, 1922. 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Wednesday, February 1, 1922. 



M. I. T. GAME 

Continued from page 1 



HOCKEY TEAM TRIMS BATES 

Continued from page 1 



Old Deerfield Fertilizers 



The game started with whirlwind 
play, which laated the entire halt, the 
Engineer* witli a comfortable , ' ,1 «'' "" 
their opponents The lead was main- 
tained ami tb« *<""' el ""• ♦' ,l(1 "' ,ne 
period was 134. aggie opened the 
secoad half with a superior passing 
name anil bronchi the HOM even in 
short oriler. I In* lead alternating until 
Hie last few seconds when the winning 

basket was toaaed bj Tech. 

The Summary : 

TKI II. M - A> *'• 

Storh, I.andis, 11 rf,Tumey 

Hover, Davidson, ToeOB, rf 

If, Bmitb, Boat I 

Coleman, e >', Marshman 

Blood, Ig fi |{ik ' '• 1,ale 

Babbard,rg Ig, Qowdj 

BeotC -Tecb SO, M. A. C. 18. Goala 
from BOOT, Stoib. Davidson, Bret ting. 
Blood, Smith 4, Marshman. (ioalson 
tree tries— Tonon 7, Blood :i, Smith 7, 
Tumey. Ileferee — George Hart, 'lime 
—15 minute periods. Score at half- 
time -Tech IS, If. V. < ■ •"> 



Following out their resented cusloin 

of bowleg before the crimson monarch 

Ihe Mass. Aggie i|iiintet was deteated 
by the Harvard basket hall team last 
Wednesday eveninu al Meinenway !i.vni- 

aaalum, Bg-SO. The Cambridge aggrega- 
tion foaghl ils way to the lead ilurinu 
i he lirsl few minutes of play Sad !"">> 
Don mi w:is never in danger to the end 

of the name. Aggie falling to threaten 

at any point. 

The Harvard defense was |.ersistent 

and etrong, foreleg the Aggie* to ■boot 

from lony; distances. Smith and Tunny 
showed themselves capable of this style 

of play ami caged seven held goali 

between them. Marshman with astttgl* 
tally was the only oilier visitor who 
could find the hoop. Laxity on the pail 
of the referee allowed much roUghtt*** 
to gO unnoticed. Tiiine y w as not at his 
best in eaglag free tries addlag but 
three points to the Seal count. 

The aooring opened early in the game 
after whii n slow play developed, termi- 
nating the first period 17-11 in Harvard"* 
favor. Five minutes after the start of 
the second half Harvard sent in a sec- 
ond team, Oach QoM following suit 
with four of his lirst ifrlng sulis. The 
Crimson failed to score during this 
time and live minutes later the regulars 
of both teams took the Boor. The game 
failed to improve In speed and the Harv- 
ard team retained its early lead. 

The summary : 

M. A. < . IIAKV MM). 

Hike, Hale. rg If. Lowent hal. Cordon, Palo 
Qowdy,lg rf, Mil. eish, Lowenihal 

Marshman. Thompson, o 0, Fills, T,ove 
Tuniey. Hoser, rf Ig, Kudofski. Miller 
Smith. Barrows, If rg, Hlack, Fairing 

Score— Hai vard 88, Aggie* SO. Qoalfl 

from lloor- (.ordon 4, Mcl.eish 3, Fitts 
8, BlarkS, Tumey 4, Smith 8, Marsh- 
man. Coals on free tries— Gordon 5, 
i'allo, McLeisb, Tumey 3, Hoser. Uef- 
eree — Tower. Time — 20 minute halves. 



FRATERNITY TELE- 
PHONE NUMBERS 

Q, T. V.. 88Q 

1'bi Bignta Kappa, si-: 14 

Kappa Si^ina, 178 

Sigma l'hi Bpeilon, B888 

Alpha Btgma Phi, of)— M 

Alpha Gamma Bbo, 8316 

Theta Chi, 8HU 

Kappa Gamma l'hi, 214 

Lambda Ch! Alpha, «325 



hardly been |»ut in play when 'Hubba", 
unassisted, raced down the ice and 
made the last score of the name. A 
final spurt by Hates in the last minute 
nearly resulted in a goal tor the Hruns- 
wick boys. 

The same line spirit of sportsmanship 
which characterizes all uaines played 
between Hales and M. A. C. was plainly 
evident during Thursday's game. 

The Aggie hockey team was unable 
to add another scalp to bring up with 
that o! Hates, and was deteated 4-1 last 
■tidaj evening at Ithaca by Cornell. 
A dash of s|i.ed by the New York team 
lathe Bret fewminntee of pley swept 
aggie off its feet, and though the play 

was fast from then on the score could 
not lie evened up. 

Cornell started off by t eking the puck 
down the lee; thawing paeelng to the 

center who made three goaM within ten 
minutes. The poor team work, which 
left the center uncovered, tightened up, 
and the Atiu'ie forwards got uoin« in 
the second period, keening the puck in 
Cornell territory the entire time. 
Toward the end of the period "Hubba ' 
missed a close one alter taking the puck 
down the ice and drawing out the goal. 
The third period was the liveliest of all. 
both teams going at top speed. In the 
middle of this period Cornell made an- 
other goal similar to their lirsl. and 
soon after Cordon carried the puck 
down for the only Aggie score. This 
score was not allowed at lirst as it was 
made after the referee had illegally 
blown the whistle for a Cornell man to 
recover his stick which he had dropped. 
Davidson and Thornton were the 
bright light* <» f *he game, outside of 
"Hubba" who was in his usual good 
form. Aggie showed some exception- 
ally good, and some exceptionally poor. 
boekey during the evening. Wight do- 
log well in stopping the attacks on the 
Cornell net. 

After resting Friday night in Ithaca, 
the team went to Clinton, N. Y., and 
played Hamilton. Saturday night, on 
their new indoor rink. Undergrad- 
uate spirit ran high as hockey is 
the only major sport at Hamilton, and 
they have a record of but two defeats 
in two and one-half years. The surface 
is about the size of that at the Boston 
Arena and the ice was very fast. The 
Aggie sextet was forced to play its fast- 
est name of the season, and trailed 5-3 
at the end of the game. 

The entire forward line showed a re- 
versal of the form displayed SgslUSt 
Cornell and the Aggie defense never 
played better. For two periods the 
Hamilton goal eot a steady rain of 
shots, but toward the end of the second 
period Hodsdon took the puck and after 
a long shot caged a quick goal on the 
rebound. 

Hamilton came back strong in the 
third period and the jinx stepped on 
Die ice when Hodsdon shot a goal for 
Hamilton, and in the next seven min- 
utes Hamilton got four more. 

Aggie was fighting hard, and in the 
next few minutes played the best hockey 
this year, the forwards going down the 
iee with tine team play, two goals in 
three minutes resulting. It was at this 
point that Collins and Lyons were put 
off the ice. and the Aggie chances of at 
least a tie were shattered. In cpite of 
the fad that M. A. C, had but three 
men on the ice at this time, including 
the goal tender, neither team was able 
to score again. "Hubba" and Hodsdon 
were the stars of the game, with the 
entire forward line playing hard every 

minute. 



"Reasonable in dollars and sense." 
A. W. HIGGINS, INC., South Deerfield. Ma*& 



ts 



l\o& Store 



C*rp*ivter & Morehouse, 

PRINTERS, 



No i, Cook Place, 



Amherst, Masa 



Deuel's Drug Store 



TOIL 



ARTICLES 



Shaving Sticks and Creams 



Razors and Razor Blades 



VICTOR RECORDS 



Kodaks and Supplies 



Fountain Pens 



Heavy Flannel Shirts 

Mackinaw Shirts 

These are the popular things with the college men 
throughout the country. 

VOURS NOW ! 



F. M. THOMPSON 8b SON 

Hart Schaffner & Marx Clothes. 



THE NEW M. A. G. SONG BOOK 

At the Treasurer's Office— $1.00 

LEARN TO SING ALL THE AGGIE SONGS 



When You Are Down Town 



DROP IN 



The Candy Kitchen 

— FOR — 

Lunch, Candy, Ice Cream and Smokes 



i 



COLLEGE CANDY KITCHEN 

"The Home of Sweets" 



Pies' Pastry! We Bake Our Own— Mother Makes Them 

YE AGGIE INN 



By tbe Campus Entrance 



Basket Ball Shoes, $2.50 to $4.00 ■ 



GoWDY '22, Mgr. 



MoSKI.Y '22 



COI.I.INS '22 



Carey '22 



Saroknt '23 



S IK IK t 'i J 



Tin- officiating in both names u»ai 
,„,,>, unsatisfactory, little knowledge of 

,,-.-. .t rnle* being shown. During the 

Hamilton mum-, which tn referred bj 

an official who followed the old, out-of- 

Canadian rales, Aggie suti.-r.Mi 

gevnn penalties, inure than received 

,, any game in the li,sl lutwa yars ui 
playing. 

Hie hospitality shown ai botb Cornell 
,,,,! Hamilton could not have boon bet- 

,n,i from I his standpoint Hie trip 

was thoroughly eojoyable. 

The summaries : 
. oKNKI.I. Aeoisi 

Davidson, rw lw, Gordon 

McDonald, rw 

rhoroton, C <•. llaskins 

I -Mill. IW lw - • •>'«»"" 

( oe, lw 

Ourdon, ep op, Bodedon 

Tona.p |). Collins 

Wight, g K, Kroeck 

>e.,re-< ..rnell 4, M A. C. 1. Coals— 

rbornton I, Davidson J, an.l Gordon. 
Keferea -Dewaon.Belboueie Uuieerelty. 
Time 20m. period*. 

II \ H1I.T03 AOOII s 

Bates, rw rw > '«> s 

R. Tbompaon, lw lw, Gordon 

\v. Tbumpeon, «• »', Hankie* 

Marlowe, id rd, Bodadon 

K .1 Header, Id Id, Colllni 

1; ., tteeder, g r, Kioe.-k 

(iuals Vales, U. Thoinpson 1. W. 

Tfcowpaoo, Marlowe, OolHaa, llo.is.loii. 

an.l Whiiaker. I'mpire - Newloii. 

(L'tica). Tinw — :* Urn, periods. Bob- 
itl mi v ataa t"i Iftatea, Whiiaker 

l.'i Lyons. 

RELAY TEAM AT BOSTON 



will soma in ahea.l of the M. A.C teBJB. 
l'ra.-tite has heen golag on f<>> over a 
month, and Ihe men who may he chosen 
to run have had repeated tryouls au.iiust 
(wo or three men on their trials, so that 
they are in prime condition and have 
Ihe I. est ..t l..rm in start inn and taking 
the hanks and passine. the baton, if 
condition* permit all Of lha men will 
run in one of t tie other events winch 
are scheduled. If these events come 
too close, til her heloie or afler 

the relay, ao thai la order to partici- 
pate the men would he obliged tO sac- 
rili.e condition for the main event, they 
will not run. 



FRESHMAN WIN 32-13 

FROM McCLANE 



Continued from page 1 

l.i ni has not been running for over a 

.i;m .111 account of an injure. 1 fool, hut 

be is earning round la tine shape end 
r baring little trouble In making tasi 

tehecou, M. A. ('."* best quarter- 

er, is doing lirst-class work on the 
hoard*, and allowing as good results in 
winter track as he does in the Spring. 
Captain .Sullivan, who was number 

one man hist year, is in the pink of con- 

.11 and has demonstrated attain and 

11 that nobody is going iO pass him 

"ii any track, either here or in Boston. 

I.. S. Woodworth is at his best, and 

those who saw him run last winter aud 

in the Spring knew that "Lev"' "at his 

i**l v ll an opponent to be reckoned 

* Mi. MaeCraady was also ..n the 

team which bumbled New Hampshire 
v.ai, and in is better condition 
than at thai time. 

U. Woodworth, Kemp, Isaac and 

I'einal.l have been doing good work and 

are in line condition. Those otherjniein- 

- ot tbe aOjUad who have been out 

ry night to run against these men 

given still practice and keen spirit 

to 1 be whole squad. 

Hew Hampshire has recently built 

1 new board track which is exactly 

-unilar to the one at the Arena, and 

number their truck squad at sev- 

r-frre men; however, t oach Derby 

ft lending some of Hie beat relay men in 

New England agalnel them. New 

Hampshire will undoubtedly make a 

d fight for lirst place, as they were 

ated rather badly last year, and have 

M'.'ired uo pains to turn out a team that 



Sullivan and Samuel* Feature in 

Big Score for Fir*t Year 

Star Team. 

The Freshman basketball team kepi 
Up the 100% reputation last Saturday 

with aSt-18 wia over the kteLaue silk 
Mill quintet of Turners Falls. The 
name was fast throughout and was 
characterized by frequent fowling on 
each side. 

Samuels and Sullivan featured for the 
winners, showinu up well both on the 
floor and on the foul line. I.akoskic 
was ihe star for Turners Falls aggrega- 
tion, nettinn 12 of ibelr II polnte. 

The yearilUgS showed the excellent 

results of Ooach "Bed" ball's work and 

tar surpassed Iheir opponent* in the 
technique of tbe gaaae. 'They 111. -el Sa- 
cred Heart this week and seem to be in 
a fair way to win. Now that Iheir 

schedule is half completed there seems 

to be a good chance for a no loss season. 

Summary : — 



TUFTS AND WESLEY AN SOON TO 
APPEAR ON THE AGGIE FLOOR 

Fast Game Expected With Connecti- 
cut Aggie Next Week. 
Wter playing away from home for 
the last three weeks the basket!. all 
team come back for I StUJ of four 
weeks. On Alumni Day, Feb I, ihe 
learn incels 'Tolls on the local lloor. 

Tbia game ahould be rery ta>i as the 
boys are seeking revenge for the defeat 
they suffered oa the "JuaiboV* eourt. 

'The follow in» week two more high da** 

sanies will be staged. <'< • Aggie 

will be (he attraction the first of the 
week, Willi VYeslcyan roTUiabtng the 

card the last of Ihe week. Both these 

panics should be exceptionally fuel as 

both the vi.sitinc teams have very speedy 

quintets. 

'The hockey team also has two games 
at home I. .tore traveling again. H is 

probable that Conn. Aggie will seeds 

sextet ot tee artists to engage our learn 

on Alumni Day. The game with Am- 
herst has been arranged Feb. 7 Instead 

of the llllh. The learn has he. n signed 

up io no t.. Philadelphia Keb. 10 and 11 
although an definite teams have been 
Signed up with which to play. 

both oi tbeee teams bave eot had the 
beat of luck durum Hie lasi t.w games 

and they need the banking of the entire 

student body to show them that aggie 

lias mil lost fait fa in then ability to win. 




Ml 



The fountain oi Youth ! 
You rind it in Rogers Peet 



F.lwar.l Tisdale •_':'. bas pulled a tea- 

don in his lea which will prevent his 

running on the board track, for the rest 

ol 1 he wini. -r. 



clothe! ! 

Extremely .smart without heino; 

extreme • 
The best of everything college 

men wear. 
J)(nri)-ti,-(lni( iii price <iik( up- 

fn-ihi/r ill gfyfo. 

Special "Shopping Service" 
for order* by mail. 

R.00BR1 I'kkt Company 

Broadway Broadway 

at |8th st "Four at Mtb si 

I on venic ut 

Broadway C01 Fifth Ave. 

at Warren :•' 41st st. 

\l w YORK CITY 



Campus and Dress Footwear 

QUALITY TRIK HOSIERY 
Reasonable Prices. 



M. A. 



Samuels, rf 
CablH. rf 

Sullivan, It 

Simmons, c 
Beaver, i'k 

Hurley, Ig 



'SO 88. 
n. 
:i 
1 
:i 
I 
11 
:; 



I . 

."» 

II 
:t 
ti 
ti 
ti 



1*. 
11 

'2 

it 
4 


« 



12 h 88 

Referee Gkrwdy. Time—iO-minute 

periods. 

M< l.vtx-ia. 



Kells. rf 
Lakoskle, If 

Christian, c 
Cote, rg 

Beaure»ar.l, lu 



11. 

(i 
4 
ti 

(t 



1 . r. 

Q 

I 12 


(» <• 

1 I 



1 :, 18 

Ueferee — (iow.ly. Time _'(i ininute 
periods. 

HOUSE DANCES 

TbeQ. T. V. fraternity held a Bttcee**- 
ful house dance last Saturday evening 
from 7-tO til' 18. About b"> couples at- 
tended and the music was furnished 
by "Buddy" Frost's orchestra. 

Theta Chi also beld an enjoyable 
dance on Saturday evening at the boUSC 
on l'leasant St. Twelve couples at- 
tended. 



RESULTS DETERMINE COSTS 

[I isn't the initial cost of a dairy sup- 
ply that determines ils economy, but 
rather the n suits produced by its con- 
linued use. Many Dairy men have made 
what ihey thought was a saving by 
lower lirsl cost only l<> later Bad thai 
they have sacrificed all and more Io lee* 
in quality and service. 

'The dependable hiuh quality and 

value ot the serv>c which always fol- 
lows the use of 



THOMAS S. CH1LDS 

IM olMOK \ I I I. 

27:1-270 HiiHi St. Ilolyoke 






in >ver fails toreiiirn profits to the Dairy- 
man many times in excess of Its DOSt. 
'This quality service has gained for 

Wyandotte Dairyman's (leaner and 
< leans. 1 an established place in the 

Dairy industry because it is a guarantee 

of that sanitary protection which in- 
sures hiszh quality products that build 
permanent and Increasing bnsim 

These results are guaranteed to you 
also or the trial costs you nothing. 



Have Your Next Suit Made to Order 



VI 



India* in 

circle 



MIDWINTER ALUMNI DAY 

February 3 and 4 
WILL YOU BE BACK? 




Order from your supply 

house. 

It cleans clean. 



in >-\.'i> 

pacha** 



LABROVI 

THE LEADING TAILOR 
Fine assortment of Woolens on hand 

Full Dress Suits and Tuxedos 
to Rent 

Full Line of Ores* Supplies 

Cleaning, Pressing, Remodeling, Re- 
pairing and Dyeing promptly done. 

Single Suit* Premmcd, reduced Io BOc 
On Premnlna Ticket* BOc 

H will pay yon to buy a ti< bet. 



vs .• (in sxpert ww* ot »ll aesertpOon*. 
11 Amity St.- LABROVITZ PbOMSSJ-W 



You can save from 

$3.00 to $5.00 a pair 



— on- 



Tbe J. B. Ford Co., Sole Manufacturers, 
Wyandotte, Micb. 



Young 1 Men's 
College Footwear 

by buying at 

FLEMING'S, Northampton 






'-*»# 



w* 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Wednesday, February 1. 1912. 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Wednesday, February 1, 1922. 



THE MASSACHUSETTS COLLEGIAN 



Published erery Wednesday by the 
Students of the Massachusetts Ag- 
ricultural College. 

BOARD OF EDITORS. 



Bii.oing r. Jackson *22 Bdttor-ln-f hlef 

Hobakt W. Bpkino *J Manatfin* Kdltor 

ASSOCIATK KDITOKK. 
I.I 1IIFK H. ARKINOTON IS *SS'1 Si**'* MttOf 

Kenneth a. Hahnaku "ti < onpetttton Bdttoi 
John M. Whittibk "2S Ataletto Editor 

RUTH M. Wu.Hi ft B*e****J* gsHtOI 

STANLEY W. HltOMI.EV 'Tl 
lltMNU W. Si AUK V 

Hoi oMoa Conn "a* 

Ei.ihiia K. Bus*. Ji« • '24 



permission »>y tboas higher op to give 

utterance (<> them, il is Up to lis to 

listen respectfully, nol Interrupt or he 
siircastic in our rebuttal*. If questions 

■re lo order, let theni he attention* of 

ufiit leinen, not hoots. 

All this is only a eons'ulerati. f the 

difference between real college Mllbre 

»0d something inferior. We leave it lo 

the judgement of the college what oor 

attitude should be. 



both for our own sakes and the sakes 
of our associates and finally fur the 
sake of the reputation of "Old Aggie." 
Yours respectfully, 

s. i>. m. *n. 



TOWN hall: 



BUSINESS Department. 
Charles A. BOCS "■ Business Manager 

Myron O. Mcrkay II Advertising Manager 
Owbn K. KuLSoM tl Circulation Manager 

Holds* whittaker 91 

< IIKKUKU I.. NlDN *l 

KuHK.KI B. STK.KHF. "H 



Subicription $2.00 per year. Single 
copies, 10 centB. Make all orders paya- 
ble to The Massachusetts Collegian. 

In case of change of address, sub- 
■oribers will please notify the business 
manager as soon as possible. 
» — — . 

Entered as second-class matter at the Amherst 
Post Office. Accepted for mailing at special 
rate of postage provided for In section 1105. Act 
of October. 1917 authorized August 20. 1918. 



COMMUNICATIONS 

]•; \ i; i. J, Sainkkish PoBT 7f)4 

VKTKK.VXK OK KOHKIuS WAHK 

ill TIIK 

UNITED M A IKS 

Amherst Mass.. .Ian. 21, IMS. 

The President 
Mass. Agrl. College, 

Amherst , Mass. 

My Dear (Hr: 

Allow me to extend to you. your fac- 
ulty and staff and the student body of 
the Massachusetts Agricultural College, 
the sincere thanksand appreciation of 
the Veterans of Foreign Wars of Am- 
herst, for the hearty co-operation and 
assistance give* to them in performing 
the last sad right* for onr late comrade 
in arms, Arthur Victor Petit. 
Signed) 

CARL K. .Johnson, Commander. 

JAMB* B. Wakkk.x, Adjutant. 



To Tin. C.h.i.koian: 

fat the last few weeks the class of 
1010 has been holding informal lunch- 
eons every Wednesday, from 12:50 to 
1-30, at Cottrell's, Brattle Street near 
Scollay Square. These luncheons have 
been attended to date solely by '10 men. 
We are anxious to extend our cordial 
invitation to any Aggie man, , under- 
graduate or faculty member who "may 
he either permanently or who may hap- 
pen to visit Boston on a Wednesday. 

These luncheons have been very much 
enjoyed by those who have attended. 
There is no business transacted or col- 
lections made; it is simply a gathering 
of Aggie men for the sake of old time 
friendship which we wish to keep fresh 
and lo further the spirit of loyalty to 
the college among the Alumni, and it 
offers the opportunity for any one in 
Boston on a Wednesday to be sure of 
lidding some one with whom he can 
luncb, and talk over the old days with 
common interest. 

Again we offer our cordial invitation 
to any man of "Old Aggie" who can 
attend. 

For the class of 1010, 

Pa t i. Faxon, President. 



St I'KIt I'KitDl ICTIOS DAY! 

Thursday Nae Murray and Uwell 
* Sherman in " The Gilded 

Lily,"7reeU. Masterpiece. >f 

tilm beauty. Oreater success 
Mat. 3, Kve. ttian "(In With the Dance." 
6-45. 8-30 Path* News Comedy 

Aesop's Fables 

Mr. and Mrs. Carter De- 
Haven, King Baititott and 
Grace Cunard in "The Girl 
in the Taxi." from the hila- 
rious stage mceesa. More fun 
than "Twin Beds," their pre 
vloiis production 

Scenic reel 

2 reel Sunshine Comedy 



Friday 



Mat. 3, Kve. 
6-45. 8-30 



o . « Bebe Daniels and Walter 

Saturday Biers In "The Speed Girl." 

A 6-cylinder. 120 fun-power, 
record-breaking comedy .with 
Belie at the wheel. 

Pathe News 
•/-re.-l Sunshine Comedy 

Wanda Hawley and T. Boy 
Barnes m"Her Face Value." 

Kill I Bigger'H Saturday Even- 
ing I'ost story. Beeves behind 
the scenes of a great inovinu 
picture studio 

Pathe New*. Lloyd Hamil- 
ton in "Boiling Stones" 
•j- reel Mermaid Comedy 



Mat. 3, Kve. 
6-45. 8-30 

Monday 



Mat. 3. Kve. 
6-45. 8-30 



Assembly Attitudes. 

The eommunication in this Isaac 
about the attitude shown to the speaker 
in last week's assembly precipitates 
several thought* which have been in 
our minds for some little lime. 

As a student body we have been care 
less and tfcoughtle** in our manner of 
treatment of these nien whum I he cul- 
lege authorities have Wrought here, 
solely for our benefit. 

Our tirst offence is sleeping while the 
talk is in progress. About nine 
out of every ten students have the 
general appearance of a worn-out foot- 
ball team coining home on a late train. 
Perhaps the speaker may be please. I 
thai his voice has so soothing a:i •fleet, 
but the chances are that his reaction is 
more negative. We wonder just what 
he thinks when, after gazing at droop- 
inn heads and closed eyes for half an 
hour, he hears the crowd break out in- 
to mad applause as be lit I down. 

To be sure, the students should have 
an hour a week to sleep, overwork 
and hard studies demand it. But why 
not eke it out o>« 11 or rl professors, 
one each week for the tens? They are 
used lo it. anyway. 

Many of the speeches may be dull. 
hut that fact makes no difference. In 
such a case, the man thoughtful of the 
speaker's feelings and concerned that 
the speaker should take away with 
him a good opinion of the college, can 
at least feign interest. The college 
is genuinely trying to Ret men here 
that have messages of some Interest. 
And we treat them all pretty much 
alike, anyway. Good orator* a* well 
as bad ones knock us out after the first 
few minules. Il seem to us that we 
ought to he able to stay awake and pre- 
tend to be interested. At least . let's 
try to give an impression of intelligence, 
not dazed stupidity. 

The above is our worst fault, one 
easily corrected and one thai we should 
correct, if only for the sake of gentle- 
manly decorum. 

Lastly, we musi allow the speaker 
a right to his own ideas. They may 
not be ours, but if he has been given 



To TIIK Com. KOI \ \ 

I think thai the ungentlemanly con- 
duct manifested toward the speaker in 
Vwuibly, on .Ian. tft, should not go 

nntnentloned. To have ■ speaker, 
Bailed here by the "powers that be," 
rarry away with him such an unfavor- 
able impression ceitainly works no 
good for M. A. C. 

We are supposed to be gentlemen 
here, and any such breach of respeci 
Inward a man whom the college autho- 
rities saw tit to have speak to us should 
be frowned upon by any and all who 
have a spark of manliness and decency 
in them. Forastudent to gel up ami 
practically denounce a speaker simply 
beeftOM he holds views differing from 
his own, is certainly an approach to 
boorish nee*. The wrong is intensified 
when we stop to consider that the one 
who addressed us was the father of one 
of our fellow student*, though of course 
that fact is not such a great factor in 
the discussion. Nevertheless, no mat- 
ter who the speaker may be, or what 
views he may hold, he is entitled to the 
respect and consideration of the whole 
student body , outwardly, even if not in- 
wardly. 

A good many saw tit to applaud the 
sarcastic and ceitainly ungentlemanly 
remarks of the one who made them. 
They are nearly as much to blame as 
he, and ought to he ashamed to have 
given accord to such utterances. 

Perhaps the man who spoke in Ihe 
the aforesaid manner (1 don't know 
who he is and care less) did not realize 
that by openly declaring himself unfav- 
orable to a law passed through the influ- 
ence of a majority of clear thinking anil 
public-minded people he has thus laid 
himself open to a great deal more of 
just criticiMii than be himself gave the 
forum leader in a manner, unbecoming 
a sniiliiit at M. A. ('. The phrase "I 
have had Ihe privilege but not the 
pleasure of listening to yourself— was 
especially embarrassing and shameful. 
The forum is a place for discussion, not 
abuse, and if used for the latter will 
come to no good end. 

If we be geullemen. let us watch 
our conduct aud speech toward others, 



r\ MESSAGE OF APPRECIATION 

To TiiK Mkn and Faculty ok If. A.C. : 

We wish to express our deep appre- 
ciation lo yon all for the sympathy you 
have expressed and the honors which 
have been bestowed upon our soldier 
in his "home-coming.'' You have made 
a very difficult period much easier to 
bear. 

You have helped us realize more fully 
that the sacrilice which he made was 
for something real, something worth- 
while. Only those who have gone 
through the sacrifices of "loss" can ap- 
preciate the effort required by those 
who lose their only boy, to reconcile 
their own personal loss to the country's 
welfare. 

Your services and faithfulness have 
shown us what it means to you, his com- 
rades in hardship. 

It was no easy, careless duty to per- 
form. The simple guardianship through 
the storm and heavy going to his final 
soldier's grave was a final proof to us of 
your sincerity. To freely and volun- 
tarily go through the discomforts of 
that journey, shows the sincerity of 
your feelings, and was the impressing 
el i max of your formal honors. 

We appreciate it. 

As the "Service Students" performed, 
because of their veiy nature, the ma- 
jor part of their duties, we feel special 
thanks should he giveu them. 

Because of our associations with 
Aggie, we are naturally proud of and 
therefore, doubly appreciate what her 

men do. 

We thank you, one and all— men of 

M. A. C. 

Yours, 

Kb*. A. X. l'KTIT, 

Miss Cokinnk T Pktit, 

Mk. ami Mkk 1)k\n F. Bakkii. 



Why go down town for a 

First-Glass Hair Cut or Shave? 

Patronize the 

College Barber Shop 

Memorial Building', H. A. C. 

H. J. DUWELL, Proprietor. 

Save Money— Buy During Our 

ANNUAL PRE-INVENTORY SALE 



Real Bargains on 
QUALITY GOODS 

Sale Now Going On ! 



Tenor and Mandolin Banjos 

Saxophone*. Drum; mto., Rohoadlna 

DEAN'S MUSIC HOUSE 

Cor. Main and State Sts.. Springfield. 

Local Agent. 
B. A. PENN.;i2 Woodsid* Avenue, Amherst. 



G. EDWARD FISHER 
A. .P STAEBNER 

Agent for 

Browning, King & Co. 

A national tailoring institution. 

SUITS and OVERCOATS MADE to MEASURE 

Kxcellent fabrics— Styles with an in- 
dividuality—Workmanship the best 

Satisfaction Guaranteed 

Let me show you styles and samples 
TEL. 1TO 



The Amherst Tavern 

EUROPEAN and AMERICAN PLAN 

Appetizing, Wholesome Meals— Cooke.i 
under modern sanitary conditions. 

Private Dining Rooms for "Frats" 
or special parties. 

Bright, comfortable rooms, single ol 

double, at reasonable rates for 

the season. 

Courtoay, Cleanllnem*. Quality, Quan- 
tity and Vmrlmty /• our motto. 

We cordially invite your patronage. 




"IF WINTEB COMES CAN SPRING BE FAR BEHIND?" 

V%A.<: have just received Spring Top (out* from llurlicrry. Spring 
iXJ Suits from IlieUey-Freeiiiiui. Snriiiii Goll .IncltH* from Allen 
Solly and Sprint* Hats from Knox. An early neleelion is advised. 

Comfy Slipper* 
For the Sliiy-ul-lloim* Night*. 







SOPHS IN DEBATE WITH 

FRESHMEN AT ASSEMBLY 



Prof. Machmer to be the Presiding 
Officer in Today's Assembly. 



The annual Freshman-Sophomore 

,:,,„., debate will be held Ibis sf!*rn< 

,,i assembly in Bowker Auditorium. 
\ding Dean Mat-inner will be the pie 
>i.ling officer. The siil.jeel lo he debat- 
ed is: Resolved that the present discip- 
linary relations between the Freshman 
and Sophomore classes are detriment*! 
t.i eolleff* spirit at If. A. G, 

The speaker- are as iullows: 
MJiriniilii-r. 199 & Sr./iilirc. 1!rJ4 

.lames Balal. Allied P. Staelmci. 

(apt. Cant. 

Carl K. F.(iuterman, Buss.ll L. Noy**, 

Gordo* F. Ward, Richard V Olffurd, 

Kmil .1. Cor win, Waller L. 1)1 mock, 

Alternate. Alternate. 

The judges chosen for this del. ale 
are: Prof. Koberl .) . McFall of Ihe 

agricultural Economies Deptrtmnnt, 

Prof. Lawrence R. OlOM ol the Forestry 

Department, and Assistant Prof — mn 
Charles II. Gonld of the Pomology De- 
partment, 

The debate pro m l * ** t<> arouse eon- 
sidembl* tntemnl among lb* stadnnti 

since M will incl ude a discussion of such 
events as the Pond Parly and Arena 
Party, Which subject was hroiight 
I. .lore the student body in a recent 
dlseoatHoa. The debate is held 

under tbe aasploeaof ihe Ron Athletic 
Board, with Mr. Frank P. Band. Gen- 
eral Faculty Manager, and Abraham 
Krasker, Manager of debating. 



JUNIORS AND FRESHMEN 

ARE 1NTERCLASS VICTORS 

Yearlings now Lead League with a 
Perfect Average. 
The Freshman basketball loam 
strengthened their hold on flrsi place in 
ihe iiner.iass standing w ben ibej de-l 
elsivelj defeated the Sophomore quin- 
tal l.y a score of 20 toll. As there ex- 
ists a keen rivalrv between the I wo 
classes it seems only natural th:<l the 
name should ha\e heen toUghl as 
Strenuously as it was. Team work on 
tbC pari Of tbe Freshmen at the critical 
momenta accounted largely foi tbelt 
victory. Perrantl was tbe individual 

star, scoring enough point* himself lo 
defeat lb* Sophomore*. Barker and 

Cahlll also played Well for the Fresh- 
men. Bartletl a< rlfbl guard aad 
Weatherwax at right forward did good 
work for tbe Bopbomoree, 

The scores : 

1025 



SENIOR CLASS OFFICERS 

ELECTED FOR TERM 

In ass.nihl.v lasl week, tbe Seniors 

elected their class officer* for the coin- 
lag term. The results were : 

I'rcsi.leiit. "• M" Smith of Fasthainp- 

i<.n : President <>i the senate, and ■ 
worthy member of tbe IBM basketball 

team ami a ineml.ei ol « 1 • 1 1 at ei nii.v . 

Vice-president, "Stubby" Cl*rt nf 
Sunderland, baseball manager, ■ repre- 
sentative of lli.' Senate, and a member 
ol <,» T. V. fraternlt] . 

Treasurer. "Hank" Mos.l.v. repre- 
sentative Of the Senate, ( hail man of In- 

i..i inai Contrail lee, and ■ member >>t I 
I • fraternity . 

Captain Rogei A.heson. A member 
of \ r i' fraternity, and ol tbe 1981 

football team. 

Sargeant-at-Arms, "Stan" Freeman, 
basketball manager, 1981 football team 

..•liter and a member ol A X \ liaicinity . 



only until tbe Br*l of March, Ai Ibal 

tunc tb*j will goon sale for all si mien is 

Interested. 

A. MIENTKA 

Shoo Repairing While U Walt 
M.v, PRICK* 

Mens W h.il.-Sol.s. IIiiI.Imi ll.cls . |||-50 

Mens Half Hole*. Kabbar Heeli f,,Sc 

Men's i;.ii. I. .1 s.ii.s. Bobber Heels . f,v?5 

Mens Half Soles 11.50 

\N..ik<inaiai.l.c.l-A.MIIH:SI HOI Bl 

Edith Hamilton Parker 

Graduate Teacher of Dancing. 

Simlio,M \NO\M r.l.ni K.Northami i 

FRIDAY EVENING, Assembly Class 

Popular with M. A.C. Men 







... 


\- . 


r. 


Feirant i, If 




1 


4 


VI 


Cablll, rf 




1 


II 


% 


Barker, c 




I 


(I 


6 


tfouradlan, 


lg 


11 


II 


(I 


It. A. .lack, 


Ig 











Fish, rg 







II 






1923 JUNIOR PROM 

FOR PATRIOTS DAY 



1924 



KID GORE MARRIED 

Continued from page 1 



I'.artleit. it 

Brunnor, If 
Clifford, it 

Salmon, c 

Whitman, rg 

Weatherwax, li: 
Hayes. Ig 



u. 

2 

I) 

(I 

II 

(I 

sj 





1 


II 
(I 
I) 
II 



211 

r. 

:. 
a 

n 



(I 

4 

il 



I 
Keleree 



II 



hero of numerous pond parties. He 
was prominent in athletics, and «ra<lu- 
ated in l«.»i:i. He then started in eoacb- 
iiiK our athletic teams here ai M. A. C. 
When the World War broke out, or bet- 
ter in August, 11)17, he wenl to 1'latts- 
bnrg, and two months later was com- 
missioned a tirst lieutenant in the In- 
fantry. In January, HUH, he was sent 
over****. While in training he was 
wounded, due to the premature explos- 
ion of a hand grenade. He remained 
in a French hospital during the month 
of February, and when he was dis- 
charged he was assigned to K Company 
(.1 the JlHth United States Infantry, 
1st Division. The following May he 
severely gassed at (antigny. and 
-tin to a base hospital. In July, again 
discharged, he was sent to a classilica- 
tion camp at St. Aignon, where he re- 
mained as classification officer — suc- 
ceeding a major— until the signing of 
the Armistice on Nov. 11, B'lf<. Soon 
alter he returned to this country with a 
nansport of casuals, lauding at New- 
port News, Va. He went immediately 
"•amp Devens where he was honor- 
ably discharged in February, 10H». 
since that time he has resumed his pre- 
war duties at the college, and has de- *P.9' 
veloped some of the best athletic teams 
Aggie has seen in many seasons. 
He is a member of Q. T. V. Fraternity. 
Alter Feb. 15 Mr. and Mrs. liore will re- 
side at The Perry, Amherst. 



Time— 18 inin. periods. 

Ball, M. A. C. 

The Freshman-Sophoiiiuic gam* was 
followed by a game between the Juniors 
ami the Tw..-Year team. This g*m* 
was Stopped at the end ol the first half, 
due to poor li^bt condition. The scoie 
at this time was in favor ol the Juniors, 
7 to 8. The other half of the gam* will 
be played next week. The score at the 
B nd of the lirsi halt: 
1923 



Prom Dance to End on Morning of 

the 19th. Cabaret and Show the 

Next Day. 

The date for lbs Junior Promenade 
has bee* deflnitelj set forth* 18th and 
19 of April. Tbe prom dance will take 
place the nlgbl of Tuesday, April ISth 

and the cabcrel will be oil We. I liesday. 
the lillh. "< latciice."' the ploin show. 

will be staged on the nlgbl <>f tbe I9tb. 

The cc lillec has looked OVCI s.\,ial 

excellent menus and lb* eaberel 
promise* to !><• well worth tbe cost. 

Prelims will gO 0* sale for juniors OB 

Feb. I6tb ami will be reserved for them 



Private lessons by appointment. 
Tel. 761 Northampton 

M. NOVICK 

Custom Tailor 



Cleaning, Pressing, Repairing and Dyeing 

Scat I v and prompli done. 
Work called for and delivered. 

Save money by buying a Pressing Ticket. 

4 Suits Pressed for $2.25. 

Dress Suits for Hire. 



19 Pleasant St. 



Tel. 9 J 



Beal , rf 
Sargent. 11 
Dickinson. c 
A Iyer, rn 
Miner, rtr 
Grayson, Ig 



Cutler. In 
Baraicle, rg 

Strout, c 
I'lough, rt 
Baker. If 



(.. 

1 

I) 

2 

n 

il 

(I 

8 

Two-Vkar 
(,. 
1 
(l 


o 

1 



n 

1 
II 

I) 



1 . 
(I 
(I 
II 
1 





r. 
I 

5 

(I 
II 



Keiser 



Cravats 



Smooth, pliable, firm and lustrous. 



THE VERY LATEST IN NECKWEAR 



CARL H. BOLTER 

correct MEN'S OUTFITTER exclusive 

Amherst House Block. 



JACKSON & CUTLER 



— -DEALERS in 



DRY AND FANCY GOODS 
Trunks Bags Suit Cases 



The complete standing 
li a* follows: 



Freshmen. 

Senior-. 

Two-Tear, 

Juniors, 
Sophomores, 



o !■ 



9 

:; 
I 



w 1 1 N 



if th» 

LOOT 

(I 
1 
1 



P.I . 
1 ,000 

.HUT 
. .".I it i 
,883 
.000 



Candy Shop **>da Parlor 

BECKM ANTS 
Candies and Ice Cream 

Northampton, Maaoaohuaatto 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Wednesday, February 1, 1922. 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Wednesday, February 1, 1922. 



S. S. HYDE 

Optlolnii «»»»<1 Jeweler 
ti rieasant Street < up <>m; Mttelit . 

Oculists' Prescriptions Filled 

Broken Lenses Accurately Replaced 

Big Ben Alarm Clocks 
AND OTHER RELIABLE MAKES 

Fully Guaranteed 



WILBRAHAM WINS 16-12 

FROM TWO YEAR 



ALUMNI DAY 

Continued from page 1 



J. K. MILLS, Photographer 

Class Groups 
Amateur Developing and Printing; 

Mills Studio Phone 456-R 



Two Year Fails to Score Any Bask- 
ets from Fonls. 

Coaefa Grayson's Two iTett basketball 
leain met it* third consecutive defeat 
wbentbey were defeated by tin- Wilbra- 
hiim academy quintet by dose -cue 
of Ki-li <»" Saturday afternoon Jan. 88. 
Both teams played a tight live man de- 
fence. W'iU'ialiain bold a 10-S l<a«l al 
the oloee <»i tin- Brsi half. Four !••>• •> « ^ 
were scored i>y captain Faroswortb 
from tbe 15 foot line, wbleh proved t«> 
be h deciding fat t«-i '"> Ihe game. Tbe 
Two Tear team was unable to tally on ■ 
free try. Drennellau, Cutter, Boss and 
Green scored t<>r Ihe Two STear. 



(•an afford to mine, tor several matters 
will i»f reported on and dlsc o s aed , of 
interest and concern to all Aggie men. 
This meeting will l>e followed by an 

alumni dinner at Diaper, which will 

speak for Itself, both as to "eats" and ■ 
•rood time. 
Tbe alamo) like nothing better than 

l„ see out learns ill BCtloU, and l<> see 

them come through with a win. And 
they are going to aee al leant one game 
Saturday afternoon, at this writing 

ni» team has l.eeii loll ml to offer re-isl- 
ance to OUT huekey sextet on that date. 

The baaketball Bve, however, will take 
on the Tufts quintet lathe I > ■- i 1 1 Hall. 

and with the spirit of revenge In their 
hearts, the Aggie team should made it 



fast and interestiim for the Medford 

hoys on Ihe home lloor. 

Fraternity initiation banquets on Sal- 
unlay night will end the festivities of 
this Mid-Winter Alumni Day. They 
will he held as follows: Q. T. V., Q. T. 
V. House. Amherst; Alpha (iamma 

Kho, Draper Bote), Sortbamptoa ; Theta 

Chi, The Terry, Amherst; Alpha BigUBS 
Thi. Plymouth Inn. Northampton; 
Kappa (iamma Phi, Fraternity House, 
Amherst; Kappa Sigma, Pohc Tree Inn, 

Northampton; Lambda Ohl Alpha, 

Draper Hall, Amhensl; Phi Sigma 
Kappa, The Davenport. Amherst {Sigma 
Phi Epsllon, Plymouth Inn, North- 
ampton. 

The commit In charge has done its 

beat to prepare a worthwhile program 

for tbeee two days, and with the good 

crowd of alumni which they expect 



GREAT PRICE REDUCTIONS 

Men's'lliilf Holes Sewed $1.50 

Kaa's Goodreer Rttbeer Heels 50 

Men's Whole Neolin Soles I ltd <iooil>ear 

Rubber Heels 2 - 00 

Mens Whole Leather Soles Sewed ;'M<I 

i i)\i';ii Robber Heele .... 2.50 

All Work Guaranteed I 

High-grade Line of Men's Shoes 
for Sale at Low Prices. 

J. GINSBURG 

19 Pleasant Street, on roar eat op town. 



THE MILLETT JEWELRY STORE 

Callage Jewelry -out Links, ftoft Cottar Pins, 

ItreM Suit Seta. Violin. llai' : o. Mandolin Mrliitfl 

Fine Watch Repairing, also Broken Lentet 

Raptaced PTOtnattr* 
32 Main Street, Amhent. M»u. 



-TRY 



C. H. GOULD 

id Brst-clase 

Watch, Clock and Jewelry Repairing 

U Pleasant St., Imherst, Mass. 



GRANGE STORE 

Fine Oroceries 
Cindifs aimd Fruits 

MASON A. DICKINSON, Proprietor 



Aggie Stationery 

with Class Numerals 
\922L TO 1925 



A. J. HASTINGS 

Newsdealer and Stationer 

Amherst - - * M » SH - 



MRS. PRUDENCE P. CASSIN 

SELECT CATERING 

at Reasonable Prii es. 
Informal* m Specialty 

It Bo. P ro spec t St.. Astberst, Mass 

Tel. 5BB-M 



North End Lunch 

120 Pleasant Street. 



Our food is right — 
Our prices reasonable 

TRY US OUT 

w. bTdrury 




From A Faint Blue Glow 
To Modern Miracles 

EDISON saw it first— a mere shadow of blue light streaking across the 
terminals inside an imperfect electric lamp. This "leak" of elec- 
tric current, an obstacle to lamp perfection, was soon banished by 
removing more air from the bulbs. 

But the ghostly light, and its mysterious disappearance in a high 
vacuum remained unexplained for years. 

Then J. J. Thomson established the electron theory on the trans- 
mission of electricity in a partial vacuum— and the blue light was 
understood. In a very high vacuum, however, the light and appar- 
ently the currents that caused it disappeared. 

One day, however, a scientist in the Research Laboratories of the 
General Electric Company proved that a current could be made to pass 
through the highest possible vacuum, and could be varied according to 
fixed laws. But the phantom light had vanished. 

Here was a new and definite phenomenon — a basis for further re- 
search. 

Immediately, scientists began a series of experiments with far reach- 
ing practical results. A new type of X-ray tube, known as theCoolidge 
tube, soon gave a great impetus to the art of surgery. The Kenotron 
and Pliotron, followed in quick succession by the Dynatron and Mag- 
netron, made possible long distance radio telephony and revolutionized 
radio telegraphy. And the usefulness of the "tron" family has only 
begun. 

The troublesome little blue glow was banished nearly forty years 
ago. But for scientific research, it would have been forgotten. Yet 
there is hardly a man, woman or child in the country today whose 
life has not been benefited, directly or indirectly, by the results of 
the scientific investigations that followed. 

Thus it is that persistent organized research gives man new tools, 
makes available forces that otherwise might remain unknown for 
centuries. 



GeneraMElectric 

Company 



General Office 



Schenectady, N. Y. 

95-473HD 



NEW COLLEGE STORE 

Run by Students 

On the Campus - - - On the Job 



back, tblnga are boaad lobttnsoathe 
campus. The Alumni OBlee wishes to 
ur ge agalO 'lie necessity that all those 

who are planning to attend shall sig- 
nify by sending a card t<> tbe Office, 
[hat i hey may make arrangements tot 

iiu- dinner <>n Saturday. 



INTERFRATERN1TY RELAY 
. ontests in the Lnterfraiernily Belaj 
series were considerably livelier in lbs 
la»t two meets on Friday !,n ' 1 Monday, 

ihe average lime of these two days 

beiag at leant aaeooad less than those 

,,t previous meets. On Friday, the 

iTerage tins* for the three races was 

j.ia i-;». on Monday, the rasi lime ol 
■> i:i :s-4 would liave been Ihe average 

|,;„| it not hewn lor a lotleit race, in 
which Ihe laek of competition great I] 
increased the running time. Phi BlgSSS 
Kappa l«eads the fraternities in Ihe 

percentage column. 



KAPPA sh.M \ 

W. I.. Made 
I. Made 
Fish 

Cahll 



Friday "s laces: 

\\ii;n.\ CHI AI.I'HA 

Kemp 
I'erranti 
Steele 
Loriag 

Won by Lambda Ohl Alpha. 

rime: 2.14 8-6. 
mi HflMA kaita '/• '• v - 

Woodwoith Darling 

Suite Kennedy 

Garretson Barnes 

|. 1( Barnard 

Won by Phi Sigma Kappa. 

Time: 2.16 a -ft. 
i hi i \ < in KAPPA sHJMA PHI 

Roberts Joaaheif 

Rhodes '' :l,,e 

N'urray Bates 

llallet Uolteen 

Won by ThetaChi. 

Time: 2.17 4-5. 

Monday's rac. 

KAPPA HI«»MA 

W. Made 

Powell 

Fish 
(ahill 

Won by Kappa Siuina 

lime: 2.14. 



HOCKEY TEAM ON TO 

WEST POINT 

Last evening Hie Huekey Team lefl 

lor their annual game with Ihe West 

|»olal aggregation at West Point which 

will take place tonight. With two 

•tralghi defeats against then the At^ie 

team lake on the \riny with a vow tO 
s-t their college even with the spoil- 
ing world once more. 

The West Point leant has been p'a>- 

Ing hard teams tins y«ei aod srtll • 
agaiasl the at. a. 0. team with tour 

straight wins to their credit. This la.t 
alone will make victory sweeter to \u 
gie. West Point has 1. ceil out opponent 
lor many years, last yeai there being 

ao game because ol incomplete arrange* 
meats. The close aeoresin past years 
would point t«> a bard game to-day but 

with Aggie at its beat are should stand 

more than a fighting chance. 

West Point's had man is Mat linclli . 

playing center ice, who snored six goals, 

agaiasl Springfield last Saturday. Two 
weeks au r <> the Army heat Hamilton 
who in turn took a »aine Irom Aggie 

Saturday evening, 

The nine men who made I In- trip 
w.ii-: Captain Collins. Bodsdon, Cor- 
don. Lyons, llaskins. lewhill, Kroeck. 
Vic. II, ami Whitaker. Coach Mansell 

(eels thai A^-jie will he well repre- 
sented and is assured thai ti"- boys will 
play their heal game of the season. 



KINGSLEY'S 



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Kemp 



A I. I'll A I. A MM \ KHO 

Bates 

Stevenson 
Ferranti Nelson 

i .. n-i no; Isaac 

Won by Lambda Chi Alpha. 

Time: S.18 1-2. 

SIGMA I'll I r.rsll ON ALPHA SIGMA PHI 

Blanehard 
Bray 

Mexendar Forfeited 

Ulfford 

Won by Sigma Phi Bpsilon. 

Time 2.1X 1-10. 



Phi Sigma Kappa 
ma Phi Epsllon 
Lambda Chi Alpha 
Alpha Sigma Pbi 
ThetaChi 
Kappa Sigma 
<,». T. V. 
Alpha Oamrua 
Kappa Gamma Phi 



WON 
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CAMPUS CALENDAR 

Wi nst sen \ y. Feb. l. 
m assembly. Debate. Re 
salved, Thai lha pteaenl dln- 

Clplinar] relations between 
Ihe Freshman and Sophomore 

claases are detrimental to 
college spirit. 

Hookey, Weal Point al West 
l'oint. 

Tm ksi. \i . I i B. 2. 
7-0.H-. M.-Y. W C. A. Meeting, Me- 
morial Building. 
m. — orchestra Rehearsal, Me- 
morial Building, 
Fr.nivv. Fin. a. 
Alumni Da] 

m. -Social Union entertain- 
ment, Mr. I'hidelah Pice. 
Bowkei Auditorium. 

m. Musical Clubs Concert. 
Bowker Auditorium. 

S\ti ui-av. Fkk. 4. 
Alumni Day 

Y. w. c. A. Beuefll Play. 

Adams Hall. 
HI-IMIA. M.— Alumni Meeting, Memorial 

Building. 

H —Alumni Dinner. Draper 
Hall. 

—Basketball Came. Tufts at 
If. \. C. 
Baaketball Game, Presbmen 

vs. Sacred Heart II. B. ol 
Molyoke at llolyoke. 

Basketball Game, Two-Year 
\ S . Deerfield Academy at 
at. A C. 



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digestion, 
brighten teeth 
and soothe 
mouth and throat. 



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Creamed Chicken and Waffles Our Specialty 

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MRS. L. M STEBBINS 
MKilsHrsei. >iei.4H.-w> Haaaw, m»m. 

WEBSTER'S STUDIO 

Nash Block 
AMHERST SHOE REPAIRING CO. 

Your Shoes Repaired 

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DRAPER 

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The Leader for College Banquets 



Wm. M. Kimball, Prop. 



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K M.- -Sunday Chapel. Speaker. 
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field. 

TiKsn.w. Feb. 7. 
Olee <iui> Behearaal 

inorial Building. 

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Heetlng. Speaker, 
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Clothes and Shoe Brushes 

Anything in Hardware and Cooking Utensils 

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THE MUTUAL PLUMBING & HEATING CO. 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Wednesday, February 1, 1922. 



WHEN QUALITY IS PASSED UR ROR LOW R RICES 

You are simply mortgaging the results which you expect in service, and you are assuming the risk of losing far 
more in the end than you thought you were gaining in the beginning, but our goods have both quality and low prices, 
so take advantage of both of these when buying. 

SOUTHWICK BROTHERS & GAULT 



VARSITY SECONDS 

DRUB FROSH 4-1 

Tewhill and Goldsmith Play Well in 
Scrub Games. 

In ;i practice game with the varsity 
scrubs, die freshman bockej team vu 
defeated by tbe snore <»! i-i. Tbe 
weak point in the freshman team was 
clearly manifested to lie at goal-tend- 
ing as a result of this name. Since 
White has heeii declared Ineligble there 
have been no candidates who ha\e 

essayed to fill his shoes. The varsity 
senilis outclassed the Freshmen In all 
parti of the game, and experienoi 

(heir part had a telling effect on the 
outcome. Tewhill and Goldsmith star- 
red tor the varsity, while Taylor and 
Hutching played well lor the Freshmen- 
The score : 



appropriated first, second, and third in- 
dividual placing put I hem head and 
shoulders above the Obloans and indi- 
cated in bo liike-warm manner, that 
eastern horticultural instruction is the 
best that is to he obtained. 
Competition has ever been between 

New Hampshire State and Massachu- 
setts Agricultural College; and, in 
iuterstate contests where these two col- 
leges are pitted one against the other, 
DO quarter is asked, and none is ui veil. 
lint when either institution steps out 

into foreign fields to defend New F.n«- 



land's laurels, no Stronger backer, no 
heartier friend could he wanted than 
the erstwhile antagonist across (he 
line. 

Massachusetts won tbe New England 
horticultural crown from New Hamp- 
shire at the Concord, N. II. show. 
There can he no gainsaying that, and 
in view of succeeding events It reflect! 

mi discredit on the Granite State team, 
(in the other hand, to suller defeat at 
(he hands of the men who today are 
the champions ol America can he con- 
sidered little less than an honor. To 



repeal the sentiment of tbe opening 

paragraph, tfeu Hanipaalre'i oongratti 

lalions lo Massachusetts in her hour oi 
victory. To print this article in oui 
Coi.i.k.oian is a great honor, and New 
Hampshire's congratulations are uioie 
than appreciated ! 

ALUMNI 

'21. — Arthur I.eighlon is leaching 
mathematics at tbe Huntington School 
of the Boston V. M. ('. A. He is also 
taking a course in the Harvard (ira.i 

uate School of Education. 



\ kssm >< ui us. 

Tan, rw 
Nicoll, Iw 

Tewhill, e 
Goldsmll h. id 

Chase, Id 

Baker, a 



i i; i. sum i n. 
rw, Taylor 

c, Ward 
e, Currier 

c, Kricson 

Iw, Guild 

Id. afoGeoeb 

id, liulchiiis 

<x, < Heaves 

Time -Two 18 minute periods. ltef- 
eree— Head. Goal* — Ward, Tewhill. 
Tarr, Nicoll.au.l Goldsmith. 



PROF. WARD IN ASSEMBLY 
I'roi. Harry F. Ward of the Union 
Theological Seminary, New fork, was 

the speaker at Assembly Wednesday. 
The speaker said t hat the laws against 
free speech and freedom of IBS press 

which were suppressed during tbe war 

are yet in force. That behind this laid 

Industrial strife and Illegal pressure 

back of I he police. 

After baring made his address the 
speaker asked for questions from the 
floor. Judging from the type of ques- 
tion hurled at the speaker by a few, 
they must have been of the impression 
that the speaker's remarkswere Incllnsd 
to he somewhat radical, but the situ- 
ation was cleared when l'rof. Ward said. 

"Every eltlsen is entitled to enjoy every 

civil liberty provided it is within the 
law." 




CONGRATULATIONS 

MASSACHUSETTS! 

The following article was printed in 
the. Ian. 11 number of The New //.///</'- 

It is with a great deal of pleasure 
that '/'//<• Xfir Hampshire takes ad- 
vantage of the opportunity lor ex- 
tending sincere congratulations to 
Massachusetts Agricultural College on 
the signal victory of its (misjudging 

team at the national fruit show which 
was held recently at Toledo. Ohio. Fil- 
tered in a contest which has developed 
into an interseciional match for first 
honors in fruit Judging, M. A. C. found 
her team pitted against Ohio State for 
national honors. The Ohio team won 

the championship, but the Hay State 

boys were out for everything they could 

gel, in 1990, ami was considered the 
logical winner at the show just past , 
and the masterly fashion in which they 




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Why, just buy Camels and look at the package! 
It's the best packing science has devised to keep 
cigarettes fresh and full flavored for your taste. 
Heavy paper outside— secure foil wrapping inside 
and the revenue stamp over the end to seal the pack- 
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And note this! There's nothing flashy about the 
Camel package. No extra wrappings that do not 
improve the smoke. Not a cent of needless expense 
that must come out of the quality of the tobacco. 

Camels wonderful and exclusive Quality wins on 
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Because, men smoke Camels who want the 
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Camels are made for men who think for them- 
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amel 



REYNOLDS T03ACCO COMPANY, Win»ton-Salem, N. C. 







MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 



Vol. XXXII. 



Amherst, Mass., Wednesday, February 8, 1922. 



No. 15 



M. A. C. TAKES REVENGE *mm respond to 
IN 26-18 WIN FROM TUFTS ! alma mater s call 



Captain Gowdy, Tumey, and Bike 

Play Splendid Game Before 

Alumni and Students. 



The Annie quintet rmle the visiting 
.IiiiiiIiu'h to victory 16-18 last Saturday 
tftatnooa in the IMIl Hall before a 

laift galkcrlagof alumni and students. 
The game was fast and aggressive from 
Marl to finish, tue TuftB men going 
down to defeat only after a hard light. 
it was by its West work that the Maroon 
•ind White team showed its heels lo 
the speedy visitors. With close eover- 
in| and accurate shooting Mass. Aggie 
gained the lead early, and was not 
beaded throughout the name although 
threatened constantly. 

Lgglc started things off with a rush. 
M d Al Smith caged the ball in the first 
lew minutes of play. Tumey followed 
almost immediately with a twin contri- 
bution, then Evans and Hounds broke 
through with enough points to eveu the 
score. Marshman look a hand at this 
point, and increased the SCUte bj »et 
i in- i wo baskets. The game was slowed 
up by fouls shortly before the end of 
Ibe period. Roeer went iu just before 
the whistle blew with the score 10-11 in 

Aggie's, favor. 

In the second period Tufts started in 
with a vigorous determination to even 
up tbe scoie. The play was hard and 
rough, hut the Medford men failed lo 
Main the lead. Captain Gowdy was 
going great at this point guarding 
witli never failing success and neatly 
eluding his opponent for a field goal, 
like kept his man, Mahoney, with but 
one tally to his credit and went down 
i he floor once for a basket . The Brown 
and Blue came wilhin four points of 
tying late in the game, but the premier 
work of Smith and Tumey gave the 
\ utiles a substantial lead before the end 
ol the game. Evans and Hounds were 
bigh scorers for the visitors. 
The summary : 

MASS. A(i(iIE8. TUKT8. 

Tumey, Barrows, rf lb, Hopkins 

Smith, Hoser, Is rb, Daley 

Marshman, c c. Hounds, Kogers 

Bike, rb If, Mahoney 

i.owdy.lb rf, Evans, Barrows 

i toaJs from floor— Tumey 4, Smith 2, 
Marshman 2, Bike, Gowdy, Hopkins, 
Rounds 3, Mahoney, Evans 2. Baskets 
Horn foul— Tumey 6, Mahomey 4. Ref- 
. ne— Aylesworth. Time— 20 minute 
ods. 

FRESHMAN HOCKEY 

Owing to the condition of the ice on 
the hockey rink last Thursday the 
lnter-class Hockey game between the 
>oj»homores and Freshmen did not take 
place as scheduled. Two days of warm 
weather had left the »ink in a slushy 
condition making play impossible. 
I he Deerfield Academy game was also 
postponed for tbe same reason. 



Fine 8howing of Graduates Enjoy 
Week-end Meetings and Enter- 
tainments at the Old College. 

Last Friday and Saturday were ob- 
served on campus as the annual mid 
winter alumni days. As usual a large 
number of alumni came back to enjoy 
again the spirit of their Alma Mater. 
Friday night they were entertained 
by the Social i'nion in Slock hi blue 
Hall. Mr. l'hidelah Hue gave an in- 
teresting reading which was followed 
by a concert given by the combined 
musical clubs under tbe leadership 
of Vinten and WUUgk, Saturday 
morning various alumni meetings were 
held and alumni committee reports 
were heard. A I noon dinner was 
served in Diaper Hall. Tufts College 
formed the bas ; s lor Ibe afternoon* 
amusement when their b.isketbell team 
bowed before Coach Geffa'l quintet. 
The customary fraternity reunions and 
banquets were held on Sal unlay 
evening either in Amherst or in nearby 
towns. Taken as a whole Alumni Day 
was a success this year. Sec Mel leu 
was pleased with the law niiml.ei 
of graduates who were back and es- 
pecially with the men from the earlier 
classes or from distant stales. An ac- 
count of the various meetings follows 
this introduction, and tbe Tufts game 
is related on this page 

Continued on page 6 



SOPHOMORES WIN INTER- 
CLASS DEBATE WITH 1925 



Negative Comes Out Ahead in De 
bate Over Student Disciplinary 

Methods. 
With the Sophomore team defending 
the negative and winning from t he 
Freshmen on the subject: "Resolved, 
That the present disciplinary relations 
between the Sophomore and Freshman 
classes are detrimental to college spirit 
at M. A. C," those who attended As- 
sembly last week listened to one of t In- 
most heated debates the college has 
witnessed in some time. 

The first speaker for the affirmative 
was James Batal. He outlined in most 
minute detail the adventure* oi a 
Freshman at an Arena Party. His 
point was made that Arena Parties are 
disgusting, and attempted to prove that 
such parties were harmful to the self- 
respect of the Freshman. 

The first speaker for the negative was 
Kussell Noyes, and be outlined the 
three points which the 19M team Would 
attempt to prove. They are as follows: 
1 Unit* among the members of the 
Freshman class is effected through the 
interclass activities at the beginning of 

the year. 
2. Tbe rules which the rreshmen 
Continued on p»g« » 



STRONG OFFENSIVE BY COLLINS AND LYONS 
GIVES M. A. C. VICTORY OVER WEST POINT 

Army Team Loses First Game of Year to Maroon and White by 4-3 
Score. Kroeck and Kastner Busy at Goal. 

The Iggtc farmers whipped up the 

old A nny mule last Wednesday after- 
noon, and never losing control of the 
■UuallOD dn-ve home with a loin to 

three bockej win tucked in the buggy. 
Tbe game was I ■« best played and the 
hardest loiiglil which has been played 

al Wist Point t bis seas f'»r previous 

to Wednesday'! content lae Army had 
heen undefeated, 

iggls Itarted the game with it well- 
orgaained surprise attack, and in one 
minute and twenty seconds of |day Cap 

tain "Hnbba" shot a long, hard, u«»«»i 

li the middle Ol the rink for the lirsl 

■core "l the name Seven minutes more 
ami by .l.ver skating and pass-work, 
' Miarky" Lyon- puked in a second goal 
loi M. 4.C. West Point made one goal 
taefa period the liist one came after 

tSfinlnatei of play, when Marlaalll, 

\V. -i Point's slat .enter, poked ihe puck 

by Kroeck aftei tome *nrj i leva* stick- 
work. 

The teeond period started oil wilh 

■one fast work, ptey being faster then 
in the preceding period. Marinelli 
evened tbe aeon for VTaat Potat, wbea 

he shot his mm ond goal of the name, 
after tWO and three. mailers minutes ol 
play. Three minutes later, " II ubba'' 
led a flank attack lo regain the lost 
position, and succeeded in shooting a 
goal which put iggtc In the lead one- 
inoi • 

The play daring the third period was 
the fastest "I the entire game, but the 
pUCh was in Ihe Aim.v teiiiloiy most of 
||, e lime. The Aggie ,,;:,m **•• If 

i heir beavtet ami bombarded the Army 

goal without success. West Point also 
made some good Mies to even up the 
score and succeeded in doing so for less 
I han a minute when Marinelli managed 
to net by the Maroon and White and 
eage a fast one. I here were less than 
Continued on psfe 2 



N. H. STATE WINS AT B. A. A. 

BY A SCANT SIX YARDS 

Capt. Sullivan Runs Fine Race but 
the Granite Staters Prove 
Too Fast in the End 
" The farmer race ". as one ol our 

linpolitan Journals 's wont to pni 

it, •' was a lop thriller. " [a other 

wor.U. the New Hampshire state relaj 

team defeated M. A. «'• last Sam. day 
at the 15. A. A. meet by about ill 

vai.ls. Sullivan bopped la the lead 
oi Draper oi New Hampshire, I lis 
lead alternated through the tour 

ebaoges of relay. on Ihe last relay 
A.hes.m sialic. I seven yards behind 

Paine, and although be galaed Bral 

plane quickly, be was I. -reed to slow 

,. ; |.e !»>•• lap wt.i.h snefcW 

Patau lo tome ahead and gain the 
victory. It was a nip-ami-iuck raos 
throughout. Ike lime made by New 
Hampshire Stale was I minules 11 M 

seconds. 

The runners, in their order of run- 
ning, were: 

\. II. S. U. A. < . 

Drapei Sullivan 

Cotton MaoCready 

Conghlln I- S. Woodwortb 

Pal„ e anbeeun 



APPEARANCE OF "SHIFTERS" 

CAUSES SPECULATION 

Nearly One-Hundred M. A. C. Men 
Now Members of a Brother- 
hood Started at M. I. T. 

The secret organisation known as the 

"Shifters" which gained so niii.h publi- 
city In ibe Bnetoa papers a few weeks 

IgO has now started at Ai^ie. This 
organization Initiated over 8800 men in 
three days at M. I. T. including the 
Dean and all the member ol the eorpor- 
aiion. While it is no! exactly a college 
fraternity it is understood that it aims 
to promote brotherly feeling between 
men. Although the membership at M. 
,\. (J. is still small, if it gTOWS like it did 
:it M I.T. the entire student body and 
faculty will be members in a week. 

The dean of M . 1. T. is hearty iu his 
approval of the order and says thai the 

Installation of tbe chapter at Teen was 
one of the beat tbiaga that ever hap- 
pened there. Therefore, when a mem- 
ber of the orgina/.ion at Tech came to 
Amherst a few days ago, lie was au- 
thorized to start a chapter beta. The 
results of his work are already evident 
as about four hundred are already 
initiated and there promises to be a 
■trong chapter ban in the near future. 



R. H. WOODWORTH ELECTED 

SOPHOMORE PRESIDENT 



Brother is Present President of the 
Junior Class. 
The Sophomore .lass held a meeting 
in f lark Hall Tuesday evening, .Ian. 31. 
The main business ol t he evening was 
t,, eleet ofBoers. Those elected were: 
Robert II. Woodworlh of Newton, pres- 
mI.,,1 ; Charles J.Tawuillol Florence, 
rice-president; Martha B. S. Bppa of 

Wilbraham. tiea-uni: Ruth If . Wood 
ol North Andove.i, historian; A. Corwin 
Harretson of Hound Brook, N. J., sec- 
retary : Sterling MyriVk of LoRgmeadow, 
captain; Brlc F. Lamb *f Waban.ser- 
geant-at-arms. 






2 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Wednesday, February 8, 1922. 



WEST POINT GAME 

Continued from p»f • 1 



two minutes left to play, and it looked 
M if an extra period might be necessary 
whet) a forward wave fonsislingof lias- 
kins and Lyons shot up the ice, and re- 
ceiving a clever pass across his wing, 
"Sharky" drove through the final score 
of the gams. 

In the remaining minute of play, 
West Point tried vainly to even the 
score, without success. "Hubha" Col- 
lins and "Sharky" Lyons starred for 
Aggie, and the work of Marinelli in 
scoring West Point's three goals was 
exceptional. Both Kroeck and Kastner 
were called upon to do a heavy share of 
the defense, and each one made some 
fitifl ttopa at the n*'i 

Aggie played the best brand of 
hockey that they have shown this sea- 
son, the forward line taking the puck 
away from the Army forwards time and 
again, by clever "checking back." 

The .Summary : 

AOUlEH. AliMY. 

Gordon, lw Iw, Stevenson 

Haskins. c c, Marinelli 

Lyons, rw rw, Woods 

Uodsdon, p p, O'Connell 

Collins, cp cp, Stout 

Kroeck, g g, Kastner 

Score — Aggies 4, Army 3. Goals — 
first period, Collins 1.20, Lyous 8.00, 
Marinelli 12.30; second period, Marinel- 
li 2.45, Collins 0.18; third period, Mar- 
inelli 13.15, Lyons 14.00. Substitutions 
— Army, O'Shea for Woods, Woods for 
O'Shea, Rich for Stevenson, Stevenson 
for Rich; Aggies, Lamb for liaskins, 
Whi taker for Gordon, Gordon for Whit- 
aker. Referee — Major Harris, Army. 
Time — three 15 minute periods. 



SIDEKICKS 

In spite of the game being so very 
tight not a foul was called on either 
team. 

They run a great life at West Point, 
— run between all classes, get up by 
bugle, eat by bugle, and go to bed by 
bugle. 

ApairofK's at the goals, kings at 
stopping the puck. 

West Point had only been scored on 
twice this season, let alone beaten. 
Hamilton was oue of the Army's 
victims. 



COLLEGIAN COMPETITION 

The Collkgian competition is still 
going on at full blast. Read has made 
the most gain. Kennedy is still in the 
lead, with Waugb gaining fast. There 
are only xeren more issues before the 
contest closes, so new men put a brace 
on and get going! The book examina- 
tion, which was to take place last Wed- 
nesday, has been postponed until fur- 
ther notice from Competition Manager 
Barnard. 

The standing of the competitors of 
The Massachusetts Collegia n up to 
date is as follows: 



EDITORIAl 


. DEPARTMENT. 




1924. 




Kennedy 




42.0 


Read 




34.2 


Waugh 


1925. 


27.29 


Balal 




30.2 


Taube 




22.86 


Keith 




6.74 


Oliver 




5.41 


BUSINESS 


DEPARTMENT. 




1925. 




Slade 




23.8 


Simpson 




23.3 


Lewis 




8.8 



QUINTET WINS 34-17 

FROM BOSTON UNIVERSITY 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Wednesday, February 8, 1922. 



Ed Tumey Singlehanded Scores 

Enough Points to Win For 

Varsity. 

Massachusetts Aggie showed the way 
to the Boston University quintet by a 
margin of 34-17 last Tuesday eveniiin 
on the Drill Hall tloor in rather a slow 
game. The Aggie team celebrated its 
home-coming with an unquestonable re- 
covery from the slump which had har- 
assed them in the past few games. In 
the first half it looked as though Tumey 
was the only member of the Aggie team 
who had his eye on the basket. His 
aim was deadly and half-time showed 
13 of the 15 Aggie points to his favor. 
The second half proved the mistake of 
this idea when Bike, Marshman, Smith 
and HarrowB tore loose in the most ap- 
proved style withseven baskets between 
them. The first period was evenly play- 
ed, both teams being somewhat weak 
on the defensive, but with loug shots 
preferred, the Aggies merging into the 
lead 15-13. The Hub aggregation was 
totally eclipsed in the second period, 
their defense unable to withstand the 
attack of "Kid' Gore's team. 

The game opened with both teams on 
the defensive. Boston University broke 
the ice with the first basket, then gave 
way to Kd Tumey who scored two field 
goals and a free try. The Boston quin- 
tet began a very aggressive game and 
kept in the running the entire half, the 
whistle blowing with Aggie out on top 
15-13. 

The Maroon and White showed a bet- 
ter brand of basketball in the second 
half , and Boston University weakened 
considerably. The Hub men failed to 
sink a tloor basket in this half and 'had 
to content themselves with four success- 
ful free throws. Marshman astonished 
the crowd by tossing one in from the 
far corner. Bike added two baskets to 
his first half tally which made him sec- 
ond highest point getter of the evening. 
Coach Gore's subs were able to hold 
the visitors scoreless the last few min- 
utes of the game. Conry starred for 
the loosers doing good work at guard. 

The summary: 

AGGIE. HOSTON UNIVERSITY. 

Smith, Kane, Koser, If 

rb, Conry, Worcester 

Tumey, Grayson. Barrows, rf 

lb, Pettingill 

Marshman, Thompson, e 

c, Harris, Lenkius 

Gowdy, lb rf, Feldman 

Bike, Hale, rb If, Cochrane, Graves 

Goals from floor— Smith 2, Tumey 7, 
Barrows, Marshman 2, Bike 3, Pettingill 
2, Harris, Feldmjtn, Cochrane 2. Foul 
shots— Tumey 4, Feldman 5. Referee- 
Finn. Time — 20 minute periods. 



TWO-YEAR QUINTET WINS 
FAST CONTEST FROM ARMS 



Lose by Two Points to Deerfield on 
Saturday. 

In a nip and tuck game with Deerfield 
Academy in the Drill Hall last Satur- 
day, the visitors nosed out the Aggie 
Two-year by one shot from the floor, 
the linal score being 24-22. 

In another fast game with Arms 
Academy at Shelburne Falls last 
Friday evening, February 3, the two- 
year team nosed out the home quintet 
in a five minute overtime period, the 
final score being 21-20. Ross and 
Parsons starred for the visitors, while 
Cardwell was high scorer for the 
Academy. 



Old Deerfield Fertilizers 

'■''Reasonable in dollars and sense.'" 
A. W. HIGGINS, INC., South Deerfield. Mass 



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Shaving Sticks and Creams 



Razors and Razor Blades 



VICTOR RECORDS 



Kodaks and Supplies 



Fountain Pens 



Heavy Flannel Shirts 

Mackinaw Shirts 

These are the popular things with the college men 
throughout the country. 

YOURS NOW ! 



P. M. THOMPSON & SON 

Hart Schaffner & Marx Clothes. 



THE NEW M. A. C. SONG BOOK 

At the Treasurer's Office— $1.00 

LEARN TO SING ALL THE AGGIE SONGS 



When You Are Down Town 

DROP IN 

The Candy Kitchen 



-FOR- 



Lunch, Candy, Ice Cream and Smokes 



COLLEGE CANDY KITCHEN 

"The Home of Sweets" 



aggie: inn 

What is better than a good investment ? A College or Fraternity Shield is neat 
and will last forever. We have a complete line. Drop in and see it. 

I El I N INI —By the Campus Entrance 



FRESHMEN WIN FROM 

AMHERST HIGH 40-13 



Team Still Unbeaten, Six Wins to 

Credit. 8acred Heart H. S. 

also Defeated. 

I i, t . Kii'sluniin baaketball ieaea sli " 

..ainiaiiis its t00% record, having won 

mn ^iuics ill asnuiiiy starts. Last Wtil- 

| :l y I hey handed llie Ainlieist lliyh 

School a l>a«l bMtlOR Willi I lie HON 

jo i:i. Although things m ra rairlj 

even in th« first half. Sullivan :uul Sam- 
i,el« broke away in tlie second period 

;,,,,! eonld not be stopped. Sullivan 
dropped through 18 donole-etMinters, 

enough alone to decisively defeat liis 
formtl teammates. Ma-ratti starred 
fur the losers while Kiel. lit was their 
high scorer. 

l, ;l> i Saturday the yearlings took on 
Haciwd Heart lliuh School from llol- 
v ,,ke. This is considered one ol the 
lastesl high school teams in the valley 
HH, until they met the Freshmen, they 
b«d won P.» out Of 81 u;i s - However. 

the froth triumphed again, Riving the 

tori i he small end of ft 14-'.» score. 
Tbej showed good teamwork and Were 
Iuviliclble bOtb M the defense and the 

offense Th« Ural ball en. led <>-•>, hut 

the yearling* came hack in g I form 

l,,, the second period and walked away 
with ihc name. 

The SCOWa : 

1926 B. ■"« '*• 

Samuel*, rf 8 10 

Sullivan, It 18 <» *i 

>i Millions, e 10 2 

Beaver, rg ° ° " 

Hurley, lg > " 4 



WllllKSl HIGH 
liowil, \\l 

Magrath, ru 

liloWII, c 

Fid. lit, If 
Mackimmie, rf 



17 

n. 
1 

8 

e 

i 
n 



4(1 
p. 



« 

v. 

'/ 

4 

o o 

7 

o (i 



4 5 18 

Referee- Bleed M. A.C. Tlwe-80 

minute periods. 

19»fi is- '• ■'• 

■ U.-U. It 1 4 

Sullivan, If 8 « 

Simmons. C *' " 

Seaver, rg i o 2 

Hurley, kg •' ° * 

4 14 



SOPHOMORES WIN DEBATE 

Continued from page 1 
are compelled to obey foster respect for 

the eellege and eaoonrage eollega spirit. 

I, M. A.C has college spirit under 
the present system of iuterclass lela- 
lions. 

The Freshman class offered as their 
points: 

1. General disgrace to college and 
harm to college spirit due to the Arena 
Part lea. 

2. Ilannliil effect on college spirit 
of present relations between the two 
elaaaea. 

:$. Unfair system of working required 

by the college of the Freshmen as ad- 
ministered l.y I he Sophomores. 

The complete teams were as follows: 
li»24 108* 

Noyes Bate! (captain' 

Gilford Gutennan 

Diniock (alternate) Ward 
Btaebeer (captain) Corwin (alternate) 
Captain Staebnar ejas unable to par- 
ticipate on account of illness. 

The teams appeared to be evenly 
matched up to the time of the rebuttals. 
Noyes for the negative attempted to 
show that the Freshmen had not ar- 
BUed on the subject at all, but bad 
merely shown that the Arena l'arty and 
the present work Byslern are not the 
I. est possible methods of punishment, 
and had not shown at all that these two 
were detrimental to college spirit ; nor 
had they touched on any of the other 
relations at all. 

(internum, for the Freshmen, showed 
that his team had attempted to prove 
that the relations are detrimental to 
college spirit; that men would nevei 
conic to Aggie If they knew what dis- 
grace might await them (Arena Parties); 
that the negative team had evaded the 
main issue. 

The three judges-Prof. K. J. McFall, 
Prof. 1-. K. ('rose, and Ass't I'rof. C. II. 
Gould— all voted in favor of the neg- 
ative. I'rof. Prince presided at the de- 
bate, which was under the auspices of 
the Non-Athletic Board. 



HOCKEY TEAM TO PLAY IN 
PHILADELPHIA THIS WEEK-END 



Varsity to Place Two of Strongest 
Clube of America in Quaker City. 
This week-end the hockey team jour- 
neys to Philadelphia where on Fiiday 
and Batnrdaf nights it plavs the strong 
St. Nicholas Ib.ekey Club of New York 
City land Quaker City club of Phila- 
delphia in the Philadelphia let 
Palace. According to the recoi.ls 
that these two learns have made so far 
this season, these games should prove 
to he the hardest that our team will 
have to play. The Quaker City Hockey 
club defeated the fast Vale team 84 in 
a game that was played early in the 
season. Since then, however, they 
Have learned much through the many 
games they have played so that when 
(hey meet Aggie they will be playtag 
an exceptionally high class of hockey. 
These two teams are so nearly equal in 
Strength that when they were pitied 
■galea! one another in a gaUM last 
week the score ran a tie, 2 to 2. Seveii- 
miniites of over time were played with- 
out any Change in the score. The game 

was heralded by the daily papere as the 

fastest, the most startling, and the most 
sensational game that has taken place 
in Philadelphia this year. Bot with 
the biand of hockev that our team has 
been playing this season and with the 
improvement that has followed each 
jjame played thus far, our team may be 
expected to make a very creditable 
■bowing, and hag a victory, or two. 




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Handsome Scottish cheviots in 
exclusive heather mixtures — rain- 
proofed. 

Down-to-date in price and up- 
to-date in style. 

The best of everything college 
men wear. 

* Registered Trademark. 

Special "Shopping Service" 
for orders by mail. 

Rogkks Pkkt Company 
Hroadway Broadway 

at 13th St. "Four at 34th St. 

( onvenient 

Broadway Corners" Fifth Ave. 

at Warren at 4lBt St. 

NFW YOHK CITY 



BA< KKIi UK ART 


it. 


V. 


i\ 


Kane, lg 




(I 


a 


1 


Voat. rg 







(t 





Burke. ( 




1 


2 


4 


K'.'iilienst . 


If 











Sullivan, rf 







2 


l 



1 o 8 

Keferee— Graysoa ,,f m. a. c. Time 
%\ minute periods. 



Hank Binks '20 is now employed in 
- tahiagton hy the Security Storage 
< oiiipany. 

Cbompson's Ontelp Calks 

A typewriter Is a mighty handy article for the 
college man. We carry < onma ami Remington 
Portable Typewriters, and lent ami repair all 

ee ns first. 

THOMPSON'S SHOP, Rear National Bank 



FRESHMAN CLASS MEETING. 

The Freshmen held a meeting on Tues- 
day evening, Jan. 31, in Femald Hall. 
Astheelass cheer was not very famil- 
iar to all the members of the class, it 
was rehearsed a few times. The cheer 
as printed in this paper before was in- 
correct and the correct copy follows: 
1-0-2-5 
Massachusetts '25 
Bahl Kali! Bah! 
Massachusetts "2."> 
Team! Team! Team I 

A notion was carried to secure a nomi- 
natinti committee composed of a man 
from each fraternity, one from ainotiu 
the non-fraternity men, and one from 
among tbieo-eda. Each group was to 
elect its own member. 

The committee met in the Memorial 
Building Monday evening and made the 
nominations for class otlicers. The elec- 
tions take place after assembly today. 

Butli Carpenter of Hudson and Helen 
Veselak of Westfield, both of the two- 
year course last year, were guests at 
the Abbey last week. 



RESULTS DETERMINE COSTS 

It isn't the initial cost of a dairy sup- 
ply that determines its economy, but 
rather the results produced by its con- 
tinued use. Many Dairymen have made 
what they thought was a saving by 
lower first cost only to later find thai 
i hey have sacrificed all and more to loss 
in quality and service. 

The dependable high quality and 
value of the service which always fol- 
lows the use of 



never fails to return profits to the Dairy- 
man many times in excess of its cost. 

This quality service has gained for 
Wyandotte Dairyman's Cleaner and 
cleanser an established place in the 
Dairy industry because it is a guarantee 
of that sanitary protection which in- 
sures high quality products that build 
permanent and increasing business. 

These results are guaranteed to you 
also or the trial costs you nothing. 



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Full line of Dress Supplies 

Cleaning, Pressing, Remodeling, Re- 
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FLEMING'S, Northampton 






The Massachusetts Collegian, Wednesday, February 8, 1922. 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Wednesday, February 8, 1922. 



TIIE MASSACHUSETTS COUBGTAN 

Published every Wednesday by the 
Students of the Massaehuset ts Ag- 
ricultural Collet-. 

HOAKl) OF EDITOB8. 



Bii.dino K. jAOeSOS fj Better in Chief 

Hohaht W. MlM tk Manat'inkT Kdimr 

Asbociatk K.imtokh. 

I,, rilKK B.AKUIM.T..N >» Ass'l NU'I gdttof 

Kkvnith a. Bamako * I oin|»et»tton Bdltoi 
John m. WiiiTTiKit -a UhJetlc Editor 

BOTH M. WOOD«M |-a.-Ii..i.i.m- K.litor 

htani.kv w. BaoHur* 'ti 
Ibviihi W. Si im "-'■"' 

Hol..>\H>N < Olll S *88 

Bi.ihiia K. Bi IM. •In-. "*' 



BUSINESS DltPAUTMKNT. 
Chari.k* A. mum W mwlnem Msnsser 

Myron <;. M« »»A1 •-'-• S\«»SrtnUOg Manager 
Owr.N K. r««M '-•» < li< ulaiinn Manager 

Hol.l'KS W llll I AKKI! V 

CLtrvoBD i.. Bai n a "-'i 
Bonn B. siKKKK •»! 



Subscription $2.00 per year. Single 
eopios, 1» cents. Make all orders paya- 
ble to The Massachusetts Collegian. 

In case of change of address, sub- 
scribers will please notify the business 
manager as soon as possible. 



IMUI lo inteilete with our I. road appli- 

oatlou of democracy. Boi it does not. 

Miinv men lake courses simply on the 

reeonimeedntloa of other students nr 
because they sound well In tbe cata- 
logue. We l«»<»k over the schedule 

inucli iis if it were a menu, and with M 
little retard for mil future mental good 
as most ol us are for future dyspepsia 
in Ibe <ase of the menu. Welsh rarebit 
li;is i he edge "it pea sou|p | <lut 60 has it 
on Plug 63. HOW many of us would 
be alive today had we been permitted 
to exercise our elective privilege soma 

tilleen years ago? In our ease, at least. 
bread and milk would ha\e been shovel 

aside, beefsteak and onions adopted as 

■ steady diet, and a white marker, 

properly adorned with cherubs, would 

be OTer us today. The roinmittee be- 
lieves that the professors are better 
able than we are ourselves to Judge 
what subjects we need lo be proficient 
Mo be mentally alive) 16 years hence. 
Ami remember that they base this be- 
lief on the fad that MM alumni (after 
seeing the effect of eleetlvee on them- 
selves) voted for a well planned re- 
quired course, to 109 for the present 

elective system. 

•(.in courses" weie hard hit by the 
recommendation lhat a better system of 

evaluating credits be studied out. Last 

year's Seniors, their diplomas safely 



Entered a. second-cLM matter at the A mherst - ^ slammed them, iBOUgfa an 

p M > office Accented for inailinu at »l>e< tal *' 

^«fw...i'i 1 Mfnri„ M i,io,.n^.AH overwhelming majority has taken them 

of October. 181 T satborisod Angiiit 20. 1918. j,, livecreilit doses. Kroin t hei r reports. 

I Agricultural Education ami Rural Bod- 

A Glance Into the Future. ology profeaaors had better look lo the 

Tboaewho a. -ended Ibe meeting ol prlmlogof tlmlr go* to silence enemy 

tlu , :iInmni ,as. Saturday, In which the balterlea la tbe ..car future. A gel was 
„,rs, of Btod, Committee reported define a. "e eoarac demanding a .... 

ETre.olt.of tbeirextealve inveetiga, !-«■-- ™* f, ; , a ...ax.,,.,,,,, of 

,„.s and made de.ini.e recommenda- .relit, "and that d.fl.ltto. should be 

sfor the future policy of Ir Col- ■*>, 1 by Webs,,-,, These same Sen- 

,,.,.,. ..re very well reward^. Tbe re- tor. said that there were too many 

,,;„;, based ea a thoroughly schol- eredH hours reqoliwd here, and pro., 

arlv research and the recommendations Bblj the loss of *«*. would nol be fell if 

were eoge.1 ami unbiased. tbes. requirements were brought down 

lUnyof .be recommendations are of to a more reasonable figure. Just as 

.toaolar interest a. Ibet represent ■ loo concentrated foods reqolre laxative. 

radical departure from policies m-w so do Doc. Gordon', freshman geology 

• i.i.i-Mtu • followed tor two credits, or Doc. Torrey'e Sopbo- 

beini; fait hlullv toiiowto. 

The present system ol.nain.ainine so more botany for three, require . bal- 

laigea number of major course, was 
condemned and the abolishment of it 

nrged. loveetlgatloa has shown that 

fully one-third of the courses offered 
here are serving only a handful oi 
dents, many of them bet Bg discontinued . 
off and on because no one wants t hem. 
The recommendation seemed I good 
,,,,,., A superabundance of machinery 
should be avoided and dead wood re- 
lent lessly chopped out Many courses 
here are straws for the students .who 
ate np against the loo high minimum 
requirement rule lo graap. it will be 
more than Interesting, it will be thrill- 
ing, to hear some ol the piofeseora rise 
lo defend these children Of their. lea- 
tioti, when tbe time comes for some just 
Herod to condemn them to t he slaugh- 
terhouse. 

Thirty-four of thirty-seven Seniors 
questioned last June admitted that ihe 

prerequisites taken tor majors had been 

little needed. The committee believed 
that such prereqalsltes were essential, 



aace sometime, of some relaxlog agrl- 

cultural education live credit courses. 

Coordlaotton of courses was tuned. 
Under tbe present sysiem duplication 

of effort is common, due to Ignorance 

on the part of one professor of what 
some other professor has already dwell 
upon at leogtb. Any student can tell 
for himself how many hours he has lost 
that might have amounted to some- 
ihing If be had not been obliged to hear 
the same thing over the third or fourth 
time. Faculty get-togethers on this 
point mi^lit be productive of better 

lesllltS. 

The elementary agricultural cou 
here are weak. This is largely due to 
the men teaching l hem being already 
overworked and not being able to 
spend time on the Freshman clans. 
These courses are usually considered 
by them as nonsense. Freshman horti- 
culture st amis out in our mind as an 
example of this. The committee recom- 
mend that . inasmuch as these courses 



reqolN good Knglisb lO their written 
work. The fact remains that if we stay 
in the Inited Slates we shall he obliged 
to talk and write the language of our 
country, and at least should be able to 
do this 86% correctly. Speaking for the 
humanities in general, after Ihe report 
had been read, Dean Lewis said that in 
his belief a solid year of tbe four year 
eourse should be spent on them, and be 
was heartily applauded. 

"Keep up the entrance requirements 
ami keep our college work above sec- 
ondary grade." This was the general 
opinion of every one the committee 
questioned, and speaks well for the at- 
titude of our gradoates. 

There is an unusual amount ot ma- 
terial in this editorial, but it is the 
basis of our future, tbe future of M. A. 
('. seholaslically, and must interest 
(hose who love the college. 

We shall probably discuss these rec- 
ommendations more fully, individually, 
in the future, and we surely hope that 
professors or students will assert their 
opinions lo us in communications, 
which we shall lake great pleasure in 
printing. 

Aiju'ie men think too little of their 
rinririiliint '. 

COMMUNICATIONS 

TO THB Coi.i.koian: 

You are right, make Ihem write it 
"Massachusetts Aggie" BOd then when 
we have done that, let us, with all our 
hearts, learn all we can of the history 
of the college of Clark ami Goodotl. A 
friend of mine was anxious lo know 
about a pile of rocks I had collected in 
touring about New Kngland : I told 
him they were there, to remind me of 
Kdward Hitchcock, president of Am- 
herst College. 

Traveling about my farm I like to 
meet William A. Stearns and bear him 
say again. "Young gentlemen: your 
highest attainment is the attainment of 
right relations toward tlod; and a 
concordance with the other harmonies 
nf tbe universe." 

For if I would know the true spirit of 
my college I must know the spirit of 
those two high minded students of 
Amherst College, William S. Clark and 
Henry Hill (loodell. 

And to know lhcm,l must try and see 
them walking tbe streets of Amherst 
with two men who made them what 
I hey were— Hitchcock and Stearns of 
old Amherst. 

With great regard. 

Newton Shui/tib. 



FRIDAY NIGHT DANCE 

On Friday, Feb. 17. another dance Is 
to be held in the Memorial Bolldiag 
from 8-00 to 1140 l». M. Everybody 
knows how successful such dances have 
been in the past, and this one should 
be one of Ibe best of its kind. 

Boh Woodwork's orchestra will play 
and tickets 78 cents a couple, Off 66 
cents apiece, and may he obtained at 
the door. 



ECONOMICS CLUB TO MEET 

EVERY TWO WEEKS 

The Aguie Be. esab held an informal 
meeting last Wednesday evening, Feb. 
1, for tbe lirst time this year. F. V. 
Waugh '22, was elected president as 
successor I o Dwyer. An executive com 
mittee was elected to make tip plans 
for the coming season. Uefreshmenls 
were then served ami the meeting ad- 
journed at 0-30. Tbe club]. bins to hold 
meetings every two weeks in the Memo- 
rial Building. 



Foit Your 

Flashlights 

Interiors 

College Scenes 

Arrange with expert through 

ELISHA BLISS '24 



Why go down town for a 

First-Class Hair Gut or Shane? 

Patronize the 

College Barber Shop 

Memorial Building, M. A. C. 
H. J. DUWELL, Proprietor. 



bat that the required courses for each I are valuable la offering prospective, 



major should be balanced. Ac matters 

gtan. 1 now, some heads ol departments 
watch over their prospective students 
carefully, while others let them pursue 
their course untouched until their 

Jaaloi year. 

In connection with this it wae UIged 
that majors should be elected at the 

end of the Fresamea year, Bed thai 

until the Senior year rery little choice 
be given the student as tO which sub- 
jects he might take. At lirst. this 



they may belter be taught by one 
thoroughly competent man than by 
several uninterested, overworked ex- 
perts. 

A tremendous bomb was burled in 

Ibe proposition t bat English should be 
taught and required here for four years 
instead of two. It was found that our 
graduates are deficient in the ability to 
use good English, doe perhaps partly to 
Inefficient teaching but more to the fact 
that teachers in other subjects do not 



To i iik Coi.i.koian: 

Along with the exhortation in regard 
to assembly speakers which was pub- 
lished in these columns a week ago 
it seems that there should be included 
one in respect lo visiting teams and 
officio]*. The hissing of one of the 
players and of the referee in the Tufts 
name last Saturday was especially un- 
fortunate in that many alumni were 
present. They can remember the lime 
when one who showed ungentlemanly 
conduct toward a visiter was shown 
the shortest route to the pond. Do 
we want them to think that Aggie has 
degenerated to such an extent lhat 
no one is free from hisses and catcalls 
who does not do exactly as we think 
he should? Let's turn over a new 
leaf in this respect. While the crilbsm 
hits only a few the effects are felt by 

A. K. w. 24 



A. .P STAEBNER 

Agent for 

Browning, King & Co. 

A national tailoring institution. 

SUITS and OVERCOATS MADE to MEASURE 

Kxcellent fabrics— Styles with an in- 
dividuality—Workmanship Ihe best 

Satisfaction Guaranteed 

Let me show you styles and samples 
TEL. 1TO 



Kenneth Bernard "22 is in tbe in- 
firmary with a slight case of chicken 
pox. 



The Amherst Tavern 

EUROPEAN and AMERICAN PLAN 

Appetizing, Wholesome Meals— Cooked 
under modern sanitary conditions. 

Private Dining Rooms for "Frats" 
or special parties. 

Bright, comfortable rooms, single or 

double, at reasonable rates for 

the season. 

Courtmay, Cloanllnoaa, Quality. Quan- 
tity and Variety la our motto. 

We cordially invite your patronage. 




NOT INCLUDING TI1K THUMB 

"On the finiier* ol DM hand you <»n <ount the <»*<o,«. I.Uor. in *!• ro«»<r|r 
who ran play »lo»* wil h BICKBY-FBBBMAH when it eo»- to ha.Hl.ta.lorM,* a .ait. 
u : on -Made or Heady-to-Wear. If you don't he.i,ve yen ean he fit*, wll. . -•>■ 

<™ r snit, try HICBBY-FBEBMAN. BUST BY TEW , 

Kver and always CONSUL,! WALSH 



TKAXHING EXPERIENCE 

FOR THE UNDERGRADUATE 



Underclassmen Sometimes Hear of 
this Opportunity at Too Late 
a Date. 
i;,. ...... i eipeiieuees nf stndeots and 

iluatesofM. A.C, bavt i '*"•" 

led thai spprentice leeching Is the 
Ineoraaee polio let oroapeetlee 

leacbers. 

Sophomores and juniors will be in- 
terested to know nf ibe orrongemenl be- 
tween the colleoe and tbe 7ecattonol 
[MvUloa oi it"- »«»»• Departmeoi of 
1,,1,,,-ation wberebj an undergraduate 
who eapeets lo leach may be p*.aced In 
, school ot department andei state 
sapervlalon, ood itree nae lermol prae- 
, teaching. Boca > man, enrolled la 
course 80 In Education, earns no! lo ea- 
,, Q V e credits In this experience, so it 
„ aeeeesarj for blm to accumulate ex- 
tra credits In prevloos terms. This is 
the point wbtch lew men haw under- 
,tood in time lo gel the extra credits. 
Seniors who Rod themselves unable to 
teenre Ibe apprenticeship leal that tbe 
opportoaltj should bova beea made 
known to them at an early date. Some 
2 rad nates who bare made serious mis- 
takes durlag their tirst let t teaching 

. h;i , they mtgbi have bad tbe in- 

iritb experienced teachers who were 

,!,U. of inetroctlug and correction: 

them, and wb<> vers eatei ic do both. 

i„ »ome cases the school pays tbe man 

enough tocoeor bis llflog expenses ia 

addition to the guidam-c and sssUtance 

. very pbaae of tbe aetlvUleeof ■ 

, instractoi seen as lesson planning, 

oonductlog classes, sopenrletoi projeel 

work and oversight ..I student aclivil ies. 

Professor Welles visits ibe apprentice 
geveral tlmea rtarlng tbe term and oot- 

M obeerrotloni and reports. Tbe 

state soperrleota aire tbe man nearly 

,ame contacti ha woold gel in real 

hlng and When the man returns to 

college lor aootbei course In Bdocatloa 
nndemtooda what the dlscossloM 

mean. 



Paul Boroetl of Ibe Senior elaae baa 
recently returned from socb an exper- 
ience and Is enthusiastic in his support 
,,l this plan SS an essential part ol 

teacher training. Tbe Bases I oooty 

school at which be served b!a appren- 
ticeship is as certain that this is the 
heal way to Bad a man's capacity. I a- 
derelaeamea who may desire to become 
teachers should coesnlt with Professor 

Welles and ihe Stale Auent on the Cam- 

pOJ as to opporlooltles In this Hoe. 



THE INTERFRATERN1TY RELAY 

(II the l.llelliateruilv lela.V luces thai 

were scheduled for Friday, February :t, 

Lbs Kappa MgOia and Alpha UammS 
Bho race was the onlv one to be run oil. 
Ihe lime loi these races was much 

alower Iboa usual as two oi the races 
were forfeited. The Alpha Btgma Phi 

forfeited their race to Theta (hi. The 

Kappa Uamms I'l.i also forfeited ibeir 
nee loSlgma Pbl Bpalleo. The races 

thai were lo be run off Monday. Febru- 
ary »>. were postponed beeause of un- 
suitable weather until Friday ol this 
week. Fridays races were as follown! 

Al.l'll V '■ VMMA Kilo 

Isaac 
Males 

Mephenson 
Nelson 



SQUIB 
The proof of the 'Tin mist Number' 

of the Squib is in the bands ol Ihe 

punier, and the issue should 1 ut by 

Ihe end of this week or early next 
week. This number is short but snappy 
and will OS enjoyed by all those who 
dabble in new ideas. 

The fourth aombet will be the Peffce 
Onseffe number and la foil to the brim 

with lively ami clever staff. The boofd 
is Baking the DO-Operation Of the student 
body to help make this number the 



best one ol I he year. 

After tbe number is published, 

ftyufhby Will electa new Staff, Those 

men who bare beea chosen as ■ result 

oi I he recent competition are as follow 1 1 

i'. Gilbert •*§, w. <; Rhodes '24, K. 
ball ftt, ft. Langenbacher 'J», *'•• 

Knowlea 'tft, C. Salmon 'J», I,. Ilalc J... 

Mr. Albert (.. Ibasoii \.\. 'SS Of 
Worcester, liaas, Is noo employed b> 
the Curiis Publishing Company and 

i! was his intention to be presenl at the 

Unmnl gathering this week-end. 



Ai.niA SIGMA rui 
Forfeited 



IvAI'I'A <■ WIMA Clll 

Forfeited 



KAI'I'A sM.VIA 

Cabill 
Rowell 

Fish 

W. blade 

Won by Kappa Sinma. Time 2. Id 

TIIKIA (III 

Boberts 

Frost 
Rhodes 

Mallet 
BI0M A rill I I'slI.uN 

Blancbard 
( inn boh 
Atkins 
Olfford 

Phi Sigma Kappa 

Blgma Pbl F.psilon 
Lambda I hi Alpha 
Theta Cbl 
Kappa Blgma 

Alpha Blgma Pbl 

Q. T. V. 

Alpha Gamma Rho 

Kappa Gamma Pbl 



Just as much R part ol lh« smart college outfit 
as pep and enthusiasm arc a part of college life, 

Stetson Hats 

ANI» — 

Nettleton Shoes 



CARL H. BOLTER 

correct MEN'S OUTFITTER exclusive 

Amherst House Block, 



The 6.W. Lathe Shoe Co. Inc. 



TOWN HALL 



Today- Encasement Extra- 
ordinary! 

< CCtl I! . MeMiHe'* master pro- 
duction, "The Affair* of 

Anatol,"'.' reel*. »'>t;il>le .;,*!. 

Paramount Maaaiine 

Thursday Prices 



Wed'day 

M..t . 3, Kve. 
6-45, 8-30 

Richard Barthelmess sad 
ThursdaV MarJorls Daw In •'Esperi- 
iumnoj en ce." 7 roots, trosa ths m- 

nious stinte plsf. 
M.it.3. Kve. NcW( Weekly Comedy 
6-45.8-30 Aesop's Fables 

May McAvoy in "Everythin* 
for Sale." ReaJsrt's wonder 

KitI In B story <>f thS lK'iir. 
Scenic rosl ,, 
•2 reel Toonerville Trolley. 
Comedy 

Doris May In "The Foolish 

Aite." it's i> knockout ' , » on 
will Imitfh lilt yon OTJ 
News WeeKly 
2-reel Harold Lloyd tomedy. 
"From Hand to Mouth 

George Beban. Irene Rich, 
and Helen Jerome i Eddy > m 
"One Man in a Million. 
Beban'l ImtOSl motion plrture. 

Pathe Review 

"Savinit Sister Susie (a 

scream). 2-reel Christie 

Comedy 



WON 

I 
I 

•I 
2 
1 
1 

I) 



LOST 



(I 
1 
1 

2 
* 

:\ 
\\ 
:\ 



1.1MMI 

1.000 

.750 
.600 

.WKI 
.:{:«) 
.25(1 
.INK) 
.(KM) 



Will show a complete line of 



Young Men's Spring Footwear 



—at the — 



Friday 

Mat. 3, Bye 
6-45,8-30 

Saturday 

Mat, 3, Kve. 
6-45. 8-30 

Monday 



;, Kvo. 
6-45,8-30 



COLLEGE CATALOGUE CHANGES 

The PobliC Dooomenl better known 

MtbeCatalnfroe for tea lloaaaeooeetts 
\ ,. i i.-ult in;»l Collese, has been soma- 
what rc»lsedalnea the last poMlealloa 
mme f hree mootbe ag o. The large eota- 
]„„ publisbed eight tlmea a year, baa In 
lll( . pest been ma.le up of all Informa- 
li(in . description of courses, entroacc 
reqotremeaU, and racta abool tbeaol- 
, aml hM been dWded ...to two 
leparata volumes. Ooeol Ibeaa rol- 
ames Is davoted solely to description of 
courses while the ntbei will deal mora 
with ths aenerol Informatroa abool tea 
eollejn, aawell as toeootaln afewll- 
u.tratloni of tba campee. Tba docn- 
meal ongeaerol Information is. h- one 
M ni largely to Hign Bchoola aod Pre- 
peratory echoola and, ibe fact thai 11 la 
illustrate.! makes ti pooslble for the ato- 
deot- to formoTate la tbeti minds s 
pictll re of tbe campaa. Tbeae doeu- 
im . nl , aI , now ee baod at the Pieal- 
I l'eut's ofBoe. 



AMHERST HOUSE BARBER SHOP 

Friday, February 10, 1922 



Your inspection is invited. 



JACKSON & CUTLER 

DKAI.KRS IN 

DRY AND FANCY GOODS 
Trunks Bags Suit Cases 






Candy Shoo 



Northampton, 



BECKMAN'S 

Candies and Ice Cream 



Soda Parlor 



Mamaachuamtta 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Wednesday, February 8, 1922. 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Wednesday, February 8, W22. 



S. S. HYDE 

Optlolan «»t»ci j«*-w*?i*»«* 

B HHMII1 Street (npOBS Mltht . 

Oculists' Prescriptions Filled 

Broken Lenses Accurately Replaced 

Hlg Il4-ii \ t.n in ( lo. ks Mini oilier lieli.-ilile Mukes 

A. MIENTKA 

Shoe Repairing While U Wmlt 
M.u PR1CB8 
Men's Whole Boles. Rubber Heels . . $2.50 
Men's Half Hole«. Rubber Heels . . . $2.00 
Men's Rubber Holes. Rubber Heels . . »*-| 5 
Men's Half Boles $1.50 

w-.ik Guaranteed— AMHKRST inn M 



SING LEE 

Main Street 

Quick Laundry 

PRIVATE DANCING LESSONS 

MABKLLF. LOVEJOY MILLS 

Individual Dancing a Specialty 

Mills Studio, Phone 4iVi It, P. O. Block 



ALUMNI MEETING 

Continued from page 1 



GREAT PRICK REDUCTIONS 

M*n's*Half Boles Sowed $1.50 

Men 's i.ni'ilji'iil ■ l!iilil>ei Heels 50 

Men's Whole Neolin Bolesand 1>,; "„ «_ 

Kill, her Keels 2.00 

Men'S Whole l.e.ither Soli > Sew id BBd 

idyeai Rubber Heel* .... 2.50 



All Work Gt 



ifeed / 



High-grade Line of Men's Shoes 
for Sale at Low Prices. 

J. GINSBURG 

19 Pleasant Street. Ob jour war op town. 



[«si Baturdaj al HMB k. m, i t » « - 

alumni held ■ meat ins In the Me rial 

Bollding. The subject ol courses In 
tin- oolleg* was bronghl up and ;i 
change in tbem lato be made In the 
near fat are. However,tne alumni were 
unanimous In declaring thai tbe educa- 
tion I be j received In this Institution 
was decidedly worth while. This lust 
statement was s report of the Course of 
Study Committee, and was tbe event 
must looked for al ibe alumni meeting. 

The Course of Study Committee wee 
appointed by the associate alumni al 
tbe request of President Butterfleld, 
abuui a \eai ago, lo make .1 atudj 01 
tbe curriculum and make reoommenda- 
lions for improvement it needed. II. .J. 
Baker '11, dlreotor of extension service 
ai ihe ( 'mi mt'i uiit Agricultural Col- 
lege, is chairman of tbe committee In- 
cluding graduates from 1892 i<> 1918. 
The other members of the committee 
are: J. K. Wilder '88, of Chicago; Prof. 
C. S. Plum '82, of Ohio State College; 
A. F. Burgess '96, of Boston; Walter G. 



(lark 10 ot New York ; Frank it. Hills 
'18, ..I Peterboro, \. 11.; Lawrence A. 
Bevau '18, of Boston; B. S. Draper 'lft, 
ot Charlotte, N. C.\ and Oeorgs L. 
Goodrich '18, oi Melrose. The man are 
widely spread over the oountry, and 
rank from professors lo farmers. 

The committee answered the frequent 
criticism that many Massachusetts Agri- 
cultural College graduates enter profes- 
sional work related to aglioulture in 
preference lo becoming farmers. 

Chairman Baker, speaking for the 

Alumni Association, declared "that 

Aggie men who enter experiment work, 
who become invegtigators for the differ- 
ent departments of agriculture, or who 
become teachers of agriculture render 
as great aed even fat greater service lo 

tbe slate, than would he possibls if 

every man became a fanner. As Massa- 
chusetts la largely dependent on other 
sections ot ibe country for its raw ma- 
terials, graduates of Maasaehnseits Ag- 
ricultural College who arc engaged di- 
rectly to agricultural production in 
other states, or who are conducting re- 

search in ol hcisl ales are. nevei I hclcss, 

contributing directly to Ibe welfare of 



Massachusetts." 

Chairman Baker also asserted "that a 
College education muBt train a man lo 
clear thinking; it "Hist provide the key 
to knowledge that bearB on his work : it 
must provide technical information of 
practical value; it must inculcate a 
broad view of human relationships and 
and a realization of responsibilities. 
Massachusetts Agricultural College 
alumni, from the oldest to the young- 
est, believe thai their alma mater lias 
done these things for them." 

other busineeaof no Importance was 
broughl up, ami when everything was 
practically settled the meeting ad- 
journed, and tbfl regular alumni din- 
ner was given in Diaper Hall. It being 
so late when both had finished that tbe 
regular after dinner speeches were 
omitted, and the alumni fathered in 
the drill hall to see I heir alma inater 
trounce their old rival, Tufts, to tbe 
tune of 2o to li in a last, aggressive 
game of basketball, la the evening 
they attended their fraternity initiation 
banquets. 

Following is a list of alumni on the 
campus during last week-end: Brooks 



TRY 



O. H. GOULD 

for first-class 

Watch, Clock and Jewelry Repairing 

18 Pleasant St., Amberat, Maes 



GRANGE STORE 

Pine (iroccries 
Candies and Fruits 



MASON A. DICKINSON, Proprietor 



Aggie Stationery 

with Class Numerals 

1922 TO 1925 

A. J. HASTINGS 

Newsdealer and Stationer 
Amherst - - - stnea. 

MRS. PRUDENCE P. CASSIN 

SELECT CATERING 

;it Keasnnalile l'i i 
Informal* m Specialty 

II So. Prospect *'•• assheret, Ml 

Tel. see-M 




SJUFWtO 




WSS& 



L 



7«:ii«i<:«iKi>!«Ji;> 
J}' Minim* j-J. 

n »BE HUN* 8* 

MSn 1 111 It ' 



K 



The Feed that is in every 
dealer's stock and is 
contained in every high 
producing dairy ration 



North End Lunch 

120 Pleasant Street. 

Our food is right — 
Our prices reasonable 

TRY US OUT 



W. B. DRURY 



BUFFALO CORN GLUTEN FEED is a 
standard product that can be obtained at 
almost any feed store. Dealers always carry 
a regular stock of it to fill the great demand 
of dairy farmers who wish to produce a large 
flow of milk from their cows. 

There is no other feed that is as available as 
Buffalo Corn Gluten Feed, and whether you 
are mixing your own ration or having it mixed 
for you by the dealer, be sure you include it. 

Other high protein feeds are 
scarce and some are out of the mar- 
ket now but not so with Buffalo 
Corn Gluten Feed. You have al- 
ways had it and you will always 
be able to get it. It is the main- 
stay of every good dairy ration. 

Also manufacturers of 

DIAMOND CORN GLUTEN MEAL 
Corn Products Refining Co. 

New York Chicago 




Justtheotherday wegotinabiglotocandy, everythurs.wegetinjustasbigabunch andbythettmeSat.comesaround 
wedon'thavenoneleft a tall. Itseemsmightyqueer thatwecan'tkeepalittlecandymthecase butisupposealltne- 
boysknowhowheshitisandtheyjustcomeindrovesandeatandeatandeat. 

NEW COLLEGE STORE 

"Where you bot the candy" 



'75, Bliss '88, Davis 'H«», afeCloud ''.«». V. 

Williams *1M), M. Williams 'gg, BaCOB 

i). Kinney '02, Kin- OT. Walls t>7, 

1 lark '08, Cole ,02, l'arsuns 'Of, Osiniui 

08, Ostium IW, A- I). Karrar 1)0, P. W. 

larrar'iw, ilniihaid 'oo, Dickinson '10, 
UcLanflblla 'li. Smith '07, li. B. Smiih 
12, Hill* 12. Ftanigau ex'12, Gore 'IS, 

\evan'12, Drury '18, Williams 'i:. I.t>- 
lor 'l-i, Day i">. Upahlres 10, White 
'15, Russell '16, Mattoon '10, sflehelsoa 

Hi, Putter '10, M. Warner '17, Uncos '17, 

golden '17, Blehard Bmltn '17, Whitney 
'n.Spanldiag '17, Btnrtevani n.Kiidt- 

ntd ex-17, Lorlai '18. l.;itiplie;ir Is, 
Worth ley '18, Newton "is, Kreneli ID, 
K. Williams •19, Gillette '19, HeCartbf 
1'.), <;. Mattoon 'It), Tnvler '20, Uoanl- 
man '20, Ball *t0, Pratt 'g0, Bobertsos 

20, Btaekpole '20, Bakeeaan '20, staples 

'20, (isay '20, Scott '20, Uea.i .20, Sie.l- 
man '20, KoHoiY '20. .loll iishii ex-'2<>, Mil- 
ler e\-'20, Smit li '22. Kilinan '21, tioultl 

gl, Qilligaa '21. West '21, Brtgkam 21. 
Ijelghtoe '21, Kinu '21, Davis '21, Baker 

21, Halloa '21, Kimball '21, Douglas '91, 
Unison ex-'22. Cook e\-'22. 



Coleridge-Taylor, and as an sneore, • 

,,i Aggie's most beam if ul songs, "When 
Twilight Deepens". 
Baddy Frost and Dneky Kennedy 

showed just how much we need to 

"Pity tbe Ivories", wbsa they gol 

going, variations, syncopation*, and vi- 

brationi rolled onl beneath their lingers 
ae they played some of the new dance 
nutate 

"Originalities' by Vinleii and Waugh 
were the bit of the evening, and the 

siegers were toned to glrs three en- 
cores before they were allowed in slop. 

A novelty addition to an old favorite 

consisted of a verse on I lie Kiesliman 

Sophomore Debate, as an eneote i" 

'•While Does Ihe Wind Come From". 

Other songs were "CMI Oil Benora", 
"Educated Now, By Seek", and lbs 
"Agricultural Blnee". 

Alter the Glee Club san-; "Little 

Tommy" by ataeey, and '*The ford 
Bong" by a. Flivver, the ooneerl ended 
with the singing by the nbole student 
body ni "Sons of Old Massachusetts", 



KINGSLEY'S 



SODAS 



SUNDAES 



CANDIES 



Luncheonette 



140 Main Street, Northampton, Mass. 



shine: as-u-go 

i ; «• i in- i i i I •<■ i 

The College Shoe Shine Parlor 

fOI M > 1 1 1 

Hat Renovating. Shoe Dyeins. Shoe Shinink 

At i:t \inii> si . in am. Bx. CMke. 



AMHERST BOOK STORE 

Note Books Fountain Pens 



High Grade 

COLLEGE FOOTWEAR 



-AT — 



Economy Prices 
M. 



ALUMNI CONCERT 

Alumni back for the Mid-winter Alumni 

day were entertained Friday evening in 

leiwker Auditorium by Ibe combined 

Club and Orchestra la the besl 

concert yet gtvea by them this year. 

The DOneert opened alter Mr. IMiidelah 
Bice finished his read'mu of "The Great 
Adventure", a play by Arnold Bennett. 
Uollin' Down to Hio" by the (ilee 
< ;ul> was followed by "Yankee Doodle 

i omes to Towa" by the Orchestra. The 
Quartette, com pos ed of Cotton. Frost, 
\ inlen and Williams, gave "A 1-itlle 
i lose Harmony". Tbe Banjo Quartette 
consisting of Wangb, Vlnten, Towns 

and Woodworth, came aetoss nexl wilh 

"Strnmmlnga", a clever little bunch of 
melodies. The Male Quartet and the 
wln>le Club cave the "Viking Bong" I»y 



Save Money -Buy During Our 

ANNUAL PRE-INVENTORY SALE 



Real Bargains on 
QUALITY GOODS 

Sale Now Going On ! 



G. EDWARD FISHER 



M. NOVICK 

Custom Tailor 



Cleaning, Pressing, Repairing and Dyeing 

Neatly and prom ply done. 
Work called for and delivered. 

Save money by buying a Pressing Ticket. 

4 Suits Pressed for $2.25. 

Dress Suits for Hire. 



19 Pleasant St. 



Tel. 9-J 



CAMPUS NOTES 
The two large ptiee oi elnderawbleb 
have attracted so nsuoh attention near 

(lark Hall t he lasi lew weeks are to be 
used by the Grounds Department neal 
sprint: in resurfacing Btockbrtdge Bead. 
Large trucks have been destroying the 
former good surface and during tbs last 

season it became espc.ially had. Law- 
rence Dickinson '10, head al the 
(irottnds Dept.. SXpeCtS to have il in 
prime condition for travel next sumnui 

All the cinders vera drawn from the 
Power Plant aad are but a part of the 

residue of the 20 tons of coal burned 
there a day. 

The laadaeaps seminar now numbers 
10, tbe largesl number of gradn 

Students on the grounds. Indiana. 

Texas, Georgia, Hon Jersey, Mi. liol- 

yoke and North Amheisl are repre- 
sented. Of these there ate several 
teachers, lour teaehlng al aVggN and 
two at Mt. Bolyokn. Tbej are al pies 

ent working 00 a competition for the 

city of Chicago, college grounds Is New 

Jersey, a private place in Indiana, an 
outdoor theater la Balem, and several 
other jobs. They meel Mondays at 

11 A. M. 

Bev. Newton M. Hall, of Bpringneld, 
prominent avangeliatk and civic leader 

throughout Western Massachitsei t>, 
was the weekly speaker at Min.ia.v 
Morning chapel, Kel>. 4. 

Squib vs. Collegian. 
Bowline; fans will be Interested to 
bear that the ('oi.i.m.ian hoard Is dial- , 
longing the flgutt to a bowling match 
on ihe Memorial Hall alleys, to 
place when SQufbog gets up btscoun 

STORM DAMAGED TREES 
Professor Laurence U. Grose ol the 
department oi forestry has prepared an 

emergency leal let to meet the demand 
for information on tree repair, occa- 
sioned by the unprecedented storm of 
November. "Bcpnirlng Storm-Dam- 
nged Trees" is tbe title of the publica- 
tion, which is extension leaflet num- 
ber 47. Tliis leaflet, co mains lifteen il- 
lustrations for practical directions given 
to tbe salvage by careful treatment ©I 
those trees worth saving. The leaflel 
will soon be ready for circulation to j 
Massachusetts citizens. 



C. F. DYER 



f frji«"a:f 123X1 tCSEQJI 

WMGLEYS 

Newest 
Creation 




The Shoe man. 
Main St., Amherst 

"BIDE-A-WEE" 

Creamed Chicken and Waffles Our Specialty 

And otliei good UstaSJS tci eat. 

MRS. L. M STEBBINS 

Mid. lie atreet, tel II I w Hadlei , Mass 



Peppermint fla- 
vored chewing gum 
with Peppermln 
Sugar Coating. 

Sugar jacket 
"melts in your 
mouth," leaving 
the deliciously 
flavored gum 
center to aid 
digestion, 
brighten teeth 
and soothe 
mouth and throat. 



WEBSTER'S STUDIO 

Nash Block 
AMHERST SHOE REPAIRING CO. 



Your Shoes Repaired 

WHILE V<»! WAIT 



the: 



Northampton, Mass. 
The Leader for College Banquets 



Wm. M. Kimball, Prop. 



HARDWARE 



•Come to us for- 



Fireplace Goods, Coat and Tronser Hangers 

Ever Ready Flash Lights and Paint 

Clothes and Shoe Brushes 

Anything in Hardware and Cooking Utensils 

Always glad to see you. 



THE MUTUAL PLUMBING & HEATING CO. 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Wednesday, February 8, 1922. 




DO BIRDS COME FROM BIRD 

We know they don't, but some still belive they do-and it follows that real suits don't come from poorwoolem 
and slip-shod tailoring. A new lot of patterns has just arrived for your Spring Suit-they're better man ever 
and you'll like them. ^ _ _, _ . .. _ 

SOUTHWICK BROTHERS & GAULT 



POULTRY DEPARTMENT. 
ill.- Poultry Depart meiit lias recently 
received two sen mammoth laenba- 
tura.onei cai.inet-styie Baekeys, and 

t be other a Newtown. 

The buckeye Includes several new 
feat area, among which are eeatralised 

heat, both air ami hot water heating, 
and, a railieal departure from estal.lish- 

i-.i practice, a multiple tier arraBgraeat 
for the sgga. These tiers are arranged 

on movahle coiner rods, so all thai is 
accessary to turn the aggS is to shiti tin- 
corner rods, thus tilting the shelves. 

Its capacity is ahout MQOeggs. Brood- 
lag trays are provided. 

The other machine is a more stand- 
ard form. It is made up of multiple 
units which can he run all together or 
separately. The incubators have been 
installed in the mammoth Incubator 
cellar, and may be inspected at any 
time. 

The classes in Poultry Incubation are 
just at present "counting their chicks'" 
hut not before they arc hatched! The 
chicks are just Doming out, and of MOO 
eggs set, it is estimated that about 115U 
will be the total hatch. Many ol these 
are pedigreed stock, and will replenish 
the breeding stock of the plant. 

Mr. Corran, Agricultural Director of 
the United States Veterans' Bttreaaat 

Boston, spoke last week to the members 

of the Federal Board on matters relative 
to those laklag poultry work, lie said j 
that the men should have a definite idea 
as to what they are get eg to do before' 
they leave college, and should have a 
little farm of their own to start on, as 
the average wages paid to men who 

have completed a course in poultry 
such as the Federal Board men lake is 
but forty dollars a month and room and 
board. 



BELGIAN SCHOOL SUGGESTS 

EXCHANGE OF STUDENTS 

A rather unusual opportunity is pTC- 
eeated through the Belgian Ambassa- 
dor to the [Tatted States and the Hel- 
gtaa Director General of agriculture 

and Horticulture. They suggest that it 

might be of mutual idvaalage to the 

I'nited .Stales and Belgium If a number 
Of American young women might alico.1 
the Normal Institute of Agricultural 
Home Economies in Laeken. It is also 

suggested that American agricultural 
colleges aright "exebaag*" students or 
teachers for a time with the Belgian 



Institute on a "living expense" basis. 

The purpose of the school is to pre- 
pare JOUOg women for all phases of 
rural life. About half of the students' 
lime is devoted •<» formal instruction 
and half to practical work. If one 
wished to enter the institution, negoti- 
ations could be opened through the 

Belgian Bmbaeay In vFaahlagtoa. 

I'nder the present exchange rate it 
„..;-.!.! bfl relatively inexpensive for 
American girls to take advantage <»t 
this opportunity. 

An experiment station li maintained 

in connection with the Institute where 
agricultural implements and products 



may be tested. 

The school is in one of the suburbs ol 

Brussels, In grounds that until recently 

formed pari of the royal domain of II - 
Seghem and have been donated forth, ii 
present purpose by the royal fan 
The()ueen of the Belgians has bees 

personally interested in the develop 

luent of the school. Its director, In. 
.'can Llndemans, spent some time in 
the Office of Home Economies. United 
States Department of Agricult lire, ami 

visited raaajr agricultural colleges ami 

home economics schools in the (Jolted 

States while the plans for the Las 
Institute were being developed. 



STATION PUBLICATIONS 

The Experiment Station here on the 
campus has recently published two bul- 
letins, numbers i"> ead 10, which are 
now belag mailed by the department. 
Bulletin IS, compiled by P. II. Smith 
and Miss E. M. Bradley is the result of 
the "Inspection of Commercial Feed- 
stutfs" as recently conducted by the 
station. It has been published, in con- 
junction with Bulletin lfi compiled by 
Mo-eis, U. D- Haskins, E. S. Walker 
and B. S. Smith, entitled "Inspection 
of Commercial Fertilizers." Both doc- 
uments are the results of months of re- 
search and inspections, and have just 
been added to the list of Station pub- 
lications. 

Another publication which is on 
hand at the station is one entitled "Oat 
By-products for Farm Stock."' It con- 
tains a discussion on the composition 
and digestibility of oat by-products. It 
is the result of experiment conducted 
by J. B. Eindsey and C. E. Beals. 

A document not so recent but not 
quite as well known as some of the 
others is one dealing with "Rust of 
Antirrhinum," a deadly disease which 
attacks the snap-dragon plant both 
under glass and out-of-doors. The 
pamphlet treats of the disease and its 
cure and is a great aid to green-house 
men in the state. Its compiler is W. L. 
Doran, who has made a careful study 
of the disease. 





H 



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YEARS^yEARS 

to develop 

CAMEL QUALITY 

We worked on Camels for years before we put them 
on the market. Years of testing— blending— experi- 
menting with the world's choicest tobaccos. 

And now, EVERY DAY, all our skill, manufactur- 
ing experience and lifelong knowledge of fine tobaccos 
are concentrated on making Camel the best cigarette 
that can be produced. 

There's nothing else like Camel QUALITY. And 
there's nothing else like Camels wonderful smoothness, 
fine tobacco flavor and FREEDOM FROM CIGA- 
RETTY AFTERTASTE. 

That's why Camel popularity is growing faster than 

ever. 

A better cigarette cannot be made. 

4v-*>_ We put the utmost quality into 

THIS ONE BRAND. 







MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 



Vol. XXXII. 



Amherst, Mass., Wednesday, February 15, 1922. 



No. 16 



CHAMPION CONN. AGGIE i ™n c finley of east^ 
FIVE DEFEATED 30-17 ! HAMPT0N ,N ASSEMBLY 



Captain Alexander and Mates Put Up 

Whirlwind Battle but are 

Outplayed. 



The Massachusetts Aggie basketball 

. grated the Nutmeg from EMom -w 

. 17 last Salurd ; afternoon OB lb* 

home court in the fastest and hardest 

foagbt f aase of tbc aaaaoa, \<-\ci wa- 
il, c Aggie qnlstal la danger during the 
entire Rama, bal Inn Connecticut aggro* 
nation, annaed todnfnnl after wlaalag 

Hum some of the best teams in New 

Koglaad, put ■» n aorap wbten took lb« 

|>M{ tliat '-Kill" Hole's men could give. 
The Mass. Aggie live ke|.t control of 
the situation with tin- result tliutlhey 

outclassed las visitors la panslaa.de- 

leiiM- au. 1 tlool work. The whole team 

played splendid b;iH- while Cantata 
Qowdj'a gnafdlag was exceptional, aad 

Al Smith Banned almost unable to miss 
the basket. Tumey was at his best in 
ng free tries. 
The game opened with a hurst of 
■peed that bid fair for a close contest. 
Oowdj dropped in the tirst tally within 
three minutes of play ami Bike fol- 
lowed shortly afterwaid with I Boor 
contribution. Tumey sank three Ionia 
before the visitors could solve Aggie's 
paafwotk ami slip through for as open* 

lag count. Connecticut rallied and 
tned many shots at the hasket, but siic- 
l eedad la Beating only one more, while 
Tuiney came through with two baskets, 
ending the half 12-5. 
M Smith neatly tosse.l in tarn, right 

,,i the start of the second period. Then 
the visiting captain, Alexander, tried 
icrately to rally his teammates, ami 
Continued on page 



Uivesa Vivid Word Picture of Rub 

sian Revolution, Speaking from 

Five Years' Experience. 

One of the most enjoyed, if not the 

most laleroating, Assembly of lbs year, 

thus tar, was held last Wednesday af- 
ternoon with Mr. John L. Kinley as the 
speaker. Mi. Kinley look as his topic 
"Watching the Kiissian Revolution," 

an. I spoke from personal experiences 

.it conditions in Kussia today 

Martini; With the year IM1 he out- 
lined briefly his nip and stay in Itussia. 
which lasted nearly live years. Through 

his effective Manner of Bpeaklai and 

hie statement ot clear, bold tacts, he 
impressed his audience with the true 

,| inaling conditions in Pussia and 

Bade them see vet] clearly the real 
plight of this ureal nation. 

lie recalled a few incidents relative 
to the gnat lb-volution even now going 
on in this vast country: beginning with 

the overthrowing of the Csar la 1911. 

Be described la brief the fate of the 
royal family, *;»"' '" ■>»*• l,ee " t,,e 

richest in all the world. A fact that 
Mr. Kinley slated, which brings the 
gieal resolution nearer home, was that 
moat ot the men who comprised that 
■nail body in Russia whidi was the 
eaUBS of the nation's downfall, and 
which later became known as the 
Bolshevist, were trained right in our 
Continued on page 8 



AGGIE'S FASTEST HOCKEY TEAM WINS 3-2 
GAME FROIvl SOICHOLAS AT PHILADELPHIA 

Fa$t Work of Maroon and White Sextet Completely Staggers Strong 

New York h " tion - Captain "Hubba" Collins Opens 

Eyes of . .elphians. Quaker City Wins 5-1. 



LYONS, HASKINS, AND KROECK PLAY KR1LUANT HOCKEY 



PHILADELPHIA ALUMNI 

ON HAND FOR GAMES 



C. L. WIRTH OF MINNEAPOLIS 
ELECTED CHEER LEADER 



VARSITY DEBATERS CHOSEN- 
R. 1. STATE and CONN. AGGIE 



Eight Men, Headed by Krasker "22 
Comprise the Teams Which Will 

Defend Aggie. 
In the final tryoiits held immediately 

■titer assembly last Wednesday Feb. 8, 

Btoekbrtdge Hall, 1'rof. Priaee se- 
ed tin- personnel of the two teams to 
represent Aggie in the M. C. It. I. De- 
bating League this year Bach of the 

contestants delivered a live-minute talk 
mi either side of the question to be de- 
ed, which is: Resolved. That the 
Philippines be granted their inde- 
pendence within two years. 

I lie eight men chosen are : 
Abraham Krasker '22 of Boston. 
Uexandni Baadovr*S8of I'ittstieid. 
Benjamin Qamsae Wo! Holyoae. 
Walter L. Dimock "24 of Oxford. 

i don 11. Ward '25 of Englewood. N. J 
lames J. Hatal '25 Of Lawrence. 
I ail B. f. Cuterman '2."> of Springfield. 
iiuel (ioldstein '15 of Hrockton. 
Continued on p»g*e 3 



Football Manager of 1923 Team to be 
Earle 8. Carpenter. 

Alter Assembly, Wednesday. the 
So,,h. .more. Junior and Senior eiaSfM 

elected Goarad L, Wlrth *», eheet lea- 
flet te Bnceeed Hooper 18, and Karl.- B, 
Carpenter '24. assistant football man- 
ager. 

Wirth hails from Minneapolis, Minn. 
While attending St. .John's Military 
Academy at Delaliehl Wise, he made 
an enviable record on the crew, toot ball 
and baseball teams. "Connie" has led 
(he eheering at many occasions this 
year, and from all appearance, he will 
be a worthy successor of "Hoop". He is 
a Kappa Sinma man. 

Carpenter, a Sophomore, who was 

oboaeB assistant football msBSger, be- 

eomea automatically manager la his 

senior year. Carpealef eon.es from 

Behohotb, and is a gradaate of both 

Tkant oa High School and Hobbb Btowb 

at Providence. While at the latter he 

took a prominent part In dramatics. 

Last year, "Carp' managed the Freeh- 

man football team. He has proven 

himself to be an etheient manager, and 

his recent election is a deserved one. 

He belongs to I be Alpha Sigma PW 

Fraternity. 



Graduates Near ftuaker City Re- 
sponsible for Good Treatment 
of Varsity. 

few people realize the lar«e part 
which the Philadelphia Alumni Asso- 
ciation played in the trip which the 
hockey lean, made last week-end. 

The members Of Ihe Philadelphia 
Club agreed to house the men and also 
to see to their entertainment. This 
was done in so thorough a manner that 
the men called the trip the best one 
Of the many the have made this year. 

Itesides a good bed, the men w.i. 
(Wen their meals at the hotel and areri 
entertained during t he day by fratern- 
ity men at the I'. ot I*. 

"Skip" Smith and Kd"" l'erry, the 
leaders of Ihe Philadelphia Club were 

at the games. A ng other gggMB 

present were: Mrs. Smith, Mr. and Mrs. 
II. I.. HttSflell, Huckman, lloardman. 
(handler, Doiicette, Slate. Ilenninger, 
Gaaser, F. C. Peters, bane. Necdham. 

JUNIOR ELECTION 

The .Junior Class held a BBBOkei 
Thursday evening, Feh. 9. DSM Hums 

of the II i' Srln.nl was present and 

favored the class With a few remarks 
Fred llollis also gave a short talk. The 
principal purpose of the meeting was to 
elect otSeerS. Those chosen were: 

uwen B. Balaam <.t Boellftdslc, presi- 
dent ; TreeeoM T. Abele of Qolncy, vice- 
president; Francis K. buck ley of Nat i<k. 
treasurer; blither 1$. Arlington of Flor- 
ence, secretary; Mason W. Alger of 
West bridgwater, captain; Miss Doro- 
thy Tinner of Washington, I), ('..histo- 
rian : Robert Mohor of Newton Center, 
sergeant at-arins. Battel W. Fldridgc 
ot Winchester was elected chairman of 
the Smoker committee, and his other 
colleagues also elected were: Raymond 
II. GmysOfl Of Hllford, and Marshall S. 
Hodadon of Melrose Highlands. 



bast Friday Bight Ike Colonial 1\ 
press pulled into West Philadelphia 
station :«) minutes late and dropped, 
among others, 10 husky Massachusetts 
hockey men who swallowed a hasty 
supper and within an hour tollowed 
Captain Collins onto the lee Palace sur- 
face where for I wo hours I hey astounded 
the l.o.kcy enlhusiasls of Philadelphia 
and finall.N left the link M winners 
over Ihe Btroag Si. Nicholas learn ol 

New Yolk. 

Shol l ly aflel Ihe opening of the lilsl 

period. Collins tried J» lone shol from 

Ihe .■enlei ..I the link and Hon. then on 

Philadelphia!. s we.v heard (0 say: "1 

had no idea that those BUM were so 



THREE ADDITIONS TO VAR- 
SITY BASKETBALL SCHEDULE 

There should he three games added 
to the basketball schedule as given on 
the campus calender. They are: North- 
eastern at M. A. C. Feb. 18; Williams 
at Williams Feb. 22; and Clark at 
M. A.C Mar. 1. 




Captain COLLins 

fast,'' or "Those men are plaving real 
hockey," and "The fastest College team 
we have seen | M 
The play by periods was as follows: 
First Period— Collins tried a lone, 
shot from center rink. Lyons shot 
behind the home team's goal and 
brought the puck out passing to 
"Hubba", who again shot true to Coles' 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Wednesday, February 15, 1922. 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Wednesday, February 15, 1922. 



slick. Lyons a«ai n retrieved the pink 
and tried | shut. "Kddie" Hill, I lie 
New Yorkers slar, broke loose from 
the crowd, but a line slop by Kroeck 
saved a score. Lyons and Collins went 
down the ice in turn and llodsdon broke 
away up the sideboards. After seven 
ami a half minutes of play '"Kddie" 
Hill scored lor St . Nicholas. Shortly 
aller,llenri(|iies scored and SI. Nicholas 
was through for the evening. From 
then on, the Annie team constantly 
peppered their opponents' goal tend. 
The M. A. C. joy was supreme when 
"lluhha" M-oied the first goal for Agiiie 
with live minutes left to play . Three 
long shots by Collins and a I ry by Lyons 
and Haskins ended the period with the 

•eon 1-2. 

Second Period— Led by"Kd"l'erry, the 
small band ot roolers gave the varsity a 
long yell when they appeared for a sec- 
ond period. St. Nicholas started with a 
rush that soon relaxed. Collins broke 
away four times in the next few min- 
utes, while Kroeck slopped one new 
attempt. Haskins and Lyons each tried 
a shot, and soon Kroeck was called on to 
make another one of his line stops. 
Whitaker and tioldsmilh went in for 
Cordon ami llodsdon. Collins soon made 
another pretty try for a score, and Whit- 
aker followed with a long shot from the 
side that nearly upset Coles at goal. 
Another long shot and follow-in by 
" Hubba'" nearly resulted in an Aggie 
score. "Sharkey" Lyons next tried his 

hand ai ibootiag the puck, and toward 

the end ol the period Kroeck slopped 
several St. Nicholas shots; and then 
Whitaker tried to once more even the 
count. The period ended with the eeorc 
still 1-2. 

Third Period— The varsity went cm 
the ice in this period with six 
men, who for IS ininuics gave 
the best exhibition of team work 
that they have shown all year. Their 
passing, checking-back, follow ing-in, 
and shooting were beautiful to watch. 
After Haskins tried a shot from the 
ttideboards "Hoc" Cordon skated ecroaa 
the front of the St. Nicholas goal, and 
scored on a tine shot from a dillicut 
angle. This made the score 2-2, and 
the small band ol Aggie rooters yelled 
for victory. For four minutes Lyons, 
Collins, and Cordon weiildnwn the ice 
for repeated tries at their opponents' 
goal, while Haskins broke up any St. 
Nicholas attempts to rally. With two 
minutes to play, Marshall llodsdon. 
Aggies, most diminutive player, broke 
through the St, Nicholas defense and 
pushed the puck by Coles, I hereby 
winning the RMM for Aggie by the 
score 3-2. 

The lineup: 

M. A. t . s|', NICHOLAS. 

Lyons, rw rw, Bunting 

Haskins, c c. Henriques 

Cordon, Iw. lw.. Cushman 

Whitaker, lw lw, Townsend 

llodsdon. id 

Coldsmkh, rd id. Hill 

Collins.ld Id, VonBernuth 

Kroeck, e g, Coles 

Score— M. A. 0. 3, St. Nicholas 2. 
Coals by — Collins, Gordon, llodsdon, 
Hill, and Henriques. Referee— Divine. 
Time— lo min. periods. 



Saturday night found the varsity 
back at 46th and Market streets, on 
hand for their second game with pro- 
fessionals in 24 hours. For nearly two 
whole periods the Aggies showed i heir 
heels to their opponents. This time 
the opposing team was the fast Quaker 
City sextet who presented a strong 
team play that finally broke through 



ihe M. A. C. defence, and scored four 
limes in the last six minutes of Ihe 
linal period. 

For a whole period the skating was 
superb and the defense of either team 
nearly faultless. Collins and Lyons 
tried hard to score, but were stopped 
only at goal by Lewis' stick. The score 
al Ihe beginning of the second period 
was IK). At its start, Kroeck made sev- 
eral good slops, but soon the M. A. 0. 
offensive was directed at the (Quaker 
City goal. Collins and llodsdon got two 
good shots, and soon "Hubba" skated 
down the left side and by clever stick- 
woik eluded the opponents' defense. In 
less than no time, the puck streaked 
through a 6 inch hide between the iron 
poet of Ihe goal at Lewis' thigh pads. 
Aggie had drawn first blood. Her rooters 
were jubilant, and the spectators gave 
Collins a great hand as he skated back 
up the ice. Whitaker next made a try 
for a goal, and the Quaker Cily man- 
aged to score a goal just before Ihe 
whistle blew. When it did, the score 
was 1-1. 

For a few minutes, each team played 
fast hockey, but the strain soon told on 
the Maioon and White. A clever three 
man defence swept down the ice and in 
six minutes Quaker City came out vic- 
tors to the tune of 5-1. 

Both games were hard, and fast, and 
Massachusetts Aggie has now a reputa- 
tion to uphold in the (Quaker City, and 
(apt. Herbert L. Collins of Arlington, 
is "Worthy Chief Bop." 

The lineup ! 
\l. A. 0. QVARKfl Cm. 

Lyons, rw rw, W. Schnarr 

Haskins. e 8, Slinson 

Gordon, Whitaker, lw Iw, C. Schnair 
llodsdon, rd rd, Macl'herson 

Collins, Id Id, Dexter 

Kioeck. g K, Lewis 

Beore— Quaker city r>, m.a.c. i. 
Goal*- Collins, C Schnarr 2.W. Schnarr 
2, Stinsoii. Keferee — Needham of M. 
\.c. Time— 15 min. periods. 



TWO-YEAR BASKETBALL 

VICTORY IN DRILL HALL 



Quintet Defeats Worcester North 
High School 15-9. 

The MAC. Two-Year basketball team 
defeated Worcester North High School 
15-0 on the Drill Hall floor last Satur 
day immediately after the varsity game 
with Connecticut Aggie. 

The jjame was hard fought, although 
not especially brilliant. The teams 
were fairly evenly matched, but 'he 2- 
year men showed more speed and better 
team work than their opponents. 

The lineup : 

M. A. C. Two-Yi AK.-l.Y 

B. K. 1*. 

Bona, rf 1 B 7 

Grieve. If 

Cutler, If 

Wilson, If 

Parsons, c 3 6 

Adair, rg 1 2 

Doonelan, lg 

5 6 15 

WoncnsTSB Kobtb H. B. — 11. 

It. K. I\ 

Keanlon, rf 111 

Murphy, if 

Shagian,lf S 

Foley, c '2 2 

Carrigan. lg 

Calder, rg 6 

i a t» 

Keferee— Ball of ftf. A. C. Time-15 
min. periods. 



Old Deerfield Fertilizers 

" Reasonable in dollars and sense."" 
A. VV. HIGGINS, INC., South Deerfield. Mass 



Basket Ball Shoes, $2.50 to $4.00 



F*ea«;e'«a {Shoe Store 



C&rp?rvter & Morehouse, 

PRINTERS, 



No i, Cook Place. 



Auiheist. Mast 



Deuel's Drug Store 



TOIL- 



ARTICLES 



Shaving Sticks and Creams 



Razors and Razor Blades 



VICTOR RECORDS 



Kodaks and Supplies 



Fountain Pens 



GET VOUR 

SPRING MALLORY 

NOW ! 

We do not hesitate to say that the Mallory is the best felt hat on 
the market today at anywhere uear the price. These fine 
hats are now selling at $5.00. All new shapes and 
colors. Other good hats at $3 and $4. 



F. M. THOMPSON & SON 

Hart Schaffner & Marx Clothes. 



THE NEW M. A. G. SONG BOOK 

At the Treasurer's Office— $1.00 

LEARN TO SING ALL THE AGGIE SONGS 



When Vou Are Down Town 



DROP IN 



The Candy Kitchen 



-FOR- 



Lunch, Candy, Ice Cream and Smokes 



COLLEGE CANDY KITCHEN 

"The Home of Sweets" 



Have you seen our Pennants, Banners, Pillows and Leather Goods ? 
Did you buy yours P How much did you pay ? 



aggie: inn 



M1DDLEBURY BOWS TO 

M A. C. IN DRILL HALL 



Leonard is Whole Vermont Team 

While Tumey, Smith and Marah- 

man Play Well for Aggie. 



In an anuressive and exciting (Tame 
ff blcfa fU decided only in the late part 
f play the MM. Annies 'Ideated Mid- 
dleboxy f/M6o* Ibegyai Boorlaal Tues- 
day evening. At the end of the Brel 
half the Varsity quintet was in Lh« teed 
l, v a bare BMnjrta 0* two points, gained 
by Kddie Hike just hefore the whistle, 
l,„t the Mi.ldlebury team could not 
it and the speedy onslaught of the 
bom* team in the last half and were 
able t<> penetrate the Aggie defend to) 
..iily one tally. 

In the opening period t lie two teams 
ippeared to be evenly matched, Marsh- 
man netting a pair of points in the first 
minute of play. The visitors showed 
themselven deft at going through the 
Iggta defense but failed Insecure more 
than two floor goals in the whole period. 
The Maroon and White team was play. 
B| on the defensive, livening things up 
by fast dashes up the floor. Leonard 
kept the Verraonters in the ruuning by 
making every foul try. 

lint the second half was a different 
itory, the Aggie defense tighteninu up 
and the whole team passiug with great 
precision and exactness. With Marsh- 
man and .smith leading the offense the 
home team forged ahead and easiiy itn- 
inerged victorious. 

Marshman was the individual star of 
o( the contest, playing his best game of 
the season, and Tumey worked well on 
the foul line. Captain Leonard did 

most of the scoring for the Yen it 

team, rating as one of the niftiest 
t,.nl-shootera seen on the Aggie floor, 
this year, missing but two free throws 
,.ut of twelve. 
The summary: 

M v ,. MMMH.MU in. 

Miiith, Kane, Thompson, If 

rb, Leonard, Kyan 
Tumey, Roser, rf &, Kdwards 

Marshman. c c, Ueinbrecht,Tiinberman 

..owdy.lb rt .»« h 

Bike,* lf ' Uard >' 

Goals from tioor-Sniilh 2. Tumey 2, 
Boaar, Marshman 3, Bike 2, Leonard, 
Keinhreeht, Hardy. 

Fouls shot -Tumey 5, Roser 2. Leun- 

• l.l 10. 

Keferee- Finn. Time-two 2U min- 
ute periods. 



best college teams developed anywhere 
this season, anil has suffered only two 
defeats, one from Springfield and the 
other from Knox College. Aniongteams 
they have defeated are Clark, Stevens, 
Cobb,, Browa, Williams and Ualoa. 

The Middlelown team has a quintet of 

players who are fast, pass hard, and 

are very good OB long shots. The \\ c* 

lcyan lineup will probably bOI (apt. 

Robartaoa rf, Roblaaoa if, Moore e, 

Conway lg, and Parsons rg. 

Next Saturday evening al *-0<> Iba 
basketball learn will play Northeastern 
in the Drill Hall. Northeastern has a 
good team but baa bOOB beaten a num- 
ber of times by close scores. They 
were beaten by Tufts in a tight name 

Tufts eatergleg the rtetor la the last 

I, w minutes. BOtb the games will be 

cloaa aad faat, jadglBi from pievloaa 
teoree, but Cap*. Goardy'a taaea la oul 

to keep the pace and stay in the win- 
ning column. 



DEBATERS CHOSEN 

Continued from p»g* 1 



WESLEYAN TO MEET; 

M. A. C. THIS EVENING 



Red and Black Team has Won from 

Such Teams as Connecticut and 

Stevens. Aggie Out for 

Straight Wins. 



With four straight wins now to their 
credit, Aggie tackles the Wesleyan bas- 
ketball team tonight at 7-30 in the 
Drill Hall. Fresh from their win over 
I onnecticut, last Saturday, the team is 
ut to keep up the record so far estab- 
iabed this year of no defeats on the 
one floor. Wesleyan has one of the 



Abraham Krasker, manager of the 
19U debating ■ learn, has bad consider- 
able experience in both debating and 
public speaking. While a sophomore 
he was captain of the class debalinu 
team which represented '22 in the an- 
nual Preebmaa— Sopboasora debate 

lie was also chosen one of the three 
speakers to represent M. \. C. at the 
Union Atrriculmral 15an<iuei held in 
Ford Hall. Boatoa r laal Jaoaary. He is 

a member of Ihe Delia IMn Alpha 
Fraternity. 

AlexanderSatidow was captain of I he 
IMS debating team which defeated the 
lOSSelaal la the annual inlerclass de- 
bale. He was also (hosen to speak in 
the contest held in Boston al the Inion 
Agricultural Banquet where he won 
tirst prize. He is a member of the 
Delta Phi Alpha Fraternity. 

Benjamin Catn/.ue was graduated 
from llolyoke High School where he 
took a prominent part in public speak- 
ing At M. A. 0. he spoke in the Burn- 
ham Declamation Contest in both his 
Freshman Bad Sophomore years. He is 
I member of the Delia I'hi Alpha Fral- 
ternity. 

Walter Dimock, of Oxford Blgfa 
was president of the Oxford Higb 
School Literary Society. Hecenily be 
was one of the participants in the an- 
nual Fresh man -Sophomore debate, 
and helped to defeat the Freshman 
class. He is a member of ibeTbela 
Chi Fraterniiy. 

Gordon Ward was captain of the 
Knglewood High School debating team 
during bis high school days Al 
M.A.C. be showed his ability M a 
speaker when he was chosen to repre- 
sent Aggie in the speaking contest held 
at the banquet given by the Ualoa 
Agriculturists in Boston on Jan. 18, 
There he won second prise. Ward was 
also a member of the Freshman debat- 
ing team. 

.lames Batal is I graduate of Law- 
rence High School where he was cap- 
tain of the debating society. There he 
took an active part in debating. Al 
M. A.C. he was captain of the Freeh- 
man debating team. 

Carl K. F. Cuteiinan comes from Cen- 



tral High School, Springfield, where be 
was a member of the Senior debating 
club. lie was one of the menibeis of 
the Freshman debating team. Outer- 
man is a member ol the Kappa Sigma 

Fraternity. . 

Samual Ooldstcin was captain of I lie 
Boys Congress, a debating organi/.aiion 
in the Brockton High School, where he 
received most of his experience, lie is 
I member of the Delta l'hi Alpha 
Fraternity. 

V Ilia! debate will be held this 
Wednesday afternoon immediately after 
assemhl> between the varsily debaters. 
The atlirn. aiive side will be defended b> 
Krasker leader, Outerinan, Dimock 
and Ward, while the ncgali\e will lie 
represented by Samb.w leader, Batal, 

Ooldatela and Oajpaae. These sides 

are not permanent. The negative aide 
will be debate.) with Khode Island Male 
College al If. A. C, and Ihe allirmat ive 
will make the trip to Sloirs, Ootin., to 

debate with c A, C. 

At present there is an opening for an 
Maletael manager. All .luniois iniei- 
cKied see A. Krasker in room 14 Soulh 
College as early as possible. 




FRESHMAN CLASS ELECTIONS 

As a result ol the Fresman class elec- 
tions, held after Assembly Wednesday, 

Gilbert K. Case of Greeaerleh, was 

elected president ; John S. Crosby ol 
Arlington, vice-picsident ; Carl 11. F. 

Gaterataa of BprlBgfJeld.treaaurar; allai 

A Rita Casey of Fall Ki\cr. secretary. 
Donald Sullivan ol Amheisi. class rap- 
lain: and Ronald A. Jaol ol Amherst, 
sergeant -ai-arms. 



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The Massachusetts Collegian, Wednesday, February 15, 1922. 



The Massachusetts Collegian, Wednesday, February 15, 1922. 



THE MASSACHUSETTS COLLNilAN 

Published erery Wednesday by the 
Students of the Massachusetts Ag- 
ricultural College. 



BOARD OF EDITORS. 



BBi.nmo F. Jackson *22 Rdltor-ln-Ctalef 

Hobakt W. Si'KiNO 'Tl Managing Editor 

Associatk BOTTOM, 

I,ii iikh B. Akkinoton "a Abb t Man's; Kditor 
Kknnki m A. IUiinakii '22 ( oinpctition Kditor 
JOBS M. Wiiittikk '28 Athletic Kditor 

Rtiril M. W0OD*M KM-lunife Kditor 

8TANI.KV W. BKDMI.KV '22 

lli\lN<; W. Hl.Ai-K. '2a 

Hnl.ilMiiN ('(III U "■ 

Ki.ibiia F. Itl.iss, .In.. '24 



DftlUn courses continue composition, as 
well as appreciation, for good Eofflltb, 
and are very Interesting and worth 
while. The Ksgllsb Dcparlment has 
men thoroughly competent to give a 
four-year course as well as they now do 
the two-year one. 

If our graduates are truly "Inefficient 
users of English," our students must 
certainly need more good Knylish train- 
inn while they are here. 



Business Department. 

Chari.es A. Rick '22 Basinets Manager 

Myron <J. Mcrrav '22 Advertising- Manager 
Owkn K. FOUOH '28 Circulation Manager 

HoLPKN WlllTAKKU '23 
GUmiD Li I5FI.OKN '24 
HoiiKKT K. SlKK.UK tt 



They're Priming Their GunB 

From the a|>pearance of last Satur- 
day's Dean's Board, we ina> indue that 
somebody has started to "prime the 
nuns," and thai several Seniors of this 
year will not be so free about calling' 
Air. Kc, a "lint course" as were the 
1981 men. 



Subscription $2.00 per year. Single 
copies, 10 cents. Make all orders paya- 
ble to The Massachusetts Collegian. 

In case of change of address, sub- 
scribers will please notify the business 
manager as soon as possible. 



Entered at second-class matter at the Amherst 
Poit Office. ACCOSted for mailing at special 
rate of pontage pn>\ ide.l for in section 110S. Act 
of October. 1917 authorized August 20. 1918. 



English at Mass. Aggie. 

II has been indirectly brought to our 
attention that our editorial comment on 
future curriculum tendencies at M. A. 
C. may have at one point reflected un- 
favorably on the I'.no 1 ish Department 
here, through the mention of "ineffi- 
cient teaching." 

Such was not in the least our inten- 
tion. We merely quoted the report 
of the Course of Study Committee that 
it was perhaps due partly to inetiicient 
tsasblag, but more likely to other 
causes that our graduates are inefficient 
users of English. 

Our honest opinion is that we have 
here an unusually efficient English 
Department, one better than a vast ma- 
jority of the "technical" Institutions 
can boast. For the two years that this 
Department has students under it in 
required courses, a wide field of com- 
position, grammar, and liierature 
is thoroughly covered. The student is 
forced to put real effort into the work 
if he Iropes to pass It, for the 60% grade 
is not easy to attain and the Department 
is not at all backward in saying, "Try 
again !" 

Moreover, when the two years have 
been successfuly completed, the stu- 
dent has had a good foundation built 
for him to stand on. and has a workable 
conception of the English language in 
its various aspects. 

But it is also our opinion that two 
years of required English are not 
enough. They might be if the other 
departments on the campus co-operated 
with the English Department, but such 
is not the case. Very little attention is 
paid to anything but technical material 
contained in written reports, theses, and 
like material. Correct English counts 
for nothing one way or another Under 
these conditions the student soon for- 
gets much that he has learned in bis 
first two years, the tool becomes rusty 
through disuse, and in bis Senior year 
the student is graduated an "inefficient 
user of English." 

We have now on the curriculum elec- 
tive courses that might very well be 
made required. The three Junior Jour- 



Winter Sports on the Boom 

A word of congratulation should be 

given to those athletes who are so well 
upholding the name of Mass. Aggie on 
the ice and basketball court this winter. 

The defeat of Connecticut Aggies in 
basketball was I he most signal triumph 
i hat i he <;.. rites have enjoyed in that 
Bold this winter. Four victories in a 
row after a like number of defeats show 
that the team has the real comback 
spirit admired by lovers of spoil. And. 
in spite of some unjust foreign criticism, 
I we are glad to see the Aggie men 
always playing the same bard, ci.kan 
game they are known for. 

Hockey has furnished a pleasant sur- 
prise this winter. Out of very little 
veteran material for a nucleus, a sextet 
has been developed that ranks well up 
with the best ever produced hare. The 
fact that Vale, the Army and the expert 
St. Nicholas Club have fallen before the 
Maroon and White shows that "Hub" 
Collins and his mates are carrying our 
colors victoriously far into other dis- 
tricts. And it is interesting that three 
of the defeats were due to overwhelm- 
ing third-period drives against a team 
tired out by traveling and previous hard 
games. 

Nothing succeeds like success, and 
our winter varsities are surely succeed- 
ing. 



With the recent edition of the l!»2l- 
1911 catalog, comes once again the an- 
nouncement of the college calender for 
the next year and a half. 

Much to the disappointment of the 
undergraduates whose graduation is to 
come within the next year or two is the 
fact that commencement is to come in 
the final days of .June in both 1022 and 
1923. It is too late now to make any 
change in the commencement program 
for this coming June, but there is good 
reason for a change being made la 
future cases, commencing with the 
class of IMS. 

It is a very evident fact that having 
graduation exercises at such a late date 
seriously interferes with the summer 
vacations of all the Aggie undergrad- 
uates. 

Practically every other college in the 
East closes pievious to Aggie, and as a 
result we find the baseball team with- 
out a commencement game. It must be 
remembered I bat a college graduation 
comes to most men but once, and it 
should be made as pleasant a time for 
them as possible. 

The late commencement also affects 
the undergraduates of the college. Al- 
most without exception tbey work 
throughout the summer to earn their 
way through college and a late com- 
mencement seriously hinders them in 



procuring work. It forces lb em to take 
whatever jobs are left by men from 
oi her institutions. 

Thus we see that a late commence- 
ment would benefit seniors and under- 
graduates alike. 



AGRICULTURAL TEACHER'S 
IMPROVEMENT ENDEAVORS. 

Two former students of If, A. c. who 
are now teaching agriculture in this 
slate have recently spent a oriel period 
at the college obtaining intensive train- 
ing along lines to supplement original 
qualifications. It. C. Peek, l!»2f. who 
leaches agriculture at New Salem 

academy, and B. B. Millard, ex'ioio. 

who leaches animal husbandry at Essex 
County School have returned to their 
respective positions. 

The vocational division of the Stale 
Department of Education requires every 
teacher in vocational schools of the 
state to carry out a professional im- 
provement project every year for (he 
purpose of keeping abreast of the times 
and usually about one month is used 
for this purpose by the agricultural 
men. Sometimes a man needs to ob- 
tain skill in some process ami often he 
needs technical or scientific inforina 
tion along new lines or certain phases 
of teaching methods. At tbe summer 
school at M. A. C. several men are usu- 
ally enrolled lor this purpose, soma at- 
tend ttie winter school and others are 
enrolled for graduate si tidy covering m \- 
eral years. The Slate Office guaran- 
tees tbe instructor the opportunity lo 
carry out the improvement program 
which it approves and this opportunity 
naturally leads to advancement for ca- 
pable men. 

Unfortunately, il appears likely that 
the Summer School will be omitted this 
year and these men will be obliged to 
go elsewhere. Harvard is adding new 
courses in this lield with regular credits 
for summer work which will serve some 
of the men, but it is hoped that some 
way may be found at M. A. ('. to at least 
continue toe graduate study of men in 
this part of tbe stale. 

Most of the teachers of agriculture in 
the state who are not graduates of M. 
A. C. come into contact with the col- 
lege in this professional improvement 
work and oportunity is here p re sented 
to increase the list of loyal supporters 
or foster sons, while the service render- 
ed reaches a wide area. 

Probably thirty or more employed 
teachers of agriculture obtain definite 
personal assistance of (his sort from the 
college each year, in addtion to the 
more general assistance extended to all 
instructors through timely suggestions. 
As each instructor has a large clientele 
in his own community this extends the 
influence of the college considerably. 

DEERFIELD CONCERT 

.Last Friday night the Musical Clubs 
gave one of their best concerts thus far, 
in the Town Hall at Deerfield. The 
usual programme was rendered, inn 
owing to the absence of three members, 
two special acts were omitted. To 
(ill (heir place, two numbers were given 
by "Freddie" and "Hay," and "Buddy"" 
Frost and "Ducky" Kennedy. Tbe for- 
mer's first act made such a hit, (hat 
when tbey appeared the second time, it 
seemed that the audience would never 
slop encoring. When it was over, they 
had given all their original songs of 
this year, as well as those of last year. 
The main reason for the great success 
of the concert was the audience, it 
was the most appreciative one to which 
tbe clubs have given a concert this 



year. Every number made a hit, and 
in so doing was rendered "par excel 
lence." 

When tbe concert was over, the Clubs 
were invited to the Academy, where re- 
freshment- were served, and tbe men 
shown about the school. Before com- 
ing home, the Clubs gave another short 
special concert to the school and sang, 
"There is a Certain Valley," "Aggie 
my Aggie," ami "When Twilight 
Shadows Deepen." They then were 
given a rousing send off home by the 
whole school. 

Wesley Foundation 

AMHERST 

Student Life Work Bureau. 
Pergonal interviews regarding 
service as teachers, professors, 
missionaries, rural service, pas- 
tors, agricultural instructors, vo- 
cational education in home and 
foreign fields. 

F. A. LEITCH 

9 Collese Ave. DIRECTOR 

Edith Hamilton Parker 

Graduate Teacher of Dancing. 

Studio, MASONIC IU.OCK, Northampton 

FRIDAY EVENING, Assembly Class 

Popular wilh If. A. C. Men 



Private lessons by appointment. 
Tel. 761 Northampton 



Why go down town for a 

First-Class Hair Cut or Shave ? 

Patronize the 

College Barber Shop 

Memorial Building, M. A. C. 
H. J. DUWELL, Proprietor. 



A. P. STAEBNER 

Agent for 

Browning, King & Co, 

A national tailoring institution. 

SUITS and OVERCOATS MADE to MEASURE 

Excellent fabrics— Styles with an in- 
dividuality—Workmanship tbe beBt 

Satisfaction Guaranteed 

Let me show you styles and samples 
TEL. 1TO 



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Appetising, Wholesome Meals— Cooked 
under modem sanitary conditions. 

Private Dining Rooms for "Frats" 
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Brlgbt, comfortable rooms, single or 

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the season. 

Courtesy. Cleanllneaa. Quality. Quan- 
tity and Variety la our motto. 

We cordially invite your patronage. 



MAISOIS WALSH 




More than a Toggery — 
A College Institution 
We are waiting for the opportunity to- show you Spring lturnerry Top Coats. 



rev. neil Mcpherson 
speaks at sunday chapel 

\ forceful ami eloquent address was 

,|elivelcd lo I he students Hi Sunday 

I | i: ,,,el, on Feb 19, by the Bev. Neil 
McPheraoa <d lbs r"lrsl Congregational 

\ buret, of Springfteld H<- began his 
l( ldrtM by reisring lo Samuel as the 

»ubltttM Child of tbC old testament, in 

thai Samuel was a child oi prayer, ol 
prophet and of devotion to God. 

Bte talk had to do especially with 

child life. "Child life," he said, "is 

one of ihe simplest, it leaki lbs lm- 

,,,i ;1 „,| ihe aon-essentlnl. child 

lias not hin« of oceanic grandeur. 
Ii is noted for iis simplicity : tot ubsi 
i, more simple than the north wind, 
ihe sunbeams, the raindrops, and the 
H/avM. ,; "« l rcveU in the simplicity ol 
life. The simplicity ol truth ha- the 

clarity of sunlight about It, No lawyer 

- big enum-h lo trip an I ml and 

truthful man." 

Continuing, the sp.-akd referred i" 

Ibe meat maeier mind* ol literature 

and related an interesting resume of 
one Of Ihe chiel characters in Waller 
sell's "Heart of Midlothian lie ad- 

moolsbed Undent* t-> do their dutj in 

I he I. ice ..I dite ol.slacl.s, lor il is t..\ so 

doing that I man really Hta himsell for 

lii. i ireal w..ik. 
•The soul power <>i generosity," eon- 

mined the speaker. "That's tb* big 

thing in life! Not the accumulation <>t 
wealth bui of personality. Von men 
sregotngoal Into tbisworid lostimu- 

lalfl personalities There's a power in 

this world thai Is mahlng for beauty, 
for strength, and for righteousness. It 

wonderful thing If you can accept 
ami accomplish il difficult lask. Il is 
tbediflenll tasks which make lbs man. 
The hard situations in lint challenge 

you to show your worth. Students, let 
burning candle be I symbol ol your 
life. May yog have a passion lo give 
light, that mankind may be bettered 
and glorified." 



PROF. NOVITSKI ACTS QUICKLY 
AND PERFORMS THE HERO ACT 

\u overheated and unprotected steam 

pipe \% as I he cause ..1 a lire which might 

nave produced dire results in North Col 
lege bad II not been for tbe alertness 

ami .(nick action < • t a lew Bbort Course 
men and Vocational Director Novitski. 



COMMUNICATION 

A. ('. Cm ri.o i w, 



Kkitoi; oi M 
\ mhelst. 

hi nr Sir: 

I have been able through your inser- 
tion ol nole in college paper lo gel in 
touch with several Students seekinn 
some place of service in South America. 
Al ten o'clock Wednesday morning, |, lU ,i K K. Itichardson. class of M>17 M . A . 

Februar) 8, Mr. Novltski, wbi'.e busy c. seems to possess sxosllsnl q ual Ince- 
st the desk in his office, delected the tioas for Director of agriculture on the 
odor ..I burning wood. Thinking thai BuneterFarm. Be has been in Cuba 

possibly some newspaper bad caught a nd speaks Spanish and has had a prac- 

fire from ih" fireplace in the Social Heal farm experience. 

We have the follwing vaeaneies open. 



Union Booms, be rushed in lo Bed Ibe 
wainscottlng behind the radiator was 
smoking. With the aid of two men 

who happened to come in al I bill 



Ii might be ot Internal toyonr student 

body and olhcr graduates lo learn of 

these important positions and oommnni- 



DANCES 

There will be a dance at the 
Memorial Bttlldtug next Friday evening, 
February )7ih, from T-Sfl lo 11. The 
tickets Will be r.tlc apiece or The a couple. 
Wood worth's four piece orchestra will 
probably play. 

On Saturday, February 25, there will 
be an informal at Ihe same place, 
which in all likelihood, will be in 
cabinet style. Tickets will be *8.76. 

Woodworih's orchestra will furnish 
Ihe music and dsaclug will he on one 
floor. Qlrls from Smith should sen 
their house matrons to get permission 
to slay until Ihell-oO car. Patronesses 
have mil been secured as yet but will 
be announced in Ihe near future. 



moment, be brohe Ihe celling piaster ,..,,,. x% j||, ,,,,. 
of the shower directly under nest b and 
dlseoi sred thai tbe lath between I he 

floors Was al.ln/e. The three weul U| 

to ihe Social Union Boom again, and 

havlngbeeannnbleto Dud axe la ibe Profeasor in English, If. A. re,, ...red. 



Yours sincerely, 

f, A. I. kit* il. 

POSITIONS IN < ol.l.MiKK. 



entire building, ihej used iw<> chain 
se a means with which to break down 
the wall plaster in Ihe rictnltj <>t the 
Ire. Then with the help of a tew fire 
extinguishers, the flames were attacked 
from above and below and the t i i «- was 

spee.liU overcome. Much credit is 

due Mi. Novltskl for disoovariag the 
blase and also tor lbs way in which be 
helped extinguish ii. 



R. 0. T. C. ANNOUNCEMENT 



Summer 



Camp to be Located at 
Camp Devens. 



Assistant Professor in Knglisb, slHtKl- 
BOfJO, 

Professor oi Education, Ph. 1). required. 

French and Spanish. M. A. tjSOOO. 

French and German, M. A. required, H 
000, 

physical Fducai ion. College graduate, 

■ot). 

Physical (Education, Woman. Musi he 

able lo teach swimming. 
Athletic Comb. Single man. Will he 

required to teach one subject. 
positions in si:<oNH\n\ SCHOOLS. 



OWN HALL. 



Thursday 



Mat. 3, Kve. 
6-45. 8-30 



sri'KU I'KOM (TION DAY! 



Here be la. famous iwrtnerof 
( Implln'M "The Kid," Jachie 
Cooftan, the klil lilliineir. In 

"Jeers Bad lay." 

I >orli May and Wheeler <»:.k 
man in the east. 



I", i- 



\ :m 



-30 i\ 



I Mil |. 



6-80 i- 



CAMPUS CALENDAR 

Wkhsksh a v. Fin. IS. 

m. kseeSBbly. Speaker. Pro). 

Raymond 6. Settell of Am- 
herst College. 
m.— Basketball. Deerfield 

Academy vs. Freshman at 
M. A. c. 
m. -Basket ball. Wesley an al 

It. A. ( . 

TatrasDAY, Fats. 16, 

M.— Hockey. Amherst al Pratt 
ilink. 

SAXOBDAT, Fk.I!. 10. 
m . — Sot-ial Union entertain- 
rnent. Orpheus Hail Quartet. 
Bowker Auditorium. 
mhi p. m.— Basketball. Nort heasici n 
College at M. A. C. 
SUNDAY. Fkb. 19. 

v. m. --Sunday Chapel. Speaker. 

Dr. Alfred K.Stearns, Phillips 
Academy, Nndover^ 

W'H.NKSI.VV. Fir.. 'It. 

Washington's birthday. Ho 
classes. 
:— The regular issue of 'he Cot> 

i BOfAS will be printed on Feb. fl. 

>pite the holiday. 



Home Keonomiis, French, Commercial 
Work. Must be able lo do administ ia 
live work during president's absence. 
Precept . ess, miisl be able lo teach Kng- 
lisb. slHKl salary. 



Friday 



Doable Feature lit I. 

No Advance la Pricet. 

Ma. Harsh la " Nobody's 

Kid," from the novel. Mary 
Mat. 3, Kve. < aiy, li> • Katr Ijuitfley iioali- 
. i AND Charlie Chaplin la 
"The Idle Claee." A scream. 



6-45. 8-30 

Saturday 

Mat. 3, Kve. 
6-4S. 8-30 

Monday 



Ethel Clayton ia •leyond" 
A drama of the ilee|«at prol. 
leniB of human life, Intense 
ami ex. -it intc from start to 
tonsli Htory by Henry Arth- 
ur .I.IIICH. 

Newt Weekly 
• ii- i Buster Keaten Comedy 



The K. O, T < annual Summer Camp 

will probably. s.> far as can m.w be fore- 
seen, be held at Camp Kevins. A.vei. 

during the early part of the summer, 

and all t hose men v\ ho ill lend ihe < 'amp 

from M. A. c.will probably be seal 

I here. 

The following ex I reel from a War De- 
part men l publication specifies those 
who may go : 

"Two summer camps will normally 

be held ii basic samp and an advance 
,-auip. The basic may be attended or 
BOt, SS tbe Student may elect, and if 

elected ma] be attended at the end of 
the first «.i second year of the basic 
course, (i. e. Freshman <>r Sophomore 
year al M. A. C.) One advance eamp 
It compulsory for students whjo enter 

the advance BO Ur sCS and it will be al- 
ien, led afier completion of ihe basic 
course and enrollment in the advanced 
course. The period of instruction at 

eamp will be divided betwssn the i 

fundamental military subjects and 

training In ih<- special technical sub- 
jects in the branch concerned." 

The subjects which Ihe camps, both 

basic and advanced, plan to cover, in- 

elude rifle and pistol maikstnanship, _ ^ ^_ ^^ — ^ _ . _ 

cavalry drill, equitation, musketry. ta<- ^jML/ Kx, Ow I >l OC 



Mat. 3, Kve. 
6-45.8-30 



John Bowers and Colleen 
Moore In "The Sky Filet." 

from liiil i>li < minor's ureal 
novel. A cattle stampede, 
and thrill upon thrill make 
this one of the year's unfnr- 
uetable feature*. 

Path* Review. 
Bobby Vernon la 

"Fresh from the Farm." 



When you have said 

"IT'S A STETSON" 

You have summed up all that could possibly be said about 
HAT STYLE and SERVICE. 



CARL H. BOLTER 

correct MEN'S OUTFITTER exclusive 

Amiikrst House Block 



tics, care ol animals and equipment 

; inspection, ceremonies, physical train- 
in- and gnard duty. 

tt is expected to giro all theinstrnc- i-t-sjuks 
lion daring the forenoons ot week days, 

with the exce|. lion of rifle and pistol 

dice and samp sanitation, thns candy Shoo 



CUTLER 

— pgAi-gaa in